History Characters / DisneyDucksComicUniverse

20th Feb '17 3:27:43 AM SorPepita
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* BigBrotherWorship : [[spoiler: Until [[BrokenPedestal Chapter 11 ]].]][[spoiler: When we meet her again as an old lady she inverts this trope by insulting Scrooge at every turn .]]

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* BigBrotherWorship : BigBrotherWorship: [[spoiler: Until [[BrokenPedestal Chapter 11 ]].]][[spoiler: When we meet her again as an old lady she inverts this trope by insulting Scrooge at every turn .]]



* RoguesGalleryTransplant: She is one of main villains in ''Comicbook/DarkwingDuck'' comics where she team-up with Negaduck.

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* RoguesGalleryTransplant: She is one of the main villains in ''Comicbook/DarkwingDuck'' comics where she team-up with Negaduck.
15th Feb '17 2:22:33 PM rafi
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Added DiffLines:

* TheCowl: In his super-hero alter-ego, Paperinik. Sometimes played straight (especially in ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures''), sometimes as an AffectionateParody, and sometimes PlayedForLaughs.
1st Feb '17 3:13:27 PM infernape612
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* JerkassFacade: Formally established in in the Barks comic "Back to the Klondike." He likes people to think he's a heartless skinflint, because it means that less people try to beg or mooch off him. In one story, disillusioned by how many people outright hated him, he tried to drop the facade and become a philanthropist, only to have everyone walk all over him to such an extreme that he immediately put the facade back up. The only people he's consistently comfortable dropping the facade with is Huey, Dewey and Louey. Even Donald doesn't often get to see his soft side, he's afraid that Donald would lose any respect he has for Scrooge if he ever realized that the cold exterior isn't all there is.

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* JerkassFacade: Formally established in in the Barks comic "Back to the Klondike." He likes people to think he's a heartless skinflint, because it means that less people try to beg or mooch off him. In one story, disillusioned by how many people outright hated him, he tried to drop the facade and become a philanthropist, only to have everyone walk all over him to such an extreme that he immediately put the facade back up. The only people he's consistently comfortable dropping the facade with is Huey, Dewey and Louey.Louie. Even Donald doesn't often get to see his soft side, he's afraid that Donald would lose any respect he has for Scrooge if he ever realized that the cold exterior isn't all there is.
1st Feb '17 3:12:47 PM infernape612
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* {{Fiction 500}}: Scrooge is the wealthiest duck in the world, has an enormous building holding his cash, his fortune exceeds trillions in worth, and his financial empire spans the world.

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* {{Fiction 500}}: Fiction500: Scrooge is the wealthiest duck in the world, has an enormous building holding his cash, his fortune exceeds trillions in worth, and his financial empire spans the world.



* JerkassFacade: Formally established in in the Barks comic "Back to the Klondike." He likes people to think he's a heartless skinflint, because it means that less people try to beg or mooch off him. In one story, disillusioned by how many people outright hated him, he tried to drop the facade and become a philanthropist, only to have everyone walk all over him to such an extreme that he immediately put the facade back up. The only people he's consistently comfortable dropping the facade with is Huey, Dewey and Louey. Even Donald dont often get to see his soft side, he's afraid that Donald would lose any respect he has for Scrooge if he ever realized that the cold exterior isnt all there is.

to:

* JerkassFacade: Formally established in in the Barks comic "Back to the Klondike." He likes people to think he's a heartless skinflint, because it means that less people try to beg or mooch off him. In one story, disillusioned by how many people outright hated him, he tried to drop the facade and become a philanthropist, only to have everyone walk all over him to such an extreme that he immediately put the facade back up. The only people he's consistently comfortable dropping the facade with is Huey, Dewey and Louey. Even Donald dont doesn't often get to see his soft side, he's afraid that Donald would lose any respect he has for Scrooge if he ever realized that the cold exterior isnt isn't all there is.
1st Feb '17 11:37:08 AM MisterCPC
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-> Voiced by: Various, Creator/KathSoucie (1986-1998), Creator/TressMacNeille (1999-present)

