History DarthWiki / FallenCreator

22nd Nov '17 4:56:52 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/ManfredTrenz was responsible for many beloved Commodore64 classics such as the ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' series, ''VideoGame/GreatGianaSisters'' and ''VideoGame/{{Katakis}}'', but his success practically died with the system. ''VideoGame/RenderingRanger'', a fine SNES game he worked on, was inexplicably [[NoExportForYou published only in Japan]]. An attempt to revive ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' in 3D failed. He formed his own studio, Creator/DenarisEntertainementSoftware, which then proceeded to make many [[SarcasmMode medium-changing masterpieces]] such as ''VideoGame/CrazyFrogRacers''. He's apparently working on a sequel to ''Videogame/{{Katakis}}'', but it is stuck in DevelopmentHell.

to:

* Creator/ManfredTrenz was responsible for many beloved Commodore64 UsefulNotes/Commodore64 classics such as the ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' series, ''VideoGame/GreatGianaSisters'' and ''VideoGame/{{Katakis}}'', but his success practically died with the system. ''VideoGame/RenderingRanger'', a fine SNES game he worked on, was inexplicably [[NoExportForYou published only in Japan]]. An attempt to revive ''VideoGame/{{Turrican}}'' in 3D failed. He formed his own studio, Creator/DenarisEntertainementSoftware, which then proceeded to make many [[SarcasmMode medium-changing masterpieces]] such as ''VideoGame/CrazyFrogRacers''. He's apparently working on a sequel to ''Videogame/{{Katakis}}'', but it is stuck in DevelopmentHell.
5th Nov '17 2:03:45 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Subverted by Creator/MartinScorsese, who had his own potentially career-ending ProtectionFromEditors-related bomb (the musical ''Film/NewYorkNewYork'') and drug-related meltdown in the late 1970s, but managed to claw his way back from it with ''Film/RagingBull'', which was critically acclaimed if not necessarily commercially successful. His early 1980s movies (''Film/TheKingOfComedy'', ''Film/AfterHours'', etc) were generally respectable even if they didn't set the world on fire, but ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' and ''Film/{{Goodfellas}}'' fully restored his reputation as one of America's best directors.
3rd Oct '17 8:11:38 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/WoodyAllen is a multi-talented actor, director, writer, and musician. (For example, he holds the record for most UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nominations for Best Screenplay -- fourteen.) First becoming famous as a stand-up comic in the 1960s, he went on to major film successes like ''Sleeper'', ''Bananas'', ''Film/AnnieHall'', ''Manhattan'', and ''Hannah And Her Sisters'' (among others) in the '70s and '80s. His films began to decline in prestige and commercial success in the 1990s; in fact audiences favoring his "early, funny" films were already a problem for him in TheEighties. Unfortunately, he also had a massive scandal in his personal life that [[NeverLiveItDown overshadowed]] much of his earlier work -- an affair with his long-time lover Mia Farrow's adopted daughter, Soon-Yi. Because he had known the girl since she was seven, it didn't matter very much that she was 22 at the time they married and that she was a legal adult when the relationship is believed to have begun, thus dogging him with jokes about pedophilia ever since. This ended his relationship with Farrow and also estranged him from one of their biological children in the aftermath. It didn't help that the real-life scandal caused audiences and critics to be more judgmental about his [[AuthorAppeal tendency]] to romantically pair his characters in films with ones played by very young actresses, although he's far from the only Hollywood offender there. Allen's films continued to decline, with several massive flops in the late '90s and 2000s, with minor bright spots in 2005's ''Match Point'', 2008's ''Film/VickyCristinaBarcelona'' and 2011's ''Film/MidnightInParis''. While he is prolific, with at least one new film each year since 1982, his glory days appear to be well behind him. It doesn't help that Woody Allen came out and supported Creator/RomanPolanski after the famous director was arrested for drugging and raping a thirteen year-old girl.

to:

* Creator/WoodyAllen is a multi-talented actor, director, writer, and musician. (For example, he holds the record for most UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nominations for Best Screenplay -- fourteen.) First becoming famous as a stand-up comic in the 1960s, he went on to major film successes like ''Sleeper'', ''Bananas'', ''Film/{{Sleeper}}'', ''Film/{{Bananas}}'', ''Film/AnnieHall'', ''Manhattan'', ''Film/{{Manhattan}}'', and ''Hannah And Her Sisters'' ''Film/HannahAndHerSisters'' (among others) in the '70s and '80s. His films began to decline in prestige and commercial success in the 1990s; in fact audiences favoring his "early, funny" films were already a problem for him in TheEighties. Unfortunately, he also had a massive scandal in his personal life that [[NeverLiveItDown overshadowed]] much of his earlier work -- an affair with his long-time lover Mia Farrow's adopted daughter, Soon-Yi. Because he had known the girl since she was seven, it didn't matter very much that she was 22 at the time they married and that she was a legal adult when the relationship is believed to have begun, thus dogging him with jokes about pedophilia ever since. This ended his relationship with Farrow and also estranged him from one of their biological children in the aftermath. It didn't help that the real-life scandal caused audiences and critics to be more judgmental about his [[AuthorAppeal tendency]] to romantically pair his characters in films with ones played by very young actresses, although he's far from the only Hollywood offender there. Allen's films continued to decline, with several massive flops in the late '90s and 2000s, with minor bright spots in 2005's ''Match Point'', ''Film/MatchPoint'', 2008's ''Film/VickyCristinaBarcelona'' and 2011's ''Film/MidnightInParis''. While he is prolific, with at least one new film each year since 1982, his glory days appear to be well behind him. It doesn't help that Woody Allen came out and supported Creator/RomanPolanski after the famous director was arrested for drugging and raping a thirteen year-old girl.
31st Jul '17 3:50:34 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* American [=McGee=] began as a level designer of the first two ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}'' installments, and later gave us [[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice his own grim take]] on a certain Creator/LewisCarroll classic and became an overnight superstar with even talks of movie deals for the property. Since then, he's never been anywhere near as popular, with his subsequent works being mostly ignored (''Scrapland'' got a [[SoOkayItsAverage lukewarm reception]] from players and critics, and ''VideoGame/BadDayLA.'' was [[SturgeonsLaw a pure trainwreck]]). ''VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesGrimm'' got a small amount of press and has done reasonably well on [=GameTap=], but still has yet to achieve the critical or commercial success that ''[[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice Alice]]'' had, which might explain why he chose to create a sequel, ''VideoGame/AliceMadnessReturns'', which has received reviews ranging from fairly positive to lukewarm, although it can hardly be credited as a full return to form.

to:

* American [=McGee=] began as a level designer of the first two ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Quake}}'' installments, and later gave us [[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice his own grim take]] on a certain Creator/LewisCarroll classic and became an overnight superstar with even talks of movie deals for the property. Since then, he's never been anywhere near as popular, with his subsequent works being mostly ignored (''Scrapland'' (''VideoGame/{{Scrapland}}'' got a [[SoOkayItsAverage lukewarm reception]] from players and critics, and ''VideoGame/BadDayLA.'' was [[SturgeonsLaw a pure trainwreck]]). ''VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesGrimm'' got a small amount of press and has done reasonably well on [=GameTap=], but still has yet to achieve the critical or commercial success that ''[[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice Alice]]'' had, which might explain why he chose to create a sequel, ''VideoGame/AliceMadnessReturns'', which has received reviews ranging from fairly positive to lukewarm, although it can hardly be credited as a full return to form.
29th Jul '17 9:48:41 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Between the three of them, the trio of "Zucker Abrahams Zucker" (affectionately nicknamed "ZAZ") did ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'', ''Film/{{Airplane}}'', ''Series/PoliceSquad'', and ''Film/TheNakedGun''. They started splitting up after the first ''[[Film/TheNakedGun Naked Gun]]'' film and separately, all three of them have declined into this trope. Jerry Zucker's last film was the critically panned and mostly forgotten ''Film/RatRace'', after which he appears to have retired entirely, Jim Abrahams and David Zucker are stuck with ''Film/ScaryMovie 4'', and David Zucker had the high-profile flop ''Film/AnAmericanCarol'' (an {{Anvilicious}} parody whose protagonist was a StrawmanPolitical Creator/MichaelMoore {{expy}}). That last one notably tried to play up his earlier success from ''Airplane!'', which caused the few critics that actually saw it (it [[NotScreenedForCritics wasn't screened for critics]]) to remark on how terrible it was in comparison to his earlier movies and how unfunny he has been since.

to:

* Between the three of them, the trio of "Zucker Abrahams Zucker" (affectionately nicknamed "ZAZ") did ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'', ''Film/{{Airplane}}'', ''Series/PoliceSquad'', and ''Film/TheNakedGun''. They started splitting up after the first ''[[Film/TheNakedGun Naked Gun]]'' film and separately, all three of them have declined into this trope. Jerry Zucker's last film was the critically panned and mostly forgotten ''Film/RatRace'', after which he appears to have retired entirely, Jim Abrahams and David Zucker are stuck with ''Film/ScaryMovie 4'', ''Film/ScaryMovie4'', and David Zucker had the high-profile flop ''Film/AnAmericanCarol'' (an {{Anvilicious}} parody whose protagonist was a StrawmanPolitical Creator/MichaelMoore {{expy}}). That last one notably tried to play up his earlier success from ''Airplane!'', which caused the few critics that actually saw it (it [[NotScreenedForCritics wasn't screened for critics]]) to remark on how terrible it was in comparison to his earlier movies and how unfunny he has been since.



