History AwesomeButImpractical / TableTopGames

1st May '17 4:47:43 PM Blastgamer
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* [[TabletopGame/{{Chaotic}} Chaotic's]] [[https://chaotic.wikia.com%2Fwiki%2FAa%2527une_the_Oligarch&psig=AFQjCNGS8oJvCSxpCKQT1zaSENKrQHL6yw&ust=1493758708314481 Aa'une The Oligarch]]. He starts out in his Projection form, which is a basic M'arrillian Chieftain who's only effect is that it's the side that starts the game face-up, similar to [[TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering Magic's]] transform cards. In order to transform him into his incredibly powerful [[https://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/chaotic/images/a/aa/C-Ma_Aa-Une-the-Oligarch.png/revision/latest?cb=20090716043120 Avatar form]], which has 200 in every stat, 100 energy, ''20'' extra damage with every stat attack, and the ability to basically destroy every creature on your opponent's board if you haven't used any mugic, you must:
** Have Aa'une win combat. Doable.
** Have Aa'une be equiped with [[http://www.tcgplayer.com/games/21/cardimages/758.jpg Baton of Aa'une]]. ''Very'' easily gotten rid of by certain mugic, attacks, or creatures, but a good battlegear to have on him.
** Play the attack [[http://www.tcgplayer.com/games/21/cardimages/750.jpg Rage of Aa'une]]. Again, good to have in your deck if you'r playing Aa'une, but even with the max 2 copies its entirely possible you won't have it on hand when Aa'une fights.
** Then, if all of the former conditions are met ''on the same turn'', you have to cast [[http://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/chaotic/images/d/d9/Calling_of_aa%27une.png/revision/latest?cb=20140223185644 Calling of Aa'une]] to flip him over and play the Oligarch. The issue here is that Aa'une himself has ''no mugic counters'' and Calling is a ''M'arrillian'' mugic, meaning you have to have a fluidmorpher to cast it, as there's almost no way Aa'une himself could ''ever'' gain that many mugic counters on his own. This means if Aa'une is your only creature left, you'll have hard time transforming him.
4th Feb '17 3:57:54 PM iowaforever
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*** In the 6th edition Eldar codex, this is no longer the case, as the Fire Prism has become much more practical. It's gun has 3 firing modes, a S5 AP3 Large Blast, perfect for blasting apart large units of everything from Marines on down, a S7 AP2 Blast, perfect for Terminators and the like and an S9 AP1 Lance, perfect for killing tanks. The clincher? All 3 of these have a 60 inch range and can be fired after moving 12 inches, meaning that in a board of any size, it's very difficult to return fire on one. Awesome Yet Game Breaking might be a better term.

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*** In the 6th edition Eldar codex, this is no longer the case, as the Fire Prism has become much more practical. It's gun has 3 firing modes, a S5 AP3 [=AP3=] Large Blast, perfect for blasting apart large units of everything from Marines on down, a S7 AP2 [=AP2=] Blast, perfect for Terminators and the like and an S9 AP1 [=AP1=] Lance, perfect for killing tanks. The clincher? All 3 of these have a 60 inch range and can be fired after moving 12 inches, meaning that in a board of any size, it's very difficult to return fire on one. Awesome Yet Game Breaking might be a better term.



*** The [[KillItWithFire Redeemer]] version however, is a different story.

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*** The [[KillItWithFire Redeemer]] version and [[MoreDakka Crusader]] versions, however, is are a different story.


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** Imperium Plasma Pistols. Strength 7 [=AP 2=] will kill or wound most anything in the game, but the plasma pistol suffers from a variety of drawbacks that are usually mitigated in its bigger cousins (the rifle-sized plasma gun and the heavy plasma cannon). The plasma pistol costs the same amount of points as the others (15 points, enough to add one Space Marine or three Guardsmen to a squad), yet is limited to one shot a turn compared to two shots or a small blast like the plasma gun and cannon respectively, it's 12" range requires that the wielder gets close to the enemy, and it has a 1 in 6 chance of not only missing but blowing up in the wielder's face and removing the pistol as a threat. When fighting against cheap horde armies like Orks or Tyranids, a plasma pistol will struggle to make its points back, and when targeting tanks or Monstrous Creatures it might only take off one or two wounds/hull points before the wielder dies.
19th Oct '16 1:09:53 PM Pysiewicz
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* ''TabletopGame/TheWitcherGameOfImagination'' got few few weapons that are inherently awesome, only to be almost completely useless:
** Whips can be used for very flashy combat maneuvers like tripping over, disarming and strangling, but over such short distances it's easier to just draw your sword or shoot your enemy from afar. They are close to useless against armoured enemies, most of animals and monsters.
** Exotic weapons bypass any armour except plate armor, but they also cost a small fortune and have only d6 damage roll, while normal weapons can be customised for the user to deal additional fixed damage and become easier to wield.
** Two-handed weapons deal 2d6 + twice the Strength of damage, but they require sufficient Strength and many combat maneuvers are restricted for one-handed weapons. It's more practical to use a a one-handed weapon and a shield, as this grants protection and the [[ShieldBash shield may be weaponized]].
** [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the case of mini-crossbows and lamias (whips with metal spikes all over their length). The former deal relatively little damage and have a very short range, but they can be hidden in wide sleeves and shoot two bolts in a single round - [[NoRangeLikePointBlankRange right in the face]], thus dealing absurd damage if used properly. The latter has the range limitations of other whips, but deals damage like a two-handed weapon. And unlike other whips, it overcomes the problem with close-quarter fights, since the handle is a mace.
3rd Oct '16 12:31:46 AM Morgenthaler
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* In the board game ''{{Risk}}'', the player who controls the whole of Asia gets a bonus of 7 battalions per turn, the largest bonus in the game. This might be useful save for the fact that you almost certainly don't need the bonus if you are capable of successfully holding Asia for a turn (with its many border provinces).

