History AwesomeMusic / Classical

10th May '18 11:59:30 PM mlsmithca
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*** Bruckner intended his [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw2LNhwnquk Symphony No.9 in D minor]] to be his last word in the genre, but h sadly died before he could finish the finale. Although he left enough sketches that several musicologists have produced performance versions of the movement, the three movements Bruckner did complete stand surprisingly well on their own, though they leave us wondering how the usual Bruckner coda of glorification might grow out of the eerie first movement, the brutally savage scherzo, and the melancholy E major slow movement in a way that puts a worthy capstone on his entire symphonic oeuvre.[[note]] When it became clear to Bruckner, a devout Catholic who dedicated the symphony to God Himself, that he would not live to finish it, he tried proposing his setting of the ''Te Deum'' prayer as a finale, but this is rarely followed as the ''Te Deum'' is in C major, while a proper finale would involve a journey from D minor to D major - as is done in the attempts at completing his sketches. It is speculated that he planned to join together the main motifs of all four movements in the coda, as he did in Symphony No.8, and several of the performance versions of the finale incorporate this idea; Belgian composer Sébastien Letocart takes the "capstone" idea in a different direction by quoting the main motifs of Nos.3, 5, 7, and 8 in the coda of his completion of the finale of No.9.[[/note]]

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*** Bruckner intended his [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw2LNhwnquk Symphony No.9 in D minor]] to be his last word in the genre, but h sadly died before he could finish the finale. Although he left enough sketches that several musicologists have produced performance versions of the movement, the three movements Bruckner did complete stand surprisingly well on their own, though they leave us wondering how the usual Bruckner coda of glorification might grow out of the eerie first movement, the brutally savage scherzo, and the melancholy E major slow movement in a way that puts a worthy capstone on his entire symphonic oeuvre.[[note]] When it became clear to Bruckner, a devout Catholic who had dedicated the symphony to God Himself, that he would not live to finish it, he tried proposing his setting of the ''Te Deum'' prayer as a finale, but this is rarely followed as the ''Te Deum'' is in C major, while a proper finale would involve a journey from D minor to D major - as is done in the attempts at completing his sketches. It is speculated that he planned to join together the main motifs of all four movements in the coda, as he did in Symphony No.8, and several of the performance versions of the finale incorporate this idea; Belgian composer Sébastien Letocart takes the "capstone" idea in a different direction by quoting the main motifs of Nos.3, 5, 7, and 8 in the coda of his completion of the finale of No.9.[[/note]]
10th May '18 6:31:00 PM bt8257
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*** Bruckner intended his [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw2LNhwnquk Symphony No.9 in D minor]] to be his last word in the genre, but sadly died before he could finish the finale. Although he left enough sketches that several musicologists have produced performance versions of the movement, the three movements Bruckner did complete stand surprisingly well on their own, though they leave us wondering how the usual Bruckner coda of glorification might grow out of the eerie first movement, the brutally savage scherzo, and the melancholy E major slow movement in a way that puts a worthy capstone on his entire symphonic oeuvre.[[note]] When it became clear to Bruckner, a devout Catholic who had dedicated the symphony to God Himself, that he would not live to finish it, he tried proposing his setting of the ''Te Deum'' prayer as a finale, but this is rarely followed as the ''Te Deum'' is in C major, while a proper finale would involve a journey from D minor to D major - as is done in the attempts at completing his sketches. It is speculated that he planned to join together the main motifs of all four movements in the coda, as he did in Symphony No.8, and several of the performance versions of the finale incorporate this idea; Belgian composer Sébastien Letocart takes the "capstone" idea in a different direction by quoting the main motifs of Nos.3, 5, 7, and 8 in the coda of his completion of the finale of No.9.[[/note]]

to:

*** Bruckner intended his [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw2LNhwnquk Symphony No.9 in D minor]] to be his last word in the genre, but h sadly died before he could finish the finale. Although he left enough sketches that several musicologists have produced performance versions of the movement, the three movements Bruckner did complete stand surprisingly well on their own, though they leave us wondering how the usual Bruckner coda of glorification might grow out of the eerie first movement, the brutally savage scherzo, and the melancholy E major slow movement in a way that puts a worthy capstone on his entire symphonic oeuvre.[[note]] When it became clear to Bruckner, a devout Catholic who had dedicated the symphony to God Himself, that he would not live to finish it, he tried proposing his setting of the ''Te Deum'' prayer as a finale, but this is rarely followed as the ''Te Deum'' is in C major, while a proper finale would involve a journey from D minor to D major - as is done in the attempts at completing his sketches. It is speculated that he planned to join together the main motifs of all four movements in the coda, as he did in Symphony No.8, and several of the performance versions of the finale incorporate this idea; Belgian composer Sébastien Letocart takes the "capstone" idea in a different direction by quoting the main motifs of Nos.3, 5, 7, and 8 in the coda of his completion of the finale of No.9.[[/note]]
10th May '18 6:23:02 PM bt8257
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*** We don't have much in the way of confirmation, but it is quite possible that the opening of Symphony No.4 in E-flat major (''Romantic'', the only one Bruckner named himself) was meant to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHJtTO_Hp1k make you shiver]], string tremolo, horn solo echoed by woodwinds, building slowly, steadily, and suddenly low brasses and strings moving in unison [[CreatorThumbprint to what we now call]] the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruckner_rhythm Bruckner rhythm]]. And after the grandeur of the first movement, we have a solemn funeral march with occasional glimpses of heavenly light, a boisterous "hunting" scherzo dominated by brass fanfares, and a finale that, like most of Bruckner's symphonies, brings the whole piece back to where it began with a full orchestral glow in its final pages.

to:

*** We don't have much in the way of confirmation, but it is quite possible that the opening of Symphony No.4 in E-flat major (''Romantic'', the only one named by Bruckner named himself) was meant to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHJtTO_Hp1k make you shiver]], string tremolo, horn solo echoed by woodwinds, building slowly, steadily, and suddenly low brasses and strings moving in unison [[CreatorThumbprint to what we now call]] the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruckner_rhythm Bruckner rhythm]]. And after the grandeur of the first movement, we have a solemn funeral march with occasional glimpses of heavenly light, a boisterous "hunting" scherzo dominated by brass fanfares, and a finale that, like most of Bruckner's symphonies, brings the whole piece back to where it began with a full orchestral glow in its final pages.
10th May '18 12:23:31 AM mlsmithca
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* AwesomeMusic/SergeiProkofiev



