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Nightmare Fuel: Current 93

  • "I Have A Special Plan for This World". Its lyrics are taken from an already scary Thomas Ligotti poem and recited emotionlessly into a tape machine, alongside a Drone of Dread with frequent invocations of Uncanny Valley and a Last Note Nightmare to end them all.
  • The title track of Black Ships Ate The Sky, a hard-driving noise-rock BSOD Song built on repetition, in which the speaker rapidly loses his mind as he witnesses the Black Ships destroy reality.
  • "The Inmost Night" off of All the Pretty Little Horses. Rambling, vaguely cautionary lyrics, ranted over arrangement of piano, guitar, and drones, rendered utterly unnatural-sounding via flanger and backed with additional unidentifiable noises.
    • From the same album, ''Twilight Twilight Nihil Nihil," an atonal string drone backing deadpanned rounds concerning suffering, destruction and nothingness. The official transcription in the liner notes looks like something you'd find scrawled on the walls of a Room Full of Crazy.
    • "The Frolic," one of the gentlest songs on the album musically, is a Villain Song in the perspective of John Doe (from the Thomas Ligotti tale of the same name). It's about taking a trip with a small, happy child through an Eldritch Locationmuch like John Doe says he does with his victims. It also features a sudden Last Note Nightmare and several layers of recorded speech from the producer's daughter, who was no older than eight at the time of recording. The parts where it's clearest what she's saying drive the point home hard:
      Dragonflies and mayflies, no more dying, no more dying, DEAD!
  • "She Took Us To The Places Where The Sun Sets," from Birth Canal Blues. The lyrics, roared in a distorted Voice of the Legion, jump between caustic damnations and disjointed visions of the world after man. Live versions, while not as heavy on the vocal effects, included several additional verses regarding the end of the world which were along the same vein.