History CreatorBreakdown / ComicBooks

25th Feb '18 1:57:27 AM Scoutstr295
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* Bill Jemas wrote a miniseries called ''Comicbook/{{Marville}}'' which began as a parody of comic books, then after two issues the series devolved into Bill Jemas preaching his (completely nonsensical and almost universally factually wrong) philosophies of life, the universe, and everything. The series was widely critically panned even before jumping the shark and didn't sell well ''at all.'' The penultimate issue of the comic[[note]] the final issue of the comic was just a set of submission guidelines for Epic Comics [[/note]] has the main character retelling the entire story to a comic publisher- with both agreeing that the story is ''the most important story that could ever be told''- but it isn't published because all audiences want in comics are superheroes. The entire issue reads like a diatribe against the comic's readers (or more likely; the lack thereof) for not understanding its genius. Jemas was convinced Marville didn't succeed because comics readers have no interest in non-superhero stories, and immediately after publishing the final issue Jemas founded the Epic line of Marvel Comics.

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* Bill Jemas wrote a miniseries called ''Comicbook/{{Marville}}'' which began as a parody of comic books, then after two issues the series devolved into Bill Jemas preaching his (completely nonsensical and almost universally factually wrong) philosophies of life, the universe, and everything. The series was widely critically panned even before jumping the shark and didn't sell well ''at all.'' The penultimate issue of the comic[[note]] the final issue of the comic was just a set of submission guidelines for Epic Comics [[/note]] has the main character retelling the entire story to a comic publisher- with both agreeing that the story is ''the most important story that could ever be told''- but it isn't published because all audiences want in comics are superheroes. The entire issue reads like a diatribe against the comic's readers (or more likely; the lack thereof) for not understanding its genius. Jemas was convinced Marville didn't succeed because comics readers have no interest in non-superhero stories, and immediately after publishing the final issue Jemas founded the Epic line of Marvel Comics.
19th Jan '18 12:13:19 PM MagiMecha
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* In-Universe example in ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand'': when word gets out that there's a new Batgirl in the city and it seems that Batman's letting her actively run, Oracle flips her lid, blaming Bruce for letting someone run around with her name, her legacy and, more importantly, her ''legs''.
12th Oct '17 5:45:53 PM TheMountainKing
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*** [[HarsherInHindsight His mother died in 2013,]] which inspired him to write ''WonderWomanEarthOne'', which focuses heavily on the main character's relationship with her mother.

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*** [[HarsherInHindsight His mother died in 2013,]] which inspired inspiring him to write ''WonderWomanEarthOne'', which focuses heavily on the main character's relationship with her mother.
12th Oct '17 5:45:22 PM TheMountainKing
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*** [[HarsherInHindsight His mother died in 2013,]] which inspired him to write ''WonderWomanEarthOne'', which focuses heavily on the main character's relationship with her mother.
19th Sep '17 3:27:15 AM Doug86
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* Mystek of the ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Task Force]]'' was ThrownOutTheAirlock due to a tag-team combo of ExecutiveMeddling and the resulting CreatorBreakdown. [[http://lamerciepark.com/legacy/comics/taskforce.html As writer Christopher Priest explains]]:

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* Mystek of the ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League Task Force]]'' was ThrownOutTheAirlock due to a tag-team combo of ExecutiveMeddling and the resulting CreatorBreakdown. [[http://lamerciepark.com/legacy/comics/taskforce.html As writer Christopher Priest explains]]:



* Creator/{{Dwayne McDuffie}}'s final ''[[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' arc was basically a metaphor for his then-deteriorating relationship with DC Comics. Near the end of the story, most of the League's members have quit (in real life most were taken away from Dwayne due to ExecutiveMeddling) and several other members, notably ComicBook/BlackCanary, begin to question their commitment to the team and whether or not they even care enough to continue protecting the world.

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* Creator/{{Dwayne McDuffie}}'s final ''[[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica ''[[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' arc was basically a metaphor for his then-deteriorating relationship with DC Comics. Near the end of the story, most of the League's members have quit (in real life most were taken away from Dwayne due to ExecutiveMeddling) and several other members, notably ComicBook/BlackCanary, begin to question their commitment to the team and whether or not they even care enough to continue protecting the world.
23rd Jul '17 6:46:46 PM PatPayne
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* [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] went through a CreatorBreakdown that, for all intents and purposes, is still going on. He suffered a stroke in '96, and his ability to draw has slowly deteriorated ever since.

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* [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] went through a CreatorBreakdown that, for all intents and purposes, is still going on. lasted till his death in 2016. He suffered a stroke in '96, and his ability to draw has slowly deteriorated ever since.
27th Mar '17 6:01:01 AM MrCanoehead
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** His work in Comicbook/UltimateXMen had a bit of foreshadowing to this. The book always had a cynical edge to it (even moreso than Millar's concurrent work in Comicbook/TheUltimates, which at least had BlackComedy to blunt it's sharp corners), but took a nosedive into [[CrapsackWorld [=GrimDark=]]] during the "Weapon X" story arc. To be fair, Millar was hospitalized for a debilitating illness and in chronic pain during his early tenure on the book, and he [[WordOfGod later admitted in an interview]] that he was probably projecting his own misery onto the characters.

