History AwesomeMusic / Classical

20th Jan '18 9:21:13 AM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHbuIh2p-SI Night on Bald Mountain]]", used for a memorable (if nightmare-inducing) segment of the original ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''. There's also the even rarer [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqNzOG34fKQ original version]] that included the operatic vocals and it actually sounds even better.

to:

** "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHbuIh2p-SI com/watch?v=l5pnoSgIuVo Night on Bald Mountain]]", used for a memorable (if nightmare-inducing) segment of the original ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''. There's also the even rarer [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqNzOG34fKQ original version]] that included the operatic vocals and it actually sounds even better.
19th Jan '18 11:57:40 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** By far Dukas' most well-known and beloved composition is his musical interpretation of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's poem ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkj2QeogAsU L'apprenti sorcier]]'' ("The Sorcerer's Apprentice"), a piece that was a hit with audiences even before being immortalised forty years later in the third segment of Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'' with WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse in the title role. From the haunting opening measures, to the immediately hummable theme as the apprentice brings the broom to life, to the orchestral frenzy as he is then forced to splinter the broom with an axe - only to create hundreds of brooms that cause the music's energy to build even higher, to the outburst of the final measures, it sticks in the memory even without the animated accompaniment.

to:

** By far Dukas' most well-known and beloved composition is his musical interpretation of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's poem ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkj2QeogAsU com/watch?v=jNaNDXyXRFo L'apprenti sorcier]]'' ("The Sorcerer's Apprentice"), a piece that was a hit with audiences even before being immortalised forty years later in the third segment of Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'' with WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse in the title role. From the haunting opening measures, to the immediately hummable theme as the apprentice brings the broom to life, to the orchestral frenzy as he is then forced to splinter the broom with an axe - only to create hundreds of brooms that cause the music's energy to build even higher, to the outburst of the final measures, it sticks in the memory even without the animated accompaniment.



** ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' shocked its first audiences with its [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aoAKKZ1UNk musically violent depiction]] of a VirginSacrifice. It's now regarded as one of the greatest works of its era, and rightly so. Creator/WaltDisney liked it so much he made it the only work by a living composer to be incorporated into ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''.[[note]] Though Stravinsky did not approve of how the music was used.[[/note]]

to:

** ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' shocked its first audiences with its [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aoAKKZ1UNk com/watch?v=ooi7eomsTuc musically violent depiction]] of a VirginSacrifice. It's now regarded as one of the greatest works of its era, and rightly so. Creator/WaltDisney liked it so much he made it the only work by a living composer to be incorporated into ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''.[[note]] Though Stravinsky did not approve of how the music was used.[[/note]]
19th Jan '18 11:51:01 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AwesomeMusic/JohnWilliams
19th Jan '18 7:37:42 AM DecafGrub47393
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AwesomeMusic/JohnWilliams



** By far Dukas' most well-known and beloved composition is his musical interpretation of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's poem ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNaNDXyXRFo L'apprenti sorcier]]'' ("The Sorcerer's Apprentice"), a piece that was a hit with audiences even before being immortalised forty years later in the third segment of Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'' with WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse in the title role. From the haunting opening measures, to the immediately hummable theme as the apprentice brings the broom to life, to the orchestral frenzy as he is then forced to splinter the broom with an axe - only to create hundreds of brooms that cause the music's energy to build even higher, to the outburst of the final measures, it sticks in the memory even without the animated accompaniment.

to:

** By far Dukas' most well-known and beloved composition is his musical interpretation of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's poem ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNaNDXyXRFo com/watch?v=Gkj2QeogAsU L'apprenti sorcier]]'' ("The Sorcerer's Apprentice"), a piece that was a hit with audiences even before being immortalised forty years later in the third segment of Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'' with WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse in the title role. From the haunting opening measures, to the immediately hummable theme as the apprentice brings the broom to life, to the orchestral frenzy as he is then forced to splinter the broom with an axe - only to create hundreds of brooms that cause the music's energy to build even higher, to the outburst of the final measures, it sticks in the memory even without the animated accompaniment.



** "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8Ca_edg6RE Night on Bald Mountain]]", used for a memorable (if nightmare-inducing) segment of the original ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''. There's also the even rarer [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqNzOG34fKQ original version]] that included the operatic vocals and it actually sounds even better.

to:

** "[[http://www."[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8Ca_edg6RE com/watch?v=wHbuIh2p-SI Night on Bald Mountain]]", used for a memorable (if nightmare-inducing) segment of the original ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''. There's also the even rarer [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqNzOG34fKQ original version]] that included the operatic vocals and it actually sounds even better.



** ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' shocked its first audiences with its [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooi7eomsTuc musically violent depiction]] of a VirginSacrifice. It's now regarded as one of the greatest works of its era, and rightly so. Creator/WaltDisney liked it so much he made it the only work by a living composer to be incorporated into ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''.[[note]] Though Stravinsky did not approve of how the music was used.[[/note]]

to:

** ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' shocked its first audiences with its [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooi7eomsTuc com/watch?v=0aoAKKZ1UNk musically violent depiction]] of a VirginSacrifice. It's now regarded as one of the greatest works of its era, and rightly so. Creator/WaltDisney liked it so much he made it the only work by a living composer to be incorporated into ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}''.[[note]] Though Stravinsky did not approve of how the music was used.[[/note]]
16th Jan '18 5:57:13 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qhEgE7-K34 Les Cloches de Hinckley]] is still a worthy finale to the massive ''Pièces de fantaisie'' collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive rapid descending scales in the right hand over block chords in the left hand and, eventually, half speed descending scales in the pdeal.

to:

*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qhEgE7-K34 Les Cloches de Hinckley]] is still a worthy finale to the massive ''Pièces de fantaisie'' collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive rapid descending scales in the right hand over block chords in the left hand and, eventually, half speed descending scales in the pdeal.pedal.
15th Jan '18 7:53:30 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The fourth set of "Pièces de fantaisie" gets going even sooner than the first three. After opening with the charming Aubade and the haunting Résignation, Vierne finishes off the set of twenty-four pieces in style:

to:

** The fourth set of "Pièces ''Pièces de fantaisie" fantaisie'' gets going even sooner than the first three. After opening with the charming Aubade and the haunting Résignation, Vierne finishes off the set of twenty-four pieces in style:
15th Jan '18 7:25:37 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The spooky [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbzrmdpFwDw Fantômes]][[note]] Vierne expressly instructed that this piece was for concert performances only - ''i.e.'', that it is unsuitable for church services.[[/note]] opens with two heavy, dissonant chords posing the question of "the Evoker": "Who then prepares the future?" (the future of music, specifically). The bulk of the piece is a five-way attempt to answer this question. A recurring arugment sets "the Young Esthete", whose parallel octave arabesque theme states that the future is his since he is free, against "the Old Pedant", whose Gregorian chant-inspired theme claims that the future is his as he guards the traditions. They are interrupted twice, first when "the Negro" and his sprightly theme suggest that the future belongs to the dancer, and second when "the Monkey" and "the Beggar" alternately declare that future is in the hands of, respectively, fancy and misery (the latter represented by a hurdy-gurdy-like rendition of "O Sole Mio"), all while "the Evoker" repeats the question. But it is Fate itself that has the final, hushed word about the future: "It is nowhere and everywhere."

to:

*** The spooky [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbzrmdpFwDw Fantômes]][[note]] Vierne expressly instructed that this piece was for concert performances only - ''i.e.'', that it is unsuitable for only, not church services.[[/note]] opens with two heavy, dissonant chords posing the question of "the Evoker": "Who then prepares the future?" (the future of music, specifically). The bulk of the piece is a five-way attempt to answer this question. A recurring arugment sets "the Young Esthete", whose parallel octave arabesque theme states that the future is his since he is free, against "the Old Pedant", whose Gregorian chant-inspired theme claims that the future is his as he guards the traditions. They are interrupted twice, first when "the Negro" and his sprightly theme suggest that the future belongs to the dancer, and second when "the Monkey" and "the Beggar" alternately declare that future is in the hands of, respectively, fancy and misery (the latter represented by a hurdy-gurdy-like rendition of "O Sole Mio"), all while "the Evoker" repeats the question. But it is Fate itself that has the final, hushed word about the future: "It is nowhere and everywhere."



