Main You Have Outlived Your Usefulness Discussion

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04:41:18 PM Nov 18th 2014
edited by
I think this article should have no real life examples. No Real Life Examples, Please! lists evil and villain tropes as not being allowed to have real life examples, but this trope is on the Evil Tropes index, and clearly is something reserved for villains. Basically, the real life examples there now are implicitly calling certain people or organizations evil, which doesn't really seem like it should be on this site.
08:01:49 AM Nov 19th 2014
Might want to post that here.
07:03:19 PM Apr 30th 2014
Why is it "useful ness" instead of "usefulness"?
01:34:42 AM May 1st 2014
Prolly because you run across a link that says You Have Outlived Your Useful Ness. It's The Problem with Pen Island.
04:08:25 PM Oct 18th 2013
In Mass Effect 3, the Dalatrass Linron objects to healing the genophage stating that the krogan, with the rachni defeated, had lost their usefulness and that the affliction must not be cured, lest the krogan become a threat to the galaxy again. However, Shepard can nevertheless decide whether to actually cure the genophage or sabotage the cure.

Depending on the player's choice, Linron either congratulates or berates Shepard for their actions.

Would this trope apply in this instance?
04:28:19 AM Jul 3rd 2011
Would this apply to "GI Joe vs. the Transformers"? In vol. 2, issue 4, a refitted Starscream escapes to rejoin Shockwave, the new Decepticon leader (Megatron was defeated in the prior volume) and just when Shockwave is about to let him "come home" a recording plays. It's revealed Cobra Commander had lined his housing with plastic explosives as the part of Shockwave's tower with him, Starscream and other Decepticons in it explodes.
07:19:26 AM May 20th 2011
meta-trope from Literature If you bothered to read, you may ntice, that the author has few favorite characters, who "live the life right way" Others serve mostly as opponents and temptations.

And in last Volume 4 they fades away one by one. For any random chance, for any strange accident, they either die or move far-far away. Almost all of them. They have no use for the author toward the end of the book, as he now gives medals to right guys.
05:21:35 AM Aug 23rd 2010
Deleted the following as it's incorrect.

  • Goldfinger, from which AVTAK cribbed much of its plotline (replace "gold" with "computer chips" and "Fort Knox" with "Silicon Valley") naturally invokes the trope as well, as Goldfinger leaves many of his subordinates, including Odd Job, who's loyal to the end, locked in the gold depository with a ticking nuke.

Goldfinger wasn't trying to get rid of his subordinates. He sealed the door to the vault after the American troops started their attack so they couldn't disarm the nuclear bomb.
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