History AwesomeMusic / Classical

25th Jul '17 8:05:28 PM mlsmithca
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* Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov is one of the more well regarded of the "Mighty Handful" of five Russian nationalist composers of the late 19th century,[[note]] The other four are Borodin, Mussorgsky, Mily Balakirev, and Cesar Cui.[[/note]] much of his music transcending Russian borders to have universal appeal.

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* Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov is one of the more well regarded of the "Mighty Handful" of five Russian nationalist composers of the late 19th century,[[note]] The other four are Borodin, Mussorgsky, Mily Balakirev, and Cesar Cui.[[/note]] century, much of his music transcending Russian borders to have universal appeal.
25th Jul '17 7:53:09 PM mlsmithca
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** ''Theatre/MadamaButterfly'' completes the triptych of some of the most frequently performed operas not just by Puccini, but by any composer. It is certainly not the most racially sensitive opera, but it still contains some truly outstanding music, especially the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sguDvcD9TJQ extended love duet]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlP7QHuhLJg between Butterfly and Pinkerton]] at the end of Act I, and the celebrated aria [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1woH96ROG-c "Un bel di vedremo"]] from Act II, sung as Butterfly waxes romantic about Pinkerton's impending return, not knowing the unpleasant surprises that await her when he does. The orchestra's final cadence as Pinkerton finds Butterfly dead was harmonically unusual for the time, but certainly makes for a memorable conclusion.



* Music/GioachinoRossini is one of the most regularly-performed opera composers, and his overtures are particular standouts - ''The Thieving Magpie'', ''The Barber of Seville'', and quintessentially ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7O91GDWGPU Wilhelm Tell]]''.

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* Music/GioachinoRossini is one of the most regularly-performed opera composers, and his overtures are particular standouts - ''The Thieving Magpie'', ''The Barber of Seville'', and quintessentially ''[[http://www.composers.
** By far Rossini's most popular opera is ''Theatre/TheBarberOfSeville'', with especially famous moments including its lively [[https://www.
youtube.com/watch?v=c7O91GDWGPU Wilhelm Tell]]''.com/watch?v=OloXRhesab0 overture]] (frequently used in animated and live-action films and television, such as the Creator/WarnerBros short ''WesternAnimation/TheRabbitOfSeville'' and the closing credits to Music/TheBeatles' film ''Film/{{Help}}'') and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ipb9xbXSAY "Largo al factotum",]] the [[IAmSong introductory aria]] of the opera's cheerful protagonist, Figaro; the passage halfway through when he sings his own name over and over is one of the most widely referenced and parodied moments in opera.
** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MRvDGd02mA overture]] to ''The Thieving Magpie'' is one of Rossini's best, and full of {{Standard Snippet}}s (most notably the easy-going clarinet theme from the centre section). It was used to great effect for several of the fight scenes in ''Film/AClockworkOrange''.
** Rossini's most famous single composition in many countries is the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoBE69wdSkQ overture]] to ''Theatre/WilliamTell'', even if many people who live in those countries are unable to hear it without imagining Series/TheLoneRanger and Silver galloping across the desert. And there's so much more to the overture than just the "''Lone Ranger'' theme", which is the fourth of four major sections, the others including a solemn opening prominently featuring a solo cello, a terrifying musical storm, and a gentle pastoral (the second most familiar theme from the overture).
25th Jul '17 6:13:44 PM mlsmithca
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*** One of the few compositions Rachmaninoff produced after emigrating to the United States after the Bolshevik Revolution was the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAu6BRWL8p8 Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini,]] a set of 24 variations on Paganini's Caprice No.24 in A minor (see corresponding entry). Though in one movement, the piece has a four-movement internal structure, opening with an introduction that starts not with the theme, but the first variation (a stripped-down version of the theme), and including several variations incorporating the "Dies irae" plainchant theme, a diptych of boisterous major key variations on an inversion of the theme, the emotional centre that is Variation 18 (also based on an inversion of the theme), and a coda after the final variation that ties together all the concerto's ideas before a comically understated final gesture.

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*** One of the few compositions Rachmaninoff produced after emigrating to the United States after the Bolshevik Revolution was the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAu6BRWL8p8 Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini,]] a set of 24 variations on Paganini's Caprice No.24 in A minor (see corresponding entry). Though in one movement, the piece has a four-movement internal structure, opening with an introduction that starts not with the theme, but the first variation (a stripped-down version of the theme), and including several variations incorporating the "Dies irae" plainchant theme, a diptych of boisterous major key variations on an inversion of the theme, the emotional centre that is Variation 18 (also based on an inversion of the theme), and a coda after the final variation that ties together all the concerto's rhapsody's ideas before a comically understated final gesture.



