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JeanW
topic
12:14:54 PM Dec 11th 2013
I think the notion that John regards/regarded Sherlock as a superior officer is right on the money. John doesn't trust easily, but he chose to trust Sherlock no matter what, just as a soldier would a superior officer. I imagine it's going to be especially hard for Sherlock to earn that trust back in series 3.
AvoidThisSpace
topic
08:58:36 PM Jan 27th 2012
Septimus Heap added part of the article beginning at:

  • Fridge Brilliance: Sherlock's comment about hubris and the "fragility of genius" explains why he tests his intellect by solving crimes rather than committing them (as Sgt. Donovan suggests he will someday): it allows him to be incredibly clever and then brag about it, whereas criminals can't very well flap their mouths about their evil schemes without being caught. It also makes the end of A Study in Pink a bit more heartwarming, since Sherlock chooses to protect Watson rather than prove to Lestrade (again) how clever he is.
    • On the Science of Deduction website, all of the Anonymous codes are signed off as "xx".
etc etc etc.

I think the various points covered should 1) mostly go under Fridge Brilliance rather than the Fridge Horror section and 2) should in most cases be single-bullet indented, as the topics they cover aren't related. Two-bullet indented lines should be topically related to the point they follow. Also 3) the line about John's blog showing us John made Sherlock watch the Bond films is unneccessary as that point is covered in an earlier post. This troper made the above alterations. Sharon Toggle changed it to the previous format. An explanation would be appreciated.
SeptimusHeap
moderator
topic
01:29:35 PM Jan 23rd 2012
Possible Justifying Edit. How to deal with it?
  • Look at Lestrade's face after Sherlock admits he lost count of how many times the CIA agent "fell out of a window." He could possibly be joking, but Lestrade doesn't know that; as far as he knows Sherlock has taken a turn for the psychopath, just as Sergeant Donovan predicted, and he has a right to be scared as hell.
    • Uh...he's not. He looks irritated. Mildly amused. A little disturbed, sure, but he is far from scared or doubting Sherlock's mental state.
AvoidThisSpace
09:11:26 PM Jan 27th 2012
Delete the second point and YMMV the first point. Or else remove the element of discussion, and change the post to just say that the "fell out of a window" comment would make Lestrade worry about the person who said it, regardless of whether his expression showed that.
GMGuity
topic
09:39:24 PM Jan 20th 2012
After watching Reichenbach Fall a few more times I was taken aback by the sheer brilliance of what I was seeing. I think Sherlock was starting to piece together a great deal of Moriarty's gambit by the time Mrs. Hudson hands him the envelope with the Gingerbread Man. That's why he knew he and John had to make a break for it when he's arrested - because the story of the Gingerbread Man is about him eluding capture until he meets the Fox.

So right around then, I think he starts planning for the confrontation on the roof of St. Barts. His agita at meeting Richard Brook, the confusion on the roof, much of his emotional behavior right up to his jumping off the roof is him acting.

Moreover, I think Sherlock talked Jim into killing himself by playing dumb and letting Jim confirm his suspicions: that there is no key code (of course there isn't! Sherlock would've been smart enough to translate that binary code the minute he recognized it!) Sherlock realizes Moriarty is too dangerous to be adequately handled by the justice system, having threatened his way out of a clear-cut conviction, so he made sure to find a way to end his threat once and for all: ("I may be on the side of the angels...but I am NOT one of them!")

When he freaks out after Jim shoots himself...that's entirely an act. Because Sherlock knows Jim's got eyes everywhere, and since Jim is now dead, Sherlock HAS to "die" to make sure they don't murder his friends. We've seen since "The Blind Baker" how easy it is for him to put on a performance to manipulate those around him. No reason for that NOT to go for even an unseen audience...namely Jim's invisible snipers!
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