History DeaderThanDisco / Music

2nd Oct '17 11:36:36 AM Kelothan
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Once one of the most promising rappers (not just white or female) on the market, Iggy Azalea has become so widely hated in such a short amount of time that people find it hard to believe she was once considered inspirational. Her fall from grace [[http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/2015/03/is-iggy-azalea-the-female-vanilla-ice/ has been compared to]] that of Music/VanillaIce. Nicki Minaj is still going strong, but Azalea is primarily known derisively as "that white Australian girl who pretends to be a ghetto chick from Atlanta". Despite her attempts at repairing her reputation, it has sunk to the point where her second album ''Digital Distortion'' has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly postponed]], combined with Def Jam CEO Steve Bartels refusing to issue more singles from the album after "Mo Bounce" flopped. Nowadays, the general consensus of her music is that it's generic electro-pop-rap with an annoying fake auto-tuned voice and that her previous success with "Fancy" and "Black Widow" was a fluke, and Azalea herself is viewed as a manufactured, phony, and culture-appropriating {{jerkass}}.

to:

Once one of the most promising rappers (not just white or female) on the market, Iggy Azalea has become so widely hated in such a short amount of time that people find it hard to believe she was once considered inspirational. Her fall from grace [[http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/2015/03/is-iggy-azalea-the-female-vanilla-ice/ has been compared to]] that of Music/VanillaIce. Nicki Minaj is still going strong, but Azalea is primarily known derisively as "that white Australian girl who pretends to be a ghetto chick from Atlanta". Despite her attempts at repairing her reputation, it has sunk to the point where her second album ''Digital Distortion'' has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly postponed]], combined with Def Jam CEO Steve Bartels refusing to issue more singles from the album after "Mo Bounce" flopped. Nowadays, the general consensus of her music is that it's generic electro-pop-rap with an annoying fake auto-tuned voice and that her previous success with "Fancy" and "Black Widow" was a fluke, and Azalea herself is viewed as a manufactured, phony, idiotic, and culture-appropriating {{jerkass}}.
20th Sep '17 12:20:01 PM KizunaTallis
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Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences [though not nearly as large as in their prime], but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.

to:

Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences [though (though not nearly as large as in their prime], prime), but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you one would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.
15th Sep '17 8:41:55 PM AreYouTyler
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Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences, but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether, and those audiences are way smaller now than they were in those bands' prime. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.

to:

Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences, audiences [though not nearly as large as in their prime], but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether, and those audiences are way smaller now than they were in those bands' prime.altogether. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.



The first sign of serious trouble was when both of singles from 2010's ''All American Nightmare'' barely charted (though the TitleTrack was a #6 hit) and the album itself only debuted at #37. While plenty of bands would still see this as a big success, it was a ''massive'' slide from where they were. Not only did this not correct itself by 2012, but ''Welcome to the Freakshow'', their fourth major-label album, debuted at #65 (only selling 60,000 copies as of 2015), and "Save Me", the lead single, charted even lower. Sales were so bad that their major label Republic Records unceremoniously dropped them. The final nail in the coffin was when frontman and founder Austin John left the band ''in the middle of a tour'' due to his drug issues. The band tested out Jared Weeks, the former frontman of Music/SavingAbel (another band that fell to complete obscurity when post-grunge declined), for the rest of their tour, only for him to leave soon afterwards. Now signed to The End Records, a rock label owned by rising star BMG, they released ''When the Smoke Clears'' with a friend of the band on vocals to negative reviews; it managed to peak in the 70s on the Billboard 200 before vanishing the next week. The music video for their single "Hit the Ground" struggled to reach 80,000 views within six months of its release and only peaked at #34 on the Mainstream Rock charts; on top of that, the band had to crowdfund the album just to try and build some buzz due to nonexistent promotion from their label. Hinder released their sixth album, ''The Reign'', on August 11 2017, but all its singles have tanked to (once again) non-existent hype.\\\

to:

The first sign of serious trouble was when both of singles from 2010's ''All American Nightmare'' barely charted (though the TitleTrack was a #6 hit) and the album itself only debuted at #37. While plenty of bands would still see this as a big success, it was a ''massive'' slide from where they were. Not only did this not correct itself by 2012, but ''Welcome to the Freakshow'', their fourth major-label album, debuted at #65 (only selling 60,000 copies as of 2015), and "Save Me", the lead single, charted even lower. Sales were so bad that their major label Republic Records unceremoniously dropped them. The final nail in the coffin was when frontman and founder Austin John Winkler left the band ''in the middle of a tour'' due to his drug issues. The band tested out Jared Weeks, the former frontman of Music/SavingAbel (another band that fell to complete obscurity when post-grunge declined), for the rest of their tour, only for him to leave soon afterwards. Now signed to The End Records, a rock label owned by rising star BMG, they released ''When the Smoke Clears'' with a friend of the band on vocals to negative reviews; it managed to peak in the 70s on the Billboard 200 before vanishing the next week. The music video for their single "Hit the Ground" struggled to reach 80,000 views within six months of its release and only peaked at #34 on the Mainstream Rock charts; on top of that, the band had to crowdfund the album just to try and build some buzz due to nonexistent promotion from their label. Hinder released their sixth album, ''The Reign'', on August 11 2017, but all its singles have tanked which failed to (once again) non-existent hype.chart, with one single peaking at a lamentable ''#39'' on rock radio. Around that time, the remaining band members sued former lead singer Winkler [[http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/7949080/hinder-sues-former-lead-singer-trademark over trademark infringement]].\\\
14th Sep '17 12:29:25 PM Prime8NStuff
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* AutoTune or rather, the extremely obvious robotic type of auto-tune that was popularized by Music/TPain in the late '00s has fallen victim to this. When Music/TPain used autotune to make his singing voice sound more "robotic", it launched [[FollowTheLeader a trend of countless rappers and singers doing the same thing]], such as Music/KanyeWest, Music/LilWayne, Akon, Music/FloRida, Music/{{Kesha}} and 3OH!3. It was inescapable from 2007-10 and filled up parties everywhere. However, it was also subject to frequent mockery due to how annoying it sounded; the backlash became too much to bear. Most artists who used it began to move away from the technique; those who continued using it found diminished sales and show attendances. T-Pain, the one who popularized it, would hit this status himself. It's now viewed as a punchline for late-00s hip-hop and one of the most regrettable trends as of late.

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* AutoTune or rather, the extremely obvious robotic type of auto-tune that was popularized by Music/TPain in the late '00s has fallen victim to this. When Music/TPain used autotune to make his singing voice sound more "robotic", it launched [[FollowTheLeader a trend of countless rappers and singers doing the same thing]], such as Music/KanyeWest, Music/LilWayne, Akon, Music/FloRida, Music/{{Kesha}} and 3OH!3. It was Songs featuring the technique were inescapable from 2007-10 and filled up parties everywhere. However, it was also subject to frequent mockery due to how annoying it sounded; the backlash became too much to bear. Most artists who used it began to move away from the technique; those who continued using it found diminished sales and show attendances. T-Pain, the one who popularized it, would hit this status himself. It's now viewed as a punchline for late-00s hip-hop and one of the most regrettable trends as of late.
12th Sep '17 1:03:27 PM Megafighter343
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However, the band's popularity rapidly collapsed in the early-mid '00s. First was when their guitarist Wes Borland - [[EnsembleDarkhorse who was a fan-favorite and considered the most talented band member]] - left. Next, their 2003 album ''Results May Vary'' got terrible reviews and barely made it past platinum. Not helping matters was an ill-received cover of "[[Music/TheWho Behind Blue Eyes]]". This album proved to be a GenreKiller for Nu Metal (which was already in decline at the time) and a CreatorKiller for Limp Bizkit, as the band soon went on a hiatus. They later reunited in 2011, when their album ''Gold Cobra'' got the best reviews in their career, yet it debuted at a dismal #16 on the Billboard 200. However,
[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7r1IctCR_A "Endless Slaughter"]], their latest single off of the [[DevelopmentHell oft-delayed]] ''Stampede of the Disco Elephants'', was met with near-unanimous derision and was widely decried as an incoherent, nonsensical mess.\\\