*** The 10 Preludes, Op.23, were part of the same flurry of creativity as the second concerto. The brilliant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiYT0Iu9Hnw No.2 in B-flat major]] starts with an alternately soaring and swooping accompanying figure under a syncopated melody, and just gets better from there; the buildup to the return of the opening melody is a particular highlight. The stately [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pJkPfTsEcE No.3 in D minor]] is the most richly contrapuntal of Rachmaninoff's preludes, the opening five-note figure providing the thread for an elaborate tapestry of melodies weaving around each other. The marchlike [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDFCCHjLzjs No.5 in G minor]] is the most famous of the set, its crashing chords and descending parallel octaves framing a slower centre section of harmonic tension. And the non-stop whirlwind trifecta of the dizzying [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyxpeLh7z3s No.7 in C minor]], the sparkling [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnLyzrHJx_I No.8 in A-flat major]], and the troubled [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaoGWXxhzc No.9 in E-flat minor]] (noted for its extremely difficult double-note figures in the right hand) will leave any pianist or listener breathless.

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*** The 10 Preludes, Op.23, were part of the same flurry of creativity as the second piano concerto. The brilliant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiYT0Iu9Hnw No.2 in B-flat major]] starts with an alternately soaring and swooping accompanying figure under a syncopated melody, and just gets better from there; the buildup to the return of the opening melody is a particular highlight. The stately [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pJkPfTsEcE No.3 in D minor]] is the most richly contrapuntal of Rachmaninoff's preludes, the opening five-note figure providing the thread for an elaborate tapestry of melodies weaving around each other. The marchlike [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDFCCHjLzjs No.5 in G minor]] is the most famous of the set, its crashing chords and descending parallel octaves framing a slower centre section of harmonic tension. And the non-stop whirlwind trifecta of the dizzying [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyxpeLh7z3s No.7 in C minor]], the sparkling [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnLyzrHJx_I No.8 in A-flat major]], and the troubled [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaoGWXxhzc No.9 in E-flat minor]] (noted for its extremely difficult double-note figures in the right hand) will leave any pianist or listener breathless.
25th Jul '17 6:12:23 PM mlsmithca
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** ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' has more than earned its place as one of Puccini's most popular operas, and perhaps the highlights are the heartbroken arias [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLR3lSrqlww "Vissi d'arte",]] sung by the title character as she laments having seemingly been abandoned by God in the face of the TropeNamer for ScarpiaUltimatum,[[note]] It nearly didn't make it into the opera; Puccini thought it slowed the action down and wanted to cut it.[[/note]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mX7ugJ5NM8 "E lucevan le stelle",]] sung by Cavaradossi as he reflects on his life while facing execution at dawn. "Vissi d'arte" is particularly powerful when sung by Maria Callas, who made Tosca one of her signature roles.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdTBml4oOZ8 "Nessun Dorma"]] from ''Theatre/{{Turandot}}''. The end of the aria is the bit that everyone knows (Luciano Pavarotti in particular made it something of a signature tune in his repertoire):
--->Dilegua, o notte! Tramontate, stelle! (Vanish, o night! Set, stars!)\\

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** ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' has more than earned its place as one of Puccini's most popular operas, and perhaps the highlights are the heartbroken arias [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLR3lSrqlww "Vissi d'arte",]] d'arte"]] (especially when performed by Greek-American soprano Maria Callas), sung by the title character as she laments having seemingly been abandoned by God in the face of the TropeNamer for ScarpiaUltimatum,[[note]] It nearly didn't make it into the opera; Puccini thought it slowed the action down and wanted to cut it.[[/note]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mX7ugJ5NM8 "E lucevan le stelle",]] sung by Cavaradossi as he reflects on his life while facing execution at dawn. "Vissi d'arte" dawn.
** ''Theatre/{{Turandot}}'' was the opera Puccini was composing at his death, and it ranks among his best:
*** "Nessun Dorma"
is particularly powerful when sung by Maria Callas, who made Tosca one of her signature roles.
**
possibly Puccini's most well-known composition, with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdTBml4oOZ8 "Nessun Dorma"]] from ''Theatre/{{Turandot}}''. Luciano Pavarotti]] making it one of his signature arias and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg-59NoES2o Franco Corelli]] also having some thrilling moments with it. The end of the aria last minute or so is the bit that everyone knows (Luciano Pavarotti in particular made it something of a signature tune in his repertoire):
--->Dilegua,
knows:
---->Dilegua,
o notte! Tramontate, stelle! (Vanish, o night! Set, stars!)\\



*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg-59NoES2o Franco Corelli]] had some thrilling moments with this one, too.