* AwesomeMusic/AntonioVivaldi



* Sergei Prokofiev is perhaps ''the'' most famous composer from Soviet Russia, and left many awesome pieces for future generations to enjoy.
** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2SXCW2sgCE "Dance of the Knights" (AKA "The Montagues and Capulets")]] from ''Romeo and Juliet'', instantly recognisable to UK listeners as the theme from ''The Apprentice''. The perfect music to accompany any scene of armies on the march.
** Prokofiev added several gems to the symphonic canon over the course of his career.
*** By far his most popular symphony, partly as it is the shortest, merriest, and most musically accessible, is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLT55kPIFCo No.1 in D major,]] the ''Classical''. With the symphony, he tried to answer the question "What sort of music would Creator/JosephHaydn write if he were alive today?" (meaning 1916), and came up with a meditative slow movement and a wryly humorous gavotte bookended by a sonata allegro and a finale packed to the gills with energy and charming melodies. While the formal and tonal language owes a lot to Haydn (and Mozart), Prokofiev put an individual and memorable spin on said language with more contemporary harmonic progressions.
*** Just behind No.1 in terms of popularity and frequency of performance and recording is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFsdG9vmtOE No.5 in B-flat major,]] composed in one month as the tide of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was turning in the Allies' favour, and described by the composer as "a hymn to free and happy Man, to his mighty powers, his pure and noble spirit." The tightly constructed opening Andante unfolds from a relaxed melody that recurs throughout the other three movements, which include a tense scherzo, a hauntingly nostalgic Adagio that builds to a tortured climax before ebbing to where it began, and a lively finale with a surprisingly dark coda that hints more at B-flat minor than B-flat major. The symphony is an especially fine example of Prokofiev's skill at weaving a piano into orchestral pieces so that it functions not as a featured soloist, but as another orchestral instrument.
*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqUIiHC3C14 Symphony No.6 in E-flat minor]] is one of Prokofiev's most underrated works. The first movement builds to an especially dark climax; seldom has a major-key resolution sounded so menacing. And although the other two movements both begin and end in major keys, there is no sense of triumph, especially in the shrieking coda of the finale (which comes after a reminiscence of the minor key first movement). It also features particularly adept use of the piano as an orchestral instrument across all three movements.
** Prokofiev's five piano concerti are all awesome in their own way, but a few stand out.
*** The intensely emotional [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLnSZczAdZI No.2 in G minor]] is a masterwork, if also one of the most brutally difficult concerti in the standard repertoire[[note]] Many otherwise technically gifted pianists either refuse to touch it (such as the Argentinian pianist Martha Argerich) or put off learning it (such as the Russian pianist Evgeny Kissin); even Prokofiev himself had trouble playing it during a 1930s performance with the BBC Symphony Orchestra.[[/note]]. From a first movement dominated by an almost five-minute long solo cadenza of ever-mounting technical ambition that builds to an apocalypse-like restatement of the enigmatic opening measures by the full orchestra, to a blazing perpetual motion scherzo that powers along at almost ten notes a second, to a violent intermezzo heralded by a thundering ground bass in the lower orchestra instruments which returns in epic style for a climax that sounds like the forces of Hell unleashed, to a finale with a lullaby-like main theme bookended by frenzied dance sections in which the soloist gallops and/or hops across three or four octaves and back again, the savage technical demands hardly let up for a moment, and must be seen, not just heard, to be believed. To add to the awesome, Prokofiev wrote it when he was just 22 years old.[[note]] Though the version performed today is a revision from ten years later; the original score was lost to fire during the Russian Revolution, and Prokofiev re-constructed and revised the concerto from the sketches, but said it might as well have been a completely new piece.[[/note]]
*** From the serene opening clarinet solo to the non-stop fireworks of its final pages, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgnE25-kvyk No.3 in C major]] seizes the listener by the collar and never lets go. After the slow introduction, the strings practically buzz with excitement before the piano bounds straight to centre stage for nearly ten minutes of breathless exhilaration (with a brief interlude recalling the introduction). The second movement presents a solemn, songlike theme for a set of variations that explore a wide emotional range, and the finale flanks another island of shimmering sonority with adrenaline rushes, particularly in the coda; the ascending-descending double note scales as the concerto gallops full speed to its triumphant final measures must, again, be not just heard but seen to be believed (especially if the soloist plays them as written rather than "cheating" and playing them as ''glissandi''[[note]] Curiously, despite keeping her distance from Concerto No.2, Argentinian pianist Martha Argerich is among the few performers with the courage and technical chops to play the double note scales from No.3 as written.