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* In the board game ''{{Risk}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Risk}}'', the player who controls the whole of Asia gets a bonus of 7 battalions per turn, the largest bonus in the game. This might be useful save for the fact that you almost certainly don't need the bonus if you are capable of successfully holding Asia for a turn (with its many border provinces).
26th Sep '16 11:30:54 PM Deathhacker
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** A lot of relics fall into this territory. Most common is the "evolving weapon" type, where the weapon gains additional attributes as you rack up kills. The problem is, unless it allows you to kill mooks and you wipe an entire squad from the get-go, these bonuses often accrue so slowly that you'd maybe see their effects on the last turn of the game, when it's too far gone to put it to good tactical use. Similarly, a lot of other relics apply some awesome effect to a generic weapon, but the effect is either overkill (such as the Norn Crown) or completely useless (such as instant death on a To Wound roll of a 6). If a relic manage to avert all of this, sometimes good'ol points costs ruins them as anything viable. Those that manage to completely avert this unfortunately become GameBreakers.

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** A lot of relics fall into this territory. Most common is the "evolving weapon" type, where the weapon gains additional attributes as you rack up kills. The problem is, unless it allows you to kill mooks and you wipe an entire squad from the get-go, these bonuses often accrue so slowly that you'd maybe see their effects on the last turn of the game, when it's too far gone to put it to good tactical use. Similarly, a lot of other relics apply some awesome effect to a generic weapon, but the effect is either overkill (such as the Norn Crown) or completely useless (such as instant death on a To Wound roll of a 6). If a relic manage to avert all of this, sometimes good'ol points costs ruins them as anything viable. Those that manage to completely avert this unfortunately become GameBreakers.[[GameBreaker Game Breakers]].
26th Sep '16 11:30:28 PM Deathhacker
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** A lot of relics fall into this territory. Most common is the "evolving weapon" type, where the weapon gains additional attributes as you rack up kills. The problem is, unless it allows you to kill mooks and you wipe an entire squad from the get-go, these bonuses often accrue so slowly that you'd maybe see their effects on the last turn of the game, when it's too far gone to put it to good tactical use. Similarly, a lot of other relics apply some awesome effect to a generic weapon, but the effect is either overkill (such as the Norn Crown) or completely useless (such as instant death on a To Wound roll of a 6). If a relic manage to avert all of this, sometimes good'ol points costs ruins them as anything viable. Those that manage to completely avert this unfortunately become GameBreakers.
16th Aug '16 4:58:16 AM Morgenthaler
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** [[FridgeBrilliance Hmm.. maybe this is WHY it's a "terrible" tank!]]
16th Aug '16 4:57:55 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''StarfleetBattles'' had battleships. Huge and powerful, and enough to make your oponent look for his [[BringMyBrownPants brown pants]], they were horrificly expensive (especially in campaign play), and effectively required an expensive support fleet to protect and augment it. In the end, 'historically' only the Klingons ever built any, and only two of a planned nine.

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* ''StarfleetBattles'' ''TabletopGame/StarfleetBattles'' had battleships. Huge and powerful, and enough to make your oponent look for his [[BringMyBrownPants brown pants]], they were horrificly expensive (especially in campaign play), and effectively required an expensive support fleet to protect and augment it. In the end, 'historically' only the Klingons ever built any, and only two of a planned nine.



* In ''WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'', half the highest-level careers are this. The Wizard Lord, the highest-level magic user, requires the character to possess 6,000 gold crowns' worth of arcane tomes, in a game system where the players are playing wandering sellswords and obtaining a single gold crown is a grand achievement.

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* In ''WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'', ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'', half the highest-level careers are this. The Wizard Lord, the highest-level magic user, requires the character to possess 6,000 gold crowns' worth of arcane tomes, in a game system where the players are playing wandering sellswords and obtaining a single gold crown is a grand achievement.