** All four of Rachmaninoff's piano concerti embody awesomeness to varying degrees. Though [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vna-_bCgb70 No.2 in C minor]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOOfoW5_2iE No.3 in D minor]] are the most popular and frequently performed, there's a lot to like about [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZfEeJkqaFE No.1 in F-sharp minor]][[note]] inspired, as mentioned under Grieg's entries, by the Grieg concerto, which was in turn inspired by the Schumann concerto, but for a "copy of a copy" it still manages to be a sharply-defined and brilliant piece![[/note]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbMcdWJv7cI No.4 in G minor]], as well as [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAu6BRWL8p8 the Paganini Rhapsody]]. Rachmaninoff wrote them to perform himself, and as he was one of the greatest piano virtuosi of his day, they are all very difficult to play (No.3 stands alongside the second concerti of Bartók, Prokofiev, and especially Brahms as a candidate for ''the'' most difficult concerto in the standard repertoire[[note]] As to which is most difficult of all, that topic regularly spawns long Internet discussion threads, though the Rachmaninoff has perhaps the most daunting reputation as it is more frequently performed and recorded than the Bartók or Prokofiev concerti, and its solo part is more extroverted and flashy than that of the Brahms concerto.[[/note]]), but amid the fireworks are some of the most outstanding melodies written for piano and orchestra.

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** All four of five of Rachmaninoff's compositions for piano concerti and orchestra embody awesomeness to varying degrees. Though He wrote them to perform himself, and as he was one of the greatest piano virtuosi of his day, they are all very difficult to play, but amid the fireworks are some of the most outstanding melodies written for piano and orchestra.
*** Rachmaninoff's
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vna-_bCgb70 com/watch?v=-ZfEeJkqaFE Piano Concerto No.2 1 in C F-sharp minor]] was his first published composition and was inspired, as mentioned under Grieg's entries, by the Grieg concerto, which was in turn inspired by the Schumann concerto, but for a "copy of a copy" it still manages to be a sharply-defined and brilliant piece, with lots of showy moments for the soloist and orchestra.
***
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOOfoW5_2iE com/watch?v=Vna-_bCgb70 Piano Concerto No.3 2 in D C minor]] are was the piece with which Rachmaninoff snapped out of a several-year creative funk following the disastrous premiere of his Symphony No.1, and by this point he had settled more thoroughly into the lush, emotionally charged style that dominated most of his output. From the hushed chords for solo piano in the very first measures (which re-appear near the beginning of the finale in the orchestra) to the flying and diving accompaniment to the orchestra's weighty main theme in the first movement, to a second movement whose songlike melody was "adapted" by Eric Carmen into "All by Myself", to a finale that works its way from tragedy to triumph, it remains one of the composer's most popular and frequently performed, there's a lot to like about works.
*** More popular still is
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZfEeJkqaFE com/watch?v=MOOfoW5_2iE Piano Concerto No.1 3 in F-sharp minor]][[note]] inspired, as mentioned under Grieg's entries, by the Grieg concerto, D minor,]] which was in turn inspired by is regularly named alongside the Schumann concerto, second concerti of Bartók, Prokofiev, and especially Brahms as a candidate for ''the'' most difficult concerto in the standard repertoire.[[note]] As to which is most difficult of all, that topic regularly spawns long Internet discussion threads, though the Rachmaninoff has perhaps the most daunting reputation as it is more frequently performed and recorded than the Bartók or Prokofiev concerti, and its solo part is more extroverted and flashy than that of the Brahms concerto.[[/note]] The almost vocal opening melody, doubled up across the hands, sounds simple enough, but later in the first movement there are individual measures that include more notes than the first two pages! The fireworks are even flashier in the finale, but the concerto finds time for a "copy of a copy" it still manages to be a sharply-defined emotional sensitivity as well, particularly in the second movement and brilliant piece![[/note]] and the E-flat major interlude in the third movement.
***
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbMcdWJv7cI Piano Concerto No.4 in G minor]], minor]] is the shortest and least performed of Rachmaninoff's piano concerti, and one of his most abstract and experimental compositions; though he was not a fan of the music of such composers as well as Bartók, Stravinsky, and the members of Les Six and the Second Viennese School, he was still aware of it, and while the results of his acknowledgement have divided critics, they are never less than compelling, especially in the second movement.
*** One of the few compositions Rachmaninoff produced after emigrating to the United States after the Bolshevik Revolution was the
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAu6BRWL8p8 Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini,]] a set of 24 variations on Paganini's Caprice No.24 in A minor (see corresponding entry). Though in one movement, the Paganini Rhapsody]]. Rachmaninoff wrote them to perform himself, and as he was one piece has a four-movement internal structure, opening with an introduction that starts not with the theme, but the first variation (a stripped-down version of the greatest piano virtuosi of his day, they are all very difficult to play (No.3 stands alongside theme), and including several variations incorporating the second concerti "Dies irae" plainchant theme, a diptych of Bartók, Prokofiev, and especially Brahms as a candidate for ''the'' most difficult concerto in the standard repertoire[[note]] As to which is most difficult of all, that topic regularly spawns long Internet discussion threads, though the Rachmaninoff has perhaps the most daunting reputation as it is more frequently performed and recorded than the Bartók or Prokofiev concerti, and its solo part is more extroverted and flashy than that boisterous major key variations on an inversion of the Brahms concerto.[[/note]]), but amid theme, the fireworks are some emotional centre that is Variation 18 (also based on an inversion of the most outstanding melodies written for piano theme), and orchestra.a coda after the final variation that ties together all the concerto's ideas before a comically understated final gesture.