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-> Voiced by: Various, Clarence Nash (1940), Gloria Blondell (1945-1950), Ruth Clifford (1948), Vivi Janiss (1954), Creator/JuneForay (1960), Creator/KathSoucie (1986-1998), Diane Michelle (1998-1999), Creator/TressMacNeille (1999-present)



-> Voiced by: Frank Welker (Big Time Beagle, Baggy Beagle), Chuck [=McCann=] (Bouncer Beagle, Burger Beagle), Brian Cummings (Bugle Beagle), Peter Cullen (Bankjob Beagle), Terry [=McGovern=] (Babyface Beagle)

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-> Voiced by: Frank Welker (Big Time Beagle, Baggy Beagle), Chuck [=McCann=] (Bouncer Beagle, Burger Beagle), Brian Cummings (Bugle Beagle), Peter Cullen (Bankjob Beagle), Terry [=McGovern=] (Babyface Beagle)Beagle), Will Ryan (All Beagles in ''Sport Goofy in Soccermania'')
26th Jan '17 8:22:45 PM Theriocephalus
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** Best shown in a Paperinik story, where he came up with a device that could change history, realized ''immediately'' the danger, and get rid of the blueprints... By throwing them in the trash, because most people can't understand his blueprints. Needless to say, the whole mess in the story started because one of the few people who could was a villain and keeping his house under control exactly for this. [[LampshadeHanging Both Paperinik and the villain call him an idiot to his face for this]].

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** Best shown in a Paperinik story, where he came up with a device that could change history, realized ''immediately'' the danger, danger ''immediately'', and get got rid of the blueprints... By by throwing them in the trash, because most people can't understand his blueprints. Needless to say, the whole mess in the story started because one of the few people who could was a villain and keeping his house under control exactly for this. [[LampshadeHanging Both Paperinik and the villain call him an idiot to his face for this]].
26th Jan '17 2:09:29 AM rafi
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Added DiffLines:

* WhosLaughingNow: His Paperinik persona started out as a means for Donald to get back at Scrooge and Gladstone continuously tormenting and humiliating him, and the very first story features Paperinik stealing Scrooge's mattress as he sleeps on it for added humiliation factor.
17th Jan '17 3:58:05 AM HarpieSiren
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** On occasion he crosses over to CowardlyLion, but these instances are rare -- his cowardice tends to be played strictly for laughs, and if a story calls for him to be brave he'll either simply be portrayed as brave for that particular story, or he'll do brave things without recognizing the danger he's in.
** Eh... his cowardice ''did'' "come out of nowhere." Agreed that it shows up much more in the comics, but Donald's bravery often DependingOnTheWriter, but even there he can be quite brave and has been known to literally laugh in the face of Death. [[http://alekwas.soup.io/post/348847518/Donald-Duck-laughs-in-the-face-of Don't believe me?]] Or save his nephews from danger or fight off Beagle Boys, etc. And he often still is ready to tackle an enemy head on rather than run away! Donald's "cowardice" in the movie was exaggerated because it kept with the theme of each of Mickey's friends having one fatal flaw and since Mickey's was his small size and Goofy's was his lack of wit...Donald got left with "cowardice" even though it's not quite true to his personality.
*** Is it? ''Musketeers'' director Donovan Cook went on record in the print media at the time, explaining that Donald's cowardice as depicted in the movie was borrowed specifically from the ''Floyd Gottfredson'' Donald comics of 1935-36. This rings true: Gottfredson, whose comics were Mickey newspaper strips with Donald as a co-star, played Donald as the most cowardly coward ever.
*** Should also be taken into account that the times when he does show fear are when he's literally in situations that any sane person would find dangerous. One example would be Don Rosa's ''Last Lord of Eldorado''. At one point Donald is trapped hanging over a giant chasm, holding two pieces of a rope bridge together. Notably, even his nephews are worried for him and Donald is shown to be in incredible pain. So why would he not be afraid?
*** Also has to be considered that, unlike his Uncle Scrooge, Donald has three children at home that rely on him. So in any situation he goes into he has to take into account the fact that if something happens to him they'd be left alone. And though they do have other family in the form of Scrooge, Gladstone, and Grandma that still wouldn't necessarily make up for the suffering they'd undergo (and the general shift their lives would take) were something to happen to Donald. So in comparison to Scrooge, who only has his money, and his nephews, who are still children no matter how smart they are, Donald has the most to lose if something ever goes wrong. And with Scrooge typically paying 30 cents an hour at most there's not much reason for him to get super excited about putting his life on the line.

