History Film / BraveHeart

17th Mar '17 4:53:02 AM NightShade96
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* ArtisticLicenseHistory: In interview, Mel Gibson admitted that the film was heavily fictitious but claimed the changes had been made for dramatic purposes. The film is often cited as the least accurate historical epic of all time. It is estimated that more than 90% of the movie is fiction. The historical inaccuracies include:
** Much like the Balian of Ibelin in ''Film/KingdomOfHeaven'', this movie's main character is entirely a fictional construct, any similarities to the real William Wallace other than the events of the war against England are entirely coincidental. That said, writer Randall Wallace had very little historical evidence to work with in regard to William Wallace's life; he has noted that even Churchill's definitive work "A History of the English Speaking Peoples" observed in only a single line that virtually no factual material survives about the Scottish leader. Because of this, Randall Wallace relied heavily on a 15th-century romantic poem by the Scottish writer Henry the Minstrel ("Blind Harry") in constructing his story.
** The battle of Stirling ''Bridge''. The bridge itself played a key role in the battle by bottlenecking the superior English force, so they could not come after the Scots all at once, and it was entirely missing from the movie. The battle in the film is simply called "The Battle of Sterling".[[note]]When an extra pointed this out, Gibson explained that they had to leave out the bridge because it was too difficult to work around. The extra's priceless response? [[DeadpanSnarker "Aye, that's what the English found."]][[/note]]
** The sacking of York was invented for the movie. Wallace never got as far south as York during his invasion of northern England.
** "Braveheart" was actually the nickname of Robert the Bruce, not William Wallace.
** In the night scene after Malcolm Wallace's funeral we see the silhouette of a man playing bagpipes. Argyle tells William that they are outlawed tunes played on outlawed pipes. However, the bagpipes have only ever been banned twice in Scotland: in 1560 after the Reformation and again in 1746 after the Battle of Culloden. In the late 13th Century the bagpipe was much more popular in England and it certainly wasn't viewed as a Scottish instrument of any importance until much later.
** There is an in-joke in the film that William Wallace's private time with Isabella led to the conception of Edward III. This could not have been the case, since Edward III was born almost ten years after Wallace died. Also, Isabella of France was nine years old at the time of Wallace's death. And not yet married to Edward II. And still living in France.
** Edward II was not a successful king, but neither was he the prissy little coward the movie portrays him as. In fact his personal courage may have been his most oft-noted virtue; when the Battle of Bannockburn went against the English, his own men had to drag him away to save his life because he wanted to keep fighting. (And that's another thing -- he was at the Battle of Bannockburn.)
** The Scots won their independence at the Battle of Bannockburn after an English army had arrived to lift the Scottish siege of Stirling Castle, not after Robert the Bruce changed his mind about a peace parley. Incidentally, the film has the Bruce starting the Battle of Bannockburn immediately upon hearing of Wallace's death -- which was actually nine years earlier.
** The makers were very nearly sued by the Scottish government for this one. Robert the Bruce did NOT betray Wallace, and in fact is considered a much bigger hero than Wallace ever was (the name "Brave Heart" was actually given to Bruce, NOT Wallace). To be fair, Wallace was probably the one person Bruce [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder didn't betray]] at one point or another, and that's mostly because they never actually met. That, and Wallace didn't support Robert's claim to the throne-he backed John Balliol, Edward's hostage in the Tower of London and the nominal and official King of Scotland. Winning the Battle of Bannockburn has given Robert the Bruce a HistoricalHeroUpgrade for years. He was an accomplished political manipulator, and was just as brutal as Longshanks towards his enemies - he invited John Comyn to peace talks in a church, then murdered him. His army then rampaged through the Great Glen, slaughtering Comyn's supporters. This was not only a treacherous move, but a stupid one, as it divided the Scots against the English, with the Comyn clan pursuing a blood feud against Bruce over this.
** The last scene in the movie has the Bruce starting the Battle of Bannockburn immediately after hearing of Wallace's death. While news did travel more slowly in those days, it did not take nine years for that bit of news to reach Scotland.
** All of the above aside, it's worth mentioning that the same historians who are quick to wag their fingers at this film are also quick to point out that the brutality of the battles is well represented, and in some cases ''understated'' in the movie, but, of course, if there's anything Mel Gibson unquestionably does well in his films, it's violence.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseHistory: In interview, Mel Gibson admitted that the film was heavily fictitious but claimed the changes had been made for dramatic purposes. The film is often cited as the least accurate historical epic of all time. It is estimated that more than 90% of the movie is fiction. The historical inaccuracies include:
** Much like the Balian of Ibelin in ''Film/KingdomOfHeaven'', this movie's main character is entirely a fictional construct, any similarities to the real William Wallace other than the events of the war against England are entirely coincidental. That said, writer Randall Wallace had very little historical evidence to work with in regard to William Wallace's life; he has noted that even Churchill's definitive work "A History of the English Speaking Peoples" observed in only a single line that virtually no factual material survives about the Scottish leader. Because of this, Randall Wallace relied heavily on a 15th-century romantic poem by the Scottish writer Henry the Minstrel ("Blind Harry") in constructing his story.
** The battle of Stirling ''Bridge''. The bridge itself played a key role in the battle by bottlenecking the superior English force, so they could not come after the Scots all at once, and it was entirely missing from the movie. The battle in the film is simply called "The Battle of Sterling".[[note]]When an extra pointed this out, Gibson explained that they had to leave out the bridge because it was too difficult to work around. The extra's priceless response? [[DeadpanSnarker "Aye, that's what the English found."]][[/note]]
** The sacking of York was invented for the movie. Wallace never got as far south as York during his invasion of northern England.
** "Braveheart" was actually the nickname of Robert the Bruce, not William Wallace.
** In the night scene after Malcolm Wallace's funeral we see the silhouette of a man playing bagpipes. Argyle tells William that they are outlawed tunes played on outlawed pipes. However, the bagpipes have only ever been banned twice in Scotland: in 1560 after the Reformation and again in 1746 after the Battle of Culloden. In the late 13th Century the bagpipe was much more popular in England and it certainly wasn't viewed as a Scottish instrument of any importance until much later.
** There is an in-joke in the film that William Wallace's private time with Isabella led to the conception of Edward III. This could not have been the case, since Edward III was born almost ten years after Wallace died. Also, Isabella of France was nine years old at the time of Wallace's death. And not yet married to Edward II. And still living in France.
** Edward II was not a successful king, but neither was he the prissy little coward the movie portrays him as. In fact his personal courage may have been his most oft-noted virtue; when the Battle of Bannockburn went against the English, his
Has [[ArtisticLicenseHistory/{{Braveheart}} its own men had to drag him away to save his life because he wanted to keep fighting. (And that's another thing -- he was at the Battle of Bannockburn.)
** The Scots won their independence at the Battle of Bannockburn after an English army had arrived to lift the Scottish siege of Stirling Castle, not after Robert the Bruce changed his mind about a peace parley. Incidentally, the film has the Bruce starting the Battle of Bannockburn immediately upon hearing of Wallace's death -- which was actually nine years earlier.
** The makers were very nearly sued by the Scottish government for this one. Robert the Bruce did NOT betray Wallace, and in fact is considered a much bigger hero than Wallace ever was (the name "Brave Heart" was actually given to Bruce, NOT Wallace). To be fair, Wallace was probably the one person Bruce [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder didn't betray]] at one point or another, and that's mostly because they never actually met. That, and Wallace didn't support Robert's claim to the throne-he backed John Balliol, Edward's hostage in the Tower of London and the nominal and official King of Scotland. Winning the Battle of Bannockburn has given Robert the Bruce a HistoricalHeroUpgrade for years. He was an accomplished political manipulator, and was just as brutal as Longshanks towards his enemies - he invited John Comyn to peace talks in a church, then murdered him. His army then rampaged through the Great Glen, slaughtering Comyn's supporters. This was not only a treacherous move, but a stupid one, as it divided the Scots against the English, with the Comyn clan pursuing a blood feud against Bruce over this.
** The last scene in the movie has the Bruce starting the Battle of Bannockburn immediately after hearing of Wallace's death. While news did travel more slowly in those days, it did not take nine years for that bit of news to reach Scotland.
** All of the above aside, it's worth mentioning that the same historians who are quick to wag their fingers at this film are also quick to point out that the brutality of the battles is well represented, and in some cases ''understated'' in the movie, but, of course, if there's anything Mel Gibson unquestionably does well in his films, it's violence.
page]].
9th Mar '17 4:50:45 PM eroock
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Added DiffLines:

* DramaticLandfallShot: The opening sequence starts with a camera flight over costal water after which the rough Scottish mountain landscape comes into view.
1st Mar '17 5:16:05 PM JulianLapostat
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* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Wallace is made a lot more important than Robert Bruce, and the third key figure in the war, Bishop William de Lamberton, was cut out altogether. Another character cut out was Andrew de Moray, another Scottish noble who died after the battle of Stirling Bridge. Some historians have argued that his contribution to the war was just as important and more successful than William Wallace's.

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* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: HistoricalHeroUpgrade:
**
Wallace is made a lot more important than Robert Bruce, and the third key figure in the war, Bishop William de Lamberton, was cut out altogether. Another character cut out was Andrew de Moray, another Scottish noble who died after the battle of Stirling Bridge. Some historians have argued that his contribution to the war was just as important and more successful than William Wallace's.
** The real Wallace was son of minor nobility, and not only was he not a Highland barbarian StillFightingTheCivilWar of the Picts against Romans, he was a Lord with tenants, serfs and the works. In real-life the Scots pre-emptively attacked the English and Wallace invaded England sacking and pillage villages and attacking English peasants and serfs along the way.
4th Feb '17 12:03:10 AM alnair20aug93
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** Surprisingly, the future Queen Isabella "the She-Wolf" of France got this one as well.

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** Surprisingly, the future Queen Isabella "the She-Wolf" "[[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen the She-Wolf]]" of France got this one as well.
14th Jan '17 3:48:49 PM ImpudentInfidel
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Added DiffLines:

** The Battle of Bannockburn is shown as the Scotts unexpectedly attacking an English force that's only there as a formality while Robert swears his fealty to Edward II. The actual battle was the English trying to lift the siege of Sterling Castle several years into Robert's rebellion, long after they had both claimed their respective thrones.
11th Jan '17 5:24:57 AM Ohio9
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Added DiffLines:

* ArmorIsUseless: The heavy armor worn by the English seems to provide no advantage whosoever over the Scottish troops, who have almost no armor at all.
30th Dec '16 8:01:30 AM creader
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30th Dec '16 8:01:05 AM creader
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30th Nov '16 4:30:43 PM Gitman
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-->'''Craig:''' Aye. Wallace rode into his bedchamber and killed him. And there's no telling who'll be next.

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-->'''Craig:''' Aye. Wallace rode into his bedchamber and killed him. He's more of a liability now than ever he was. And there's no telling who'll be next.
30th Nov '16 4:26:26 PM Gitman
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-->'''Robert:''' '''''SO AM I!'''''

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-->'''Robert:''' '''''SO AM I!'''''I!!!'''''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.BraveHeart