*** The 10 Preludes, Op.23, were some of the first pieces Rachmaninoff wrote after snapping out of a several-year creative funk. The brilliant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiYT0Iu9Hnw No.2 in B-flat major]] starts with an alternately soaring and swooping accompanying figure under a syncopated melody, and just gets better from there; the buildup to the return of the opening melody is a particular highlight. The stately [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pJkPfTsEcE No.3 in D minor]] is the most richly contrapuntal of Rachmaninoff's preludes, the opening five-note figure providing the thread for an elaborate tapestry of melodies weaving around each other. The marchlike [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDFCCHjLzjs No.5 in G minor]] is the most famous of the set, its crashing chords and descending parallel octaves framing a slower centre section of harmonic tension. And the non-stop whirlwind trifecta of the dizzying [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyxpeLh7z3s No.7 in C minor]], the sparkling [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnLyzrHJx_I No.8 in A-flat major]], and the troubled [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaoGWXxhzc No.9 in E-flat minor]] (noted for its extremely difficult double-note figures in the right hand) will leave any pianist or listener breathless.

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*** The 10 Preludes, Op.23, were some part of the first pieces Rachmaninoff wrote after snapping out same flurry of a several-year creative funk.creativity as the second concerto. The brilliant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiYT0Iu9Hnw No.2 in B-flat major]] starts with an alternately soaring and swooping accompanying figure under a syncopated melody, and just gets better from there; the buildup to the return of the opening melody is a particular highlight. The stately [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pJkPfTsEcE No.3 in D minor]] is the most richly contrapuntal of Rachmaninoff's preludes, the opening five-note figure providing the thread for an elaborate tapestry of melodies weaving around each other. The marchlike [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDFCCHjLzjs No.5 in G minor]] is the most famous of the set, its crashing chords and descending parallel octaves framing a slower centre section of harmonic tension. And the non-stop whirlwind trifecta of the dizzying [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyxpeLh7z3s No.7 in C minor]], the sparkling [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnLyzrHJx_I No.8 in A-flat major]], and the troubled [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaoGWXxhzc No.9 in E-flat minor]] (noted for its extremely difficult double-note figures in the right hand) will leave any pianist or listener breathless.
25th Jul '17 11:27:53 AM mlsmithca
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** ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' has more than earned its place as one of Puccini's most popular operas, and perhaps the highlight is the heartfelt aria [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLR3lSrqlww "Vissi d'arte"]] sung by the title character as she laments having seemingly been abandoned by God in the face of the TropeNamer for ScarpiaUltimatum.[[note]] And it nearly didn't make it into the opera; Puccini thought it slowed the action down and wanted to cut it.[[/note]] It is especially potent when sung by celebrated operatic soprano Maria Callas.