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** On occasion he crosses over to CowardlyLion, but these instances are rare -- his cowardice tends to be played strictly for laughs, and if a story calls for him to be brave he'll either simply be portrayed as brave for that particular story, or he'll do brave things without recognizing the danger he's in.
** Eh... his cowardice ''did'' "come out of nowhere." Agreed that it shows up much more in the comics, but Donald's bravery often DependingOnTheWriter, but even there he can be quite brave and has been known to literally laugh in the face of Death. [[http://alekwas.soup.io/post/348847518/Donald-Duck-laughs-in-the-face-of Don't believe me?]] Or save his nephews from danger or fight off Beagle Boys, etc. And he often still is ready to tackle an enemy head on rather than run away! Donald's "cowardice" in the movie was exaggerated because it kept with the theme of each of Mickey's friends having one fatal flaw and since Mickey's was his small size and Goofy's was his lack of wit...Donald got left with "cowardice" even though it's not quite true to his personality.
*** Is it? ''Musketeers'' director Donovan Cook went on record in the print media at the time, explaining that Donald's cowardice as depicted in the movie was borrowed specifically from the ''Floyd Gottfredson'' Donald comics of 1935-36. This rings true: Gottfredson, whose comics were Mickey newspaper strips with Donald as a co-star, played Donald as the most cowardly coward ever.
***
Should also be taken into account that the times when he does show fear are when he's literally in situations that any sane person would find dangerous. One example would be Don Rosa's ''Last Lord of Eldorado''. At one point Donald is trapped hanging over a giant chasm, holding two pieces of a rope bridge together. Notably, even his nephews are worried for him and Donald is shown to be in incredible pain. So why would he not be afraid?
*** ** Also has to be considered that, unlike his Uncle Scrooge, Donald has three children at home that rely on him. So in any situation he goes into he has to take into account the fact that if something happens to him they'd be left alone. And though they do have other family in the form of Scrooge, Gladstone, and Grandma that still wouldn't necessarily make up for the suffering they'd undergo (and the general shift their lives would take) were something to happen to Donald. So in comparison to Scrooge, who only has his money, and his nephews, who are still children no matter how smart they are, Donald has the most to lose if something ever goes wrong. And with Scrooge typically paying 30 cents an hour at most there's not much reason for him to get super excited about putting his life on the line.
13th Jan '17 2:43:18 AM MarkLungo
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** It's worth nothing the letter that truly set Scrooge off was not a letter from his mother- but a recent one from his ''father'' that had bad news within. You can see the moment that Scrooge snaps when Soapy mockingly chides his men not to be mean "to a poor little ''motherless'' lad." Soapy should consider himself lucky that Scrooge let him ''live''.

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** It's worth nothing noting the letter that truly set Scrooge off was not a letter from his mother- but a recent one from his ''father'' that had bad news within. You can see the moment that Scrooge snaps when Soapy mockingly chides his men not to be mean "to a poor little ''motherless'' lad." Soapy should consider himself lucky that Scrooge let him ''live''.
13th Jan '17 2:16:30 AM Kalibre
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** It's worth nothing the letter that truly set Scrooge off was not a letter from his mother- but a recent one from his ''father'' that had bad news within. You can see the moment that Scrooge snaps when Soapy mockingly chides his men not to be mean "to a poor little ''motherless'' lad." And that, children, is what fueled the rage of Scrooge McDuck.

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** It's worth nothing the letter that truly set Scrooge off was not a letter from his mother- but a recent one from his ''father'' that had bad news within. You can see the moment that Scrooge snaps when Soapy mockingly chides his men not to be mean "to a poor little ''motherless'' lad." And that, children, is what fueled the rage of Soapy should consider himself lucky that Scrooge McDuck.let him ''live''.
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