History BlessedWithSuck / RealLife

13th Dec '15 9:13:49 PM brtd
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* Having a job that involves frequent travel. On the one hand being able to visit all sorts of other places and having your employer pay for it all sounds great...but this also will uproot you from home and your family quite a bit, makes scheduling your social life far more complicated and can make real vacations less enjoyable.
4th Nov '15 6:57:57 PM PurpleAlert
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*** There's also the tendency of gifted kids to grow into extreme motivation problems. They don't usually have to work very hard in school because the material is easy, and are rarely rewarded proportionally for it because they can't do better than "perfect" and "perfect" is their "average". This means that if they ever ''do'' find something difficult, they feel like failures because they're ''supposed'' to be smart enough to handle anything, or get put under such pressure to succeed that they run themselves ragged for benefit other than avoiding the punishment that comes from being less than perfect. This usually ends with the gifted kid growing into an adult who shuts down when something doesn't come easily, either because they feel like a failure and are too ashamed to continue, or because they've been doing perfectly all their lives and have nothing to show for it except being eligible to be expected to be perfect somewhere else.
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*** There's also the tendency of gifted kids to grow into extreme motivation problems. They don't usually have to work very hard in school because the material is easy, and are rarely rewarded proportionally for it because they can't do better than "perfect" and "perfect" is their "average". This means that if they ever ''do'' find something difficult, they feel like failures because they're ''supposed'' to be smart enough to handle anything, or get put under such pressure to succeed that they run themselves ragged for benefit other than avoiding just to avoid the punishment that comes from being less than perfect. This usually ends with the gifted kid growing into an adult who shuts down when something doesn't come easily, either because they feel like a failure and are too ashamed to continue, or because they've been doing perfectly all their lives and have nothing to show for it except being eligible to be expected to be perfect somewhere else.
4th Nov '15 6:56:51 PM PurpleAlert
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*** There's also the tendency of gifted kids to grow into extreme motivation problems. They don't usually have to work very hard in school because the material is easy, and are rarely rewarded proportionally for it because they can't do better than "perfect" and "perfect" is their "average". This means that if they ever ''do'' find something difficult, they feel like failures because they're ''supposed'' to be smart enough to handle anything, or get put under such pressure to succeed that they run themselves ragged for benefit other than avoiding the punishment that comes from being less than perfect. This usually ends with the gifted kid growing into an adult who shuts down when something doesn't come easily, either because they feel like a failure and are too ashamed to continue, or because they've been doing perfectly all their lives and have nothing to show for it except being eligible to be expected to be perfect somewhere else.
7th Oct '15 12:46:22 PM Andyroid
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* As anyone with hypersensitivity will tell you:SuperSenses = SensoryOverload = this trope.
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* As anyone with hypersensitivity will tell you:SuperSenses you: SuperSenses = SensoryOverload = this trope.

** Gifted children are especially vulnerable to this trope, since they seem to be in a sort of lose-lose situation. Either they are encouraged to stimulate their intelectual capacities (meaning that they have to skip entire years of school and go directly to University at an early age, meaning they have to be in a completely foreign environment for them) or they are kept in their school year (which, while benefits them due to the fact that they can interact with boys their age, can cause them to be problematic, since they are sitting in a class learning things they already know).
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** Gifted children are especially vulnerable to this trope, since they seem to be in a sort of lose-lose situation. Either they are encouraged to stimulate their intelectual intellectual capacities (meaning that they have to skip entire years of school and go directly to University at an early age, meaning they have to be in a completely foreign environment for them) or they are kept in their school year (which, while benefits them due to the fact that they can interact with boys children their age, can cause them to be problematic, since they are sitting in a class learning things they already know).know). * A rare genetic condition called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urbach%E2%80%93Wiethe_disease Urbach-Wiethe disease]] can, in some cases, cause damage to the amygdala, dampening or removing the victim's ability to feel fear. Which, on top of all the dermatological and neurological problems caused by Urbach-Wiethe diease, means you're not afraid of anything... including things that could be potentially dangerous.
31st Aug '15 1:08:36 PM DDRMASTERM
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* Being famous in general can become this, especially if it's [[NeverLiveItDown for bad reasons]]. See CelebrityIsOverrated.
2nd Jul '15 8:49:48 PM Fawfulster
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* Being a genius also sucks. A lot of people with extreme high I.Q.'s or intelligence suffer from depression because they don't have anybody on their level to talk to. Many also don't see the point of using their talent for higher benefits as they would rather have a normal life. And a lot of people with extreme high intelligence are often loners who have trouble living together with more average people.
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* Being a genius also sucks. A lot of people with extreme high I.Q.'s or intelligence suffer from depression because they don't have anybody on their level to talk to. Many also don't see the point of using their talent for higher benefits as they would rather have a normal life. And a lot of people with extreme high intelligence are often loners who have trouble living together with more average people. people. ** Gifted children are especially vulnerable to this trope, since they seem to be in a sort of lose-lose situation. Either they are encouraged to stimulate their intelectual capacities (meaning that they have to skip entire years of school and go directly to University at an early age, meaning they have to be in a completely foreign environment for them) or they are kept in their school year (which, while benefits them due to the fact that they can interact with boys their age, can cause them to be problematic, since they are sitting in a class learning things they already know).
23rd Jan '15 4:34:43 PM Patachou
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* Being a genius also sucks. A lot of people with extreme high I.Q.'s or intelligence suffer from depression because they don't have anybody on their level to talk to. Many also don't see the point of using their talent for higher benefits as they would rather have a normal life.
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* Being a genius also sucks. A lot of people with extreme high I.Q.'s or intelligence suffer from depression because they don't have anybody on their level to talk to. Many also don't see the point of using their talent for higher benefits as they would rather have a normal life. And a lot of people with extreme high intelligence are often loners who have trouble living together with more average people.
23rd Jan '15 4:33:17 PM Patachou
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* Being a genius also sucks. A lot of people with extreme high I.Q.'s or intelligence suffer from depression because they don't have anybody on their level to talk to. Many also don't see the point of using their talent for higher benefits as they would rather have a normal life.
19th Nov '14 10:30:46 PM Deathhacker
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooke_Greenberg Brooke Greenberg]] may hold the secret to immortality, or the very least how aging works. She has stayed the same physical and mental age for years. That age? 9 months to 1 year old. ** She passed away on October 23, 2013, so "holding the secret to immortality" is right out.
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooke_Greenberg Brooke Greenberg]] may hold the secret to immortality, or the very least how aging works. She has stayed the same physical and mental age for years. That age? 9 months to 1 year old. ** She old. Unfortunately she passed away on October 23, 2013, so "holding the secret but due to immortality" is right out.a disease unrelated to her age (actually it's semi-related, but it's because it affects all toddlers biologically 9 months to a year old).
27th Sep '14 9:18:06 PM randomtroper89
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* [[http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-20009051-10391704.html Lizzie Velasquez]] is a woman who suffers from a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). She consumes as much as 8,000 calories a day, yet is still extremely thin at only 56 lbs (25.4 kg or 4 stone).
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* [[http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-20009051-10391704.html [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lizzie_Vel%C3%A1squez Lizzie Velasquez]] is a woman who suffers from a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). She consumes as much as 8,000 calories a day, yet is still extremely thin at only 56 lbs (25.4 kg or 4 stone).
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