History AwesomeMusic / Classical

5th Dec '16 12:27:56 PM mlsmithca
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** ''Theatre/{{Iolanthe}}'', as well as featuring a beautifully orchestrated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiYmol0p9kE overture]] that spins together six songs from the operetta,[[note]] It stands out as one of the few overtures composed solely by Sullivan rather than by his assistants (variously including Alfred Cellier, Eugene d'Albert, and Hamilton Clarke) working under his direction; the others include those for ''Theatre/PrincessIda'', ''Theatre/TheYeomenOfTheGuard'', ''Theatre/TheGondoliers'', ''Theatre/TheGrandDuke'', the lost overture to ''Thespis'', and the seldom-performed overture to ''Theatre/UtopiaLimited''.[[/note]] includes one of the great choral entrances of the Savoy operas in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnaDBVmlg6U "Loudly Let the Trumpet Bray"]] (AKA The March of the Peers). Although the onomatopaeic imitations of trumpets and drums helps to present the Lords as pompous twits (before their dialogue firmly establishes them as such), it still manages to be one of Gilbert and Sullivan's most stirring collaborations.

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** ''Theatre/{{Iolanthe}}'', as well as featuring a beautifully orchestrated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiYmol0p9kE overture]] that spins together six songs from the operetta,[[note]] It stands out as one of the few overtures composed solely by Sullivan rather than by his assistants (variously including Alfred Cellier, Eugene d'Albert, and Hamilton Clarke) working under his direction; the others include those for ''Theatre/PrincessIda'', ''Theatre/TheYeomenOfTheGuard'', ''Theatre/TheGondoliers'', ''Theatre/TheGrandDuke'', the lost overture to ''Thespis'', and the seldom-performed overture to ''Theatre/UtopiaLimited''.[[/note]] includes one of the great choral entrances of the Savoy operas in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnaDBVmlg6U "Loudly Let the Trumpet Bray"]] (AKA The March of the Peers). Although the onomatopaeic imitations of trumpets and drums helps help to present the Lords as pompous twits (before their dialogue firmly establishes them as such), it still manages to be one of Gilbert and Sullivan's most stirring collaborations.



** When George VI was crowned in 1936 Walton wrote the awesome ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M9xZlA2zn8 Crown Imperial]]'' march, which have since been played frequently at festive occasions in the House of Windsor.

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** When George VI was crowned in 1936 Walton wrote the awesome ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M9xZlA2zn8 Crown Imperial]]'' march, which have has since been played frequently at festive occasions in the House of Windsor.
3rd Dec '16 4:24:07 PM mlsmithca
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** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfS7TVQhQTw second movement]] of his Symphony No.3, ''Espansiva'', is a balsamic Pastorale, with a soprano and a baritone vocalizing softly in the background. Sublime.



** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfS7TVQhQTw second movement]] of his Symphony No. 3 ''Espansiva'', is a balsamic Pastorale, with a soprano and a baritone vocalizing softly in the background. Sublime.
** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN24JMf72Ck second movement]] of his Symphony No. 6 ''Semplice'' is delightfully weird: a small group of wind and percussion instruments goofs around and bumps into each other, finds a melody snippet or two, gets heckled by a yawning trombone, and then fizzle out.

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** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfS7TVQhQTw second movement]] of his Symphony No. 3 ''Espansiva'', is a balsamic Pastorale, with a soprano and a baritone vocalizing softly in the background. Sublime.
** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN24JMf72Ck second movement]] of his Symphony No. 6 ''Semplice'' 6, ''Semplice'', is delightfully weird: a small group of wind and percussion instruments goofs around and bumps into each other, finds a melody snippet or two, gets heckled by a yawning trombone, and then fizzle out.
3rd Dec '16 11:05:16 AM Ulathon1
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Added DiffLines:

** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfS7TVQhQTw second movement]] of his Symphony No. 3 ''Espansiva'', is a balsamic Pastorale, with a soprano and a baritone vocalizing softly in the background. Sublime.
** The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN24JMf72Ck second movement]] of his Symphony No. 6 ''Semplice'' is delightfully weird: a small group of wind and percussion instruments goofs around and bumps into each other, finds a melody snippet or two, gets heckled by a yawning trombone, and then fizzle out.
23rd Nov '16 9:36:35 PM mlsmithca
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** The posthumous nocturne in C# minor. It can be a ''very'' difficult piece to play, but it pretty much defines "heartbreakingly beautiful" as classical music goes.