[[/note]]).
** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrDiCIwdipI Symphony-Concerto in E minor]] is one of the most blisteringly difficult cello concerti ever written; any cellist who can pull off a successful rendition is almost guaranteed to send your jaw crashing to the floor. It boasts a slow first movement that alternates a strident, marchlike motif (similar to one found in Prokofiev's ballet ''Romeo and Juliet'') with a haunting contrary motion scalar figure, a fast second movement full of technically mind-blowing passages for the soloist, including an extended unaccompanied cadenza, and a third movement loosely structured as a theme and variations with an interruption in the form of a folk tune first stated in the bassoon, all building to a final gesture by the cello in the very, ''very'' top of the instrument's register.
** Of Prokofiev's nine piano sonatas, the most popular, with good reason, have long been the three "war sonatas", [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9GzBjB-YpA No.6 in A major,]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqgkmbRm1rY No.7 in B-flat major]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usTKWIFVQHI No.8 in B-flat major,]] written during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII when he wasn't under as many state-mandated stylistic restrictions. Highlights include the harsh descending parallel thirds that recur throughout the first and last movements of No.6, the wild [[UncommonTime 7/8]] ride of the finale of No.7, and the coda of the finale of No.8 which ties up the many disparate ideas that have come before.
** Although Prokofiev's chamber work is often overshadowed by that of his younger fellow Soviet composer, Shostakovich, his sonatas for stringed instruments and piano are some of his greatest compositions.
*** Of his two violin sonatas, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQuiyEJ5iYQ No.1 in F minor]] is one of his darkest compositions, with an ominous opening Andante assai, a harsh scherzo, an eerily beautiful Andante, and a finale that starts out energetic but soon reverts to the darkness of the first movement, with an ambiguous major resolution that feels like the sweet release of death rather than a triumph. The vastly brighter [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRiO-GMA138 No.2 in D major]] started out as a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfJ9-HenydQ flute sonata]], and is a more traditionally Classical four-movement sonata with many moments of virtuosity and lyricism.
*** Prokofiev's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHIdzZ1P1pg Cello Sonata in C major]] was composed especially for Mstislav Rostropovich (also the inspiration for the composer's decision to revise his earlier cello concerto as the Symphony-Concerto), and while unwelcome attention from Stalin's cultural enforcers[[note]] Prokofiev was one of the more high-profile casualties (others included Shostakovich and Khachaturian) of the 1948 Zhdanov decree that Soviet composers must stop writing such complicated, formalist nonsense and instead celebrate all that is good about Stalin and the Soviet Union, in that order.[[/note]] meant that his usual fondness for dissonant, dense harmonies had to be scaled back to something much simpler, the result is one of the jewels in the crown of cello music, with an expansive slow opening movement, a buoyant central scherzo, and a lively finale that acknowledges Prokofiev's oft-denied debt of influence to Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff.
** Prokofiev also contributed two hidden gems to the 20th century string quartet canon.
*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TRIQP7WNkc Quartet No.1 in B minor]] was commissioned by the Library of Congress during Prokofiev's voluntary exile in the USA; after galloping out of the gate with a dizzying sonata allegro, the music seems to move toward a slow movement, only to take a sudden turn into an edgy scherzo. Instead, the slow movement is saved for the end, giving the quartet an emotionally flooring climax of which Prokofiev was justly proud.
*** The composer was evacuated from Moscow to the Kabardino-Balkar region during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and extensively studied the local folk music to incorporate into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4mNb5XkW70 Quartet No.2 in F major,]] but while the melodies of the brash, strident opening Allegro, the highly exotic central Adagio, and the troubled yet ultimately triumphant finale were borrowed from his Kabardinian hosts and the score includes imitations of the plucked and percussion instruments of the region (particularly in the Adagio, in which the accompaniment mimics a ''kjamantchi''), the harmonic language is very much Prokofiev's own.