* John Landis, the director of ''Film/AnimalHouse'', ''Film/TheBluesBrothers'', ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'', ''Film/TradingPlaces'' and the video for Music/MichaelJackson's "Thriller", suffered one of the grislier disgraces on this list. While he was filming a segment for the ''Film/TwilightZoneTheMovie'' anthology movie, a special effect went wrong, and a crashing helicopter [[FatalMethodActing killed actor Vic Morrow and two illegally employed child actors]]. Landis shook off criminal charges in a highly publicized court case, but the accident was a serious blow to Landis's career.\\

to:

* John Landis, Creator/JohnLandis, the director of ''Film/AnimalHouse'', ''Film/TheBluesBrothers'', ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'', ''Film/TradingPlaces'' and the video for Music/MichaelJackson's "Thriller", suffered one of the grislier disgraces on this list. While he was filming a segment for the ''Film/TwilightZoneTheMovie'' anthology movie, a special effect went wrong, and a crashing helicopter [[FatalMethodActing killed actor Vic Morrow and two illegally employed child actors]]. Landis shook off criminal charges in a highly publicized court case, but the accident was a serious blow to Landis's career.\\



* Another writer-director who took a fall was Creator/BlakeEdwards. He established himself in the late 1950s/early '60s with ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'', ''Days of Wine and Roses'', ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' series, etc. He hit rough waters later (the biggest flop of his being ''Darling Lili''), but the Pink Panther series revival in 1975 brought him back around, and his non-Panther films (especially ''"10"'' and ''Victor/Victoria'') were well-received too. He even managed to write and direct a [[RomanAClef thinly fictionalized]] TakeThat to Hollywood (''S.O.B.'') for his earlier treatment during this period. Then Creator/PeterSellers, who played Inspector Clouseau in the Panthers, died -- and Edwards made ''Trail of...'' using [[ClipShow outtakes and flashbacks of Sellers]], and ''Curse of...'' using a ReplacementScrappy. Critics were appalled, Edwards and United Artists were sued by Sellers' widow over ''Trail'', and both were box-office underachievers. Edwards made a lot of movies over the next ten years, but to diminishing returns, to the point that ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' once made a joke where a "brainwashing" machine says "Creator/BlakeEdwards makes a really good film..." He did receive an Honorary Oscar in 2004, though.
* Creator/PeterSellers himself was this for a time. In 1964, he was an acclaimed actor with the success of ''Literature/TheMouseThatRoared'', ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' and ''Film/DrStrangelove''. But then he suffered a series of heart attacks. While his first post-attack film, ''What's New Pussycat'', was a hit, ''After the Fox'' was a disappointment, and his behavior on the set of ''Film/CasinoRoyale1967'' was so infamous that the producer and Columbia Pictures blamed him for many, if not most, of its problems. His difficult nature and disappointing films made him almost DeaderThanDisco (particularly with American studios) until the Pink Panther revival and ''Film/BeingThere'' turned things around, an example of how the fallen can be redeemed. He looked to be on the verge of throwing it all away again with 1980's disastrous ''The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu'', but in a piece of incredibly good timing, he died a month before it was released.

to:

* Another writer-director who took a fall was Creator/BlakeEdwards. He established himself in the late 1950s/early '60s with ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'', ''Days of Wine and Roses'', ''Film/DaysOfWineAndRoses'', ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' series, etc. He hit rough waters later (the biggest flop of his being ''Darling Lili''), ''Film/DarlingLili''), but the Pink Panther series revival in 1975 brought him back around, and his non-Panther films (especially ''"10"'' ''Film/{{Ten}}'' and ''Victor/Victoria'') ''Film/VictorVictoria'') were well-received too. He even managed to write and direct a [[RomanAClef thinly fictionalized]] TakeThat to Hollywood (''S.O.B.'') (''Film/{{SOB}}'') for his earlier treatment during this period. Then Creator/PeterSellers, who played Inspector Clouseau in the Panthers, died -- and Edwards made ''Trail of...'' using [[ClipShow outtakes and flashbacks of Sellers]], and ''Curse of...'' using a ReplacementScrappy. Critics were appalled, Edwards and United Artists were sued by Sellers' widow over ''Trail'', and both were box-office underachievers. Edwards made a lot of movies over the next ten years, but to diminishing returns, to the point that ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' once made a joke where a "brainwashing" machine says "Creator/BlakeEdwards makes a really good film..." He did receive an Honorary Oscar in 2004, though.
* Creator/PeterSellers himself was this for a time. In 1964, he was an acclaimed actor with the success of ''Literature/TheMouseThatRoared'', ''Franchise/ThePinkPanther'' and ''Film/DrStrangelove''. But then he suffered a series of heart attacks. While his first post-attack film, ''What's New Pussycat'', ''Film/WhatsNewPussycat'', was a hit, ''After the Fox'' was a disappointment, and his behavior on the set of ''Film/CasinoRoyale1967'' was so infamous that the producer and Columbia Pictures blamed him for many, if not most, of its problems. His difficult nature and disappointing films made him almost DeaderThanDisco (particularly with American studios) until the Pink Panther revival and ''Film/BeingThere'' turned things around, an example of how the fallen can be redeemed. He looked to be on the verge of throwing it all away again with 1980's disastrous ''The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu'', ''Film/TheFiendishPlotOfDrFuManchu'', but in a piece of incredibly good timing, he died a month before it was released.