*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qhEgE7-K34 Les Cloches de Hinckley]] is still a worthy finale to the massive ''Pièces de fantaisie'' collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive descending scales in the right hand that somehow never seem to get old.

to:

*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qhEgE7-K34 Les Cloches de Hinckley]] is still a worthy finale to the massive ''Pièces de fantaisie'' collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive rapid descending scales in the right hand that somehow never seem to get old.over block chords in the left hand and, eventually, half speed descending scales in the pdeal.
15th Jan '18 6:23:14 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Vierne wrote two sets of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, reminiscent of Bach's ''The Well-Tempered Clavier''. One of the most stunning pieces from the earlier set, entitled "Pièces en style libre" ("Pieces in free style"), is No.21 in B-flat major, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30NDWwZlhcI Carillon de Longpont.]] The motoric ostinato which dominates the piece is based on the melody of the chapel bells from the Chateau de Longpont, and Vierne's treatment of it radiates grandeur and splendour from every note.
** Vierne's second set of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, "Pièces de fantaisie", is so vast he had to publish it as four separate sets of six, every one a winner. In the first set, following the buoyant Prélude, the eerie Andantino, the unsettled Caprice, the jaunty Intermezzo, and the solemn Requiem Aeternam (the main theme of which quotes the "Dies irae" plainchant theme), the final piece is the triumphant [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHa8XzbI_tI Marche Nuptiale]] in B-flat major, a recessional march that swells with pride and majesty from the opening block chords in the manuals through to the double octave triplets in the pedal in the final measures. The return of the opening melody in the pedal three-quarters of the way into the piece is especially powerful.[[note]] Although the heavy use of dissonance adds a slightly sinister edge to the piece, perhaps motivated by Vierne's own unhappy experience with the institution of marriage; his wife had an affair that produced a child, and they separated after just ten years on condition that Vierne never re-marry.[[/note]]
** The second set of "Pièces de fantaisie" opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (one of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it is also forward-looking in its harmonies and features two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:
*** The exuberant [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cey8o5V6Qco Hymne au Soleil]] in G major shines every bit as brightly as the celestial body to which it pays tribute, the four-voice chords in the manuals in the outer sections filling every inch of the room (or church) with a melody that returns in glorious fashion in the piece's final third.
*** The restless [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7wR7d5UeZ0 Feux-follets]] in B minor darts in and out, suddenly building and just as quickly cutting off, painting a compelling musical picture of the will-o'-the-wisp, lights that flicker and flash and then vanish just as swiftly as they appear, leaving us wondering if we imagined them.
*** The set finishes off with the brutal [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_brSy3rTls Toccata]] in B-flat minor, technically demanding and emotionally dark. With its perpetual motion semiquavers over octave hops back and forth in the pedals, it charges along like a runaway train, retreats into the shadows for the softer yet more ominous centre section, and finally re-emerges, culminating in a dense double note passage in both hands followed by block chords over a virtuoso pedal passage, its fires burning brightly to the very end.
** In the third set of "Pièces de fantaisie", the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (another of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it has a real sense of fun even before it hops from minor to major for the coda), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:
*** The spooky [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aQ3h8bYNfg Fantômes]] in C-sharp minor[[note]] Vierne expressly instructed that this piece was for concert performances only - ''i.e.'', that it is unsuitable for church services.[[/note]] opens with heavy chords posing the question of "the Evoker": "Who then prepares the future?" The bulk of the piece is a five-way attempt to answer this question. A recurring arugment sets "the Young Esthete", whose parallel octave arabesque theme states that the future is his since he is free, against "the Old Pedant", whose Gregorian chant-inspired theme claims that the future is his as he guards the traditions. They are interrupted twice, first when "the Negro" and his sprightly theme suggest that the future belongs to the dancer, and second when "the Monkey" and "the Beggar" alternately declare that future is in the hands of, respectively, fancy and misery (the latter represented by a hurdy-gurdy-like rendition of "O Sole Mio"), all while "the Evoker" repeats the question. But it is Fate itself that has the final, hushed word about the future: "It is nowhere and everywhere."
*** With the towering [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV6avzhTL_A Sur le Rhin]] in E-flat minor, Vierne pays homage to the river separating France and Germany. The outer sections feature a theme that is equal parts majestic and intimidating, and in the conclusion of the piece, it is accompanied by parallel octaves in the pedal, all building up to a spectacular block chord passage in which the minor key clouds finally part for what is easily the most transcendent major resolution of the six that appear across all four sets.[[note]] The other five - the Andantino in A minor and Requiem Aeternam in G minor from the first set, the Lamento in C minor and Sicilienne in E minor from the second set, and the Impromptu in F minor from the third set - either represent sorrowful works finding inner peace in their final measures or allow a light-hearted piece to become even more so for its conclusion.[[/note]]
*** By far the most well-known piece in the collection is the sparkling [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O6HOAEt0zQ Carillon de Westminster]] in D major. Vierne starts with [[WestminsterChimes the full set of melodies played by the famous "Big Ben" chimes]][[note]] Well, nearly; he gets the "half hour" chime slightly wrong, reversing the second and third notes of the first phrase and starting the second phrase on the dominant, not the tonic, but the difference, whether an honest mistake or a deliberate choice by Vierne (the fact that in the four appearances of the first three "quarters", he does get the two "half hour" phrases correct once each, seems to point to the latter), almost doesn't matter.[[/note]] and constructs a spectacular virtuoso toccata around it that builds to a conclusion every bit as monumental as the clock tower to which it pays homage, especially as the "hour chimes" are condensed into a twelve-note figure that booms forth from the pedal in the coda.

