History DeaderThanDisco / Music

26th Mar '17 1:45:21 PM HighCrate
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Fred Durst himself attracted a {{hatedom}} all his own. Even before Limp Bizkit's music became passe, Durst had a very juvenile attitude that became magnified by his fame. It goes back as early as him lashing out against the band Staind after taking offense to the cover of their first album, "Tormented". He unsuccessfully attempted to get them kicked off of a show, before befriending them after being impressed with their performance. Eventually, he became noted as a huge egomaniac. He gave an aura of attempting to take over any project that he was associated with. He picked fights with various industry figures, and at that he did not back up any of his trash-talking. The most infamous moment was taking shots at Creed's Scott Stapp (another hated industry figure), but when Stapp challenged him to a celebrity boxing match (with proceeds going to charity), Durst backed down, and claimed nonviolence as the reason. As one Redditor put it (seemingly perfectly), he gives off an aura of threatened masculinity. That is heightened by many of his songs essentially being hate anthems to "that bitch that fucked me over", indicating that he probably has trouble getting over things. He also acted like the "Rebel outlaw" of rock music of the time, playing off of the backlash that Limp Bizkit received at the time (despite still being tremendously popular). While you can't say that it wasn't unjustified for him to act that way (Eminem has certainly played up the "rebel outlaw" of hip hop personal dutifully), the bottom line is that it made people who hate him just hate him even more. All-in-all, he acted like a narcissistic bully who always had to get his way. Who's to say he's like that now, but he certainly was during the time of Limp Bizkit's zenith.
26th Mar '17 1:25:26 AM thrall-demonsweat
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Added DiffLines:

Fred Durst himself attracted a {{hatedom}} all his own. Even before Limp Bizkit's music became passe, Durst had a very juvenile attitude that became magnified by his fame. It goes back as early as him lashing out against the band Staind after taking offense to the cover of their first album, "Tormented". He unsuccessfully attempted to get them kicked off of a show, before befriending them after being impressed with their performance. Eventually, he became noted as a huge egomaniac. He gave an aura of attempting to take over any project that he was associated with. He picked fights with various industry figures, and at that he did not back up any of his trash-talking. The most infamous moment was taking shots at Creed's Scott Stapp (another hated industry figure), but when Stapp challenged him to a celebrity boxing match (with proceeds going to charity), Durst backed down, and claimed nonviolence as the reason. As one Redditor put it (seemingly perfectly), he gives off an aura of threatened masculinity. That is heightened by many of his songs essentially being hate anthems to "that bitch that fucked me over", indicating that he probably has trouble getting over things. He also acted like the "Rebel outlaw" of rock music of the time, playing off of the backlash that Limp Bizkit received at the time (despite still being tremendously popular). While you can't say that it wasn't unjustified for him to act that way (Eminem has certainly played up the "rebel outlaw" of hip hop personal dutifully), the bottom line is that it made people who hate him just hate him even more. All-in-all, he acted like a narcissistic bully who always had to get his way. Who's to say he's like that now, but he certainly was during the time of Limp Bizkit's zenith.
25th Mar '17 4:54:32 PM AreYouTyler
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Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] ([[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ Clear Channel forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, she was already despised by the hip-hop community for her feud with Banks, but now the Iggy hate train was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj made a quick comeback with "Anaconda" and has managed to hold a consistently successful career despite not being the most well-liked rapper either, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson. It was, by all accounts, a flop, only reaching #67 and failing on urban radio, let alone pop territory. ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'', an otherwise stellar movie, tried to cash in on her popularity by featuring her as a cameo. She also contributed a song to the [[Music/Furious7Soundtrack soundtrack]], "Go Hard or Go Home" with Wiz Khalifa, and many complained about it. There's a second version that omits her; it's generally agreed to be better than the original by those who listened to it. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears. Hyped as being the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", it debuted at #29 before quickly sliding down the charts, the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). As it turns out, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\