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However, the band's popularity rapidly collapsed in the early-mid '00s. First was when their guitarist Wes Borland - [[EnsembleDarkhorse who was a fan-favorite and considered the most talented band member]] - left. Next, their 2003 album ''Results May Vary'' got terrible reviews and barely made it past platinum. Not helping matters was an ill-received cover of "[[Music/TheWho Behind Blue Eyes]]". This album proved to be a GenreKiller for Nu Metal (which was already in decline at the time) and a CreatorKiller for Limp Bizkit, as the band soon went on a hiatus. They later reunited in 2011, when their album ''Gold Cobra'' got the best reviews in their career, yet it debuted at a dismal #16 on the Billboard 200. However,
However, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7r1IctCR_A "Endless Slaughter"]], their latest single off of the [[DevelopmentHell oft-delayed]] ''Stampede of the Disco Elephants'', was met with near-unanimous derision and was widely decried as an incoherent, nonsensical mess.\\\
10th Sep '17 9:25:46 PM Scifimaster92
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Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who herself would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, the hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to maintain a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\

to:

Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who herself would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. In addition, it later emerged that she [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IosP8iSnwNk didn't originally rap]], but instead ''sang'', and likely switched to rapping due to how bad she was at singing, making some question her claims that she moved to America to be a rapper. By that point, the hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to maintain a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\
5th Sep '17 10:26:53 PM KizunaTallis
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* {{Crunk}} music is firmly DeaderThanDisco today. Created by the Music/ThreeSixMafia in the '90s, and then popularized by Music/LilJon and the Eastside Boyz in 2003 with their huge hit "Get Low", it was absolutely massive in the mid-2000s. It was this genre that put southern hip-hop on the map, making the city of UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} ''the'' capital of HipHop (an effect that's still being felt today). Crunk filled clubs and house parties all across the nation, basically being to the '00s as to what {{trap|music}} is today. However, it quickly gained a ''massive'' hatedom both in the hip-hop community and out, with its misogynistic objectifying of women, [[OdeToIntoxication glorification of drugs]], and screaming vocals about immature subject matter (primarily about being drunk/stoned, and [[IntercourseWithYou having sex with prostitutes]] InDaClub, [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs a lot of songs combined all of those]]). The lyrics took ClusterFBomb and NWordPrivileges to the extreme (which, being based off of HipHop, is really saying something), with virtually every other word being "fuck" or "nigga". [[GenreKiller The final killing blow]] was likely Music/SouljaBoy's backlash. Today, virtually all crunk artists are DeaderThanDisco, with the possible exception of Lil Jon (mainly because of his viral hit "Turn Down for What", in collaboration with DJ Snake). The basic idea of crunk ("danceable hip-hop music") lives on in the form of trap, but crunk itself is dead and unlikely to come back any time soon, as it's not only [[TheScrappy the most hated genre]] of hip-hop but the entirety of music in general.
* An offshoot of crunk, {{crunkcore}}, is also firmly Deader Than Disco, maybe even more than its parent genre itself. It developed in the late 2000s as a type of crunk that featured the vocal styles of screamo; many crunkcore bands, however, did not scream and often just combined crunk stylings with scene images and pop melodies. Bands like Music/{{Millionaires}}, Music/BrokeNCYDE, 3OH!3, Family Force 5 (notably combining crunkcore with modern Christian themes) and Blood on the Dance Floor helped popularize the genre. They also gained ''massive'' criticism, for not only carrying the same misogynistic IntercourseWithYou themes as regular crunk, but for their ''even more'' annoying vocal and image style. Crunkcore died out just as immediately as it got popular, and while many of these bands continue to exist, they [[GenreShift changed their sound]] to abandon crunkcore completely.
* Another offshoot of crunk, snap, is also stone dead. Spawned in Atlanta sometime in the mid-00s, its origins aren't entirely clear, though most will point to Dem Franchize Boyz and [=D4L=] as the creators of the genre. What is known is that it quickly became '''monstrously''' popular. A LighterAndSofter variant of crunk that downplayed the aggression in favor of a more danceable sound, snap ruled the charts from 2005 to around 2008 thanks to hits like [=D4L=]'s "Laffy Taffy", Dem Franchize Boyz' "Lean wit It, Rock wit It", David Banner's "Play", and the Ying Yang Twins' "Wait (The Whisper Song)", which were downright ubiquitous and sold absolutely incredible amounts via online sales. Its downfall came almost as swiftly as its rise for two reasons: one was the rise of smartphones, which allowed people to store a song library on their phones and killed off the ringtone market (a great deal of snap's dominance came from ringtone sales), while the other main cause was the absolutely gargantuan {{Hatedom}} from both hip-hop and the mainstream as a whole, who saw snap as stupid, substance-devoid, and MoneyDearBoy personified. The term "ringtone rap" was largely referring to snap, and as the genre derived most of its popularity from cheap digital singles and ringtones, this view was not inaccurate. By the end of 2008, snap was having its last gasp by way of V.I.C.'s "Get Silly"; following this, the genre spent 2009 rapidly dying and was essentially gone completely by 2010. Nowadays, snap is viewed as the absolute nadir of 2000s hip hop and pop in general, not to mention one of the worst things to ever occur in rap period, and there has been absolutely nothing even resembling a revival of the genre; the artists themselves are invariably remembered as a bunch of one-hit wonders if they even are remembered, as it's more likely that people will just recognize the songs without knowing who recorded them.

to:

* {{Crunk}} music is firmly DeaderThanDisco dead in the water today. Created by the Music/ThreeSixMafia in the '90s, and then popularized by Music/LilJon and the Eastside Boyz in 2003 with their huge hit "Get Low", it was absolutely massive in the mid-2000s. It was this genre that put southern hip-hop on the map, making the city of UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} ''the'' capital of HipHop (an effect that's still being felt today). Crunk filled clubs and house parties all across the nation, basically being to rap in the '00s as to what {{trap|music}} is today. PostGrunge was to rock music in that same decade. However, it crunk quickly gained a ''massive'' hatedom both in the hip-hop community and out, with its [[MisogynySong misogynistic objectifying of women, women]], [[OdeToIntoxication glorification of drugs]], and screaming vocals about immature subject matter (primarily about being drunk/stoned, and [[IntercourseWithYou having sex with prostitutes]] prostitutes/strippers]] InDaClub, [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs a lot of songs combined all of those]]).or both]]). The lyrics took ClusterFBomb and NWordPrivileges to the extreme (which, being based off of HipHop, is really saying something), with virtually every other word being "fuck" or "nigga". [[GenreKiller The final killing blow]] was likely Music/SouljaBoy's backlash. Today, virtually all crunk artists are DeaderThanDisco, completely forgotten, with the possible exception of Lil Jon (mainly because of his viral hit "Turn Down for What", in collaboration with DJ Snake). The basic idea of crunk ("danceable hip-hop music") lives on in the form of trap, TrapMusic, but crunk genre itself is dead and unlikely to come back any time soon, as it's not only [[TheScrappy the most hated genre]] of hip-hop but one of the most despised genres in the entirety of music in general.
* An offshoot of crunk, {{crunkcore}}, is also firmly Deader Than Disco, maybe even more than its parent genre itself. It developed in the late 2000s as [[GenreRoulette a type of fusion between]] crunk that featured and the vocal styles of screamo; many crunkcore bands, however, did not scream and often just combined the crunk stylings atmosphere with scene images fashion and pop melodies. Bands like Music/{{Millionaires}}, Music/BrokeNCYDE, 3OH!3, Family Force 5 (notably combining crunkcore with [[ChristianRock modern Christian themes) themes]]) and Blood on the Dance Floor helped popularize the genre. They also gained ''massive'' criticism, for not only carrying the same misogynistic IntercourseWithYou themes as regular crunk, but for their ''even more'' annoying vocal and image style. Crunkcore died out just as immediately as it got popular, and while many of these bands continue to exist, they [[GenreShift changed their sound]] to abandon crunkcore completely.
* Another offshoot of crunk, snap, is also stone dead. Spawned in Atlanta sometime in the mid-00s, its origins aren't entirely clear, though most will point to Dem Franchize Boyz and [=D4L=] as the creators of the genre. What is known is that it quickly became '''monstrously''' popular. A LighterAndSofter variant of crunk that downplayed the aggression in favor of a more danceable sound, snap ruled the charts from 2005 to around 2008 thanks to hits like [=D4L=]'s "Laffy Taffy", Dem Franchize Boyz' "Lean wit It, Rock wit It", David Banner's "Play", and the Ying Yang Twins' "Wait (The Whisper Song)", which were downright ubiquitous and sold absolutely incredible amounts via online sales. Its downfall came almost as swiftly as its rise for two reasons: one was the rise of smartphones, which allowed people to store a song library on their phones and killed off the ringtone market (a great deal of snap's dominance came from ringtone sales), while the other main cause was the absolutely gargantuan {{Hatedom}} from both hip-hop and the mainstream as a whole, who saw snap as stupid, substance-devoid, and MoneyDearBoy personified. The term "ringtone rap" was largely referring to snap, and as the genre derived most of its popularity from cheap digital singles and ringtones, this view was not inaccurate. By the end of 2008, snap was having its last gasp by way of V.I.C.'s "Get Silly"; following this, the genre spent 2009 rapidly dying and was essentially gone completely by 2010. Nowadays, snap is viewed as the absolute nadir of 2000s hip hop and pop in general, not to mention one of the worst things to ever occur in rap period, and there has been absolutely nothing even resembling a revival of the genre; the artists themselves are invariably remembered as a bunch of one-hit wonders {{one hit wonder}}s if they even are remembered, as it's more likely that people will just recognize the songs without knowing who recorded them.



Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who herself would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to hold a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped very hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\
Once one of the most promising rappers (not just white or female) on the market, Iggy Azalea has become so widely hated in such a short amount of time that people find it hard to believe she was once considered inspirational. Her fall from grace [[http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/2015/03/is-iggy-azalea-the-female-vanilla-ice/ has been compared to]] that of Music/VanillaIce. Nicki Minaj is still going strong, but Azalea is primarily known derisively as "that white Australian girl who pretends to be a ghetto chick from Atlanta". Despite her attempts at repairing her reputation, it has sunk to the point where her second album ''Digital Distortion'' has been repeatedly postponed, combined with Def Jam CEO Steve Bartels refusing to issue more singles from the album after "Mo Bounce" flopped. Nowadays, the general consensus of her music is that it's generic electro-pop-rap with an annoying fake auto-tuned voice and that her previous success with "Fancy" and "Black Widow" was a fluke, and Azalea herself is viewed as a manufactured, phony, and culture-appropriating {{jerkass}}.

to:

Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who herself would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, the hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to hold maintain a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped very hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\
Once one of the most promising rappers (not just white or female) on the market, Iggy Azalea has become so widely hated in such a short amount of time that people find it hard to believe she was once considered inspirational. Her fall from grace [[http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/2015/03/is-iggy-azalea-the-female-vanilla-ice/ has been compared to]] that of Music/VanillaIce. Nicki Minaj is still going strong, but Azalea is primarily known derisively as "that white Australian girl who pretends to be a ghetto chick from Atlanta". Despite her attempts at repairing her reputation, it has sunk to the point where her second album ''Digital Distortion'' has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly postponed, postponed]], combined with Def Jam CEO Steve Bartels refusing to issue more singles from the album after "Mo Bounce" flopped. Nowadays, the general consensus of her music is that it's generic electro-pop-rap with an annoying fake auto-tuned voice and that her previous success with "Fancy" and "Black Widow" was a fluke, and Azalea herself is viewed as a manufactured, phony, and culture-appropriating {{jerkass}}.



However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his use of auto-tune that so many mimicked, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]] and [[MisogynySong objectified wome]]. Auto-Tune itself was also starting to get a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. T-Pain began to be seen as a symbol of what was wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, producing one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. Aside from a minor success with DJ Khaled's "All I Do Is Win" in 2010, the transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. The fall became evident in 2013 when he released "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B., and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a {{greatest hits album}} titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'', which has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly delayed since 2014]] and the three singles he released for it, [[TitleTrack "Stoicville"]], "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\

to:

However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his use of auto-tune that so many mimicked, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]] and [[MisogynySong objectified wome]].women]]. Auto-Tune itself was also starting to get a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. T-Pain began to be seen as a symbol of what was wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, producing one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. Aside from a minor success with DJ Khaled's "All I Do Is Win" in 2010, the transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. The fall became evident in 2013 when he released "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B., and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a {{greatest hits album}} titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'', which has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly delayed since 2014]] and the three singles he released for it, [[TitleTrack "Stoicville"]], "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\



Unfortunately for her, she simply [[ToughActToFollow couldn't keep up the momentum after "Girlfriend" was released]]. [[http://ew.com/article/2009/07/24/avril-lavigne-in-the-studio-exclusive/ She had planned to release a follow-up album in 2009]], but various issues, including a 2009 divorce from Whibley (who also produced several songs on the album) and ExecutiveMeddling by the record label, pushed it back to 2011. By that time, not only had her previous hits faded from pop culture memory, but other female pop stars, including Music/TaylorSwift, Music/LadyGaga, Music/KatyPerry, and Music/{{Kesha}}, had risen to prominence and eclipsed her in popularity. Her 2011 follow-up ''Goodbye Lullaby'' only debuted at #4, and failed to even reach Gold status in the US, while many fans saw it as a sellout move that took a far more commercial direction as opposed to her more personal and angsty earlier albums. She'd also long had a brewing {{hatedom}} among PunkRock fans who saw her as a [[NoTrueScotsman "poser"]] and her PopPunk style (along with that of contemporary artists like Music/FallOutBoy and Music/PanicAtTheDisco) as borderline blasphemy; her increasingly pop-oriented direction only made their charges easier to stick. The album did spawn a Top 20 single with "What the Hell", but it didn't have anywhere near the staying power that her previous singles did, while her follow-up singles barely scraped the Top 70 on the chart.\\\
She seemed to be making a comeback in 2013 with her Top 20 single "Here's to Never Growing Up", which managed to attain platinum status in the US, but she went and blew it completely the following year with "Hello Kitty", [[WereStillRelevantDammit an attempt to capitalize on both the dubstep craze]] and her continued popularity in Japan. It certainly got attention... for all the wrong reasons. The video, which was filmed in Japan and had emotionless, robotic backup dancers and filled with exaggerated Japanese imagery, was widely derided for being racist and stereotypical (or at least {{Japandering}} taken to embarrassing extremes), and the song itself was decried as an incoherent and annoyingly grating mess, barely charting on the American ''or'' Japanese charts. Her self-titled album, which contained both of the previously-mentioned songs, was the biggest flop in her career, selling even worse than her previous release (although admittedly, it was released against Music/{{Eminem}}'s quadruple-platinum ''Marshall Mathers LP 2''). And then, to add another blow, in 2014 her career was again put on hold for several years, [[http://people.com/celebrity/avril-lavigne-lyme-disease-singer-was-bedridden-for-5-months/ this time by an infection of Lyme Disease]]. By 2017, Lavigne has recovered from her illness and expects to release [[http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/7709100/avril-lavigne-signs-bmg-new-album-interview her sixth studio album by the end of the year]], [[RevisitingTheRoots claiming that she will return to her roots]] with a NewSoundAlbum, but there has been no hype for the album yet and it would take a great uphill climb for her to reclaim even a fraction of the fame she'd once enjoyed, as nowadays, Lavigne is solely seen as a relic of the early-to-mid 2000s who made annoying pop songs like "Complicated" and "Girlfriend" [[EarWorm that got stuck in your head for the wrong reasons]].

to:

Unfortunately for her, she simply [[ToughActToFollow couldn't keep up the momentum after "Girlfriend" was released]]. [[http://ew.com/article/2009/07/24/avril-lavigne-in-the-studio-exclusive/ She had planned to release a follow-up album in 2009]], but various issues, including a 2009 divorce from Whibley (who also produced several songs on the album) and ExecutiveMeddling by the record label, pushed it back to 2011. By that time, not only had her previous hits faded from pop culture memory, but other female pop stars, including Music/TaylorSwift, Music/LadyGaga, Music/KatyPerry, and Music/{{Kesha}}, had risen to prominence and eclipsed her in popularity. Her 2011 follow-up ''Goodbye Lullaby'' only debuted at #4, and failed to even reach Gold status in the US, while many fans saw it as a sellout move that took a far more commercial direction as opposed to her more personal and angsty earlier albums. She'd also long had a brewing {{hatedom}} among PunkRock fans who saw her as a [[NoTrueScotsman "poser"]] and her PopPunk style (along with that of contemporary artists like Music/FallOutBoy and Music/PanicAtTheDisco) as borderline blasphemy; her increasingly pop-oriented direction only made their charges easier to stick. The album did spawn a Top 20 single with "What the Hell", but it didn't have anywhere near the staying power that her previous singles did, while her follow-up singles barely scraped the Top 70 on the chart.\\\
She seemed to be making a comeback in 2013 with her Top 20 single "Here's to Never Growing Up", which managed to attain platinum status in the US, but she went and blew it completely the following year with "Hello Kitty", [[WereStillRelevantDammit an attempt to capitalize on both the dubstep craze]] and her continued popularity in Japan. It certainly got attention... for all the wrong reasons. The video, which was filmed in Japan and had emotionless, robotic backup dancers and filled with exaggerated Japanese imagery, was widely derided for being racist and stereotypical (or at least {{Japandering}} taken to embarrassing extremes), and the song itself was decried as an incoherent and annoyingly grating mess, barely charting on the American ''or'' Japanese charts. Her self-titled album, which contained both of the previously-mentioned songs, was the biggest flop in her career, selling even worse than her previous release (although admittedly, it was released against Music/{{Eminem}}'s quadruple-platinum hotly-anticipated ''Marshall Mathers LP 2''). And then, to add another blow, in 2014 her career was again put on hold for several years, [[http://people.com/celebrity/avril-lavigne-lyme-disease-singer-was-bedridden-for-5-months/ this time by an infection of Lyme Disease]]. By 2017, Lavigne has recovered from her illness and expects to release [[http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/7709100/avril-lavigne-signs-bmg-new-album-interview her sixth studio album by the end of the year]], [[RevisitingTheRoots claiming that she will return to her roots]] with a NewSoundAlbum, but there has been no hype for the album yet and it would take a great uphill climb for her to reclaim even a fraction of the fame she'd once enjoyed, as nowadays, Lavigne is solely seen as a relic of the early-to-mid 2000s who made annoying pop songs like "Complicated" and "Girlfriend" [[EarWorm that got stuck in your head for the wrong reasons]].



By the late 2000s though, fatigue would set in for a variety of reasons. Firstly, while other rock genres grew to popularity around the time period, post-grunge reigned with a virtual stranglehold on the mainstream to the point where it became inseparable from rock music as a whole, and due to its meanstream-friendliness, this led to an oversaturation on the radio stations. On top of that, the genre built up a reputation for being [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] in its musical structure and lyrics. With those two combined, it didn't take long for a {{Hatedom}} to develop and backlash against the music and the bands playing it to reach full swing. Bands like Creed and Nickelback became the biggest targets of SnarkBait and were held responsible for having [[GenreKiller "killed rock music"]] (or at least leaving it stagnant). The harder-tinged acts also faced backlash for the [[SexAndDrugsAndRockAndRoll childishly hedonistic]] and [[MisogynySong misogynistic]] themes of their own lyrics; the bands that avoided these sorts of themes had to either modify their sound or GenreShift completely in order to stay afloat. And because post-grunge had become nearly inseparable from rock music as a whole for over a decade, many rock fans felt that once the genre succumbed to its own fatigue, it did [[TakingYouWithMe lasting damage to rock music's reputation]] and contributed to its decline from the mainstream music scene of the 2010s, enabling ElectronicMusic to fill in the void and finally establish a foothold on the mainstream American music consciousness.\\\

to:

By the late 2000s though, fatigue would set in for a variety of reasons. Firstly, while other rock genres grew to popularity around the time period, post-grunge reigned with a virtual stranglehold on the mainstream to the point where it became inseparable from rock music as a whole, and due to its meanstream-friendliness, mainstream-friendliness, this led to an oversaturation on the radio stations. On top of that, the genre built up a reputation for being [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] in its musical structure and lyrics. With those two combined, it didn't take long for a {{Hatedom}} to develop and backlash against the music and the bands playing it to reach full swing. Bands like Creed and Nickelback became the biggest targets of SnarkBait and were held responsible for having [[GenreKiller "killed rock music"]] (or at least leaving it stagnant). The harder-tinged acts also faced backlash for the [[SexAndDrugsAndRockAndRoll childishly hedonistic]] and [[MisogynySong misogynistic]] themes of their own lyrics; the bands that avoided these sorts of themes had to either modify their sound or GenreShift completely in order to stay afloat. And because post-grunge had become nearly inseparable from rock music as a whole for over a decade, many rock fans felt that once the genre succumbed to its own fatigue, it did [[TakingYouWithMe lasting damage to rock music's reputation]] and contributed to its decline from the mainstream music scene of the 2010s, enabling ElectronicMusic to fill in the void and finally establish a foothold on the mainstream American music consciousness.\\\
1st Sep '17 10:48:12 PM KizunaTallis
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* AutoTune or rather, the extremely obvious robotic type of auto-tune that was popularized by Music/TPain in the late '00s has fallen victim to this. When Music/TPain used autotune to make his voice sound metallic, it launched [[FollowTheLeader a trend of countless rappers and singers doing the same thing]], such as Music/KanyeWest, Music/LilWayne, Akon, Music/FloRida, Music/{{Kesha}} and 3OH!3. It was inescapable from 2007-10 and filled up parties everywhere. However, it was also subject to frequent mockery due to how annoying it sounded; the backlash became too much to bear. Most artists who used it began to move away from the technique; those who continued using it found diminished sales and show attendances. T-Pain, the one who popularized it, would hit this status himself. It's now viewed as a punchline for late-00s hip-hop and one of the most regrettable trends as of late.

to:

* AutoTune or rather, the extremely obvious robotic type of auto-tune that was popularized by Music/TPain in the late '00s has fallen victim to this. When Music/TPain used autotune to make his singing voice sound metallic, more "robotic", it launched [[FollowTheLeader a trend of countless rappers and singers doing the same thing]], such as Music/KanyeWest, Music/LilWayne, Akon, Music/FloRida, Music/{{Kesha}} and 3OH!3. It was inescapable from 2007-10 and filled up parties everywhere. However, it was also subject to frequent mockery due to how annoying it sounded; the backlash became too much to bear. Most artists who used it began to move away from the technique; those who continued using it found diminished sales and show attendances. T-Pain, the one who popularized it, would hit this status himself. It's now viewed as a punchline for late-00s hip-hop and one of the most regrettable trends as of late.



* Of all the acts that fell off at the turn of the '10s, few fell harder than Music/TPain. After he was discovered by Akon, he exploded seemingly out of nowhere with his 2005 debut album ''Rappa Ternt Sanga''. As the title would suggest, he abandoned rapping early on in favor of singing. However, calling it "singing" was something of a stretch. The entire album was one big celebration of AutoTune, which T-Pain used to make his voice sound robotic. Despite being panned by many, the use of auto-tune quickly caught on and produced two Top 10 hits with "I'm Sprung" and "I'm 'n Luv (Wit a Stripper)". He also helped rap legend E-40 have his first major pop hit by appearing on his 2006 track "U & Dat". His music became a staple of clubs and parties all over the world. He continued that success with his 2007 album ''Epiphany'', which proved to be an even bigger success, as it produced his first #1 hit with "Buy U a Drank (Shawty Snappin')", became his first chart-topping album, and sold even more than his first album did. In early 2008, he also made Music/FloRida a star by appearing on his debut 10-week #1 single "Low", making him inescapable everywhere. By this point, it seemed like everyone was following his lead with extensive use of auto-tune, as countless rappers and singers were [[FollowTheLeader mimicking his style]]. It looked like T-Pain was going to carry on as one of the leaders of modern hip-hop music.\\\
However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his abuse of auto-tune that spread like a plague, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]], and the fact that women in his music were little more than [[MisogynySong material objects of pleasure for him]]. Auto-Tune itself was also getting a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. He began to be seen as a symbol of everything wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, and produced one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. Aside from a minor success with DJ Khaled's "All I Do Is Win" in 2010, the transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. The fall became evident in 2013 when he released "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B., and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a {{greatest hits album}} titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'' in 2017. The hype for it is almost non-existent. The three singles he released for it, "Stoicville", "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\
Though still touring today, he's gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His music is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers E-40's "U & Dat", Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" and "All I Do Is Win" seem to be the only exceptions to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.

to:

* Of all the acts that fell off at the turn of the '10s, few fell harder than Music/TPain. After he was discovered by Akon, he his popularity exploded seemingly out of nowhere with his 2005 debut album ''Rappa Ternt Sanga''. As the title would suggest, he abandoned rapping early on in favor of singing. However, calling it "singing" was something of a stretch. The entire album was one big celebration of AutoTune, which T-Pain used to make his voice sound more robotic. Despite being panned by many, many critics, the use of auto-tune quickly caught on and produced two Top 10 hits with "I'm Sprung" and "I'm 'n Luv (Wit a Stripper)". He also helped rap legend E-40 have his first major pop hit by appearing on his 2006 track "U & Dat". His music became a staple of clubs and parties all over the world. He continued that success with his 2007 album ''Epiphany'', which proved to be an even bigger success, as it produced his first #1 hit with "Buy U a Drank (Shawty Snappin')", became his first chart-topping album, and sold even more than his first album did. In early 2008, he also made Music/FloRida a star by appearing on his debut 10-week #1 single "Low", making him inescapable everywhere. By this point, it seemed like everyone was following his lead with extensive use of auto-tune, as countless rappers and singers were [[FollowTheLeader mimicking his style]]. It looked like T-Pain was going to carry on as one of the leaders of modern hip-hop music.\\\
However, as he got more and more popular, an equally large backlash had also been forming. He was already widely disliked for his abuse use of auto-tune that spread like a plague, so many mimicked, as well as his lyrics that often [[OdeToIntoxication glorified]] the use of [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll alcohol and drugs]], drugs]] and the fact that women in his music were little more than [[MisogynySong material objects of pleasure for him]]. objectified wome]]. Auto-Tune itself was also getting starting to get a backlash by the '10s, which may have been spearheaded by Music/JayZ's hit "D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune)", made as a response to the omnipresence of the software. He T-Pain began to be seen as a symbol of everything what was wrong with urban music, and while it wasn't immediately noticeable, the fall was beginning to take place. His 2008 album ''[=Thr33=] Ringz'' only peaked at #4 on charts despite being released a year after his last chart-topping album, and produced producing one Top 10 with "Can't Believe It" that was powered by Music/LilWayne, and two other songs that only barely scraped the Top 40. Aside from a minor success with DJ Khaled's "All I Do Is Win" in 2010, the transition to the '10s marked the beginning of the end for him. While 2011's ''REVOLVEЯ'' produced a #10 hit with "5 O'Clock", featuring Wiz Khalifa and Music/LilyAllen, it was powered solely by a strong debut from Khalifa's fanbase, as he was a hot, fast-rising rapper at the time (and, to a lesser extent, some Americans deciding to give Allen a chance after [[AmericansHateTingle ignoring her for years]]). The followup "Turn All the Lights On" (featuring Music/NeYo) failed to even reach the ''Hot 100''; the album itself only debuted at a measly #28 and became his first album to not reach certification. Robotic auto-tune began to die out because of this; the many artists he influenced began to move away from that kind of sound. Not helping matters was hip-hop and R&B's general decline from being ''the'' mainstream genres, and the rise of ElectronicMusic supplanting it at clubs and parties. This may have been the result of hip-hop being flooded with obvious auto-tune in the first place. All of this left T-Pain in a tough spot, since he couldn't easily escape the backlash to auto-tune due to being the GenrePopularizer for it. The fall became evident in 2013 when he released "Up Down (Do this all Day)", which featured B.o.B., and it reached a measly #62. The following year, he released a {{greatest hits album}} titled ''T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits'', which didn't even make the Top 200. T-Pain is set to release his fourth album ''Stoicville'' in 2017. The hype for it is almost non-existent. The ''Stoicville'', which has been [[ScheduleSlip repeatedly delayed since 2014]] and the three singles he released for it, "Stoicville", [[TitleTrack "Stoicville"]], "Make that Shit Work" and "Roof on Fye", have failed to chart anywhere at all.\\\
Though still touring today, he's T-Pain has gone from playing in massive arenas and headlining massive big events to playing in nightclubs, resorts, and small-name music festivals. His music is now viewed as emblematic of everything wrong with hip-hop in the mid-to-late '00s - trashy, excessive, misogynistic, annoying, and generally idiotic. It's telling when almost all of his music nowadays is completely forgotten, only remembered for the terrible lyrics and annoying auto-tuned voice that sang them. Even the songs that he was featured in have been forgotten by sheer association (who seriously remembers E-40's "U & Dat", Rick Ross' "The Boss" or Lil Mama's "Shawty Get Loose"?). "Low" and "All I Do Is Win" seem to be the only exceptions to this. Airplay is virtually non-existent, only getting an occasional spin on throwback stations, with his spot on "Low" making up most of it. While "never say never" is the motto of the music industry, it'll be miraculous if he could ever crawl out of the hole he's fallen in, and since he is the symbol of one of the most reviled, DeaderThanDisco trends of recent memory, that miracle is a vanishing possibility.



Unfortunately for her, she simply [[ToughActToFollow couldn't keep up the momentum after "Girlfriend" was released]]. [[http://ew.com/article/2009/07/24/avril-lavigne-in-the-studio-exclusive/ She had planned to release a follow-up album in 2009]], but various issues, including a 2009 divorce from Whibley (who also produced several songs on the album) and ExecutiveMeddling by the record label, pushed it back to 2011. By that time, not only had her previous hits faded from pop culture memory, but other female pop stars, including Music/TaylorSwift, Music/LadyGaga, Music/KatyPerry, and Music/{{Kesha}}, had risen to prominence and eclipsed her in popularity. Her 2011 follow-up ''Goodbye Lullaby'' only debuted at #4, and failed to even reach Gold status in the US, while many fans saw it as a sellout move that took a far more commercial direction as opposed to her more personal and angsty earlier albums. She'd also long had a brewing {{hatedom}} among PunkRock fans who saw her PopPunk style (along with that of contemporary artists like Music/FallOutBoy and Music/PanicAtTheDisco) as borderline blasphemy; her increasingly pop-oriented direction only made their charges easier to stick. The album did spawn a Top 20 single with "What the Hell", but it didn't have anywhere near the staying power that her previous singles did, while her follow-up singles barely scraped the Top 70 on the chart.\\\

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Unfortunately for her, she simply [[ToughActToFollow couldn't keep up the momentum after "Girlfriend" was released]]. [[http://ew.com/article/2009/07/24/avril-lavigne-in-the-studio-exclusive/ She had planned to release a follow-up album in 2009]], but various issues, including a 2009 divorce from Whibley (who also produced several songs on the album) and ExecutiveMeddling by the record label, pushed it back to 2011. By that time, not only had her previous hits faded from pop culture memory, but other female pop stars, including Music/TaylorSwift, Music/LadyGaga, Music/KatyPerry, and Music/{{Kesha}}, had risen to prominence and eclipsed her in popularity. Her 2011 follow-up ''Goodbye Lullaby'' only debuted at #4, and failed to even reach Gold status in the US, while many fans saw it as a sellout move that took a far more commercial direction as opposed to her more personal and angsty earlier albums. She'd also long had a brewing {{hatedom}} among PunkRock fans who saw her as a [[NoTrueScotsman "poser"]] and her PopPunk style (along with that of contemporary artists like Music/FallOutBoy and Music/PanicAtTheDisco) as borderline blasphemy; her increasingly pop-oriented direction only made their charges easier to stick. The album did spawn a Top 20 single with "What the Hell", but it didn't have anywhere near the staying power that her previous singles did, while her follow-up singles barely scraped the Top 70 on the chart.\\\



By the late 2000s though, fatigue would set in for a variety of reasons. Firstly, while other rock genres grew to popularity around the time period, post-grunge reigned with a virtual stranglehold on the mainstream to the point where it became inseparable from rock music as a whole (much like how ContemporaryRAndB saturated the pop music market at the same time), leading to an oversaturation on the radio stations. On top of that, the genre built up a reputation for being {{strictly formula}}ic in its musical structure and lyrics. With those two combined, it didn't take long for a {{Hatedom}} to develop and backlash against the music and the bands playing it to reach full swing. Bands like Creed and Nickelback became the biggest targets of SnarkBait and were held responsible for having [[GenreKiller "killed rock music"]] (or at least leaving it stagnant). The harder-tinged acts also faced backlash for the [[SexAndDrugsAndRockAndRoll childishly hedonistic]] and [[MisogynySong misogynistic]] themes of their own lyrics; the bands that avoided these sorts of themes either had to modify their sound or GenreShift completely in order to stay afloat. And because post-grunge had become nearly inseparable from rock music as a whole for over a decade, many rock fans felt that once the genre succumbed to its own fatigue, it did [[TakingYouWithMe lasting damage to rock music's reputation]] and contributed to its decline from the mainstream music scene of the 2010s, enabling ElectronicMusic's rise in the States.\\\
Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences, but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.

