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RTanker
topic
02:21:54 PM Nov 14th 2011
Cut this:
  • In Much Ado About Nothing, this exchange between Benedick and Beatrice:
    Beatrice: And yet, ere I go, let me go with that I came; which is, with knowing what hath passed between you and Claudio.
    Benedick: Only foul words; and thereupon I will kiss thee.
    Beatrice: Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkissed.
Because Beatrice isn't really engaged in a logical fallacy; she's just punning to make a point. She wanted Benedick to challenge Claudio to a duel to defend Hero's honor, and he has just told her that they quarreled, but it didn't go that far.
Jordan
03:42:03 PM Nov 14th 2011
I think it would count. I mean in the Touchstone example, it's not like he was making a logical fallacy either- granted, he was tricking someone, but in both instances, the character is using the fallacy for rhetorical effect, but it's still a use of the fallacy.
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