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YMMV: The Odd Couple

  • Adaptation Displacement: Most people tend to think of the TV version first.
  • Awesome Music:
    • When Roy Clark guest-starred, the episode's tag featured him performing his signature piece "Malaguena". The audience, Tony Randall and Jack Klugman were all blown away by the performance.
    • Some top-tier American opera singers - Marilyn Horne, Martina Arroyo, Richard Fredricks - appeared on the show and got a chance to strut their vocal stuff.
  • Ear Worm:
    • Just try to get that Neal Hefti theme out of your head. Fittingly, Jack Klugman loved the theme tune, but Tony Randall hated it.
    • "Happy and peppy and bursting with love!" It takes a little effort to get all the right words in the right places, but the tune is incredibly catchy.
    • "A Different Drummer" reintroduced "Stumbling (All Around)", which started its ear wormy existence way back in 1922.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: In one episode from the series, Oscar is hospitalized for an impending throat surgery, and of course, Felix pesters him to no end — even the surgeon and Oscar's fellow patient get fed up with him and all want nothing more than for him to leave Oscar alone (even after Oscar returns home, the doctor wants Felix to just leave him the hell alone). Years later when Jack Klugman was hospitalized for throat surgery, the first person to come to his side was his dear friend Tony Randall.
  • Growing the Beard: As far as the series is concerned, the first season kind of falls flat; between the single camera format and the Laugh Track, it comes off as just another standard, generic 60s-era sitcom (despite premiering in 1970). With the second season bringing us a switch to a multi camera setup with a Studio Audience, and Tony Randall and Jack Klugman feeding off the audience's spontaneity, the series began to jell and find its voice.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The movie could have starred Tony Randall and Jack Klugman.
    • In "The Pen Is Mightier," after hearing Felix's poem "Ode To A Skyscraper," Oscar begs the question "Who's going to read a poem about the 40th floor except a sensitive window washer??" Twenty years later, Barenaked Ladies recorded "When I Fall," a song about a sensitive window washer. (No mention of the 40th floor, though)
  • Ho Yay: And not just to modern eyes: Many a joke has been told about the peculiar nature of Oscar and Felix's relationship over the years. ABC was nervous about any such implications, which led Randall and Klugman to playfully film extra scenes with the Ho Yay dialed Up to Eleven, just to give the censors fits.
  • Informed Wrongness: In "You've Come a Long Way, Baby," Oscar is treated like a complete heel (by Felix, his girlfriend Nancy, and the background music) for wanting to call the police and report a baby that was left behind by his mother at Felix's office several hours before.
  • Jerk Woobie: Felix. He is the show's Butt Monkey, but others' frustration with him is often justified.
  • Recycled Script: The New Odd Couple reused 8 scripts from the original.
  • Values Dissonance: "The Pig Who Came to Dinner" featured a guest appearance by Bobby Riggs in which he played up his misogynistic public image. If similar statements had been made about blacks, for example, they would never have been tolerated, but women were apparently Acceptable Targets and Riggs' bigotry was largely played for laughs.
  • The Woobie: Felix, to those fans who don't find him nearly as irritating as Oscar does. After all, he always means well. Sure, he gets a little carried away sometimes, but sometimes the others overreact.