[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/elderscroll_7680.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300:[[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm This is what you think an Elder Scroll looks like.]]]]
[[quoteright:250:~~VideoGame, WesternRPG~~]]

->'' "Go ye now in peace. Let thy fate be written in [[TitleDrop The Elder Scrolls]]..." ''

A popular series of computer and console {{RPG}}s produced by Bethesda Softworks. ''The Elder Scrolls'' games (or TES for short) are set in Tamriel, a landmass roughly the size of Africa. The games are renowned for their [[WideOpenSandbox open-ended]] style of gameplay, allowing the player to play as a heroic or diabolical character, to pursue the main quest with vigor or to ignore it entirely, and to gain prowess and fame through working for guilds, military legions, and the like. The games are also noted for the largeness of the game world -- ''Daggerfall'' in particular has a game world roughly the size of Great Britain, with approximately 750,000 {{NPC}}s to interact with. Though later games in the series are considerably smaller, they remain much larger and more finely-detailed than the typical RPG game world.

The principal games in the ''Elder Scrolls'' series are:

[[index]]
* ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' (1994): [[TheEmperor The benevolent Emperor]] of Tamriel, Uriel Septim VII, is secretly overthrown by his own [[MagicKnight Battlemage]] Jagar Tharn, who traps him in Oblivion, assumes his appearance, and reigns in his stead. However, the ghost of his late apprentice Ria Silmane teams up with a minor noble (the PlayerCharacter) to fight the usurper. Together, they travel through all provinces of Tamriel to [[GottaCatchThemAll collect all pieces]] of the [[DismantledMacGuffin Staff of Chaos]], which the PC then uses to kill Tharn and restore the rightful Emperor. The game was originally going to be about, well, arenas, but that idea was scratched in favor of adapting the developers' home-brew [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons D&D setting]], Tamriel, into a computer game. The fast-paced gladiatorial combat style remained, though, and ''Arena'' was much more action-oriented than other {{RPG}}s of the time. The game met with lackluster sales, but developed a strong enough cult fanbase to warrant a sequel.

* ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' (1996): The PC, a personal acquaintance of Uriel Septim VII, is sent to the Western province of High Rock to investigate the ghost of its former King Lysandus, who now haunts the city of Daggerfall. Cooperating with the [[SecretPolice Emperor's Blades]], the PC uncovers a sinister plot to reactivate the LostSuperweapon Numidium, which was originally used to forge the Third Tamrielic Empire. Several factions in the region enter the fight for controlling the Numidium, and it depends on the PC who wins it. Also of note is the emphasis on side-quests--after seeing how much time ''Arena'' players spent on them, the designers decided to put them in the spotlight. ''Daggerfall'' featured several different factions for the player to join outside of the Main Quest, all of which will give players hundreds of hours of side-questing. It also had positively HUGE [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels randomly generated dungeons]], often "designed" [[RuinsForRuinsSake in the silliest ways possible]].

* ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' (2002): A convict from the Imperial City Prison (the PC) is released in the North-Eastern province of Morrowind on the Emperor's direct orders. Guided by the Blades, the PC fulfills countless local prophecies and is acknowledged as the ChosenOne who will save the land from [[ThePlague the Blight]] (no, not [[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins that Blight]] or [[Literature/TheWheelOfTime that]]). Tracing the Blight to the evil god Dagoth-Ur, the PC destroys the source of his (and other local gods') {{immortality}} and kills him, bringing relative peace to the province. The game was significantly smaller in scope than its predecessor (a "mere" 18 square miles as opposed to hundreds, and a non-infinite number of side-quests), but managed to come off as much more epic anyway due to the quality of the writing and the [[SceneryPorn diverse, exotic landscapes]]. It's also notable for being much, much weirder than the rest of the franchise, being set in an alien landscape populated by Dunmer, dinosaurs, giant bugs, and tiny Cthulhu lookalikes.[[/index]]
** ''Tribunal'' (2002): An attack by the [[MurderInc Dark Brotherhood]] brings the PC to Morrowind's capital of Mournhold. After a while, the PC finds themselves at odds with the local deities and has to [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu kill them]], now that their immortality is lost.
** ''Bloodmoon'' (2003): Arriving on a Northern island of Solstheim, the PC runs into ravaging [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]] and is soon embroiled in a ritual conducted by the Daedric Prince [[TheWildHunt Hircine]] to determine the strongest fighter on the island. Naturally, the PC has to participate.