to:

By the late 2000s though, fatigue would set in for a variety of reasons. Firstly, while other rock genres grew to popularity around the time period, post-grunge reigned with a virtual stranglehold on the mainstream to the point where it became inseparable from rock music as a whole (much like how ContemporaryRAndB saturated the pop music market at the same time), leading whole, and due to its meanstream-friendliness, this led to an oversaturation on the radio stations. On top of that, the genre built up a reputation for being {{strictly formula}}ic [[StrictlyFormula formulaic]] in its musical structure and lyrics. With those two combined, it didn't take long for a {{Hatedom}} to develop and backlash against the music and the bands playing it to reach full swing. Bands like Creed and Nickelback became the biggest targets of SnarkBait and were held responsible for having [[GenreKiller "killed rock music"]] (or at least leaving it stagnant). The harder-tinged acts also faced backlash for the [[SexAndDrugsAndRockAndRoll childishly hedonistic]] and [[MisogynySong misogynistic]] themes of their own lyrics; the bands that avoided these sorts of themes had to either had to modify their sound or GenreShift completely in order to stay afloat. And because post-grunge had become nearly inseparable from rock music as a whole for over a decade, many rock fans felt that once the genre succumbed to its own fatigue, it did [[TakingYouWithMe lasting damage to rock music's reputation]] and contributed to its decline from the mainstream music scene of the 2010s, enabling ElectronicMusic's rise ElectronicMusic to fill in the States.void and finally establish a foothold on the mainstream American music consciousness.\\\
Today, post-grunge is held up as a cautionary tale in what happens when you take a genre as unique as grunge and turn it into a [[MoneyDearBoy mass-produced commercial product]]. Only a few bands were able to come out of the fall unscathed and still consistently put out hits and play to decently sized audiences, but even then, it was largely because they either incorporated elements of other genres into their sound to the point that some would say they're "[[NoTrueScotsman not really post-grunge anyway]]" or abandoned it altogether.altogether, and those audiences are way smaller now than they were in those bands' prime. Besides them, the scene is a graveyard full of bands that can't chart to save their lives, are stuck playing in small clubs, and are little more than SnarkBait (if they aren't completely forgotten altogether). Whenever anyone uses the term [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Butt%20Rock "butt rock"]] in a derisive fashion, they're most likely referring to post-grunge, and you would have a hard time finding a rock band formed in the 10s that plays this style, since LighterAndSofter pop/indie-inspired rock and ElectronicMusic-infused rock have become the vogue, and if a band is going to play harder-edged rock in this day and age, it will most certainly not be in the style of post-grunge.



The first sign of serious trouble was when both of singles from 2010's ''All American Nightmare'' barely charted (though the TitleTrack was a #6 hit) and the album itself only debuted at #37. While plenty of bands would still see this as a big success, it was a ''massive'' slide from where they were. Not only did this not correct itself by 2012, but ''Welcome to the Freakshow'', their fourth major-label album, debuted at #65 (only selling 60,000 copies as of 2015), and "Save Me", the lead single, charted even lower. Sales were so bad that their major label Republic Records unceremoniously dropped them. The final nail in the coffin was when frontman and founder Austin John left the band ''in the middle of a tour'' due to his drug issues. The band tested out former Music/SavingAbel (another band that fell to complete obscurity when post-grunge declined) singer Jared Weeks for the rest of their tour, only for him to leave soon afterwards. Now signed to The End Records, a rock label owned by rising star BMG, they released ''When the Smoke Clears'' with a friend of the band on vocals to negative reviews; it managed to peak in the 70s on the Billboard 200 before vanishing the next week. The music video for their single "Hit the Ground" struggled to reach 80,000 views within six months of its release and only peaked at #34 on the Mainstream Rock charts; on top of that, the band had to crowdfund the album just to try and build some buzz due to nonexistent promotion from their label. Hinder expects to release their sixth album, ''The Reign'', on August 11, but all its singles have tanked to (once again) non-existent hype.\\\

to:

The first sign of serious trouble was when both of singles from 2010's ''All American Nightmare'' barely charted (though the TitleTrack was a #6 hit) and the album itself only debuted at #37. While plenty of bands would still see this as a big success, it was a ''massive'' slide from where they were. Not only did this not correct itself by 2012, but ''Welcome to the Freakshow'', their fourth major-label album, debuted at #65 (only selling 60,000 copies as of 2015), and "Save Me", the lead single, charted even lower. Sales were so bad that their major label Republic Records unceremoniously dropped them. The final nail in the coffin was when frontman and founder Austin John left the band ''in the middle of a tour'' due to his drug issues. The band tested out Jared Weeks, the former frontman of Music/SavingAbel (another band that fell to complete obscurity when post-grunge declined) singer Jared Weeks declined), for the rest of their tour, only for him to leave soon afterwards. Now signed to The End Records, a rock label owned by rising star BMG, they released ''When the Smoke Clears'' with a friend of the band on vocals to negative reviews; it managed to peak in the 70s on the Billboard 200 before vanishing the next week. The music video for their single "Hit the Ground" struggled to reach 80,000 views within six months of its release and only peaked at #34 on the Mainstream Rock charts; on top of that, the band had to crowdfund the album just to try and build some buzz due to nonexistent promotion from their label. Hinder expects to release released their sixth album, ''The Reign'', on August 11, 11 2017, but all its singles have tanked to (once again) non-existent hype.\\\



* Music/LimpBizkit started out in 1997 after they were discovered by [[Music/{{Korn}} Jonathan Davis]] and they dropped their debut ''Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$''. While it initially went unnoticed, they were able to get good word-of-mouth spread out through extensive touring, eventually going up to #22 on album charts. Their blend of metal and hip-hop combined with {{angst}}y lyrics and use of turntables was a winning combination for teens and young adults across the world, and brought NuMetal to the forefront of mainstream culture. They also performed at Woodstock '99, which ended in complete disaster, and the band's performance of "Break Stuff" was highly criticized as having fanned the flames of discontent among the crowd. Whether it truly was their fault or not is controversial to this day. Still, this did nothing to hinder the sales of their sophomore album ''Significant Other'', which shot up to #1 and sold 7 million units in the US alone. Their fame skyrocketed even further when their following album ''Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water'' was released in 2000, which debuted at #1 with over 1 million copies sold in its first week and overall sold over 20 million units worldwide. Songs like "Nookie", "Break Stuff", "Re-Arranged", "My Way", "Take a Look Around", and "Rollin'" dominated the airwaves of rock radio. They even crossed over to urban radio with the [[Music/WuTangClan Method Man]]-backed "N 2 Gether Now". They were on top of the world, and while they never were critical darlings, [[CriticalDissonance their sales spoke differently]].\\\
However, the band's popularity rapidly collapsed in the early-mid '00s. First was when their guitarist Wes Borland - [[EnsembleDarkhorse who was a fan-favorite and considered the most talented band member]] - left. Next, their 2003 album ''Results May Vary'' got terrible reviews and barely made it past platinum. Not helping matters was a controversial cover of "[[Music/TheWho Behind Blue Eyes]]". This album proved to be a GenreKiller for Nu Metal (which was already in decline at the time) and a CreatorKiller for Limp Bizkit, as the band soon went on a hiatus. They later reunited in 2011, when their album ''Gold Cobra'' got the best reviews in their career, yet it debuted at a dismal #16 on the Billboard 200. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7r1IctCR_A "Endless Slaughter"]], their latest single off of the [[DevelopmentHell oft-delayed]] ''Stampede of the Disco Elephants'', was met with near-unanimous derision and was widely decried as an incoherent, nonsensical mess.\\\
Once one of the turn of the Millennium's most popular rock bands, Limp Bizkit is now considered a disgrace to the genre, and even though nu metal did [[PopularityPolynomial regain some esteem in the public eye]], they're still considered a complete joke even by casual listeners. Rock radio has almost completely given up on Limp Bizkit, and most of their airplay comes from "N 2 Gether Now" on urban radio. The band is so hated in the States that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff most of their touring is done overseas]], where they weren't hit nearly as bad as with the backlash. The last time they really made any news at all was when long-time turntablist DJ Lethal was fired due to his [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll drug issues]]. While they're still relatively popular in Europe and Latin America, few bands are more hated nowadays than Limp Bizkit, and the funny thing is, [[http://www.aux.tv/2015/03/turns-out-fred-durst-hates-limp-bizkit-fans-as-much-as-everybody-else/ Fred Durst doesn't really disagree with the criticism]].