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Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] ([[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ Clear Channel forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, she was already despised by the hip-hop community for her feud with Banks, but now the Iggy hate train was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj made a quick comeback with "Anaconda" and has managed to hold a consistently successful career despite not being the most well-liked rapper either, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson. It was, by all accounts, a flop, only reaching #67 and failing on urban radio, let alone pop territory. ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'', an otherwise stellar movie, tried to cash in on her popularity by featuring her as a cameo. She also contributed a song to the [[Music/Furious7Soundtrack soundtrack]], "Go Hard or Go Home" with Wiz Khalifa, and many complained about it. There's a second version that omits her; it's generally agreed to be better than the original by those who listened to it. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears. Hyped as being the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", it debuted at #29 before quickly sliding down the charts, the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). As it turns out, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold). Her follow-up to "Team", "Mo Bounce", also flopped hard.\\\
22nd Mar '17 11:46:57 AM twilicorn
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However, throughout 2013 and 2014, stories began to emerge that his sleazy creep persona ''wasn't'' all an act, and after getting proof in the form of a photo taken in an elevator with mirrored walls showing him groping a female fan, Patton finally left him. His follow-up album ''Paula'', as the name implies, was a transparent, desperate and depressing attempt to win her back, only digging him further down; a Website/{{Twitter}} Q&A went haywire fast when Thicke was inundated with angry messages. The trust between Thicke and his female fans was broken irreparably; ''Paula'' bombed with only 24,000 copies sold in the US in its first week (compared to 177,000 for his debut) and international numbers even worse (only 550 copies in Canada, 530 in the UK, and ''158 in Australia''! The album that took #500 on the Australian charts instead of ''Paula''? [[HumiliationConga A greatest hits compilation]] by Music/{{Blondie}}, which sold 15''9'' units). By the summer of 2014, Thicke's name became more synonymous with "that rapey song" than anything else, with few people defending the implications of "Blurred Lines" anymore.\\\

to:

However, throughout 2013 and 2014, stories began to emerge that his sleazy creep persona ''wasn't'' all an act, and after getting proof in the form of a photo taken in an elevator with mirrored walls showing him groping a female fan, Patton finally left him. His follow-up album ''Paula'', as the name implies, was a transparent, desperate and depressing attempt to win her back, only digging him further down; a Website/{{Twitter}} Q&A went haywire fast when Thicke was inundated with angry messages. The trust between Thicke and his female fans was broken irreparably; ''Paula'' bombed with only 24,000 copies sold in the US in its first week (compared to 177,000 for his debut) and international numbers even worse (only 550 copies in Canada, 530 in the UK, and ''158 in Australia''! The album that took #500 on the Australian charts instead of ''Paula''? Australia'' - [[HumiliationConga A greatest hits compilation]] even being knocked out of the top 500 bestselling albums of the year]] in that country by a GreatestHitsAlbum from Music/{{Blondie}}, which sold 15''9'' units). By the summer of 2014, Thicke's name became more synonymous with "that rapey song" than anything else, with few people defending the implications of "Blurred Lines" anymore.\\\
11th Mar '17 5:44:56 PM PhysicalStamina
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Though still touring today, he's gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His "music", if it can even be called that, is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers E-40's "U & Dat", Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" and "All I Do Is Win" seem to be the only exceptions to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.

to:

Though still touring today, he's gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His "music", if it can even be called that, music is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers E-40's "U & Dat", Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" and "All I Do Is Win" seem to be the only exceptions to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.
26th Feb '17 11:01:58 AM Twentington
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The increase in hits was not without controversy, however, as some noticed that Toby seemed to be opting for macho, blustery up-tempos such as the CountryRap "I Wanna Talk About Me", and he received much vitriol for the politically-charged "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", a [[TheWartOnTerror post-9/11]] release that some felt was too over-the-top in its PatrioticFervor (and the subject of a feud with Natalie Maines of the Music/DixieChicks). Keith's hit streak nonetheless continued even after [=DreamWorks=] Records closed, and he seamlessly moved to his own label, Show Dog (which merged with the existing Universal South label in 2009 to become Show Dog-Universal).\\\

to:

The increase in hits was not without controversy, however, as some noticed that Toby seemed to be opting for macho, blustery up-tempos such as the CountryRap "I Wanna Talk About Me", and he received much vitriol for the politically-charged "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue (The Angry American)", a [[TheWartOnTerror [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror post-9/11]] release that some felt was too over-the-top in its PatrioticFervor (and the subject of a feud with Natalie Maines of the Music/DixieChicks). Keith's hit streak nonetheless continued even after [=DreamWorks=] Records closed, and he seamlessly moved to his own label, Show Dog (which merged with the existing Universal South label in 2009 to become Show Dog-Universal).\\\
24th Feb '17 5:09:21 AM HighCrate
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* Back in the early 2010s, one of the hottest EDM stars on the market was Swedish phenomenon Avicii. He had been performing for a while (and had a few minor European hits) before his song "Levels" became an unexpected hit after it was sampled by Music/FloRida for his "Good Feeling." While "Levels" [[SampledUp didn't reach the heights]] of "Good Feeling," it still easily raised his public profile. For the next two years he would have some moderate European success before releasing the song "Wake Me Up!", a folk-inspired dance tune featuring the vocals of cult R&B icon Aloe Blacc. "Wake Me Up!" proved to be absolutely massive and inescapable. It hit #1 in every single country in Europe and became his first mega-smash in the U.S. hitting #4 on the charts. It was the biggest EDM hit in American radio and digital history (with Major Lazer's "Lean On", released two years later, being the only other EDM song that comes close). But perhaps its most epic accomplishments was remaining all over radio stations long after it peaked in airplay.\\\
After "Wake Me Up!" finished its run, it was time to move onto the next smash-in-the-making: "Hey Brother", a bluegrass-folk song featuring Dan Tyminski of Music/AlisonKraussAndUnionStation. While it wasn't exactly a "Wake Me Up!" level megahit, it was another huge smash everywhere it charted...except in the United States, in which radio programmers were very hesitant to move away from "Wake Me Up!" Facing massive resistance in America, the song slowly limped to a #16 peak before falling off almost instantly. Only a couple weeks after it peaked was "Hey Brother" being ranked below "Wake Me Up!" on radio charts and a month or two later it had completely fallen off nearly all playlists. Even Aloe Blacc's own song "The Man" did much better (and that didn't exactly get much love from radio either nor did it last very long after it peaked). Avicii's next few singles were all D.O.A. upon their American releases (although they did fine in Europe). By 2015, Avicii was essentially a has-been in the American EDM market. While artists like Calvin Harris, David Guetta, and Zedd are still easily scoring hits in America (and even that can be attributed to their collaborations with well-known pop stars), airplay for Avicii is almost nonexistent outside of "Wake Me Up!" and while he's still respected in Europe, he's [[AmericansHateTingle remembered in America]] for having [[OneHitWonder one monster hit completely cannibalize his career]]. His 2015 album ''Stories'' came and went in the US without any fanfare, and all of its singles flat-out bombed. The closest he's gotten to the Top 40 in the US again was by being mentioned in Mike Posner's Top 10 hit "I Took a Pill in Ibiza" in 2016. The final nail in Avicii's coffin came in March 2016, [[http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/avicii-announces-retirement-from-live-performance/ when he announced that he would be retiring from touring because of health problems]].
23rd Feb '17 9:22:50 PM SN95
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Added DiffLines:

* Back in the early 2010s, one of the hottest EDM stars on the market was Swedish phenomenon Avicii. He had been performing for a while (and had a few minor European hits) before his song "Levels" became an unexpected hit after it was sampled by Music/FloRida for his "Good Feeling." While "Levels" [[SampledUp didn't reach the heights]] of "Good Feeling," it still easily raised his public profile. For the next two years he would have some moderate European success before releasing the song "Wake Me Up!", a folk-inspired dance tune featuring the vocals of cult R&B icon Aloe Blacc. "Wake Me Up!" proved to be absolutely massive and inescapable. It hit #1 in every single country in Europe and became his first mega-smash in the U.S. hitting #4 on the charts. It was the biggest EDM hit in American radio and digital history (with Major Lazer's "Lean On", released two years later, being the only other EDM song that comes close). But perhaps its most epic accomplishments was remaining all over radio stations long after it peaked in airplay.\\\
After "Wake Me Up!" finished its run, it was time to move onto the next smash-in-the-making: "Hey Brother", a bluegrass-folk song featuring Dan Tyminski of Music/AlisonKraussAndUnionStation. While it wasn't exactly a "Wake Me Up!" level megahit, it was another huge smash everywhere it charted...except in the United States, in which radio programmers were very hesitant to move away from "Wake Me Up!" Facing massive resistance in America, the song slowly limped to a #16 peak before falling off almost instantly. Only a couple weeks after it peaked was "Hey Brother" being ranked below "Wake Me Up!" on radio charts and a month or two later it had completely fallen off nearly all playlists. Even Aloe Blacc's own song "The Man" did much better (and that didn't exactly get much love from radio either nor did it last very long after it peaked). Avicii's next few singles were all D.O.A. upon their American releases (although they did fine in Europe). By 2015, Avicii was essentially a has-been in the American EDM market. While artists like Calvin Harris, David Guetta, and Zedd are still easily scoring hits in America (and even that can be attributed to their collaborations with well-known pop stars), airplay for Avicii is almost nonexistent outside of "Wake Me Up!" and while he's still respected in Europe, he's [[AmericansHateTingle remembered in America]] for having [[OneHitWonder one monster hit completely cannibalize his career]]. His 2015 album ''Stories'' came and went in the US without any fanfare, and all of its singles flat-out bombed. The closest he's gotten to the Top 40 in the US again was by being mentioned in Mike Posner's Top 10 hit "I Took a Pill in Ibiza" in 2016. The final nail in Avicii's coffin came in March 2016, [[http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/avicii-announces-retirement-from-live-performance/ when he announced that he would be retiring from touring because of health problems]].
18th Feb '17 6:10:44 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Of all the acts that fell off at the turn of the '10s, few fell harder than Music/TPain. After he was discovered by Akon, he exploded seemingly out of nowhere with is debut album ''Rappa Ternt Sanga''. As the title would suggest, he abandoned rapping early on in favor of singing. However, calling it "singing" was something of a stretch. The entire album was one big celebration of AutoTune, which T-Pain used to make his voice sound robotic. Despite being panned by many, the use of auto-tune quickly caught on and produced two Top 10 hits with "I'm Sprung" and "I'm 'n Luv (Wit a Stripper)". His music became a staple of clubs and parties all over the world. He continued that success with his 2007 album ''Epiphany'', which proved to be an even bigger success, as it produced his first #1 hit with "Buy U a Drank (Shawty Snappin')", became his first chart-topping album, and sold even more than his first album did. In early 2008, he also made Music/FloRida a star by appearing on his debut 10-week #1 single "Low", making him inescapable everywhere. By this point, it seemed like everyone was following his lead with extensive use of auto-tune, as countless rappers and singers were [[FollowTheLeader mimicking his style]]. It looked like T-Pain was going to carry on as one of the leaders of modern hip-hop music.\\\
However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his abuse of auto-tune that spread like a plague, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]], and the fact that women in his music were little more than [[MisogynySong material objects of pleasure for him]]. Auto-Tune itself was also getting a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. He began to be seen as a symbol of everything wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, and produced one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. The transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. By 2013, it was almost like he never existed. That same year, he released a single "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B. (another artist who would fall into this, see above), and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a greatest hits album titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'' in 2017. The hype for it is almost non-existent. The three singles he released for it, "Stoicville", "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\
Though still touring today, he's gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His "music", if it can even be called that, is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" seems to be the only exception to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.

to:

* Of all the acts that fell off at the turn of the '10s, few fell harder than Music/TPain. After he was discovered by Akon, he exploded seemingly out of nowhere with is his 2005 debut album ''Rappa Ternt Sanga''. As the title would suggest, he abandoned rapping early on in favor of singing. However, calling it "singing" was something of a stretch. The entire album was one big celebration of AutoTune, which T-Pain used to make his voice sound robotic. Despite being panned by many, the use of auto-tune quickly caught on and produced two Top 10 hits with "I'm Sprung" and "I'm 'n Luv (Wit a Stripper)". He also helped rap legend E-40 have his first major pop hit by appearing on his 2006 track "U & Dat". His music became a staple of clubs and parties all over the world. He continued that success with his 2007 album ''Epiphany'', which proved to be an even bigger success, as it produced his first #1 hit with "Buy U a Drank (Shawty Snappin')", became his first chart-topping album, and sold even more than his first album did. In early 2008, he also made Music/FloRida a star by appearing on his debut 10-week #1 single "Low", making him inescapable everywhere. By this point, it seemed like everyone was following his lead with extensive use of auto-tune, as countless rappers and singers were [[FollowTheLeader mimicking his style]]. It looked like T-Pain was going to carry on as one of the leaders of modern hip-hop music.\\\
However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his abuse of auto-tune that spread like a plague, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]], and the fact that women in his music were little more than [[MisogynySong material objects of pleasure for him]]. Auto-Tune itself was also getting a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. He began to be seen as a symbol of everything wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, and produced one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. The Aside from a minor success with DJ Khaled's "All I Do Is Win" in 2010, the transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. By 2013, it was almost like he never existed. That same year, he released a single "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B. (another artist who would fall into this, see above), , and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a greatest hits album titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'' in 2017. The hype for it is almost non-existent. The three singles he released for it, "Stoicville", "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\
Though still touring today, he's gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His "music", if it can even be called that, is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers E-40's "U & Dat", Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" seems and "All I Do Is Win" seem to be the only exception exceptions to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.
16th Feb '17 7:17:48 PM vexer
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However, in the process, the group became one of the biggest SnarkBait targets on the internet, with many rock fans holding nothing but unbridled hate for the band as a mockery of true rock music whose continued success was leaving the genre stagnant. Their 2011 release ''Here & Now'', despite just narrowly missing out the #1 spot to Music/MichaelBuble, would fail to produce any hits ("When We Stand Together" fell just short of the Top 40) and barely make it past platinum. In 2014, their NewSoundAlbum ''No Fixed Address'' debuted at #4, getting trounced by [[Music/OneDirection the biggest boy band in the world]]. Its singles bombed outside of the Hot 100, though "Edge of a Revolution" topped the Mainstream Rock charts. The album sold only 80,000 copies in its opening week and might not go gold for years, and changing their sound to make it pop and funk-oriented certainly didn't help. Nowadays, any mention of the name "Nickelback" will provoke nothing but laughter and memories of how the biggest band in the world turned into a complete joke. In fact, if you were to ask a rock fan why rock music had declined from the mainstream, there's a good chance they'll blame Nickelback for it. In February 2017, Nickelback attempted to [[WinBackTheCrowd lift the lid off their coffin]] with "Feed the Machine", the TitleTrack to their forthcoming ninth album. The song got considerably better reviews even from the band's hatedom, thanks to its hard sound. Depending on how well their album sells, Nickelback could consider ''Feed the Machine'' a small recovery, but they'll still be a far cry from their prime.

to:

However, in the process, the group became one of the biggest SnarkBait targets on the internet, with many rock fans holding nothing but unbridled hate for the band as a mockery of true rock music whose continued success was leaving the genre stagnant. Their 2011 release ''Here & Now'', despite just narrowly missing out the #1 spot to Music/MichaelBuble, would fail to produce any hits ("When We Stand Together" fell just short of the Top 40) and barely make it past platinum. In 2014, their NewSoundAlbum ''No Fixed Address'' debuted at #4, getting trounced by [[Music/OneDirection the biggest boy band in the world]]. Its singles bombed outside of the Hot 100, though "Edge of a Revolution" topped the Mainstream Rock charts. The album sold only 80,000 copies in its opening week and might not go gold for years, and changing their sound to make it pop and funk-oriented certainly didn't help. Nowadays, any mention of the name "Nickelback" will provoke nothing but laughter and memories of how the biggest band in the world turned into a complete joke. In fact, if If you were to ask a rock fan why rock music had declined from the mainstream, there's a good chance they'll blame Nickelback for it. In February 2017, Nickelback attempted to [[WinBackTheCrowd lift the lid off their coffin]] with "Feed the Machine", the TitleTrack to their forthcoming ninth album. The song got considerably better reviews even from the band's hatedom, thanks to its hard sound. Depending on how well their album sells, Nickelback could consider ''Feed the Machine'' a small recovery, but they'll still be a far cry from their prime.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.Music