to:

** Vierne wrote two sets of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, reminiscent of Bach's ''The Well-Tempered Clavier''. One of the most stunning pieces from the earlier set, entitled "Pièces ''Pièces en style libre" libre'' ("Pieces in free style"), is No.21 in B-flat major, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30NDWwZlhcI Carillon de Longpont.]] The motoric ostinato which dominates the piece is based on the melody of the chapel bells from the Chateau de Longpont, and Vierne's treatment of it radiates grandeur and splendour from every note.
** Vierne's second set of 24 pieces in all the major and minor keys for organ, "Pièces ''Pièces de fantaisie", fantaisie'', is so vast he had to publish it as four separate sets of six, every one a winner. In the first set, following the buoyant Prélude, the eerie Andantino, the unsettled Caprice, the jaunty Intermezzo, and the solemn Requiem Aeternam (the main theme of which quotes the "Dies irae" plainchant theme), the final piece is the triumphant [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHa8XzbI_tI com/watch?v=H6MGxWcbVH8 Marche Nuptiale]] in B-flat major, Nuptiale,]] a recessional march that swells with pride and majesty from the opening block chords in the manuals through to the double octave triplets in the pedal in the final measures. The return of the opening melody in the pedal three-quarters of the way into the piece is especially powerful.[[note]] Although the heavy use of dissonance adds a slightly sinister edge to the piece, perhaps motivated by Vierne's own unhappy experience with the institution of marriage; his wife had an affair that produced a child, and they separated after just ten years on condition that Vierne never re-marry.[[/note]]
** The second set of "Pièces ''Pièces de fantaisie" fantaisie'' opens with the doleful Lamento (notable for its very forward-looking harmonic language) and the graceful Sicilienne (which has a truly radiant final-measure minor-to-major transition), and also includes the serene Clair de Lune (one of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it is also forward-looking in its harmonies and features two-voice counterpoint in the pedals in its centre section). The other three pieces in the set are where the true awesome appears:
*** The exuberant [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cey8o5V6Qco com/watch?v=dKvi9qDRnkY Hymne au Soleil]] in G major shines every bit as brightly as the celestial body to which it pays tribute, the four-voice chords in the manuals in the outer sections filling every inch of the room (or church) with a melody that returns in glorious fashion in the piece's final third.
*** The restless [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7wR7d5UeZ0 com/watch?v=5r3TztF0KDM Feux-follets]] in B minor darts in and out, suddenly building and just as quickly cutting off, painting a compelling musical picture of the will-o'-the-wisp, lights that flicker and flash and then vanish just as swiftly as they appear, leaving us wondering if we imagined them.
*** The set finishes off with the brutal [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_brSy3rTls Toccata]] in B-flat minor, technically com/watch?v=apVX6hgVd7s Toccata,]] the first of the ''Pièces de fantaisie'' to fall squarely under OminousPipeOrgan. Technically demanding and emotionally dark. With its dark, with perpetual motion semiquavers over octave hops back and forth in the pedals, it charges along like a runaway train, retreats into the shadows for the softer yet more ominous centre section, and finally re-emerges, culminating in a dense double note passage in both hands followed by block chords over a virtuoso pedal passage, its fires burning brightly to the very end.