[[index]]
* ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' (2006): Emperor Uriel Septim VII is assassinated by the [[ReligionOfEvil Mythic Dawn]], but not before seemingly accidentally freeing yet another convict from the Imperial City Prison (the PC). The PC then joins the Blades in their search for the last remaining heir to the Empire, Martin Septim, against the backdrop of [[DuringTheWar an ongoing invasion]] from [[TheLegionsofHell Oblivion]] by the Daedric Prince Mehrunes Dagon, whom the Mythic Dawn worships. Eventually, the PC, Martin, and the Blades manage to repel the Daedra but... [[BittersweetEnding at a price]]. This was the first big-name RPG for the 7th generation of consoles, and made full use of the Xbox 360's and Playstation 3's technical abilities. However, some complained that it had been dumbed-down for casual gamers, what with arrows pointing to your objectives, overdone LevelScaling, and simplified role-playing elements.[[/index]]
** ''Knights of the Nine'' (2006): The PC investigates a [[BloodstainedGlassWindows brutal attack on the local chapel]] to discover that an EvilSorcerer plans to destroy Cyrodiil and only certain artifacts can defeat him. [[OrderReborn Reestablishing the order]] of eponymous Knights of the Nine, the PC recovers all artifacts and kills the evil wizard.
** ''Shivering Isles'' (2007): The PC is summoned by the Daedric Prince [[TheMadHatter Sheogorath]] to help prevent the [[EternalRecurrence regular destruction]] of his Oblivion realm.

[[index]]
* ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' (2011): Set 200 years after the Oblivion crisis when the empire Tiber Septim founded is in bad shape, being slowly picked apart by the fascistic [[ScrewYouElves Aldmeri Dominion]] through means of subterfuge, imposing treaty terms, or outright war. The PC barely survives crossing over to Skyrim after Alduin, the Nordic aspect of Akatosh, decimates a village the PC was planned to be executed at. Now with dragons appearing all over Skyrim, the PC discovers that they're the Dovahkiin (Dragonborn) and the only one able to stop Alduin from ushering TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, all in the midst of a civil war.[[/index]]
** ''Dawnguard'' (2012): The Dragonborn gets involved in a conflict between the newly reformed [[VampireHunter Dawnguard]] and a race of vampires in Eastern Skyrim, who wish to fulfill an ancient prophecy and [[TheNightThatNeverEnds permanently blot out the Sun]].
** ''Hearthfire'' (2012): The Dragonborn gets into homebuilding and childrearing.
** ''Dragonborn'' (2012): The Dragonborn visits [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Solstheim]] and faces off against the ''[[EvilCounterpart First]]'' [[EvilCounterpart Dragonborn]], an undead [[ReligionOfEvil Dragon-Priest]] named Miraak who, like the Dragons, is now seeking to return to life.

[[index]]
* ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsOnline'' (2014): An {{MMORPG}} prequel to the main ''Elder Scrolls'' series, set during the Second Era interregnum between the fall of the Akaviri Potentate and the rise of the Septim Dynasty. The PC has had their soul stolen by the Daedric Prince Molag Bal, and they must stop him as he attempts to take over Tamriel. Meanwhile, the Ruby Throne is empty, and three alliances vie for control of Cyrodiil and the Empire.

* ''Literature/TheElderScrollsInUniverseBooks'' covers the various {{In Game Novel}}s found in the games from ''Daggerfall'' on.
* ''[[Literature/TheElderScrolls The Elder Scrolls Novels]]'': ''The Infernal City'' and ''Lord of Souls'' by Greg Keyes. Set forty years after ''Oblivion'', they tell of the appearance of the floating city of Umbriel in Tamriel and the devastation it wrought.[[/index]]

Bethesda has also produced several other games set in the ''Elder Scrolls'' universe which are not [=RPGs=]:

* ''The Elder Scrolls Legends: Battlespire'' (1997), basically a long, [[MushroomSamba trippy]] dungeon-crawl. Set during the time of ''Arena'', and originally planned as an expansion pack for ''Daggerfall''. A WizardingSchool for Imperial Battlemages is attacked by Mehrunes Dagon, who aims to use it as a conduit for invading Tamriel. A single graduate (the PC) has to fight their way to Dagon through Oblivion, defeat him, and [[ItsPersonal free their partner]]. It is the only game in the series to include multiplayer, though that addition proved a [[MisbegottenMultiplayerMode spectacular failure]] and Bethesda never tried it again. A good chunk of the information of the things known about the Daedra originate in this game.
* ''The Elder Scrolls Adventures: Redguard'' (1998), an action-adventure game with very few RPG elements. Some 400 years before ''Arena'', a Redguard by the name of Cyrus travels home to find his sister missing and himself embroiled in a web of political intrigue. It was well received by critics and fans, but due to the cost of production and being built on outdated technology, it was a financial flop. The [[{{Feelies}} Pocket Guide to the Empire]] is the origin of most of the background lore on Tamriel.
* ''Dawnstar'' (2003)
* ''Stormhold'' (2004)
* ''Shadowkey'' (2004)
** These last three were released for mobile phones. Generally, only ''Shadowkey'' is considered canon.

