History Film / Braveheart

31st Jul '16 12:09:09 PM BatmanKalEl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Fake Nationality: American/Australian Mel Gibson as William Wallace. American Patrick McGoohan as Edward the Longshanks and in one of the funnier examples Irishman Brendan Gleeson plays Scotsman Hamish while Scotsman David O'Hara plays Irishman Stephen. However the trope is largely averted with most secondary characters who were actually played by Scots, Frenchwomen and Englishmen. Of course almost all of the extras were Irish.
30th Jul '16 3:29:20 PM TheAndyMac
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SmugSnake: Practically every single British character, except [[MagnificentBastard Longshanks]] and [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain Prince Edward]].

to:

* SmugSnake: Practically every single British English character, except [[MagnificentBastard Longshanks]] and [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain Prince Edward]].
30th Jul '16 9:04:54 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DanBrowned: Despite the film's claims of historical accuracy, there are historical falsehoods from the opening narration to the final scene.

to:

* DanBrowned: Despite the film's claims of historical accuracy, there are historical falsehoods from the opening narration to the final scene. It's filled with anachronisms, sentimental touches, simplistic historical reductionism and is essentially a mythical version of medieval Scotland with little relation to the events it claims to depict.
28th Jul '16 12:55:51 PM Gitman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%%* TheMiddleAges

to:

%%* TheMiddleAges* TheMiddleAges: The setting is the early 14th century, the High Middle Ages



* MultiMeleeMaster: In addition to his iconic [[CoolSword claymore]], William Wallace is seen to be proficient with a huge mallet, a flail (both ball-and-chain and hinged stick), a dagger, a longspear, a bow, a deer's antler, a warhammer, an ax, and rocks of various shapes and sizes.

to:

* MultiMeleeMaster: In addition to his iconic [[CoolSword claymore]], William Wallace is seen to be proficient with a huge mallet, a flail [[EpicFlail flail]] (both ball-and-chain and hinged stick), stick variants), a dagger, [[KnifeNut dagger]], a longspear, [[ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice pike]], a bow, a [[ImprovisedWeapon deer's antler, antler]], a warhammer, [[DropTheHammer warhammer]], an ax, [[AnAxeToGrind ax]], and rocks of various shapes and sizes.sizes.
* MultiRangedMaster: His uncanny accuracy with thrown rocks is a plot point, and he is also proficient with a [[ArcherArchetype bow]].
23rd Jul '16 5:28:18 PM teachzebra
Is there an issue? Send a Message


^ Fake Nationality: American/Australian Mel Gibson as William Wallace. American Patrick McGoohan as Edward the Longshanks and in one of the funnier examples Irishman Brendan Gleeson plays Scotsman Hamish while Scotsman David O'Hara plays Irishman Stephen. However the trope is largely averted with most secondary characters who were actually played by Scots, Frenchwomen and Englishmen. Of course almost all of the extras were Irish.

to:

^ * Fake Nationality: American/Australian Mel Gibson as William Wallace. American Patrick McGoohan as Edward the Longshanks and in one of the funnier examples Irishman Brendan Gleeson plays Scotsman Hamish while Scotsman David O'Hara plays Irishman Stephen. However the trope is largely averted with most secondary characters who were actually played by Scots, Frenchwomen and Englishmen. Of course almost all of the extras were Irish.


Added DiffLines:

* Too Dumb to Live: Phillip who insists on giving information to a very annoyed Longshanks even though everyone knows how ruthless the man is. In a surprise to no one he throws him out the window to his death.
23rd Jul '16 5:24:23 PM teachzebra
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

^ Fake Nationality: American/Australian Mel Gibson as William Wallace. American Patrick McGoohan as Edward the Longshanks and in one of the funnier examples Irishman Brendan Gleeson plays Scotsman Hamish while Scotsman David O'Hara plays Irishman Stephen. However the trope is largely averted with most secondary characters who were actually played by Scots, Frenchwomen and Englishmen. Of course almost all of the extras were Irish.
22nd Jul '16 9:14:59 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: Possibly the only admirable attribute of Longshanks.
* DareToBeBadass: Wallace's speech at Stirling is almost purely this trope:
--->'''Wallace:''' .... Will you fight!?\\
'''Scotsman:''' Fight? Against that? No! We will run, and we will live.\\
'''Wallace:''' Aye, fight and you may die. Run, and you'll live, at least a while. And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willing to trade all the days from this day to that for one chance--just one chance!--to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take our FREEDOM!!!
3rd Jul '16 2:49:50 AM morenohijazo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* SpareAMessenger: William Wallace invades the local English garrison, has the English lord killed and burns it to the ground at the start of the Scottish rebellion, but spares the rest of the garrison's soldiers to send word back to England.
--> '''Wallace''': Go back to England and tell them there that Scotland's daughters and her sons are yours no more. Tell them Scotland is free.
20th Jun '16 9:19:28 PM Temmere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the night scene after Malcolm Wallace's funeral we see the silhouette of a man playing bag pipes. Argyle tells William that they are outlawed tunes played on outlawed pipes. However, the bagpipes have only ever been banned twice in Scotland: in 1560 after the Reformation and again in 1746 after the Battle of Culloden. In the late 13th Century the bagpipe was much more popular in England and it certainly wasn't viewed as a Scottish instrument of any importance until much later.

to:

** In the night scene after Malcolm Wallace's funeral we see the silhouette of a man playing bag pipes.bagpipes. Argyle tells William that they are outlawed tunes played on outlawed pipes. However, the bagpipes have only ever been banned twice in Scotland: in 1560 after the Reformation and again in 1746 after the Battle of Culloden. In the late 13th Century the bagpipe was much more popular in England and it certainly wasn't viewed as a Scottish instrument of any importance until much later.


Added DiffLines:

** Edward II was not a successful king, but neither was he the prissy little coward the movie portrays him as. In fact his personal courage may have been his most oft-noted virtue; when the Battle of Bannockburn went against the English, his own men had to drag him away to save his life because he wanted to keep fighting. (And that's another thing -- he was at the Battle of Bannockburn.)
12th Jun '16 12:00:30 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/braveheart.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/braveheart.jpg]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 213. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.Braveheart