* Music/AntonioVivaldi ranks behind only Bach and Handel among famous composers of the Baroque era. Though he is most celebrated for his concerti for soloists and orchestra, helping to elevate the form to one of the most important in classical music, he was also a prolific composer of operas and sacred vocal music.
** The twelve concerti published as Op.3 under the title ''L'estro armonico'' (''The harmonic inspiration'') comprise four concerti for four violins, four for two violins, and four for one violin, and they include some of his most enduringly popular works.
*** By far the most popular concerto from ''L'estro armonico'' in Vivaldi's lifetime was the sunny [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvgfJuV_Nb0 No.5 in A major,]] full of fluid and birdsong-like passagework for the two soloists, and once considered ''the'' rite of passage for aspiring concert violinists. While it may have been eclipsed by some of Vivaldi's other compositions in the centuries since, it is such a genial work that it's hard not to be won over by it.
*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BL-KzcwHDbY Concerto No.6 in A minor]] is now a more familiar rite of passage for aspiring concert violinists, and its strident opening movement, plaintive slow movement, and stately finale may be light on technical demands compared to Vivaldi's other concerti, but they still serve as a sterling example of his style and a perfect introduction to the composer for student violinists.
*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Stjrhzwzevs No.8 in A minor]] boasts magnificent interplay between the two soloists threaded through all three movements; Bach was a particular fan of the piece, and produced a captivating arrangement for [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhgATpiXPHo organ]] that retains the orchestral textures of Vivaldi's version while still sounding fresh and new.[[note]] It was one of two concerti from ''L'estro armonico'' that Bach arranged for organ, the other being No.11 in D minor.[[/note]]
*** Bach was also a fan of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40ibRfyZQO8 Concerto No.10 in B minor,]] with its four soloists racing in and out of the spotlight every few measures as though in a musical relay race in the outer movements, and then all coming together for the intense Larghetto episode at the centre of the slow movement. Bach's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoW9jKUlq1w arrangement for four harpsichords and orchestra]] is a particular highlight of his output for soloist(s) and orchestra.
*** And ''L'estro armonico'' goes out on a high with the infectiously cheerful [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHv5MFlKFNE No.12 in E major,]] the pure joy of the first and third movements framing a dignified Largo that requires as much emotional sensitivity as the outer movements do technical prowess. Once again, Bach loved this concerto, and produced a virtuosic [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7a0s9WO9L0 arrangement for solo harpsichord.]][[note]] Among the concerti from ''L'estro armonico'', Bach also arranged No.3 in G major and No.9 in D major for solo harpsichord.[[/note]]
** ''The Four Seasons'' is a set of four violin concertos, one associated with each season, and they rank among the most famous classical pieces ever composed.[[note]] They were published as Nos.1-4 in a set of twelve, published as Vivaldi's Opus 8 and known collectively as ''Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione'' (''The contest between harmony and invention'').[[/note]] All four give the solo violinist plenty of opportunities to show off, and Vivaldi's career as an operatic composer gave him a keen sense of how to paint pictures with music. Each concerto is accompanied by a sonnet (sometimes attributed to Vivaldi himself) that describes the scenes portrayed in the music.
*** The first movement of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKthRw4KjEg Concerto No.1 in E major]], ''La primavera'' (''Spring''), is the [[StandardSnippet best known]] of the twelve movements across all four concerti, with an instantly recognisable main melody and interludes representing birdsong, the flow of a brook, and a sudden spring storm that ends almost as quickly as it began. The second movement is more sombre, with a violin drone imitating the dog of a snoozing goatherd, but the joys of spring return in full force in the dancelike third movement.
*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g65oWFMSoK0 Concerto No.2 in G minor]], ''L'estate'' (''Summer''), suggests that Vivaldi didn't care for the hottest months of the year. The first movement radiates heat so oppressive even the musicians can only play a few notes at a time (apart from another interlude of birdsong), while the second movement paints a musical picture of swarms of insects, and both movements foreshadow the furious summer thunderstorm that breaks in the finale, the most exhilarating movement across all four concerti. The accompanying sonnet suggests that we are seeing summer through the eyes of a farmer fretting over the approaching storm, and we can almost feel his despair as his crops are destroyed by the hail and heavy rain.
*** The upbeat mood returns for [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7hGiZ579cs Concerto No.3 in F major]], ''L'autunno'' (''Autumn''), at least at first. The opening movement is a merry gathering of villagers for food and drink, but before we even reach the end of the movement, the villagers' overindulgence has left them too tired to move, and they sleep right through the cool breezes of the harmonically unstable second movement. The boisterous "hunting party" finale is another of the most famous movements of the set, with ferocious pizzicato from the orchestra to imitate the blast of hunting rifles, and when the prey, fatally wounded, finally dies... the hunters simply gallop off into the sunset, making plans for the next hunt.
*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ve2rqERbeWo Concerto No.4 in F minor]], ''L'inverno'' (''Winter''), has a chill in the air in its first movement, the soft opening measures conjuring up images of snow falling, and tremolo passages later in the movement imitating chattering teeth. The serene slow movement, another of the set's most famous, imagines a scene by a fire as cold rain falls against the windowpane (represented by pizzicato arpeggii), while the finale paints a scene of people trying to keep their footing on the icy ground. There is a strange sense of delight below the surface throughout the concerto, confirmed by the accompanying sonnet which concludes, "This is winter, but what joy it brings."
** Vivaldi was one of the first composers to write concert works for flute and orchestra, and the most awesome of his flute concerti - and possibly the first flute concerto ever composed - is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZNNidKNohI Op.10 No.1 in F major,]] nicknamed "La tempesta di mare" ("The sea storm"). The title, one Vivaldi used for several of his concerti, is perhaps a bit misleading, as far from being stormy, the concerto is full of joy and life in its outer movements, with plenty of opportunities for the flautist to show off technical prowess, while the second movement provides a moment of solemnity.
** The most famous of Vivaldi's sacred vocal works is the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFYkyW1Palg Gloria in D major.]] Although there are awesome moments in the early movements (such as the sprightly "Laudamus te" for solo soprano and alto and the buoyant "Domine Fili unigenite" for full chorus), Vivaldi saves the best for last; singing the concluding double fugue on "Cum Sancto Spiritu" makes you feel ten feet tall.[[note]] Although Vivaldi borrowed heavily from an earlier Gloria by Giovanni Maria Ruggieri for this last movement, as well as several of the others.[[/note]]
10th May '18 12:16:48 AM mlsmithca
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Added DiffLines:

** Although Prokofiev's chamber work is often overshadowed by that of his younger fellow Soviet composer, Shostakovich, his sonatas for stringed instruments and piano are some of his greatest compositions.
*** Of his two violin sonatas, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQuiyEJ5iYQ No.1 in F minor]] is one of his darkest compositions, with an ominous opening Andante assai, a harsh scherzo, an eerily beautiful Andante, and a finale that starts out energetic but soon reverts to the darkness of the first movement, with an ambiguous major resolution that feels like the sweet release of death rather than a triumph. The vastly brighter [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRiO-GMA138 No.2 in D major]] started out as a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfJ9-HenydQ flute sonata]], and is a more traditionally Classical four-movement sonata with many moments of virtuosity and lyricism.
*** Prokofiev's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHIdzZ1P1pg Cello Sonata in C major]] was composed especially for Mstislav Rostropovich (also the inspiration for the composer's decision to revise his earlier cello concerto as the Symphony-Concerto), and while unwelcome attention from Stalin's cultural enforcers[[note]] Prokofiev was one of the more high-profile casualties (others included Shostakovich and Khachaturian) of the 1948 Zhdanov decree that Soviet composers must stop writing such complicated, formalist nonsense and instead celebrate all that is good about Stalin and the Soviet Union, in that order.[[/note]] meant that his usual fondness for dissonant, dense harmonies had to be scaled back to something much simpler, the result is one of the jewels in the crown of cello music, with an expansive slow opening movement, a buoyant central scherzo, and a lively finale that acknowledges Prokofiev's oft-denied debt of influence to Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff.
** Prokofiev also contributed two hidden gems to the 20th century string quartet canon.
*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TRIQP7WNkc Quartet No.1 in B minor]] was commissioned by the Library of Congress during Prokofiev's voluntary exile in the USA; after galloping out of the gate with a dizzying sonata allegro, the music seems to move toward a slow movement, only to take a sudden turn into an edgy scherzo. Instead, the slow movement is saved for the end, giving the quartet an emotionally flooring climax of which Prokofiev was justly proud.
*** The composer was evacuated from Moscow to the Kabardino-Balkar region during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and extensively studied the local folk music to incorporate into [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4mNb5XkW70 Quartet No.2 in F major,]] but while the melodies of the brash, strident opening Allegro, the highly exotic central Adagio, and the troubled yet ultimately triumphant finale were borrowed from his Kabardinian hosts and the score includes imitations of the plucked and percussion instruments of the region (particularly in the Adagio, in which the accompaniment mimics a ''kjamantchi''), the harmonic language is very much Prokofiev's own.
29th Apr '18 1:40:19 PM mlsmithca
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*** Just behind No.1 in terms of popularity and frequency of performance and recording is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFsdG9vmtOE No.5 in B-flat major,]] which consists of a tightly constructed opening Andante, a tense scherzo, a hauntingly nostalgic Adagio that builds to a tortured climax before ebbing to where it began, and a lively finale with a surprisingly dark coda that hints more at B-flat minor than B-flat major. Prokofiev was one of the few major composers who was particularly skilled at weaving a piano into orchestral pieces so that it functions not as a featured soloist but as another orchestral instrument, and Symphony No.5 is a fine example of this.