to:

* Music/LimpBizkit started out in 1997 after they were discovered by [[Music/{{Korn}} Jonathan Davis]] and they dropped their debut ''Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$''. While it initially went unnoticed, they were able to get good word-of-mouth spread out through extensive touring, eventually going up to #22 on album charts. Their blend of metal and hip-hop combined with {{angst}}y lyrics and use of turntables was a winning combination for teens and young adults across the world, and brought NuMetal to the forefront of mainstream culture. They also performed at Woodstock '99, which ended in complete disaster, and the band's performance of "Break Stuff" was highly criticized as having fanned the flames of discontent among the crowd. Whether it truly was their fault or not is controversial still debated over to this day. Still, this did nothing to hinder the sales of their sophomore album ''Significant Other'', which shot up to #1 and sold 7 million units in the US alone. Their fame skyrocketed even further when their following album ''Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water'' was released in 2000, which debuted at #1 with over 1 million copies sold in its first week and overall sold over 20 million units worldwide. Songs like "Nookie", "Break Stuff", "Re-Arranged", "My Way", "Take a Look Around", and "Rollin'" dominated the airwaves of rock radio. They even crossed over to urban radio with the [[Music/WuTangClan Method Man]]-backed "N 2 Gether Now". They were on top of the world, and while they never were critical darlings, [[CriticalDissonance their sales spoke differently]].\\\
However, the band's popularity rapidly collapsed in the early-mid '00s. First was when their guitarist Wes Borland - [[EnsembleDarkhorse who was a fan-favorite and considered the most talented band member]] - left. Next, their 2003 album ''Results May Vary'' got terrible reviews and barely made it past platinum. Not helping matters was a controversial an ill-received cover of "[[Music/TheWho Behind Blue Eyes]]". This album proved to be a GenreKiller for Nu Metal (which was already in decline at the time) and a CreatorKiller for Limp Bizkit, as the band soon went on a hiatus. They later reunited in 2011, when their album ''Gold Cobra'' got the best reviews in their career, yet it debuted at a dismal #16 on the Billboard 200. However,
[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7r1IctCR_A "Endless Slaughter"]], their latest single off of the [[DevelopmentHell oft-delayed]] ''Stampede of the Disco Elephants'', was met with near-unanimous derision and was widely decried as an incoherent, nonsensical mess.\\\
Once one of the turn of the Millennium's most popular rock bands, Limp Bizkit is now considered a disgrace to the genre, and even though nu metal did [[PopularityPolynomial regain some esteem in the public eye]], eyes of the music industry and the public]], they're still considered a complete joke even by casual listeners. Rock radio has almost completely given up on Limp Bizkit, and most of their airplay comes from "N 2 Gether Now" on urban radio. The band is so hated in the States that [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff most of their touring is done overseas]], where they weren't hit nearly as bad as with the backlash. The last time they really made any news at all was when long-time turntablist DJ Lethal was fired due to his [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll drug issues]]. While they're still relatively popular in Europe and Latin America, few bands are more hated nowadays than Limp Bizkit, and the funny thing is, [[http://www.aux.tv/2015/03/turns-out-fred-durst-hates-limp-bizkit-fans-as-much-as-everybody-else/ Fred Durst doesn't really disagree with the criticism]].
1st Sep '17 1:00:29 AM Twentington
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* Music/{{Sugarland}} also seems to be headed this way. The group was founded by lead vocalist Jennifer Nettles, guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush, and guitarist Kristen Hall, all of whom had varying degrees of success in Atlanta's folk-rock scene (most notably, Bush was previously one-half of the duo Billy Pilgrim). Their debut album ''Twice the Speed of Life'' produced three Top 10 hits and sold double-platinum, and Nettles sang duet vocals on Music/BonJovi's first country release, "Who Says You Can't Go Home", which topped the country charts in summer 2006. Not even losing Hall after the first album seemed to slow them down, as their second album sold even better, and accounted for their first #1 hits, while also producing the SignatureSong "Stay", which won the duo two Grammy Awards and serious critical acclaim (and general praise for the risky nature of the single -- five-minute ballads with only acoustic guitar rarely fare so well). ''Love on the Inside'' fared almost as well as its predecessors, netting the duo three more #1 hits and becoming their first album to reach #1 on Top Country Albums. Despite this, some critics felt that the duo was introducing too many pop and rock elements to their music, in addition to relying too heavily on fluffy lightweight hooks (as exemplified by the massive LyricalShoehorn in "All I Want to Do"). Sugarland was also sweeping the Duo categories at the Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association, and seemed to be dethroning Music/BrooksAndDunn as the genre's biggest duo.\\\
Then came their fourth album, ''The Incredible Machine'', in 2010. While its lead single, the [[EarWorm insanely catchy]] "Stuck Like Glue", was a massive crossover and their highest-selling digital single, the album itself was met with mixed reception for its increasing acoustic-pop and arena-rock influences mixed with LighterAndSofter lyrics. The critcism of the duo straying too far from its country roots was only exacerbated through collaborations with Music/{{Rihanna}} and Matt Nathanson. "Tonight", the final single from the album, became their worst-performing single. The final nail in the coffin, however, wasn't anything related to the band's music or their members' behaviors, but rather ''bad weather'', as just before their performance at the Indiana State Fair in August 2011, a stage collapsed in high winds, killing seven and injuring 58. The duo were held as [[TheScapegoat scapegoats]] for the accident and found themselves at the head of several lawsuits, ultimately resulting in them paying a large chunk of settlements. After a small tour and a cut on the soundtrack to ''Film/ActOfValor'', they went on hiatus in 2012 due in part to Jennifer's pregnancy. Both members have continued to record solo material during the hiatus, but Sugarland's legacy anymore seems to be that of an act that started out strongly, only to grow too [[GenreRoulette experimental]] and too reliant on style over substance -- or worse, as the band who saw their careers "[[{{Pun}} blown away]]" by an unfortunate weather occurrence they had nothing to do with. Also damning is the fact that, since they went off the rails, no other duo has risen to take their place (though many have tried).

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* Music/{{Sugarland}} also seems went from being one of the hottest duos in country music to be headed this way.falling completely off the radar. The group was founded by lead vocalist Jennifer Nettles, guitarist/mandolinist Kristian Bush, and guitarist Kristen Hall, all of whom had varying degrees of success in Atlanta's folk-rock scene (most notably, Bush was previously one-half of the duo Billy Pilgrim). Their debut album ''Twice the Speed of Life'' produced three Top 10 hits and sold double-platinum, and Nettles sang duet vocals on Music/BonJovi's first country release, "Who Says You Can't Go Home", which topped the country charts in summer 2006. Not even losing Hall after the first album seemed to slow them down, as their second album sold even better, and accounted for their first #1 hits, while also producing the SignatureSong "Stay", which won the duo two Grammy Awards and serious critical acclaim (and general praise for the risky nature of the single -- five-minute ballads with only acoustic guitar rarely fare so well). ''Love on the Inside'' fared almost as well as its predecessors, netting the duo three more #1 hits and becoming their first album to reach #1 on Top Country Albums. Despite this, some critics felt that the duo was introducing too many pop and rock elements to their music, in addition to relying too heavily on fluffy lightweight hooks (as exemplified by the massive LyricalShoehorn in "All I Want to Do"). Sugarland was also sweeping the Duo categories at the Academy of Country Music and Country Music Association, and seemed to be dethroning Music/BrooksAndDunn as the genre's biggest duo.\\\
Then came their fourth album, ''The Incredible Machine'', in 2010. While its lead single, the [[EarWorm insanely catchy]] "Stuck Like Glue", was a massive crossover and their highest-selling digital single, the album itself was met with mixed reception for its increasing acoustic-pop and arena-rock influences mixed with LighterAndSofter lyrics.lyrics (elements that were starting to show on ''Love on the Inside''). The critcism of the duo straying too far from its country roots was only exacerbated through collaborations with Music/{{Rihanna}} and Matt Nathanson. "Tonight", the final single from the album, became their worst-performing single. The final nail in the coffin, however, wasn't anything related to the band's music or their members' behaviors, but rather ''bad weather'', as just before their performance at the Indiana State Fair in August 2011, a stage collapsed in high winds, killing seven and injuring 58. The duo were held as [[TheScapegoat scapegoats]] for the accident and found themselves at the head of several lawsuits, ultimately resulting in them paying a large chunk of settlements. After a small tour and a cut on the soundtrack to ''Film/ActOfValor'', they went on hiatus in 2012 due in part to Jennifer's pregnancy. Both members have continued to record solo material during the hiatus, but neither has been able to gain much traction independently, either. Sugarland's legacy anymore seems to be that of an act that started out strongly, only to grow too [[GenreRoulette experimental]] and too reliant on style over substance -- or worse, as the band who saw their careers "[[{{Pun}} blown away]]" by an unfortunate weather occurrence they had nothing to do with. Also damning is the fact that, since they went off the rails, no other duo has risen to take their place (though many have tried).
31st Aug '17 7:53:19 AM HotelCalifornia
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Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to hold a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped very hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\

to:

Unfortunately, as more attention was placed on her, the more the public began to notice her flaws. Her ongoing feud with the similarly-named Music/AzealiaBanks (who herself would end up being OvershadowedByControversy due to [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment things that we really don't need to talk about]]) reached ridiculous levels, she was being accused of [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy cultural appropriation]], and her aforementioned tweets got more attention from the public. Not helping matters was her complete inability to freestyle, which she showed on live television, and the revelation that "Fancy"'s massive success was due to [[AdoredByTheNetwork the media's attempt to turn her]] [[WolverinePublicity into the new face of hip-hop]] (Creator/ClearChannel [[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/07/15/clear-channels-on-the-verge-program-helped-make-iggy-azalea-a-star-heres-how-it-works/ forced their stations to play the song at least 150 times a week]]). It also gave a bad impression to people when she was starting to be marketed more as a pop star than an actual rapper. By that point, hatred was beginning to catch on with the mainstream. Whereas Minaj has managed to hold a consistently successful career despite also being well-hated by many, Azalea began to show real signs of trouble starting with, fittingly enough, her single "Trouble" featuring Jennifer Hudson, which failed to chart beyond #67. Her cameo and song appearances in the otherwise well-liked ''[[Film/TheFastAndTheFurious Furious 7]]'' were also criticized. The real kicker was "Pretty Girls", her collaboration with Music/BritneySpears, which flopped very hard despite being hyped as the "next song to tear up the ''Hot 100''", the general consensus being that it was a [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks boring retread of "Fancy"]] (a complaint also held against "Beg for It"). Apparently, the [[OverlyNarrowSuperlative oddly-specific style]] of "electro-hip-pop songs with music videos homaging chick flicks" could only be done so many times before it got stale. Soon afterwards, it was announced that her ''Great Escape'' concert tour, which was to be her first tour as an arena-sized act, was cancelled for "unknown reasons" (read: only a third of tickets were being sold).\\\



While the UK, who brought us "Do They Know" many years earlier, has continued to pump out multi-artist charity singles, many of which went to #1, the last American one of note was the 2010 "We Are The World" remake benefiting those affected by the Haitian earthquake, which, despite [[CriticProof peaking at #2 on the charts]], was widely panned by critics and [[FirstInstallmentWins considered inferior to the original version]]. Adding a rap verse, having autotuned parts courtesy of Akon, Lil Wayne, and T-Pain (all of whom became this trope after a few years), and giving parts to common targets of hatedom such as Music/MileyCyrus, Nick Jonas, and Music/JustinBieber, probably did not help, even though it also featured the likes of Tony Bennett, Music/BarbraStreisand and Music/CelineDion, as well as keeping the vocals of Music/MichaelJackson from the original as a tribute to him. It also held the distinction of being the lowest-rated song of all-time on Rate Your Music (at least, until "[[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement I'm with Her]]" by Le Tigre overtook it). Nowadays, even the original charity singles like "We Are the World" have been derided as egotistical-sounding glurgefests--the only song to really escape this is Band Aid's original recording of "Do They Know It's Christmas?", which may also be a divisive song but still enjoys airplay around Christmastime and otherwise doesn't share much of the tropes that sour many charity recordings; and even that song is accused of having a negative portrayal of Africa.


to:

While the UK, who brought us "Do They Know" many years earlier, has continued to pump out multi-artist charity singles, many of which went to #1, the last American one of note was the 2010 "We Are The World" remake benefiting those affected by the Haitian earthquake, which, despite [[CriticProof peaking at #2 on the charts]], was widely panned by critics and [[FirstInstallmentWins considered inferior to the original version]]. Adding a rap verse, having autotuned parts courtesy of Akon, Lil Wayne, and T-Pain (all of whom became this trope after a few years), and giving parts to common targets of hatedom such as Music/MileyCyrus, Nick Jonas, and Music/JustinBieber, probably did not help, even though it also featured the likes of Tony Bennett, Music/BarbraStreisand and Music/CelineDion, as well as keeping the vocals of Music/MichaelJackson from the original as a tribute to him. It also held the distinction of being the lowest-rated song of all-time on Rate Your Music (at least, until "[[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement I'm "I'm with Her]]" Her" by Le Tigre overtook it). Nowadays, even the original charity singles like "We Are the World" have been derided as egotistical-sounding glurgefests--the only song to really escape this is Band Aid's original recording of "Do They Know It's Christmas?", which may also be a divisive song but still enjoys airplay around Christmastime and otherwise doesn't share much of the tropes that sour many charity recordings; and even that song is accused of having a negative portrayal of Africa.




* Music/LimpBizkit started out in 1997 after they were discovered by [[Music/{{Korn}} Jonathan Davis]] and they dropped their debut ''Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$''. While it initially went unnoticed, they were able to get good word-of-mouth spread out through extensive touring, eventually going up to #22 on album charts. Their blend of metal and hip-hop combined with {{angst}}y lyrics and use of turntables was a winning combination for teens and young adults across the world, and brought NuMetal to the forefront of mainstream culture. They also performed at Woodstock '99, which ended in complete disaster, and the band's performance of "Break Stuff" was highly criticized as having fanned the flames of discontent among the crowd. Whether it truly was their fault or not is controversial, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and we'll just leave it at that]]. Still, this did nothing to hinder the sales of their sophomore album ''Significant Other'', which shot up to #1 and sold 7 million units in the US alone. Their fame skyrocketed even further when their following album ''Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water'' was released in 2000, which debuted at #1 with over 1 million copies sold in its first week and overall sold over 20 million units worldwide. Songs like "Nookie", "Break Stuff", "Re-Arranged", "My Way", "Take a Look Around", and "Rollin'" dominated the airwaves of rock radio. They even crossed over to urban radio with the [[Music/WuTangClan Method Man]]-backed "N 2 Gether Now". They were on top of the world, and while they never were critical darlings, [[CriticalDissonance their sales spoke differently]].\\\

to:

* Music/LimpBizkit started out in 1997 after they were discovered by [[Music/{{Korn}} Jonathan Davis]] and they dropped their debut ''Three Dollar Bill, Y'all$''. While it initially went unnoticed, they were able to get good word-of-mouth spread out through extensive touring, eventually going up to #22 on album charts. Their blend of metal and hip-hop combined with {{angst}}y lyrics and use of turntables was a winning combination for teens and young adults across the world, and brought NuMetal to the forefront of mainstream culture. They also performed at Woodstock '99, which ended in complete disaster, and the band's performance of "Break Stuff" was highly criticized as having fanned the flames of discontent among the crowd. Whether it truly was their fault or not is controversial, [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement and we'll just leave it at that]].controversial to this day. Still, this did nothing to hinder the sales of their sophomore album ''Significant Other'', which shot up to #1 and sold 7 million units in the US alone. Their fame skyrocketed even further when their following album ''Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water'' was released in 2000, which debuted at #1 with over 1 million copies sold in its first week and overall sold over 20 million units worldwide. Songs like "Nookie", "Break Stuff", "Re-Arranged", "My Way", "Take a Look Around", and "Rollin'" dominated the airwaves of rock radio. They even crossed over to urban radio with the [[Music/WuTangClan Method Man]]-backed "N 2 Gether Now". They were on top of the world, and while they never were critical darlings, [[CriticalDissonance their sales spoke differently]].\\\
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DeaderThanDisco.Music