** Michael Cimino went from ''Film/TheDeerHunter'', the Best Picture Oscar winner of 1978, to ''Heaven's Gate'' just two years later. Its failure was so catastrophic that, as noted at GenreTurningPoint, it ruined United Artists as a stand-alone studio and turned Hollywood off the Western for a decade or more. A while later, Paramount signed Cimino to direct ''Film/{{Footloose}}'', but when filming was to have started he demanded more time and money from the producers, who fired him. He hasn't worked much since.
** The career of William Friedkin, director of ''Film/TheFrenchConnection'' and ''Film/TheExorcist'', never really recovered after ''Sorcerer'', in spite of its positive reception from critics, flopped at the box office on release in 1977. (It didn't help that it was completely overshadowed by [[Film/ANewHope a little film which came out right around the same time...]]). Add his reputation as a BadBoss PrimaDonnaDirector...
** Hal Ashby, after creating classics such as ''Film/HaroldAndMaude'', ''Coming Home'', ''Shampoo'', and ''Film/BeingThere'', made a string of critical and commercial failures in the '80s, ruining his reputation, until he couldn't find work anymore. He was dogged by rumors that he'd become an unreliably eccentric drug casualty, but a biography (''Being Hal Ashby'' by Nick Dawson) suggests that this was mostly malicious gossip spread in retaliation for his fighting back against ExecutiveMeddling. Ashby smoked epic amounts of weed and loved his booze, but it was his workaholic and perfectionist tendencies and unwillingness to compromise that really hurt his reputation in Hollywood. He died from cancer in 1988 just as he was starting to make a comeback.
** Creator/RobertAltman began the 1970s with the success of ''Film/{{Mash}}'' in 1970 and ''Nashville'' in 1975, two films which epitomised New Hollywood, and had influence far beyond their box office take. He then spent the rest of his directorial career falling and rising and falling again in twenty-year cycles. His work in the rest of the 1970s left the box office cold, and eventually turned off the critics; several of his films from the late 1970s and early 1980s remain unavailable on DVD as of 2010. He began the 80s with a disastrous musical version of ''Film/{{Popeye}}'' starring Robin Williams, and was forced to work in television for a while, until ''Film/ThePlayer'' and ''Short Cuts'' in 1992 and 1993 rehabilitated him; he threw it away with 1994's ''Pret-a-Porter'', but seemed to be coming back into fashion when he died in 2006.
** Peter Bogdanovich was compared to Creator/OrsonWelles with ''The Last Picture Show'', and succeeded it with the successful comedy ''What's Up, Doc?'' and the equally acclaimed ''Paper Moon''. It all went downhill from there, with the negative reception of ''Daisy Miller'' and ''Nickelodeon'' being the decisive points (1985's ''Film/{{Mask}}'' being his sole bright spot afterwards).
** Subverted by Creator/MartinScorsese, who had his own potentially career-ending ProtectionFromEditors-related bomb (the musical ''New York New York'') and drug-related meltdown in the late 1970s, but managed to claw his way back from it with ''Film/RagingBull'', which was critically acclaimed if not necessarily commercially successful. His early 1980s movies (''The King of Comedy'', ''After Hours'', etc) were generally respectable even if they didn't set the world on fire, but ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' and ''Film/{{Goodfellas}}'' fully restored his reputation as one of America's best directors.
* Creator/TomCruise is a pretty severe self-inflicted case of this. During the '80s and '90s, he was a renowned, charismatic movie star, but that changed over the course of the 2000s as he started acting increasingly unbalanced in public. Things did not seem so bad at first, but once he became the latest "Current Main Face of [[ChurchOfHappyology Scientology]] in Hollywood" things (and, seemingly, Cruise) [[YoureInsane went off the deep end]]. He became more known for some of his infamous stunts (particularly the notorious "couch jumping incident" on ''Series/TheOprahWinfreyShow'') and, more seriously, his embracing and promoting of Scientology's hard-line approach to mental illness and psychiatry. He nabbed some particularly bad publicity after suggesting that actress Creator/BrookeShields, who had revealed the depths of her battle with postpartum depression, "[[ArtisticLicenseMedicine just needed vitamins]]". His diva antics on the set of ''Film/MissionImpossible 3'', the film's astronomical budget, and the demand that Scientology be permitted to set up tents on all filming sites, did not go over well with Paramount either. Though the film somehow survived the box office (mostly it was Creator/JJAbrams and Philip Seymour Hoffman), his reputation didn't. It remains to be seen whether Cruise can ever reclaim his mega-stardom instead of just being known as a couch-jumping nutcase.
** Cruise seems to have regained a modicum of respect after PlayingAgainstType gloriously in ''Film/TropicThunder'', but that was a small-ish role for a star like him. His own production from UA (which he bought after Paramount dumped him) was flop after flop.
** Even a little before ''Tropic Thunder'', he started taking a few good roles (he got some critical love for ''Film/{{Valkyrie}}''), and went more moderate on the Scientology angle.
** Thanks to well-received roles in ''[[Film/MissionImpossible Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol]]'' and ''Film/{{Oblivion 2013}}'', Cruise managed a true CareerResurrection and became a bankable star once again. He is now set to headline the hotly-anticipated ''Edge Of Tomorrow'' and ''Mission: Impossible 5'', and with several more projects in the pipeline (including ''[[Film/TopGun Top Gun 2]]'') he doesn't appear to be slowing down anytime soon.
* Writer/director Creator/JohnHughes was the man who practically defined 1980s pop cinema. He hit it big right out of the gate with his teen-oriented smash-hits like ''Film/SixteenCandles'', ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'', ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'', and ''Film/PrettyInPink''. He hit a plateau with ''Film/PlanesTrainsAndAutomobiles'' and began a slow slide downward with mediocre but more dramatic films like ''Film/SomeKindOfWonderful''. He had his last major success with ''Film/HomeAlone'' and its sequel, before bombing with a string of lowbrow flops in the '90s, including ''Curly Sue'', ''Baby's Day Out'', the SoOkayItsAverage ''Home Alone 3'', and a major holiday flop with his ''Film/MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet'' remake; his biggest hits were the live-action ''Disney/OneHundredAndOneDalmatians'' and ''Film/{{Flubber}}'', the remake of classic Disney film ''The Absent Minded Professor''. ''Flubber'' was a critical disaster, but still financially successful. After 2001, he wrote scripts for the direct-to-video ''Beethoven'' sequels and a couple minor hits (''Maid in Manhattan'' and ''Drillbit Taylor'') under the pseudonym of "Edmond Dantes" until his death in 2009.
* Creator/KevinSmith looked to be heading this way after ''Film/JayAndSilentBobStrikeBack'' flopped and ''Film/JerseyGirl'' was loathed even by his die-hard fans (his statements that the film [[NotScreenedForCritics wasn't for critics]] didn't help either). He seems to have recovered with the more successful ''Film/ClerksII''.
** And despite the again-lackluster box office returns, ''Film/ZackAndMiriMakeAPorno'' was critically well-received. However, ''Film/CopOut'', the first film which he directed but did not write, was critically panned. This, together with the now-infamous "airline incident" that occurred shortly before the release of ''Cop Out'' (which, although he ''was'' totally screwed over by the airline, he managed to handle the situation very poorly), has led to Smith's reputation plummeting spectacularly among film fans. Although it remains to be seen whether Smith has well and truly squandered his loyal fanbase, these two incidents (particularly the airline incident) have clearly caused irreparable damage to his reputation.
*** His next film, ''Red State'', could make up for those incidents as it is a return to his writer/director roots and features a a fairly strong cast. However, it is a horror/thriller type movie, a genre he has never before dabbled in. Only time will tell.
*** Smith eventually got it in the news for another incident over the film rights of ''Red State''. After a bizarre introduction featuring Wayne Gretzky's stick and lots of profanity, he held an auction in which he stopped it after submitting his own bid for $20 and announced he would self-distribute. After this display of egotism, many distributors were angry and have possibly severed ties with the director.
** Smith also dabbles in the occasional writing of comic books over at DC & [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], where his stuff was already controversial. His next project, ''Batman: Widening Gyre'', was already receiving low reviews when Smith wrote out a scene where Batman flashes back to his confrontation of the crime bosses in the mansion during ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne''. Said scene "revealed" that when Batman used explosives to blow open a wall, the shock made him.... soil himself in his costume. What little respect people had for the book instantly vanished after that.
*** It also didn't help that he wrote a scene where The Joker raped Harley Quinn. First of all The Joker is about as sexually aggressive as turnip in literally every incarnation, second it shows that he understands the character even less than Tim Burton and third why the hell would you think this would remotely make sense?
*** Meanwhile, over at [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], he penned ''ComicBook/{{Daredevil}}'' for a time - a run that included killing over steady girlfriend Karen Page and villain Mysterio. The latter is particularly irksome because Mysterio is a long-time ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' villain and his motivation for going after Daredevil was never very clear. [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]] editors have since admitted that they didn't rein in Smith like they would've for other writers. Also, his ''Spider-Man/Black Cat'' miniseries, which suffered from severe ScheduleSlip. It was originally a four-parter, but it took ''several years'' for Part 4 to come out. (And by that time, the mini was given [[{{Padding}} a couple extra parts]] - most likely to justify the long wait.) And by the time it wrapped, the book was ''also'' not well-received because it retconned Black Cat's backstory so that she took up a life of theft because she was unable to kill the guy who raped her in college.

to:

** Michael Cimino Creator/MichaelCimino went from ''Film/TheDeerHunter'', the Best Picture Oscar winner of 1978, to ''Heaven's Gate'' ''Film/HeavensGate'' just two years later. Its failure was so catastrophic that, as noted at GenreTurningPoint, it ruined United Artists as a stand-alone studio and turned Hollywood off the Western for a decade or more. A while later, Paramount signed Cimino to direct ''Film/{{Footloose}}'', but when filming was to have started he demanded more time and money from the producers, who fired him. He hasn't worked much since.
** The career of William Friedkin, Creator/WilliamFriedkin, director of ''Film/TheFrenchConnection'' and ''Film/TheExorcist'', never really recovered after ''Sorcerer'', ''Film/{{Sorcerer}}'', in spite of its positive reception from critics, flopped at the box office on release in 1977. (It didn't help that it was completely overshadowed by [[Film/ANewHope a little film which came out right around the same time...]]). Add his reputation as a BadBoss PrimaDonnaDirector...
** Hal Ashby, Creator/HalAshby, after creating classics such as ''Film/HaroldAndMaude'', ''Coming Home'', ''Shampoo'', ''Film/ComingHome'', ''Film/{{Shampoo}}'', and ''Film/BeingThere'', made a string of critical and commercial failures in the '80s, ruining his reputation, until he couldn't find work anymore. He was dogged by rumors that he'd become an unreliably eccentric drug casualty, but a biography (''Being Hal Ashby'' by Nick Dawson) suggests that this was mostly malicious gossip spread in retaliation for his fighting back against ExecutiveMeddling. Ashby smoked epic amounts of weed and loved his booze, but it was his workaholic and perfectionist tendencies and unwillingness to compromise that really hurt his reputation in Hollywood. He died from cancer in 1988 just as he was starting to make a comeback.
** Creator/RobertAltman began the 1970s with the success of ''Film/{{Mash}}'' in 1970 and ''Nashville'' ''Film/{{Nashville}}'' in 1975, two films which epitomised New Hollywood, and had influence far beyond their box office take. He then spent the rest of his directorial career falling and rising and falling again in twenty-year cycles. His work in the rest of the 1970s left the box office cold, and eventually turned off the critics; several of his films from the late 1970s and early 1980s remain unavailable on DVD as of 2010. He began the 80s with a disastrous musical version of ''Film/{{Popeye}}'' starring Robin Williams, Creator/RobinWilliams, and was forced to work in television for a while, until ''Film/ThePlayer'' and ''Short Cuts'' in 1992 and 1993 rehabilitated him; he threw it away with 1994's ''Pret-a-Porter'', but seemed to be coming back into fashion when he died in 2006.
** Peter Bogdanovich Creator/PeterBogdanovich was compared to Creator/OrsonWelles with ''The Last Picture Show'', ''Film/TheLastPictureShow'', and succeeded it with the successful comedy ''What's Up, Doc?'' ''Film/WhatsUpDoc'' and the equally acclaimed ''Paper Moon''. ''Film/PaperMoon''. It all went downhill from there, with the negative reception of ''Daisy Miller'' ''Film/DaisyMiller'' and ''Nickelodeon'' ''Film/{{Nickelodeon}}'' being the decisive points (1985's ''Film/{{Mask}}'' being his sole bright spot afterwards).
** Subverted by Creator/MartinScorsese, who had his own potentially career-ending ProtectionFromEditors-related bomb (the musical ''New York New York'') ''Film/NewYorkNewYork'') and drug-related meltdown in the late 1970s, but managed to claw his way back from it with ''Film/RagingBull'', which was critically acclaimed if not necessarily commercially successful. His early 1980s movies (''The King of Comedy'', ''After Hours'', (''Film/TheKingOfComedy'', ''Film/AfterHours'', etc) were generally respectable even if they didn't set the world on fire, but ''Film/TheLastTemptationOfChrist'' and ''Film/{{Goodfellas}}'' fully restored his reputation as one of America's best directors.
* Creator/TomCruise is a pretty severe self-inflicted case of this. During the '80s and '90s, he was a renowned, charismatic movie star, but that changed over the course of the 2000s as he started acting increasingly unbalanced in public. Things did not seem so bad at first, but once he became the latest "Current Main Face of [[ChurchOfHappyology Scientology]] in Hollywood" things (and, seemingly, Cruise) [[YoureInsane went off the deep end]]. He became more known for some of his infamous stunts (particularly the notorious "couch jumping incident" on ''Series/TheOprahWinfreyShow'') and, more seriously, his embracing and promoting of Scientology's hard-line approach to mental illness and psychiatry. He nabbed some particularly bad publicity after suggesting that actress Creator/BrookeShields, who had revealed the depths of her battle with postpartum depression, "[[ArtisticLicenseMedicine just needed vitamins]]". His diva antics on the set of ''Film/MissionImpossible 3'', the film's astronomical budget, and the demand that Scientology be permitted to set up tents on all filming sites, did not go over well with Paramount either. Though the film somehow survived the box office (mostly it was Creator/JJAbrams and Philip Seymour Hoffman), his reputation didn't. It remains to be seen whether Cruise can ever reclaim his mega-stardom instead of just being known as a couch-jumping nutcase.
** Cruise seems to have regained a modicum of respect after PlayingAgainstType gloriously in ''Film/TropicThunder'', but that was a small-ish role for a star like him. His own production from UA (which he bought after Paramount dumped him) was flop after flop.
** Even a little before ''Tropic Thunder'', he started taking a few good roles (he got some critical love for ''Film/{{Valkyrie}}''), and went more moderate on the Scientology angle.
** Thanks to well-received roles in ''[[Film/MissionImpossible Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol]]'' and ''Film/{{Oblivion 2013}}'', Cruise managed a true CareerResurrection and became a bankable star once again. He is now set to headline the hotly-anticipated ''Edge Of Tomorrow'' and ''Mission: Impossible 5'', and with several more projects in the pipeline (including ''[[Film/TopGun Top Gun 2]]'') he doesn't appear to be slowing down anytime soon.
* Writer/director Creator/JohnHughes was the man who practically defined 1980s pop cinema. He hit it big right out of the gate with his teen-oriented smash-hits like ''Film/SixteenCandles'', ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'', ''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff'', and ''Film/PrettyInPink''. He hit a plateau with ''Film/PlanesTrainsAndAutomobiles'' and began a slow slide downward with mediocre but more dramatic films like ''Film/SomeKindOfWonderful''. He had his last major success with ''Film/HomeAlone'' and its sequel, before bombing with a string of lowbrow flops in the '90s, including ''Curly Sue'', ''Baby's Day Out'', ''Film/CurlySue'', ''Film/BabysDayOut'', the SoOkayItsAverage ''Home Alone 3'', and a major holiday flop with his ''Film/MiracleOnThirtyFourthStreet'' remake; his biggest hits were the live-action ''Disney/OneHundredAndOneDalmatians'' ''Film/OneHundredAndOneDalmatians'' and ''Film/{{Flubber}}'', the remake of classic Disney film ''The Absent Minded Professor''.''Film/TheAbsentMindedProfessor''. ''Flubber'' was a critical disaster, but still financially successful. After 2001, he wrote scripts for the direct-to-video ''Beethoven'' ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' sequels and a couple minor hits (''Maid in Manhattan'' (''Film/MaidInManhattan'' and ''Drillbit Taylor'') ''Film/DrillbitTaylor'') under the pseudonym of "Edmond Dantes" until his death in 2009.
* Creator/KevinSmith looked to be is almost permanently in danger of heading this way after ''Film/JayAndSilentBobStrikeBack'' flopped and since the mid-2000s in spite of his rather rabid fanbase. After a mostly succesful ten-year career making indie comedies, his attempts to make movies outside of Franchise/TheViewAskewniverse have usually been met with mixed-to-negative reactions. ''Film/JerseyGirl'' was loathed even by his die-hard fans (his statements that the film [[NotScreenedForCritics wasn't for critics]] didn't help either). He seems to have recovered with Then ''Film/ClerksII'', another View Askew work, made the more successful ''Film/ClerksII''.
**
fans happy again for a while. And despite the again-lackluster box office returns, ''Film/ZackAndMiriMakeAPorno'' was critically well-received. However, ''Film/CopOut'', the first film which he directed but did not write, was critically panned. This, together panned and is only remembered for the documented HostilityOnTheSet with the now-infamous "airline incident" that occurred shortly before the release Creator/BruceWillis. ''Film/RedState'', a religious horror film outside of ''Cop Out'' (which, although he ''was'' totally screwed over by the airline, he managed to handle the situation very poorly), has led to Smith's reputation plummeting spectacularly among film fans. Although it remains to be seen whether Smith has well usual forte, was once again well-received, especially because of Michael Parks' performance as [[SinisterMinister Pastor Abin Cooper]]. His subsequent films, ''Film/{{Tusk}}'' and truly squandered his loyal fanbase, these two incidents (particularly the airline incident) ''Film/YogaHosers'' have clearly caused irreparable damage again been met with either disinterest or derision. He's also attracted some negative attention due to his reputation.
*** His next film, ''Red State'', could make up for those incidents as it is a return to his writer/director roots and features a a fairly strong cast. However, it is a horror/thriller type movie, a genre he has never before dabbled in. Only time will tell.
*** Smith eventually got it in the news for another
poor handling of an incident with Southwest Airlines and a bizarre self-adulating stunt over the film distribution rights of to ''Red State''. After a bizarre introduction featuring Wayne Gretzky's stick and lots of profanity, he held an auction in which he stopped it after submitting his own bid for $20 and announced he would self-distribute. After this display of egotism, many distributors were angry and have possibly severed ties with the director.
** Smith also dabbles in the
His occasional comic book writing of comic books over at DC & [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], where his stuff was already controversial. His next project, ''Batman: Widening Gyre'', was already receiving low reviews when Smith wrote out a scene where Batman flashes back to his confrontation of the crime bosses in the mansion during ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne''. Said scene "revealed" that when Batman used explosives to blow open a wall, the shock made him.... soil himself in his costume. What little respect people had for the book instantly vanished after that.
*** It
both DC and Marvel has also didn't help that he wrote a scene where The Joker raped Harley Quinn. First of all The Joker is about as sexually aggressive as turnip in literally every incarnation, second it shows that he understands the character even less than Tim Burton and third why the hell would you think this would remotely make sense?
*** Meanwhile, over at [[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]], he penned ''ComicBook/{{Daredevil}}''
generated criticism for a time - a run that included killing over steady girlfriend Karen Page and villain Mysterio. The latter is particularly irksome because Mysterio is a long-time ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' villain and his motivation for going after Daredevil was never very clear. [[Creator/MarvelComics controversial handling of several different characters ([[Creator/MarvelComics Marvel]] editors have since admitted that they didn't rein in Smith like they would've for other writers. Also, his ''Spider-Man/Black Cat'' miniseries, which suffered from severe ScheduleSlip. It was originally a four-parter, but it took ''several years'' for Part 4 to come out. (And by that time, the mini was given [[{{Padding}} a couple extra parts]] - most likely to justify the long wait.) And by the time it wrapped, the book was ''also'' not well-received because it retconned Black Cat's backstory so that she took up a life of theft because she was unable to kill the guy who raped her in college.writers) and ScheduleSlip.