** In the third set of "Pièces ''Pièces de fantaisie", fantaisie'', the first three pieces are the reverent Dédicace, the playful Impromptu (another of the most frequently performed and recorded pieces across all four suites, it has a real sense of fun even before it hops from minor to major for the coda), and the shimmering Étoile du soir. The second three pieces are where things really take off:
*** The spooky [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aQ3h8bYNfg Fantômes]] in C-sharp minor[[note]] com/watch?v=QbzrmdpFwDw Fantômes]][[note]] Vierne expressly instructed that this piece was for concert performances only - ''i.e.'', that it is unsuitable for church services.[[/note]] opens with heavy two heavy, dissonant chords posing the question of "the Evoker": "Who then prepares the future?" (the future of music, specifically). The bulk of the piece is a five-way attempt to answer this question. A recurring arugment sets "the Young Esthete", whose parallel octave arabesque theme states that the future is his since he is free, against "the Old Pedant", whose Gregorian chant-inspired theme claims that the future is his as he guards the traditions. They are interrupted twice, first when "the Negro" and his sprightly theme suggest that the future belongs to the dancer, and second when "the Monkey" and "the Beggar" alternately declare that future is in the hands of, respectively, fancy and misery (the latter represented by a hurdy-gurdy-like rendition of "O Sole Mio"), all while "the Evoker" repeats the question. But it is Fate itself that has the final, hushed word about the future: "It is nowhere and everywhere."
*** With the towering [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mV6avzhTL_A com/watch?v=rDF1NS9MiL0 Sur le Rhin]] in E-flat minor, Rhin,]] another sterling example of OminousPipeOrgan, Vierne pays homage to the river separating France and Germany. The outer sections feature a theme that is equal parts majestic and intimidating, and in the conclusion of the piece, it is accompanied by parallel octaves in the pedal, all building up to a spectacular block chord passage in which the minor key clouds finally part for what is easily the most transcendent major resolution of the six that appear across all four sets.[[note]] The other five - the Andantino in A minor and Requiem Aeternam in G minor from the first set, the Lamento in C minor and Sicilienne in E minor from the second set, and the Impromptu in F minor from the third set - either represent sorrowful works finding inner peace in their final measures or allow a light-hearted piece to become even more so for its conclusion.[[/note]]
*** By far the most well-known piece in the collection is the sparkling [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O6HOAEt0zQ com/watch?v=fkUPuxnJfyk Carillon de Westminster]] in D major.Westminster]]. Vierne starts with [[WestminsterChimes the full set of melodies played by the famous "Big Ben" chimes]][[note]] Well, nearly; he gets the "half hour" chime slightly wrong, reversing the second and third notes of the first phrase and starting the second phrase on the dominant, not the tonic, but the difference, whether an honest mistake or a deliberate choice by Vierne (the fact that in the four appearances of the first three "quarters", he does get the two "half hour" phrases correct once each, seems to point to the latter), almost doesn't matter.[[/note]] and constructs a spectacular virtuoso toccata around it that builds to a conclusion every bit as monumental as the clock tower to which it pays homage, especially as the "hour chimes" are condensed into a twelve-note figure that booms forth from the pedal in the coda.