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** ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' has more than earned its place as one of Puccini's most popular operas, and perhaps the highlight is highlights are the heartfelt aria heartbroken arias [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLR3lSrqlww "Vissi d'arte"]] d'arte",]] sung by the title character as she laments having seemingly been abandoned by God in the face of the TropeNamer for ScarpiaUltimatum.[[note]] And it ScarpiaUltimatum,[[note]] It nearly didn't make it into the opera; Puccini thought it slowed the action down and wanted to cut it.[[/note]] It and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mX7ugJ5NM8 "E lucevan le stelle",]] sung by Cavaradossi as he reflects on his life while facing execution at dawn. "Vissi d'arte" is especially potent particularly powerful when sung by celebrated operatic soprano Maria Callas.Callas, who made Tosca one of her signature roles.
25th Jul '17 11:21:33 AM mlsmithca
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*** Nos.8-10 form the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQz5tWzVQiA Concerto for solo piano]] (another piece that actually loses something when attempts are made to transcribe it for piano and orchestra); the epic-length opening movement (nearly half an hour in most performances and recordings) in G-sharp minor requires a soloist of titanic endurance and skill to get through, and that's just for starters; there's still the haunting slow movement in C-sharp minor and relentless polonaise-like finale in F-sharp minor waiting for performer and listener alike, but the triumphant major key coda at the very end makes it all worth it. Truly outstanding just to hear, even more so to see performed live.

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*** Nos.8-10 form the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQz5tWzVQiA Concerto for solo piano]] (another piece that actually loses something when attempts are made to transcribe it for piano and orchestra); the orchestra). The epic-length opening movement (nearly half an hour in most performances and recordings) in G-sharp minor requires a soloist of titanic endurance and skill to get through, and that's just for starters; there's still the haunting slow movement in C-sharp minor and relentless polonaise-like finale in F-sharp minor waiting for performer and listener alike, but the triumphant major key coda at the very end makes it all worth it. Truly outstanding just to hear, even more so to see performed live.



*** It has been said of the 9th Symphony that Beethoven, in his final symphonic work, showed a desire to reach beyond the music itself and draw upon something divine. To cap this off, on the night of the Symphony's premiere, the performance received five standing ovations. What's so special about this? The Emperor of Austria received three when attending performances and it was custom for no one to outdo this. Yes, that's right, Beethoven became greater than an Emperor for his music. (And the first three movements are pretty awesome as well - so much so that Beethoven quotes each of them briefly at the beginning of the finale.) Of particular note is the performance led by Leonard Bernstein at the Brandenburg Gate just after the opening of the UsefulNotes/BerlinWall. He made just one slight change to the lyrics, replacing the word ''Freuden'' (Joy) with ''Freiheit'' [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments (Freedom)]]. (Beethoven, for all this MadArtist tendencies, would almost certainly have cried with ''Freude'' had he been there.)

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*** It has been said of the 9th Symphony that Beethoven, in his final symphonic work, showed a desire to reach beyond the music itself and draw upon something divine. To cap this off, on the night of the Symphony's premiere, the performance received five standing ovations. What's so special about this? The Emperor of Austria received three when attending performances and it was custom for no one to outdo this. Yes, that's right, Beethoven became greater than an Emperor for his music. (And the first three movements are pretty awesome as well - so much so that Beethoven quotes each of them briefly at the beginning of the finale.) Of particular note is the performance led by Leonard Bernstein at the Brandenburg Gate just after the opening of the UsefulNotes/BerlinWall. He made just one slight change to the lyrics, replacing the word ''Freuden'' (Joy) with ''Freiheit'' [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments (Freedom)]]. (Beethoven, for all this MadArtist tendencies, would almost certainly have cried with ''Freude'' had he been there.)



** The posthumous nocturne in C-sharp minor is somewhat light on the technical demands (Chopin wrote it for his sister Ludwika as a technical study to prepare her for his F minor piano concerto, from which it features several direct quotes), but it makes up for it with expressive challenges that pretty much define "heartbreakingly beautiful". It was memorably used in ''Film/ThePianist'' as the piece Wladyslaw Szpilman plays on live radio as the first bombs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII fall on Warsaw, and the piece with which he opens his first broadcast after the Nazis have been driven out of the city.

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** The posthumous nocturne in C-sharp minor is somewhat light on the technical demands (Chopin wrote it for his sister Ludwika as a technical study to prepare her for his F minor piano concerto, from which it features several direct quotes), but it makes up for it with expressive challenges that pretty much define "heartbreakingly beautiful". It was memorably used in ''Film/ThePianist'' as the piece Wladyslaw Szpilman plays on live radio as the first bombs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII fall on Warsaw, and the piece with which he opens his first broadcast after the Nazis have been driven out of the city.