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** The posthumous nocturne in C# minor. It can be C-sharp minor is somewhat light on the technical demands (Chopin wrote it for his sister Ludwika as a ''very'' difficult piece technical study to play, prepare her for his F minor piano concerto, from which it features several direct quotes), but it makes up for it with expressive challenges that pretty much defines define "heartbreakingly beautiful" beautiful". It was memorably used in ''Film/ThePianist'' as classical music goes.the piece Wladyslaw Szpilman plays on live radio as the first bombs of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII fall on Warsaw, and the piece with which he opens his first broadcast after the Nazis have been driven out of the city.
20th Nov '16 4:38:16 PM mlsmithca
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** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome. The orchestral introduction to No.1 is a musical adventure all on its own, and contains the germ of almost every melodic idea in the entire piece; the drama that unfolds in the first and third movements brackets a more serene slow movement, and the whole is never less than spellbinding. No.2 is more low-key, and the piano plays a decidedly supporting role for large stretches (particularly in the cello solo-led third movement and the jaunty finale), but it is packed with moments of outstanding beauty, and it takes a lot of technical acrobatics and emotional sensitivity to pull off a successful performance.

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** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome. The orchestral introduction to No.1 is a musical adventure all on its own, and contains the germ of almost every melodic idea in the entire piece; the drama that unfolds in the first and third movements brackets a more serene slow movement, and the whole is never less than spellbinding. No.2 is more low-key, and the piano plays a decidedly supporting role for large stretches (particularly in the cello solo-led third movement and the jaunty finale), but it is packed with moments of outstanding beauty, and it takes a lot of technical acrobatics and emotional sensitivity sensitivity[[note]] The most common performance instructions in the score for both piano and orchestra in this terrifying "warhorse" of the concerto repertoire? "Dolce" (sweetly), "leggiero" (lightly), "espressivo" (expressively), and "tranquillo" (calmly). Now try playing sweetly, lightly, expressively, or calmly while both hands have to scamper across two octaves or more, sometimes in opposite directions, in a single beat...[[/note]] to pull off a successful performance.
19th Nov '16 3:14:21 PM mlsmithca
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** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome. The orchestral introduction to No.1 is a musical adventure all on its own, and contains the germ of almost every melodic idea in the entire piece; the drama that unfolds in the first and third movements brackets a more serene slow movement, and the whole is never less than spellbinding. No.2 is more low-key, and the piano plays a decidedly supporting role for large stretches (particularly in the third and fourth movements), but it is packed with moments of outstanding beauty, and it takes a lot of technical acrobatics and emotional sensitivity to pull off a successful performance.

to:

** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome. The orchestral introduction to No.1 is a musical adventure all on its own, and contains the germ of almost every melodic idea in the entire piece; the drama that unfolds in the first and third movements brackets a more serene slow movement, and the whole is never less than spellbinding. No.2 is more low-key, and the piano plays a decidedly supporting role for large stretches (particularly in the cello solo-led third movement and fourth movements), the jaunty finale), but it is packed with moments of outstanding beauty, and it takes a lot of technical acrobatics and emotional sensitivity to pull off a successful performance.
19th Nov '16 3:12:12 PM mlsmithca
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*** Once Brahms got the hang of writing a symphony, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGeY14HEleY No.2 in D major]] took just a single summer to compose, and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L0MqnAoEJM No.3 in F major]] followed a few years later. Both are masterfully assembled and packed end to end with gorgeous melodies; the plaintive third movement of No.3 is a particular highlight.

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*** Once Brahms got the hang of writing a symphony, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGeY14HEleY No.2 in D major]] took just a single summer to compose, and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L0MqnAoEJM No.3 in F major]] followed a few years later. Both are masterfully assembled and packed end to end with gorgeous melodies; No.2, despite being the only Brahms symphony in which all four movements are in major keys, hides an inner sadness that makes it especially potent, while No.3 deftly weaves between major and minor modes throughout the first and last movements (settling into major just in time for the coda in both), and the plaintive third movement is one of No.3 is a particular highlight.Brahms' most intensely emotional pieces.



** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome.

to:

** Though (and perhaps because) [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxH50l50dvs Brahms' two]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4YqWXmF9Dg piano concerti]] are both very demanding of the soloist - the B-flat major concerto in particular is one of the most difficult in the standard repertoire - they are each fifty minutes of pure awesome. The orchestral introduction to No.1 is a musical adventure all on its own, and contains the germ of almost every melodic idea in the entire piece; the drama that unfolds in the first and third movements brackets a more serene slow movement, and the whole is never less than spellbinding. No.2 is more low-key, and the piano plays a decidedly supporting role for large stretches (particularly in the third and fourth movements), but it is packed with moments of outstanding beauty, and it takes a lot of technical acrobatics and emotional sensitivity to pull off a successful performance.



* "Vesti la giubba" from ''Theatre/IPagliacci'' by Ruggero Leoncavallo is one of the most recognisable tenor arias ever composed, and was used to great effect in ''Film/TheUntouchables''. Enrico Caruso, widely regarded as the greatest tenor of the first half of the 20th century, made it a staple of his repertoire, the emotion of a man who has just discovered his wife loves another and now has to put on a literal clown's face to perform a comic version of that very scenario coming through in every note.

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* "Vesti la giubba" from ''Theatre/IPagliacci'' ''Theatre/{{Pagliacci}}'' by Ruggero Leoncavallo is one of the most recognisable tenor arias ever composed, and was used to great effect in ''Film/TheUntouchables''. Enrico Caruso, widely regarded as the greatest tenor of the first half of the 20th century, made it a staple of his repertoire, the emotion of a man who has just discovered his wife loves another and now has to put on a literal [[SadClown clown's face face]] to perform a comic Theatre/CommediaDellArte version of that very scenario coming through in every note.
26th Oct '16 6:04:35 PM mlsmithca
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** Vierne's second set of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, "Pièces de fantaisie", is so vast he had to publish it as four separate sets of six, every one a winner. In the first set, following the buoyant Prélude, the eerie Andantino, the unsettled Caprice, the jaunty Intermezzo, and the solemn Requiem Aeternam (the main theme of which quotes the "Dies irae" plainchant theme), the final piece is the triumphant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHa8XzbI_tI Marche Nuptiale]] in B-flat major, a recessional march that swells with pride and majesty from the opening block chords in the manuals through to the double octave triplets in the pedal in the final measures. The return of the opening melody in the pedal three-quarters of the way into the piece is especially powerful.
** The second set of "Pièces de fantaisie" opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (also forward-looking in its harmonies and featuring two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:

to:

** Vierne's second set of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, "Pièces de fantaisie", is so vast he had to publish it as four separate sets of six, every one a winner. In the first set, following the buoyant Prélude, the eerie Andantino, the unsettled Caprice, the jaunty Intermezzo, and the solemn Requiem Aeternam (the main theme of which quotes the "Dies irae" plainchant theme), the final piece is the triumphant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHa8XzbI_tI Marche Nuptiale]] in B-flat major, a recessional march that swells with pride and majesty from the opening block chords in the manuals through to the double octave triplets in the pedal in the final measures. The return of the opening melody in the pedal three-quarters of the way into the piece is especially powerful.
powerful.[[note]] Although the heavy use of dissonance adds a slightly sinister edge to the piece, perhaps motivated by Vierne's own unhappy experience with the institution of marriage; his wife had an affair that produced a child, and they separated after just ten years on condition that Vierne never re-marry.[[/note]]
** The second set of "Pièces de fantaisie" opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (also (one of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it is also forward-looking in its harmonies and featuring features two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:



** In the third set of "Pièces de fantaisie", the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (which has a real sense of fun even before it makes the final hop to a major key), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:

to:

** In the third set of "Pièces de fantaisie", the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (which (another of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it has a real sense of fun even before it makes the final hop hops from minor to a major key), for the coda), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:
23rd Oct '16 10:46:12 AM mlsmithca
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21st Oct '16 4:12:30 PM mlsmithca
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** The second set of Pièces de fantaisie opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (also forward-looking in its harmonies and featuring two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:

to:

** The second set of Pièces "Pièces de fantaisie fantaisie" opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (also forward-looking in its harmonies and featuring two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:



** In the third set, the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (which has a real sense of fun even before it makes the final hop to a major key), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:

to:

** In the third set, set of "Pièces de fantaisie", the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (which has a real sense of fun even before it makes the final hop to a major key), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:
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