*** The gargantuan [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryi-DBnZgrQ Cathédrales]] in A major, which takes longer to perform than any other piece across all four sets, opens with a pedal theme that returns in the piece's climax, every bit as glorious and majestic as the cavernous interiors of Gothic cathedrals - particularly Vierne's beloved Notre Dame de Paris - to which it pays homage, ultimately giving way to a serene coda that almost functions as a benediction after all that has gone before.
*** The flighty [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C__MHa7RtUU Naïades]] in B major features a perpetual motion triplet figure that swoops and soars, occasionally played in counterpoint with a songlike figure as the water spirits represented by the piece call out to passing sailors before swimming down below the sea's surface and then up again.
*** The sinister [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIvxG73a_MI Gargouilles et Chimères]] in F-sharp minor pays tribute to the exterior of the Gothic cathedrals from two pieces earlier, opening with gloomy parallel chords in the manuals and leading to sudden fast outbursts that are as compelling as they are grotesque.
*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b8MAlkVUXs Les Cloches de Hinckley]] in E major is still a worthy finale to the massive "Pièces de fantaisie" collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive descending scales in the right hand that somehow never seem to get old.

to:

*** The gargantuan [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryi-DBnZgrQ Cathédrales]] com/watch?v=N21ZWmCyOsk Cathédrales,]] the longest of the ''Pièces de fantaisie'' in A major, which takes longer to perform than any other piece across all four sets, most renditions, opens with a pedal theme that returns in the piece's climax, every bit as glorious and majestic as the cavernous interiors of Gothic cathedrals - particularly Vierne's beloved Notre Dame de Paris - to which it pays homage, ultimately giving way to a serene coda that almost functions as a benediction after all that has gone before.
*** The flighty [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C__MHa7RtUU com/watch?v=-leGqzFrPpQ Naïades]] in B major is a contender for the title of most technically demanding piece across all four sets. It features a perpetual motion triplet figure that swoops and soars, occasionally played in counterpoint with a songlike figure as the water spirits represented by the piece call out to passing sailors before swimming down below the sea's surface and then up again.
*** The sinister [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIvxG73a_MI com/watch?v=GpPJSzjSJJM Gargouilles et Chimères]] in F-sharp minor pays tribute to the exterior of the Gothic cathedrals from two pieces earlier, opening with gloomy parallel chords in the manuals that mark yet another foray into OminousPipeOrgan, and leading to sudden fast featuring faster outbursts based on three melodic ideas that are as compelling as they are grotesque.
*** Though somewhat overshadowed by the other tribute to English bells, the majestic [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b8MAlkVUXs com/watch?v=5qhEgE7-K34 Les Cloches de Hinckley]] in E major is still a worthy finale to the massive "Pièces ''Pièces de fantaisie" fantaisie'' collection. It takes its cue from the descending scale played by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDmxijjYThw the church bells in the village of Hinckley]] and sculpts a whirlwind of organ brilliance around it, anchored by a chorale-like melodic figure and culminating with ''28'' consecutive descending scales in the right hand that somehow never seem to get old.
11th Jan '18 8:26:18 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The opening "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGGlL1wexQk Mars, the Bringer of War]]" was a major inspiration behind much of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' soundtrack. This is the music we will play when we go to war against the stars. (Or, if you're [[TheVentureBros #21 and #24]], something to [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments make you feel all badass]].)

to:

*** The opening "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGGlL1wexQk Mars, the Bringer of War]]" was a major inspiration behind much of the ''Franchise/StarWars'' soundtrack. This is the music we will play when we go to war against the stars. (Or, if you're [[TheVentureBros [[WesternAnimation/TheVentureBros #21 and #24]], something to [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments make you feel all badass]].)
7th Jan '18 1:14:13 PM mlsmithca
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Charles-Marie Widor is often held up as Exhibit A in the argument that in the late 19th and early 20th century, the greatest organists and organ composers were based in France;[[note]] Not coincidentally, it is possible to trace a line from teacher to student directly from Music/JohannSebastianBach to Widor. In the last two years of his life, Bach gave organ lessons to the German organist Johann Christian Kittel; Kittel's students included Christian Heinrich Rinck, whose own students included Adolf Friedrich Hesse. Knowledge of the Bach tradition crossed the Rhine after Belgian organist Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens was sent to study under Hesse; Widor was one of the first students to whom Lemmens passed on this knowledge.[[/note]] as well as possessing incredible technique, he had a keen sense of what the vast array of sounds available on the church and cathedral organs of his day could do, and composed pieces to take maximum advantage of it.

to:

* Charles-Marie Widor is often held up as Exhibit A in the argument that in the late 19th and early 20th century, the greatest organists and organ composers were based in France;[[note]] Not coincidentally, it is possible to trace a line from teacher to student directly from Music/JohannSebastianBach to Widor. In the last two years of his life, Bach gave organ lessons to the German organist Johann Christian Kittel; Kittel's students included Christian Heinrich Rinck, whose own students included Adolf Friedrich Hesse. Knowledge of the Bach tradition crossed the Rhine after Belgian organist Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens was sent to study under Hesse; Widor was one of the first students to whom Lemmens passed on this knowledge. He later collaborated on the publication of a complete edition of Bach's organ works with a young Albert Schweitzer.[[/note]] as well as possessing incredible technique, he had a keen sense of what the vast array of sounds available on the church and cathedral organs of his day could do, and composed pieces to take maximum advantage of it.
This list shows the last 10 events of 625. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=AwesomeMusic.Classical