** ''Theatre/LaBoheme''. All. Of. It. But ESPECIALLY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_UtIy5VEz0 "O soave fanciulla"]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZzC6e6olCY "Quando m'en vo"]] (a.k.a. Musetta's Waltz). If you hear opera in a movie or TV show and it's not Flight of the Valkyries, there's a good chance it's this.

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** ''Theatre/LaBoheme''. All. Of. It. But ESPECIALLY [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_UtIy5VEz0 "O soave fanciulla"]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZzC6e6olCY "Quando m'en vo"]] (a.k.a. Musetta's Waltz). If you hear opera in a movie or TV show and it's not Flight "Flight of the Valkyries, Valkyries", there's a good chance it's this.this.
** ''Theatre/{{Tosca}}'' has more than earned its place as one of Puccini's most popular operas, and perhaps the highlight is the heartfelt aria [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLR3lSrqlww "Vissi d'arte"]] sung by the title character as she laments having seemingly been abandoned by God in the face of the TropeNamer for ScarpiaUltimatum.[[note]] And it nearly didn't make it into the opera; Puccini thought it slowed the action down and wanted to cut it.[[/note]] It is especially potent when sung by celebrated operatic soprano Maria Callas.



*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg-59NoES2o Franco Corelli]] had some pretty thrilling moments with this one, too.

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*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg-59NoES2o Franco Corelli]] had some pretty thrilling moments with this one, too.
23rd Jul '17 1:21:45 AM mlsmithca
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*** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwLry7SV8I4 Octet in F major]] for clarinet, bassoon, horn, and string quintet (with double bass) is six movements of concentrated brilliance that manages to outshine the piece it imitates (Beethoven's Septet in E-flat major for the same instruments, less one violin).
*** Schubert's two piano trios in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N81xYAFfkvQ B-flat major]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPhhTdRHBWM E-flat major]] are among the greatest examples of the form; the second movement from the E-flat major trio was memorably used for the score to Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1975 film ''Film/BarryLyndon''.
*** His [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l06wDJIjQ2M last]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQgEBkdfNlg four]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fXYjSmR6Bw string]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0w9QhJePF4 quartets]] very nearly rival Beethoven's last five quartets as supreme examples of the form. No.14 in D minor, "Death and the Maiden", is the most popular (the coda of the finale, an adrenaline rush in which a triumphant major key conclusion is subverted at the last minute, is a particular highlight), but all four are awesome in many ways.

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*** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwLry7SV8I4 Octet in F major]] for clarinet, bassoon, horn, and string quintet (with double bass) is six movements of concentrated brilliance that manages to outshine the piece it imitates (Beethoven's imitates, Beethoven's Septet in E-flat major for the same instruments, less one violin).
violin (see corresponding entry). Highlights include a clarinet solo-led slow movement, a rollicking scherzo and trio, a graceful set of variations on the melody of one of the composer's early Lieder, and a finale with a dark, minor key introduction that soon gives way to a joyful major key sonata allegro.
*** Schubert's two piano trios in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N81xYAFfkvQ B-flat major]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPhhTdRHBWM E-flat major]] are among the greatest examples of the form; the second movement from the E-flat major trio was memorably used for the score to Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1975 film ''Film/BarryLyndon''.
''Film/BarryLyndon'', and its main theme re-appears in two episodes in the finale to give the work a sense of unity.
*** His [[http://www.last four string quartets very nearly rival Beethoven's last five quartets as supreme examples of the form. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l06wDJIjQ2M last]] [[http://www.No.12 in C minor]] only ever had its first movement completed, but what a powerful movement it is! [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQgEBkdfNlg four]] [[http://www.No.13 in A minor]] is inspired by melodies from the composer's early work, including the incidental music to the play ''Rosamunde'' (whence the quartet gets its nickname). The dramatic and intense [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fXYjSmR6Bw string]] [[http://www.No.14 in D minor]] (''Death and the Maiden'') is perhaps the most popular of Schubert's quartets; the coda of the finale, in which a triumphant major resolution is subverted at the last minute, is a particular highlight. And [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0w9QhJePF4 quartets]] very nearly rival Beethoven's last five quartets as supreme examples of the form. com/watch?v=cjMXIyPHo7c No.14 15 in D minor, "Death and the Maiden", is the most popular (the coda of the finale, an adrenaline rush in which a triumphant major key conclusion is subverted G major]] finds Schubert at the last minute, is a particular highlight), but all four height of his flair for surprising harmonic modulations; the outer movements are awesome in many ways.especially striking as they hop between the major and minor modes with abandon.



