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Ecclytennysmithylove
topic
07:47:17 PM Nov 29th 2013
I was quite surprised that the example talking about I Am Dina didn't mention the actor's name who played the Russian, so I added his name to the example:

The pan-Scandinavian movie I Am Dina, set in nineteenth century rural Norway, featured illustrious actors from all three countries and then some - like Gérard Depardieu, playing one of the male leads. For the sake of realism (one assumes), it was decided to do this in English. The result was hotly debated, but the biggest irony was probably that the only English actor, Christopher Eccleston, was cast as a Russian.
spiderlady
topic
09:20:56 PM Mar 3rd 2013
There were a large number of Americans on this page that played Americans. I think most people can agree they are not using a fake nationality (unless you are subscribe to the right wing talk show host way of thinking). Also there are some Americans listed as the wrong nationality (i.e. Steven Seagal is not Irish he is from the big city of Lancing Michigan). Some even got the ethnicity wrong (Mohamed Hassan was mostly Jordanian and considers himself such not Italian.)
Duckay
topic
12:18:08 AM Apr 11th 2011
edited by Duckay
I didn't mean to double-post there; sorry.
Duckay
topic
12:18:08 AM Apr 11th 2011
If there are bad examples, then edit those, but there are plenty of legitimate examples, and disliking a few of them doesn't mean it's a stupid trope.
NieuwsgierigHandle
topic
02:17:15 AM Mar 30th 2011
Someone needs to add Allo Allo. All Englishmen playing Austrians, Germans, Frenchmen, Italians, ... All while speaking English.
PaulA
12:54:04 AM Apr 11th 2011
Ah, now there's an interesting philosophical question. If everybody in the show is blatantly doing an unconvincing foreign impersonation for comic effect, is it still this trope?
Khathi
topic
04:44:32 AM Aug 18th 2010
edited by Khathi
  • Adding to the intrigue, "Chekov" is a rather rare romanized spelling compared to "Chekhov", which itself is some old fuck-up turned into tradition, since the transliterated <kh> actually represents a hard H, such as the first sound in "whore".

Seems that someone Did Not Do The Research here, as "Чехов" in Russian does have a [hard H] sound, because that's the only [H] sound Russian actually have — there's no [soft H] in Russian.
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