* Creator/JoelSchumacher had some acclaimed films in TheEighties and TheNineties, such as ''Film/TheLostBoys'', ''St. Elmo's Fire'', and ''Film/FallingDown''. Yet when he's the director chosen by Warner Bros to turn Franchise/{{Batman}} LighterAndSofter... while ''Film/BatmanForever'' made some money while [[LoveItOrHateIt dividing people]], the dreadful ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'' led him to picking lower budget films, most of which were failures (the critically acclaimed ''Tigerland'' and the critical and commercial hit ''Film/PhoneBooth'' being exceptions). The next big-budget film he directed, ''Film/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', met with popular approval, but critics denounced it as overproduced and badly directed. (The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, but not for Best Director or Best Picture.) It is too soon to tell if the Creator/NicolasCage[=/=]Creator/NicoleKidman thriller ''Trespass'' will restore his career after such forgettable flops as ''The Number 23'' and ''Film/{{Twelve}}'' (but since''Trespass'' got a video-on-demand release ''the same day'' as its (very) limited theatrical release and hit cinemas with a DVD date already set, probably not).

to:

* Creator/JoelSchumacher had some acclaimed films in TheEighties and TheNineties, such as ''Film/TheLostBoys'', ''St. Elmo's Fire'', ''Film/StElmosFire'', and ''Film/FallingDown''. Yet when he's the director chosen by Warner Bros to turn Franchise/{{Batman}} LighterAndSofter... while ''Film/BatmanForever'' made some money while [[LoveItOrHateIt dividing people]], the dreadful ''Film/BatmanAndRobin'' led him to picking lower budget films, most of which were failures (the critically acclaimed ''Tigerland'' and the critical and commercial hit ''Film/PhoneBooth'' being exceptions). The next big-budget film he directed, ''Film/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', met with popular approval, but critics denounced it as overproduced and badly directed. (The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, but not for Best Director or Best Picture.) It is too soon to tell if the Creator/NicolasCage[=/=]Creator/NicoleKidman thriller ''Trespass'' ''Film/{{Trespass}}'' will restore his career after such forgettable flops as ''The Number 23'' ''Film/TheNumber23'' and ''Film/{{Twelve}}'' (but since''Trespass'' got a video-on-demand release ''the same day'' as its (very) limited theatrical release and hit cinemas with a DVD date already set, probably not).



* The Wachowskis have been lurching dangerously towards this status over the last few years. After a modest start with ''Film/{{Bound|1996}}'' (which didn't do all that well at the box office but performed pretty nicely in the VHS market, no doubt due to the volume of LesYay it featured) they hit it big with ''Film/TheMatrix'', which many acclaimed for "revolutionizing" the action genre. Since then, it's been a gradual downwards slope. ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'' did pretty well at the box office, but there was a nagging feeling among viewers that it should have been a '''lot''' better, and later that year ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions'' was widely slammed as being [[MindScrew nigh-incomprehensible]] as well as being a poor conclusion to the series, and did only moderately well at the box office. ''Film/VForVendetta'' saw a brief return to form (although they didn't direct it), but since then it's been downhill all the way, as they helped to produce a butchered re-edit of ''[[InvasionOfTheBodySnatchers The Invasion]]'', had a major money loser with ''Film/SpeedRacer'' and their following production, ''Film/NinjaAssassin'' sank without a trace at the box office.

to:

* The Wachowskis Creator/TheWachowskis have been lurching dangerously towards this status over the last few years. After a modest start with ''Film/{{Bound|1996}}'' (which didn't do all that well at the box office but performed pretty nicely in the VHS market, no doubt due to the volume of LesYay lesbianism it featured) they hit it big with ''Film/TheMatrix'', which many acclaimed for "revolutionizing" the action genre. Since then, it's been a gradual downwards slope. ''Film/TheMatrixReloaded'' did pretty well at the box office, but there was a nagging feeling among viewers that it should have been a '''lot''' better, and later that year ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions'' was widely slammed as being [[MindScrew nigh-incomprehensible]] as well as being a poor conclusion to the series, and did only moderately well at the box office. ''Film/VForVendetta'' saw a brief return to form (although they didn't direct it), but since then it's been downhill all the way, as they helped to produce a butchered re-edit of ''[[InvasionOfTheBodySnatchers The Invasion]]'', ''Film/TheInvasion'', had a major money loser with ''Film/SpeedRacer'' and their following production, ''Film/NinjaAssassin'' sank without a trace at the box office. office.



* John [=McTiernan=] was one of the biggest action directors of the late 1980s and early '90s with films such as ''Film/DieHard'', ''Film/{{Predator}}'', and ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober''. It was pretty hit or miss after that with ''Film/MedicineMan'' and ''Film/LastActionHero'' both underperforming and getting mixed reviews. [=McTiernan=] made "good again" by returning to direct the third ''Die Hard'' film in 1995. Unfortunately, this was followed by the massive financial flop that was ''Film/{{The 13th Warrior}}''. The remake of ''Film/TheThomasCrownAffair'' was [=McTiernan=]'s last "real" hit. What followed was extremely harshly recieved (not only financially, but critically) remake of ''Film/{{Rollerball}}''. [=McTiernan=]'s next film (and his final film to date), ''Film/{{Basic}}'', despite the presence of Creator/JohnTravolta and Creator/SamuelLJackson also received mostly negative reviews. After that, [=McTiernan=] was in the news more for his criminal conviction in the Anthony Pellicano wiretapping scandal than for his movies.

to:

* John [=McTiernan=] Creator/JohnMcTiernan was one of the biggest action directors of the late 1980s and early '90s with films such as ''Film/DieHard'', ''Film/{{Predator}}'', and ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober''. It was pretty hit or miss after that with ''Film/MedicineMan'' and ''Film/LastActionHero'' both underperforming and getting mixed reviews. [=McTiernan=] made "good again" by returning to direct the third ''Die Hard'' film in 1995. Unfortunately, this was followed by the massive financial flop that was ''Film/{{The 13th Warrior}}''. The remake of ''Film/TheThomasCrownAffair'' was [=McTiernan=]'s last "real" hit. What followed was extremely harshly recieved (not only financially, but critically) remake of ''Film/{{Rollerball}}''. [=McTiernan=]'s next film (and his final film to date), ''Film/{{Basic}}'', despite the presence of Creator/JohnTravolta and Creator/SamuelLJackson also received mostly negative reviews. After that, [=McTiernan=] was in the news more for his criminal conviction in the Anthony Pellicano wiretapping scandal than for his movies.



* Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Burt Reynolds was one of the biggest movie stars in the world. However, by the start of the 1990s, he seemed to be more in the news for his personal life (such as his messy divorce from Loni Anderson and having to file for bankruptcy) than for his acting. Around this period, Reynolds transitioned himself into being a television star with the ''B.L. Stryker'' TV movies for Creator/{{ABC}} and the sitcom ''Evening Shade'' for Creator/{{CBS}}. Reynolds would resurface in the critically bashed buddy movie ''Cop & a Half''. It wasn't until Reynolds' Oscar nominated turn in ''Film/BoogieNights'' that Reynolds regained some respectability, but even that didn't last too long.

to:

* Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Burt Reynolds Creator/BurtReynolds was one of the biggest movie stars in the world. However, by the start of the 1990s, he seemed to be more in the news for his personal life (such as his messy divorce from Loni Anderson and having to file for bankruptcy) than for his acting. Around this period, Reynolds transitioned himself into being a television star with the ''B.L. Stryker'' TV movies for Creator/{{ABC}} and the sitcom ''Evening Shade'' for Creator/{{CBS}}. Reynolds would resurface in the critically bashed buddy movie ''Cop & a Half''. It wasn't until Reynolds' Oscar nominated turn in ''Film/BoogieNights'' that Reynolds regained some respectability, but even that didn't last too long.



* Vincent Gallo. After making a career as a supporting actor in films like ''Film/TheFuneral'', he made his acclaimed directorial debut ''Buffalo 66''. Then he made his infamous follow up ''The Brown Bunny'', which led him to an unsuccessful war of words with critic Roger Ebert, who had previously supported his career. Since then, he has mostly been in tabloids for his extremely bizarre behaviour (e.g. trying to put a hex on Ebert), his truly venomous personality (e.g. criticizing Christina Ricci for her weight, unprovoked four years after working with her), his own claims of genius, and his vitriolic verbal tirades (e.g. calling Francis Ford Coppola "a fat pig", Sofia Coppola "a parasite" and Creator/MartinScorsese "an egomaniac has been, who hasn't made a good film in twenty-five years"). While he still has a sizeable fanbase, even his most ardent supporters have come to accept that he is an unfortunate case of talent undone by ego. Nowadays, he is more likely to be known for inspiring the character of pretentious jerkass Billy Walsh in ''Film/{{Entourage}}''.

to:

* Vincent Gallo. After making a career as a supporting actor in films like ''Film/TheFuneral'', he made his acclaimed directorial debut ''Buffalo 66''. ''Film/BuffaloSixtySix''. Then he made his infamous follow up ''The Brown Bunny'', ''Film/TheBrownBunny'', which led him to an unsuccessful war of words with critic Roger Ebert, Creator/RogerEbert, who had previously supported his career. Since then, he has mostly been in tabloids for his extremely bizarre behaviour (e.g. trying to put a hex on Ebert), his truly venomous personality (e.g. criticizing Christina Ricci Creator/ChristinaRicci for her weight, unprovoked four years after working with her), his own claims of genius, and his vitriolic verbal tirades (e.g. calling Francis Ford Coppola Creator/FrancisFordCoppola "a fat pig", Sofia Coppola Creator/SofiaCoppola "a parasite" and Creator/MartinScorsese "an egomaniac has been, who hasn't made a good film in twenty-five years"). While he still has a sizeable fanbase, even his most ardent supporters have come to accept that he is an unfortunate case of talent undone by ego. Nowadays, he is more likely to be known for inspiring the character of pretentious jerkass Billy Walsh in ''Film/{{Entourage}}''.



* Creator/BenElton was a leading figure of alternative comedy in the eighties and, among other things, co-wrote ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' and ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' (which he helped [[GrowingTheBeard grow its literal beard]]). Several less popular shows, novels, and West End productions plus a perceived shift in politics later, his name is more or less code for "talentless hack." For many critics and fans, ''Series/TheThinBlueLine'' was the turning point, as on the basis of ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' and ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' many people were expecting it to be a vicious black comedy about police [[BadCopIncompetentCop incompetence, corruption, brutality and racism]]. What they got was a more traditional sitcom in the vein of ''Dad's Army''.

to:

* Creator/BenElton was a leading figure of alternative comedy in the eighties and, among other things, co-wrote ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' and ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' (which he helped [[GrowingTheBeard grow its literal beard]]). Several less popular shows, novels, and West End productions plus a perceived shift in politics later, his name is more or less code for "talentless hack." For many critics and fans, ''Series/TheThinBlueLine'' was the turning point, as on the basis of ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' and ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' many people were expecting it to be a vicious black comedy about police [[BadCopIncompetentCop incompetence, corruption, brutality and racism]]. What they got was a more traditional sitcom in the vein of ''Dad's Army''.''Series/DadsArmy''.



* In 1998, Wrestling/VinceRusso was one of the best bookers and storyline writers in the Wrestling Industry. After co-masterminding the Attitude Era with VinceMcMahon and with input from several other writers, Russo was an important part of a creative team that snatched victory from the jaws of defeat in the Wrestling/MondayNightWars. Unfortunately, when his contract expired in 1999, Russo jumped ship to Wrestling/{{WCW}}, where he almost single-handedly killed the entire company. According to ''Literature/TheDeathOfWCW'', during the time Russo worked for the WWF he would bounce ideas off of [[ExecutiveMeddling [=McMahon=], who would decide whether or not to use them]]. In WCW, he was [[ProtectionFromEditors given free reign to do whatever he wanted]], which didn't work out. With Russo's ridiculous storylines used in a company that was famous for being very traditional when it came to wrestling, the massive mismanagement of money by Eric Bischoff, and older stars like Wrestling/HulkHogan, Wrestling/KevinNash, and Wrestling/ScottSteiner outright refusing to put over new talent, Russo's arrival, which was supposed to herald WCW's return to form, instead set about pounding in the final nail in WCW's coffin. Being part of the writing/booking team at Wrestling/{{TNA}} until October 2011, it appears that Russo has yet to learn his lesson.
* Verne Gagne was a ten time World Champion and his American Wresting Association (AWA) promotion was at the very least, one of the "Big Three" promotions from the 1960s-first half of the 1980s (alongside the National Wrestling Alliance and World Wrestling Federation). The Minneapolis based AWA was one of the most successful and expansive single territories in the country. More to the point, the AWA at its peak, featured a virtual "who's who" of wrestling. One of these notables was Hulk Hogan, who went to the AWA after ending his heel run in New York and becoming a successful superstar in New Japan Pro Wrestling. As VinceMcMahon, Jr. was expanding the WWF and raiding the AWA's talent (including HulkHogan, who immediately became "The Chosen One"), Gagne stubbornly refused to change with the times (i.e. adapt to a more "sports-entertainment" type promotion). Gagne seemed to think that what worked in the '70s could still work in the '80s. By late 1987, the AWA was running on fumes (even though they landed a national cable TV deal with Creator/{{ESPN}}, they were still losing talent left and right to the WWF, including then World Champion, Wrestling/CurtHennig) and had to align themselves with World Class out of Dallas and the CWA out of Memphis. This culminated with the AWA's first and only stab at pay-per-view called ''Super Clash III''. Gagne burned his bridges with the other promotions when it was revealed that the wrestlers were literally, working for free. Wrestling/JerryLawler refused to defend the AWA World Title until he got the payout from Super Clash III. Instead, Lawler was "stripped" of the belt and the next champion was Gagne's real life son-in-law Larry Zbyszko. With the AWA sinking further and further in irrelevancy, they threw a Hail-Mary called the "Team Challenge Series", which backfired (and is generally regarded as one of the most embarrassing, poorly executed and desperate angles in wrestling history). Not too surprisingly, the AWA was forced to shut down by the end of 1990. It got even worse for Verne Gagne however. In 2009, Gagne, who by this time in his life, had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease, accidentally killed a 97 year old man in memory-loss section of a Bloomington, Minnesota health care facility. Meanwhile, Verne's granddaughter Gail (Greg's daughter) had a warrant issued for her arrest for criminal sexual conduct with a then 16 year-old St. Paul, MN high school student when she was a teacher there.

to:

* In 1998, Wrestling/VinceRusso was one of the best bookers and storyline writers in the Wrestling Industry. After co-masterminding the Attitude Era with VinceMcMahon Wrestling/VinceMcMahon and with input from several other writers, Russo was an important part of a creative team that snatched victory from the jaws of defeat in the Wrestling/MondayNightWars. Unfortunately, when his contract expired in 1999, Russo jumped ship to Wrestling/{{WCW}}, where he almost single-handedly killed the entire company. According to ''Literature/TheDeathOfWCW'', during the time Russo worked for the WWF he would bounce ideas off of [[ExecutiveMeddling [=McMahon=], who would decide whether or not to use them]]. In WCW, he was [[ProtectionFromEditors given free reign to do whatever he wanted]], which didn't work out. With Russo's ridiculous storylines used in a company that was famous for being very traditional when it came to wrestling, the massive mismanagement of money by Eric Bischoff, and older stars like Wrestling/HulkHogan, Wrestling/KevinNash, and Wrestling/ScottSteiner outright refusing to put over new talent, Russo's arrival, which was supposed to herald WCW's return to form, instead set about pounding in the final nail in WCW's coffin. Being part of the writing/booking team at Wrestling/{{TNA}} until October 2011, it appears that Russo has yet to learn his lesson.
* Verne Gagne was a ten time World Champion and his American Wresting Association (AWA) promotion was at the very least, one of the "Big Three" promotions from the 1960s-first half of the 1980s (alongside the National Wrestling Alliance and World Wrestling Federation). The Minneapolis based AWA was one of the most successful and expansive single territories in the country. More to the point, the AWA at its peak, featured a virtual "who's who" of wrestling. One of these notables was Hulk Hogan, who went to the AWA after ending his heel run in New York and becoming a successful superstar in New Japan Pro Wrestling. As VinceMcMahon, Wrestling/VinceMcMahon, Jr. was expanding the WWF and raiding the AWA's talent (including HulkHogan, who immediately became "The Chosen One"), Gagne stubbornly refused to change with the times (i.e. adapt to a more "sports-entertainment" type promotion). Gagne seemed to think that what worked in the '70s could still work in the '80s. By late 1987, the AWA was running on fumes (even though they landed a national cable TV deal with Creator/{{ESPN}}, they were still losing talent left and right to the WWF, including then World Champion, Wrestling/CurtHennig) and had to align themselves with World Class out of Dallas and the CWA out of Memphis. This culminated with the AWA's first and only stab at pay-per-view called ''Super Clash III''. Gagne burned his bridges with the other promotions when it was revealed that the wrestlers were literally, working for free. Wrestling/JerryLawler refused to defend the AWA World Title until he got the payout from Super Clash III. Instead, Lawler was "stripped" of the belt and the next champion was Gagne's real life son-in-law Larry Zbyszko. With the AWA sinking further and further in irrelevancy, they threw a Hail-Mary called the "Team Challenge Series", which backfired (and is generally regarded as one of the most embarrassing, poorly executed and desperate angles in wrestling history). Not too surprisingly, the AWA was forced to shut down by the end of 1990. It got even worse for Verne Gagne however. In 2009, Gagne, who by this time in his life, had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease, accidentally killed a 97 year old man in memory-loss section of a Bloomington, Minnesota health care facility. Meanwhile, Verne's granddaughter Gail (Greg's daughter) had a warrant issued for her arrest for criminal sexual conduct with a then 16 year-old St. Paul, MN high school student when she was a teacher there.
25th Jul '17 6:25:34 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[Creator/{{Sega}} Sonic Team]]. Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog used to be a worldwide icon and the only real challenge to [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]]'s domination of {{platform game}}s. The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis entries in the series are still considered great games. [[PolygonCeiling Then Sonic went 3D]]. For most fans and critics, most of the 3D Sonic games have a [[CameraScrew bad camera]], broken controls, and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters too many characters]], and Sonic Team has lost its old glory to them. It started with the [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure two]] ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Adventure|2}}''s, which were worthy additions to the series despite being plagued by fundamental problems. ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' marked the teetering edge of the abyss, ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' was made on the way down, and ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006 Sonic 2006]]'' was the echoing crash of the series finally hitting rock bottom. Since then, the franchise has been making significant progress at climbing back up, but it still struggles with the basics like camera controls, physics, glitches, and fair level design. It also doesn't help that Sonic Team can't seem to resist putting a weird gimmick into gameplay. [[note]]Some reviewers believe that ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' would've been the return to form Sonic needed if it weren't for the Werehog gameplay.[[/note]] ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4'', ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' and ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' have improved their reputation a bit by now, presenting creative and ambitious game ideas in the series' trademark rough and fractured frame. ''Colors'' [[WinBackTheCrowd won back a sizable portion of the disillusioned fanbase]], ''Generations'' did pretty well for itself as well, and while ''Lost World'' is divisive, it's not terrible any way you cut it. There was also ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing]]''; while a ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' [[FollowTheLeader clone]] (well, more like ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' [[XMeetsY meets]] ''VideoGame/OutRun''), the racing gameplay was actually praised by many to be ''better'' than that of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' and the game was both a commercial and critical success.

to:

* [[Creator/{{Sega}} Sonic Team]]. Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog used to be a worldwide icon and the only real challenge to [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]]'s domination of {{platform game}}s. The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis entries in the series are still considered great games. [[PolygonCeiling Then Sonic went 3D]]. For most fans and critics, most of the 3D Sonic games have a [[CameraScrew bad camera]], broken controls, and [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters too many characters]], and Sonic Team has lost its old glory to them. It started with the [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure two]] ''VideoGame/{{Sonic Adventure|2}}''s, which were worthy additions to the series despite being plagued by fundamental problems. ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' marked the teetering edge of the abyss, ''VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog'' was made on the way down, and ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006 Sonic 2006]]'' was the echoing crash of the series finally hitting rock bottom. Since then, the franchise has been making significant progress at climbing back up, but it still struggles with the basics like camera controls, physics, glitches, and fair level design. It also doesn't help that Sonic Team can't seem to resist putting a weird gimmick into gameplay. [[note]]Some reviewers believe that ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'' would've been the return to form Sonic needed if it weren't for the Werehog gameplay.[[/note]] ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4'', ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' and ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' have improved their reputation a bit by now, presenting creative and ambitious game ideas in the series' trademark rough and fractured frame. ''Colors'' [[WinBackTheCrowd won back a sizable portion of the disillusioned fanbase]], ''Generations'' did pretty well for itself as well, and while ''Lost World'' is divisive, it's not terrible any way you cut it. There was also ''[[VideoGame/SegaSuperstars Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing]]''; while a ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' [[FollowTheLeader clone]] (well, more like ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY meets]] ''VideoGame/OutRun''), the racing gameplay was actually praised by many to be ''better'' than that of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' and the game was both a commercial and critical success.
17th Jul '17 4:40:58 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* John Singleton started his career out with a bang with ''Film/BoyzNTheHood'', which was a box office hit and got him UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nominations for Best Original Screenplay and Best Director (he was the youngest to be nominated for the latter). After a number of acclaimed films in the 1990s, the changing box office climate in the 2000s made Singleton a dinosaur and forced him into making for-hire projects such as ''2 Fast 2 Furious''. One of the big reasons for his downfall was that Paramount [[http://www.tmz.com/2011/10/19/john-singleton-sues-hustle-and-flow-paramount-studios-lawsuit/?adid=recentlyupdatedstories apparently screwed him over]] after he made a deal with them for ''Film/HustleAndFlow'', basically they promised him two independent films, but they made it all but impossible for those films to get made. The bottom fell out in 2007 when he was in a car accident that caused him to accidentally kill a man (he was acquitted though), which led him to become a pariah in Hollywood. His first post-accident project was the critically mauled ''Film/{{Abduction}}''. At this point, it's looking like he will never reach the fame and glory of his early days.

to:

* John Singleton Creator/JohnSingleton started his career out with a bang with ''Film/BoyzNTheHood'', which was a box office hit and got him UsefulNotes/AcademyAward nominations for Best Original Screenplay and Best Director (he was the youngest to be nominated for the latter). After a number of acclaimed films in the 1990s, the changing box office climate in the 2000s made Singleton a dinosaur and forced him into making for-hire projects such as ''2 Fast 2 Furious''. One of the big reasons for his downfall was that Paramount [[http://www.tmz.com/2011/10/19/john-singleton-sues-hustle-and-flow-paramount-studios-lawsuit/?adid=recentlyupdatedstories apparently screwed him over]] after he made a deal with them for ''Film/HustleAndFlow'', basically they promised him two independent films, but they made it all but impossible for those films to get made. The bottom fell out in 2007 when he was in a car accident that caused him to accidentally kill a man (he was acquitted though), which led him to become a pariah in Hollywood. His first post-accident project was the critically mauled ''Film/{{Abduction}}''. At this point, it's looking like he will never reach the fame and glory of his early days.
17th Jun '17 1:09:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/HironobuSakaguchi is universally known as the father of the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series. As either director or producer of the first ten games in the series, he had a long string of successes behind them...then in 2001, he directed ''Anime/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin''. The film bombed horribly and cost Creator/Squaresoft over a hundred million dollars, bankrupted "Square Pictures", and sent the parent company into chaos. A couple years later Sakaguchi stepped down as executive vice-president of Creator/{{Square}}, and eventually founded his own gaming company, Mistwalker. While many expected great things from Mistwalker, in particular, a ''Final Fantasy'' killer, the company's initial two offerings were a pair of Xbox360 games: ''VideoGame/BlueDragon'', a ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' clone with moderate financial success and a tepid critical reaction, and ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'', a traditional turn-based adventure met with slightly weaker sales and the general response of being either a wonderful homage to [=JRPGs=] of the past or "ItsTheSameNowItSucks". Their third offering, ''ASH: Archaic Sealed Heat'' bombed in Japan and failed to find a distributor overseas. ''VideoGame/BlueDragon'' spawned a few portable sequels and was promoted with an anime, but the lack of a console sequel left even the fans that franchise had feeling burned. Mistwalker has continued to see projects cancelled or barely make an impact, let alone the impact that the ''Final Fantasy'' series continues to have, and Sakaguchi blogs a lot, but remained relatively out of the spotlight. After that, Mistwalker and Creator/{{Nintendo}} announced a joint project for the Wii, ''VideoGame/TheLastStory'', which many in the press speculated was [[TakeThat a dig]] at Sakaguchi's ''other'' franchise, though Sakaguchi acted perplexed that there was any similarity. The game sold reasonably well for a Wii title in Japan and was announced for a PAL release in 2012 and as such became a centerpiece of the Operation Rainfall campaign to release it in North America.

to:

* Creator/HironobuSakaguchi is universally known as the father of the ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' series. As either director or producer of the first ten games in the series, he had a long string of successes behind them...then in 2001, he directed ''Anime/FinalFantasyTheSpiritsWithin''. The film bombed horribly and cost Creator/Squaresoft over a hundred million dollars, bankrupted "Square Pictures", and sent the parent company into chaos. A couple years later Sakaguchi stepped down as executive vice-president of Creator/{{Square}}, and eventually founded his own gaming company, Mistwalker. While many expected great things from Mistwalker, in particular, a ''Final Fantasy'' killer, the company's initial two offerings were a pair of Xbox360 UsefulNotes/Xbox360 games: ''VideoGame/BlueDragon'', a ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' clone with moderate financial success and a tepid critical reaction, and ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'', a traditional turn-based adventure met with slightly weaker sales and the general response of being either a wonderful homage to [=JRPGs=] of the past or "ItsTheSameNowItSucks". Their third offering, ''ASH: Archaic Sealed Heat'' bombed in Japan and failed to find a distributor overseas. ''VideoGame/BlueDragon'' spawned a few portable sequels and was promoted with an anime, but the lack of a console sequel left even the fans that franchise had feeling burned. Mistwalker has continued to see projects cancelled or barely make an impact, let alone the impact that the ''Final Fantasy'' series continues to have, and Sakaguchi blogs a lot, but remained relatively out of the spotlight. After that, Mistwalker and Creator/{{Nintendo}} announced a joint project for the Wii, ''VideoGame/TheLastStory'', which many in the press speculated was [[TakeThat a dig]] at Sakaguchi's ''other'' franchise, though Sakaguchi acted perplexed that there was any similarity. The game sold reasonably well for a Wii title in Japan and was announced for a PAL release in 2012 and as such became a centerpiece of the Operation Rainfall campaign to release it in North America.
15th Jun '17 8:20:28 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Creator/KeijiInafune got his start at Creator/{{Capcom}} in the 1980s, and quickly made a name for himself as the "father" of the ''Franchise/MegaMan'' franchise.[[note]]Although he has said that his co-worker at the time, Akira Kitamura, deserves credit for actually designing Mega Man.[[/note]] He moved up the ladder to executive producer, and [[Franchise/ResidentEvil many]] [[VideoGame/DevilMayCry classic]] [[VideoGame/{{Onimusha}} franchises]] were created under his watch. By the time of the seventh generation of video games, Inafune grew sick of [[CapcomSequelStagnation Capcom's sequel policies]]; thanks to that, as EP he made sure that games like ''VideoGame/DeadRising'' and ''VideoGame/LostPlanet'' went so over budget that they couldn't be cancelled in favor of more sequels to existing titles. Another thing that got him in thin ice was his hostility towards Japanese game developers for not adapting to HD hardware and the tastes of western gamers; all this caused him to leave Capcom by 2010, triggering the cancellation of the highly-anticipated ''Mega Man Legends 3'' in 2011.\\
As soon as Inafune left Capcom, he founded a new studio called ''comcept'', and raised a staggering 4 million USD in a Kickstarter campaign for his first new major product ''VideoGame/MightyNo9'', a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Mega Man''. The game was first announced for a late 2014 release, then went through endless delays until it was released in June 2016. By the end of it all, ''Mighty No. 9'' was widely derided as an [[TheMockbuster ugly, uninspired knockoff]] rather than the SpiritualSuccessor it was meant to be.\\
Not helping was Inafune's utter abuse of Kickstarter as a crowdfunding platform: not only did he announce a KS campaign for a CGI cartoon of the character, but also another one for English voice acting ''and'' yet another for the ''VideoGame/MegaManLegends''-esque ''VideoGame/RedAsh''--and that last one meant nothing anyway, as it was already being fully funded by the Chinese studio FUZE Entertainment. All this had the gaming public question if Inafune was genuine in his efforts or a greedy con man, to the point his fellow ex-Capcom employee Creator/HidekiKamiya stated on Twitter that Inafune was [[https://twitter.com/PG_kamiya/status/249735186936369153 "a businessman, not a creator."]]\\
Eventually it was discovered that not only did he personally order the shutdown of Capcom's beloved Creator/CloverStudios, but his harsh statements on Japanese devs not adapting to Western tastes caused development of the [[BrokenBase highly]] [[DarkerAndEdgier controversial]] ''VideoGame/DMCDevilMayCry''. All of the above, along with the failure of ''Mighty No. 9'' and the mediocre reception of ''VideoGame/ReCore'' has given Inafune a reputation as Japan's counterpart to Creator/JohnRomero.
11th Jun '17 11:16:17 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/DavidCrane was one of the first game developers to become a household name, largely thanks to being the lead developer behind a number of well-loved UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} games, most notably the smash hit ''VideoGame/{{Pitfall}}''. After he left Creator/{{Activision}} however, Crane's career suffered its own pitfall. He and other former Activision employees formed Absolute Entertainment but, with few exceptions (most notably ''VideoGame/ABoyAndHisBlob''), the company churned out a series of bad and/or licensed games, mostly based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', along with ''David Crane's Amazing Tennis'' (which most critics agreed was only amazing in how bad it was); he also collaborated to the infamous ''NightTrap''. Absolute collapsed in 1995 and, while he has never left the game industry (he has made a rather successful career out of advergaming), Crane has been under the radar since then.

to:

* Creator/DavidCrane was one of the first game developers to become a household name, largely thanks to being the lead developer behind a number of well-loved UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} games, most notably the smash hit ''VideoGame/{{Pitfall}}''. After he left Creator/{{Activision}} however, Crane's career suffered its own pitfall. He and other former Activision employees formed Absolute Entertainment but, with few exceptions (most notably ''VideoGame/ABoyAndHisBlob''), the company churned out a series of bad and/or licensed games, mostly based on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', along with ''David Crane's Amazing Tennis'' (which most critics agreed was only amazing in how bad it was); he also collaborated to the infamous ''NightTrap''.''VideoGame/NightTrap''. Absolute collapsed in 1995 and, while he has never left the game industry (he has made a rather successful career out of advergaming), Crane has been under the radar since then.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1006. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=DarthWiki.FallenCreator