** Schubert's last three piano sonatas are often pointed to as examples of how Schubert was fast catching up with Beethoven as a master of the form, and may have overtaken him had he not died aged 31.[[note]] For comparison, when Beethoven was 31, the sonatas published as Nos.21-32 were still ahead of him.[[/note]] The agitated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltvKcZ9U5QA Sonata in C minor]] bookends a charming slow movement and a tense minuet with two storms very much in the mould of Beethoven's ''Pathetique'' sonata in the same key. The heroic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EClFYa3APA8 Sonata in A major]] is ingeniously tied off with a neat bow when the chord progression in the opening measures of the first movement recurs near the end of the finale. And the easy-going [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbJtHzaFpBQ Sonata in B-flat major]] is perhaps the greatest piano sonata composed between Beethoven's last sonata and Liszt's B minor sonata, with all four movements, especially the epic-length first (over 20 minutes with repeats in most recordings and performances), packed with Schubert's signature songlike melodies and unexpected harmonic shifts.

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** Schubert's last three piano sonatas are often pointed to as examples of how Schubert was fast catching up with Beethoven as a master of the form, and may have overtaken him had he not died aged 31.[[note]] For comparison, when Beethoven was 31, the sonatas published as Nos.21-32 were still ahead of him.[[/note]] The agitated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltvKcZ9U5QA Sonata No.19 in C minor]] bookends a charming slow movement and a tense minuet with two storms very much in the mould of Beethoven's ''Pathetique'' sonata in the same key. The heroic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EClFYa3APA8 Sonata No.20 in A major]] is ingeniously tied off with a neat bow when the chord progression in the opening measures of the first movement recurs near the end of the finale. And the easy-going [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbJtHzaFpBQ Sonata No.21 in B-flat major]] is perhaps the greatest piano sonata composed between Beethoven's last sonata and Liszt's B minor sonata, with all four movements, especially the epic-length first (over 20 minutes with repeats in most recordings and performances), packed with Schubert's signature songlike melodies and unexpected harmonic shifts.[[note]] If you found the different numbering systems for Schubert's symphonies difficult to follow, you'd find the different numbering systems for his piano sonatas even more so! The numbers included here are the most widely used.[[/note]]
22nd Jul '17 10:31:29 AM mlsmithca
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** The Requiem Mass was the last piece Mozart began composing; left unfinished at his death[[note]]his student, Franz Xaver Sussmayr, sketched it to completion, but the quality (and quantity) of Sussmayr's contributions is a subject of considerable debate.[[/note]], it is still packed with awesome in every measure. The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARO7ZjsXSkE "Dies irae"]] is a shining example, and "Confutatis, maledictis" will leave you breathless. (This was the one that Mozart was doing additive composition on with Salieri near the end of ''Film/{{Amadeus}}''.)

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** Mozart's piano sonatas include many fine examples of the form, and were an inspiration to many late Classical and early Romantic composers.
*** The extroverted [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TJTGOj03cU No.6 in D major]] (''Dürnitz'') moves through a lively sonata allegro and a polonaise-inspired slow movement to a finale which explores the limits of what can be done with a theme and variations in a piano sonata as it runs the theme through ''twelve'' variations.
*** The anguished [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKs1WpMJ0X8 No.8 in A minor]] was composed shortly after Mozart's mother died, and frames a heartfelt Andante with two movements that are all fire and brimstone, especially the compact rondo finale.
*** The genial [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VsqHXV8M3A No.11 in A major]] opens with one of Mozart's finest theme and variations movements, moves on to a stately minuet and trio, and finishes with the StandardSnippet-led Rondo alla Turca, deservedly one of the composer's most popular works and regularly used in films, television series, and video games.
*** The jagged [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPHj-PhnA9s No.14 in C minor]] (nearly always preceded in performances and recordings by the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLfcuLFNe_E Fantasy]] in the same key) has a first movement that blasts off up a C minor arpeggio and just gets better from there, followed by one of the composer's loveliest slow movements for piano solo (with a theme that, like many other aspects of the C minor sonata, seems to predict Beethoven's ''Pathetique'' sonata in the same key, composed fifteen years later) and a stormy rondo finale.
** The Requiem Mass was the last piece Mozart began composing; left unfinished at his death[[note]]his death[[note]]His student, Franz Xaver Sussmayr, sketched it to completion, but the quality (and quantity) of Sussmayr's contributions is a subject of considerable debate.[[/note]], it is still packed with awesome in every measure. The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARO7ZjsXSkE "Dies irae"]] is a shining example, and "Confutatis, maledictis" will leave you breathless. (This was the one that Mozart was doing additive composition on with Salieri near the end of ''Film/{{Amadeus}}''.)
20th Jul '17 8:59:34 AM mlsmithca
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** There's the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsI0yTC7bic "Egmont" Overture]] - just so magnificently gorgeous and evocative.