* ''{{GURPS}}'' tends to be full of this. Owing to the game's tendency to strive for "realism" even when it is emulating unrealistic genres, many "cinematic" maneuvers may be allowed but are still modeled as being almost as impractical or dangerous as in real life.

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* ''{{GURPS}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' tends to be full of this. Owing to the game's tendency to strive for "realism" even when it is emulating unrealistic genres, many "cinematic" maneuvers may be allowed but are still modeled as being almost as impractical or dangerous as in real life.
18th Jun '16 11:54:21 PM nombretomado
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* The original clan champions in the LegendOfTheFiveRings CCG from the Imperial set were the epitome of this. Costly and often difficult to play due to honor requirements, they were simply the biggest specimens of their respective character types. It was often easier to play three other characters for less cost and more combat utility. Later cards representing the champions often added unique and powerful abilities. Whether that justified their cost depended on the card in question.

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* The original clan champions in the LegendOfTheFiveRings ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' CCG from the Imperial set were the epitome of this. Costly and often difficult to play due to honor requirements, they were simply the biggest specimens of their respective character types. It was often easier to play three other characters for less cost and more combat utility. Later cards representing the champions often added unique and powerful abilities. Whether that justified their cost depended on the card in question.
18th Jun '16 8:26:51 AM Theriocephalus
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*** In the 6th edition Eldar codex, this is no longer the case, as the Fire Prism has moved to AwesomeYetPractical. It's gun has 3 firing modes, a S5 AP3 Large Blast, perfect for blasting apart large units of everything from Marines on down, a S7 AP2 Blast, perfect for Terminators and the like and an S9 AP1 Lance, perfect for killing tanks. The clincher? All 3 of these have a 60 inch range and can be fired after moving 12 inches, meaning that in a board of any size, it's very difficult to return fire on one. Awesome Yet Game Breaking might be a better term.

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*** In the 6th edition Eldar codex, this is no longer the case, as the Fire Prism has moved to AwesomeYetPractical.become much more practical. It's gun has 3 firing modes, a S5 AP3 Large Blast, perfect for blasting apart large units of everything from Marines on down, a S7 AP2 Blast, perfect for Terminators and the like and an S9 AP1 Lance, perfect for killing tanks. The clincher? All 3 of these have a 60 inch range and can be fired after moving 12 inches, meaning that in a board of any size, it's very difficult to return fire on one. Awesome Yet Game Breaking might be a better term.



*** The [[KillItWithFire Redeemer]] version however, is [[AwesomeYetPractical a different story]].

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*** The [[KillItWithFire Redeemer]] version however, is [[AwesomeYetPractical a different story]].story.



** Similarly, Imperial Ironclads. Ancient warships from before the development of DeflectorShields, they protect their occupants with ''tonnes'' of armor. Because they are built in the times before or during the Dark Age of Technology, they often have ''apocalyptically'' powerful armament, but their lack of shields makes them GlassCannon units at best. The Imperium usually recognizes this and converts them into either planetary assault ships (fit some rudimentary deflectors, fill it with guardsmen and bombardment weapons) because they can actually land on planets due to their freakishly strong construction, turning them into BoringYetPractical. Other uses include stripping out the weapons, replacing them with ''more'' bolstering, [[RammingAlwaysWorks adding shields at the front, massive engines at the back and using them to ram things]], or replacing everything with a {{BFG}} and using it to kill planets. Some of the very youngest ironclads[[note]]Or those the Imperium can viably fit proper shields to.[[/note]] fall into AwesomeYetPractical - they keep their Dark Age of Technology-level weapons, but their plate armor ''is'' good enough to stop "modern" weapons, and glows [[IncendiaryExponent red hot with each hit, making them look]] ''[[IncendiaryExponent awesome]]'' as they advance into battle.

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** Similarly, Imperial Ironclads. Ancient warships from before the development of DeflectorShields, they protect their occupants with ''tonnes'' of armor. Because they are built in the times before or during the Dark Age of Technology, they often have ''apocalyptically'' powerful armament, but their lack of shields makes them GlassCannon units at best. The Imperium usually recognizes this and converts them into either planetary assault ships (fit some rudimentary deflectors, fill it with guardsmen and bombardment weapons) because they can actually land on planets due to their freakishly strong construction, turning them into BoringYetPractical. Other uses include stripping out the weapons, replacing them with ''more'' bolstering, [[RammingAlwaysWorks adding shields at the front, massive engines at the back and using them to ram things]], or replacing everything with a {{BFG}} and using it to kill planets. Some of the very youngest ironclads[[note]]Or those the Imperium can viably fit proper shields to.[[/note]] fall into AwesomeYetPractical - are, however, much more useful -- they keep their Dark Age of Technology-level weapons, but their plate armor ''is'' good enough to stop "modern" weapons, and glows [[IncendiaryExponent red hot with each hit, making them look]] ''[[IncendiaryExponent awesome]]'' as they advance into battle.
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