YMMV: Under the Skin

  • Award Snub: Not that anyone really expected it to be recognized in such a great year for movies, but not getting a nomination for Best Original Score at the Oscars is pretty unfortunate.
  • Awesome Music: Mica Levi's gleefully mysterious dark-ambient score. It honestly sounds nightmarish at times, particularly the tracks "Creation" and "Lonely Void".
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: Many people only know the film as the one where Scarlett Johansson gets naked onscreen for the first time (even though in the context of the film, her nude scenes aren't particularly erotic).
  • Critical Dissonance: Earned high marks from critics (with some saying it's one of the best films of 2014), but received a much more divided response from audiences, and made little money.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Between the enigmatic, sexually predatory alien and her hormone-bloodied victims, the film is very short on sympathetic characters or compelling conflict. The alien does seem to get better later on, but it's too little too late, and the story spills into full-on Evil Versus Evil at the end when she's attacked and killed by a would-be rapist. The deformed man is essentially the only sympathetic character who is explored in any real depth.
  • Love It or Hate It: The film is either a brilliant, psychologically horrifying Sci-Fi story or a bunch of boring and drab wank.
  • Memetic Mutation: A scene in which the alien trips and falls on the street evolved into the "Scarlett Johansson Falling Down" meme.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Some people only like the film because it showcases Scarlett Johansson naked, which is rather ironic considering the extent to which Honey Trap is in effect here.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The beach scene.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The scene where the alien removes her skin at the end is an incredible job by the makeup department.
    • Also the bizarre trap-floor that victims are sucked through seconds after the alien was walking on it.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Particularly the opening few minutes, which consist of a hodgepodge of abstract images (which resemble an artificial eye being put together), random babbling syllables and words, and creepy-ass music.