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** There's the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsI0yTC7bic "Egmont" Overture]] - just so magnificently gorgeous and evocative. It was especially powerfully used during the memorial for the Israeli athletes who were killed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich.



*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8XYrNrlBj4 No.8 in C minor]] (''Pathetique'')[[note]] The only title Beethoven himself gave one of his piano sonatas[[/note]] is indelibly carved on the public consciousness, from its stormy first movement, through the placid, StandardSnippet-led slow movement, to the agitated finale.

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*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8XYrNrlBj4 No.8 in C minor]] (''Pathetique'')[[note]] The only title Beethoven himself gave one of his piano sonatas[[/note]] is the piece with which Beethoven first found a truly original voice as a composer, and has been indelibly carved on the public consciousness, from its consciousness since it was first performed in 1798. It is packed with compositional approaches that may seem mundane now but were highly novel at the time, such as the stormy first movement, movement returning to the slow introduction at the beginning of the development and the coda. The awesome continues through the placid, StandardSnippet-led slow movement, to the movement and agitated finale.rondo finale (the main theme of which recalls a theme from the first movement).



*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tr0otuiQuU No.14 in C-sharp minor]] (''Moonlight'') stands as one of his greatest achievements for piano, from its immediately recognisable slow opening movement to the almost non-stop storm of virtuosity in the finale.

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*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tr0otuiQuU No.14 in C-sharp minor]] (''Moonlight'') stands as one of his greatest achievements for piano, from its immediately recognisable slow opening movement to the almost non-stop storm of virtuosity in the finale. Though not quite as experimental with form as No.13, it shares with that sonata the trait of making the finale, not the opening movement, the main focal point of the work, an idea Beethoven used more frequently in later compositions (Symphony No.9 being the most famous example).



*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ak_7tTxZrk No.23 in F minor]] (''Appassionata'') has perhaps single-handedly created an association between the key of F minor and dark, deeply passionate music. The relentless energy of the finale is a highlight.

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*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ak_7tTxZrk No.23 in F minor]] (''Appassionata'') has perhaps single-handedly created an association between the key of F minor and dark, deeply passionate music. The music, with an opening movement that is among the most highly emotional works Beethoven composed. It is followed by a dignified theme and variations that leads straight into a finale of such relentless energy of (in which it is the finale recapitulation, not the exposition, that is a highlight.intended to be repeated) that even the audience will be exhausted by the end.
18th Jul '17 4:49:54 PM mlsmithca
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** Schubert's last three piano sonatas in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmfOgjjUPto C minor]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EClFYa3APA8 A major]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbJtHzaFpBQ B-flat major]] are often pointed to as examples of how Schubert was fast catching up with Beethoven as a master of the piano sonata, and may have overtaken him had he not died aged 31. The B-flat major sonata is especially awesome, but all three are must-hears.

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** Schubert's last three piano sonatas in [[http://www.are often pointed to as examples of how Schubert was fast catching up with Beethoven as a master of the form, and may have overtaken him had he not died aged 31.[[note]] For comparison, when Beethoven was 31, the sonatas published as Nos.21-32 were still ahead of him.[[/note]] The agitated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmfOgjjUPto com/watch?v=ltvKcZ9U5QA Sonata in C minor]], [[http://www.minor]] bookends a charming slow movement and a tense minuet with two storms very much in the mould of Beethoven's ''Pathetique'' sonata in the same key. The heroic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EClFYa3APA8 Sonata in A major]], and [[http://www.major]] is ingeniously tied off with a neat bow when the chord progression in the opening measures of the first movement recurs near the end of the finale. And the easy-going [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbJtHzaFpBQ Sonata in B-flat major]] are often pointed to as examples of how Schubert was fast catching up with Beethoven as a master of is perhaps the greatest piano sonata composed between Beethoven's last sonata and Liszt's B minor sonata, and may have overtaken him had he not died aged 31. The B-flat major sonata is with all four movements, especially awesome, but all three are must-hears.the epic-length first (over 20 minutes with repeats in most recordings and performances), packed with Schubert's signature songlike melodies and unexpected harmonic shifts.
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