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** His work in Comicbook/UltimateXMen had a bit of foreshadowing to this. The book always had a cynical edge to it (even moreso than Millar's concurrent work in Comicbook/TheUltimates, which at least had BlackComedy to blunt it's its sharp corners), but took a nosedive into [[CrapsackWorld [=GrimDark=]]] during the "Weapon X" story arc. To be fair, Millar was hospitalized for a debilitating illness and in chronic pain during his early tenure on the book, and he [[WordOfGod later admitted in an interview]] that he was probably projecting his own misery onto the characters.
16th Feb '17 9:12:33 PM Mujaki
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Added DiffLines:

** His work in Comicbook/UltimateXMen had a bit of foreshadowing to this. The book always had a cynical edge to it (even moreso than Millar's concurrent work in Comicbook/TheUltimates, which at least had BlackComedy to blunt it's sharp corners), but took a nosedive into [[CrapsackWorld [=GrimDark=]]] during the "Weapon X" story arc. To be fair, Millar was hospitalized for a debilitating illness and in chronic pain during his early tenure on the book, and he [[WordOfGod later admitted in an interview]] that he was probably projecting his own misery onto the characters.
16th Jan '17 6:59:00 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Dwayne McDuffie}}'s final ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' arc was basically a metaphor for his then-deteriorating relationship with DC Comics. Near the end of the story, most of the League's members have quit (in real life most were taken away from Dwayne due to ExecutiveMeddling) and several other members, notably ComicBook/BlackCanary, begin to question their commitment to the team and whether or not they even care enough to continue protecting the world.

to:

* {{Dwayne Creator/{{Dwayne McDuffie}}'s final ''[[JusticeLeagueOfAmerica ''[[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica JLA]]'' arc was basically a metaphor for his then-deteriorating relationship with DC Comics. Near the end of the story, most of the League's members have quit (in real life most were taken away from Dwayne due to ExecutiveMeddling) and several other members, notably ComicBook/BlackCanary, begin to question their commitment to the team and whether or not they even care enough to continue protecting the world.



* In-universe in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'': Jolly Blackburn wrote a "review" of the Gary Jackson HackMaster novel ''The Lady is a Thief''. The protagonist was based on Gary's wife Heidi, and [[CharacterDerailment becomes evil and vicious for no good reason]] at the point of the novel that was written during Gary's divorce. According to the review, the book was pulled from publication after Heidi sued for defamation, and only a few stray copies remain in circulation.

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* In-universe in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'': Jolly Blackburn wrote a "review" of the Gary Jackson HackMaster TabletopGame/HackMaster novel ''The Lady is a Thief''. The protagonist was based on Gary's wife Heidi, and [[CharacterDerailment becomes evil and vicious for no good reason]] at the point of the novel that was written during Gary's divorce. According to the review, the book was pulled from publication after Heidi sued for defamation, and only a few stray copies remain in circulation.
8th Jan '17 2:10:54 PM nombretomado
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* After the death of Creator/JephLoeb's son, Sam, there was a notable change in the theme and mood of Loeb's comics writing. He used one of his scripts and created "Sam story" comics for ComicBook/SupermanBatman, and then retired from comics. Later his friends at Marvel convinced Loeb to return to the industry and work for Marvel. Since then Loeb wrote a mini-series about how several characters mourn Sam's death through the proxy that is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica, dropped a steaming load of controversial plot onto the ComicBook/IncredibleHulk series, and tore through the [[UltimateMarvel Ultimate universe]] with [[KillEmAll Tomino-like]] reckless abandon. (It takes a Wikipedia page to list all of the characters that died in his ComicBook/{{Ultimatum}} limited series) Losing a son is never easy...

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* After the death of Creator/JephLoeb's son, Sam, there was a notable change in the theme and mood of Loeb's comics writing. He used one of his scripts and created "Sam story" comics for ComicBook/SupermanBatman, and then retired from comics. Later his friends at Marvel convinced Loeb to return to the industry and work for Marvel. Since then Loeb wrote a mini-series about how several characters mourn Sam's death through the proxy that is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica, dropped a steaming load of controversial plot onto the ComicBook/IncredibleHulk series, and tore through the [[UltimateMarvel [[ComicBook/UltimateMarvel Ultimate universe]] with [[KillEmAll Tomino-like]] reckless abandon. (It takes a Wikipedia page to list all of the characters that died in his ComicBook/{{Ultimatum}} limited series) Losing a son is never easy...
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