to:

*** Just behind No.1 in terms of popularity and frequency of performance and recording is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFsdG9vmtOE No.5 in B-flat major,]] which consists composed in one month as the tide of a UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was turning in the Allies' favour, and described by the composer as "a hymn to free and happy Man, to his mighty powers, his pure and noble spirit." The tightly constructed opening Andante, Andante unfolds from a relaxed melody that recurs throughout the other three movements, which include a tense scherzo, a hauntingly nostalgic Adagio that builds to a tortured climax before ebbing to where it began, and a lively finale with a surprisingly dark coda that hints more at B-flat minor than B-flat major. Prokofiev was one The symphony is an especially fine example of the few major composers who was particularly skilled Prokofiev's skill at weaving a piano into orchestral pieces so that it functions not as a featured soloist soloist, but as another orchestral instrument, and Symphony No.5 is a fine example of this.instrument.
21st Apr '18 8:42:32 PM mlsmithca
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** Though overshadowed by the later minor key études, the Twelve Études in the major keys (which place more emphasis on developing technique than their minor key counterparts) still have plenty of awesome moments for performer and listener.

to:

** Though overshadowed by the later minor key études, the Twelve Études in the major keys Major Keys (which place more emphasis on developing technique than their minor key counterparts) still have plenty of awesome moments for performer and listener.
21st Apr '18 1:28:31 PM bt8257
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** Though overshadowed by the later minor key études, the Twelve Études in the Major Keys (which place more emphasis on developing technique than their minor key counterparts) still have plenty of awesome moments for performer and listener.

to:

** Though overshadowed by the later minor key études, the Twelve Études in the Major Keys major keys (which place more emphasis on developing technique than their minor key counterparts) still have plenty of awesome moments for performer and listener.
21st Apr '18 1:20:07 PM bt8257
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*** We don't have much in the way of confirmation, but it is quite possible that the opening of Symphony No.4 in E-flat major (''Romantic'', the only one Bruckner named himself) was meant to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHJtTO_Hp1k make you shiver]], string tremolo, horn solo echoed by woodwinds, building slowly, steadily, and suddenly low brasses and strings moving in unison [[CreatorThumbprint to what we now call]] the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruckner_rhythm Bruckner rhythm]]. And after the grandeur of the first movement, we have a solemn funeral march with occasional glimpses of heavenly light, a boisterous "hunting" scherzo dominated by brass fanfares, and a finale that, like most of Bruckner's symphonies, brings the whole piece back to where it began with a full orchestral glow in its final pages.

to:

*** We don't have much in the way of confirmation, but it is quite possible that the opening of Symphony No.4 in E-flat major (''Romantic'', the only one Bruckner named himself) was meant to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHJtTO_Hp1k make you shiver]], string tremolo, horn solo echoed by woodwinds, building slowly, steadily, and suddenly low brasses and strings moving in unison [[CreatorThumbprint to what we now call]] the https://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruckner_rhythm Bruckner rhythm]]. And after the grandeur of the first movement, we have a solemn funeral march with occasional glimpses of heavenly light, a boisterous "hunting" scherzo dominated by brass fanfares, and a finale that, like most of Bruckner's symphonies, brings the whole piece back to where it began with a full orchestral glow in its final pages.
16th Apr '18 12:50:09 PM mlsmithca
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*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg7WsTuxMSQ Symphony No.7 in C major]] is a formal masterpiece that unfolds over just one movement but packs so many memorable ideas into that frame, and it has quite possibly the greatest (and most enigmatic) ending of any piece of classical music.

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*** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg7WsTuxMSQ Symphony No.7 in C major]] is a formal masterpiece that unfolds over just one movement but packs so movement. Where most symphonic movements rarely change tempo and frequently change key to provide contrast, Sibelius changes tempo frequently and hardly ever moves beyond C major and C minor; however, the presentation and development of the symphony's many memorable ideas into that frame, feels completely natural throughout, and it has quite possibly the greatest (and most enigmatic) ending of any piece of classical music.
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