Additionally, a "remake" of ''Oblivion'' was released for mobile phones. A PSP version was also planned and demonstrated, but is currently presumed cancelled.

In 2004, Bethesda released the original version of ''Arena'' as a freeware download. In 2009, it was joined by ''Daggerfall''.

In 2011, a rewrite of ''Daggerfall's'' game engine, known as [[http://xlengine.com/ DaggerXL]], started development under an independent programmer.

Both ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' run quite nicely under [[http://www.dosbox.com/ DOSBox]], though, so grab them [[http://www.elderscrolls.com/arena/ here]] and [[http://www.elderscrolls.com/daggerfall/ here]] and enjoy.

An Elder Scrolls Anthology was released in 2013 for the PC. It includes every game in the main series (Arena, Daggerfall, Morrowind, Oblivion, and Skyrim) along with all the addons and expansions for the most recent three.

''The Elder Scrolls'' has inspired many world-building projects, such as ''Franchise/TheUutakMythos''.

Has a page listing the [[TheElderScrolls/TheElderScrollsRaceTropes Tropes applicable to each race]].

----
!!Provides examples of:

* AbandonedMine: Appear quite frequently in the series as places to explore. A good number of still-operational mines are also seen.
* AboveGoodAndEvil: Admittedly the series tends to GrayAndGreyMorality, but special mention goes to the spirits and deities of the series; while considered variously good or evil depending on where you are and who you ask in a case of in-Universe mass AlternateCharacterInterpretation (see also AllMythsAreTrue), most in-'verse scholars claim [[BlueAndOrangeMorality they are simply above human understanding and therefore human conceptions of moral actions.]] Also, see the Vivec example from the above AGodAmI.
* AbusivePrecursors: Several examples.
** The Ayleids were not very nice people, to put it lightly. They kept the early races of men as slaves, and some of their more horrific mistreatment of their slaves included forcing them all to work naked, force-feeding them hallucinogenic drugs and watching their reactions, creating sculptures out of their bones and gardens out of their entrails, and setting human children on fire and setting hungry animals on them. It's little wonder that the slaves eventually [[TheDogBitesBack rose up against them]], overthrew them, and eventually drove them to apparent extinction.
** The Dwemer. While they mostly wanted to be left alone, they warred against just about every other race they came into contact with. Special mention goes to the Skyrim Dwemer, who took in the Snow Elves after they had been displaced by the invading Nords only to enslave them and mutate them into the modern Falmer.
* AdamSmithHatesYourGuts: Throughout the series, even when the player is a famous conquering hero, what s/he pays is still largely depends on skills. Even members of a guild a player is in will still usually charge unfair prices. The disposition of the NPC merchant also plays a role, but even if that merchant really likes you, it's rare to get fair value.
* AerithAndBob: Played with. You can find a vast mix of names within the Elder Scrolls universe, from the exotic (Mannimarco, Wadarkhu) to the common (Jon, Jim) but most of the races have their own naming conventions (based heavily in their FantasyCounterpartCulture,) and stick to those naming conventions. So it's generally played straight for the world as a whole and ranges from downplayed to averted within the races themselves.
* AffablyEvil: Quite a few villains throughout the series. Special mention to Dagoth Ur of ''Morrowind'' and the members of the [[MurderInc Dark Brotherhood]] in the games where it is a joinable faction.
* AGodAmI: Dagoth Ur.
--> What a fool you are. I'm a god! How can you kill a god?! What a grand and intoxicating innocence!
** Almalexia is like this too (something Vivec himself notes). Jarring in Vivec's case who is renowned to be the one ''least'' prone to those, but will give such a spiel if you confront him on what the Tribunal has done, asking you who you are to question a god.
* AGodIsYou: Several instances.
** Notably averted in ''Morrowind''. The entire plot revolves around [[spoiler:obtaining the tools with which it's possible to achieve godhood and getting them to the source from which said godhood can be obtained]]. But there's no way to actually do so, the only option is to [[spoiler:use them to release it]]. It's not all bad for the player in ''Morrowind'' though, as [[spoiler: you get to become TheAgeless thanks to the positive effects of the corprus disease that are not cured. You're not exactly a "god," but no longer aging and being immune to disease aren't bad consolation prizes.]]
** [[spoiler:Specifically, at the end of ''Shivering Isles'', A [[MadGod Sheogorath]] Is You.]]
** In ''Skyrim'', the protagonist is the Dragonborn, a rare mortal gifted with the blood and soul of an Aedric Dragon.
* TheAgeless: Several examples:
** Those suffering from the Corprus disease. They become immune to all other disease and stop aging completely. However, they also slowly lose their minds and develop a bad case of BodyHorror. [[spoiler: The Nerevarine in ''Morrowind'' has the negative effects cured, leaving only the positive ones in tact.]]
** Vampires. Though there are some regional differences between vampire clans, as a whole, they fit the trope. Those who go long periods without feeding will become insane however.
** Dragons combine this with ResurrectiveImmortality. They are Aedric entities with immortal souls. Their bodies may be destroyed, but they can be recreated as long as their soul persists to go back into it. They can only truly be "killed" if another dragon (or Dragonborn) absorbs their soul.
* AlienHair: The Argonians, the closest thing to an 'alien' playable race, have horns, flexible spikes, fins, rigid spikes and feathers in place of hair.
* AlienSky:
** Nirn has two moons, Masser and Secunda, which go through technically impossible phases and are actually the remains of the [[GodIsDead dead creator god]]. When they aren't full, you can see stars behind the dark parts. The sun and stars are holes punctured in reality by spirits escaping during the formation of the mortal plane, and magic flows through them (which is visible as nebulae.) The other plane(t)s are infinite plane(t)s that represent the Aedra's divinity and are floating within the infinite Oblivion. And it is frequently implied to look this way because YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm.
** The various Daedric planes of Oblivion all have very alien skies. Mehrunes Dagon's Deadlands have swirling red storm clouds. Sheogorath's Shivering Isles have huge, multicolored stars and nebulae streaked across a deep purple night. Hermaeus Mora's Apocrypha has his floating tentacles blotting out the sky. Sovngarde and the Soul Cairn, while not technically Daedric planes, also qualify as otherworldly realms with alien skies.
* AllDesertsHaveCacti: Hammerfell, despite it being otherwise closer to a North African desert. Averted in places which are desert-like (the Ashlands on Vvardenfell, for instance,) but don't fit the traditional idea most people have of deserts.
* AllMythsAreTrue: All myths in Tamriel's tradition, that is. There are many [[UnreliableExpositor different variations]] of these myths, though, so good luck figuring out which ''versions'' are true. For instance, every culture in Tamriel seems to have their own creation myth, with many shared elements, but with major differences as well.
* AllTrollsAreDifferent: Huge, hairy three-eyed simians that [[HealingFactor regenerate]] remarkably quickly.
* AltItis: Unsurprisingly common with all of the character creation options available in each game, including everything from race and class to facial features and hairstyles. This trend is usually called "Restartitus" on the official forums.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: Goblins, Ogres, Minotaurs... Dremora seem to be Always LawfulEvil.
** Falmer in ''Skyrim'', due to a combination of the original Snow Elves being brutally driven out of Skyrim and underground by Ysgramor, and then being enslaved by the Dwemer and turned blind by being forced to eat a poisonous fungus and ''then'' being biologically altered into relying on said fungus to survive. The Falmer have since been twisted into hateful monsters who want to kill and eat anyone who isn't Falmer. Basically, they're the ''Elder Scrolls'' equivalent of [[MoleMen Mole People]].
* AlwaysCheckBehindTheChair: Starting with the jump to 3D and hand-crafted environments in ''Morrowind'', the developers have come to ''adore'' this trope. Thorough players can find everything from helpful stashes of items like gold and potions to flat out [[DiscOneNuke Disc One Nukes]] by checking every little nook, cranny, ledge, and tree stump they come across.
* AlwaysOverTheShoulder: When in third person.
* AnachronismStew: Designs for architecture, fashion, armor, weapons and other items mixes elements from the Antiquity (like the very Roman-inspired Imperials,) the Middle Ages (Viking-inspired Skyrim,) the Renaissance (Daggerfall and the Bretons,) and Colonial America all the way up to the 1800s (with the {{Steampunk}} Dwemer and Sotha Sil's Clockwork City, as well as minor examples like Sheogorath wearing a pocket watch.)
* AncientConspiracy: House Dagoth, the Mythic Dawn.
* AngelsDevilsAndSquid: Loosely with the Aedra, the Daedra, and Sithis, respectively. The Daedra in particular are a very diverse group, ranging from the generally "good" (if [[GoodIsNotNice not always nice]]) ones like Azura and Meridia to those who are very devil-like such as Mehrunes Dagon and Molag Bal. They even have a "squid" represented if you include Hermaeus Mora.
* AHomeOwnerIsYou: In every main-series game starting with ''Daggerfall'', the player has the option to purchase or build homes. It is also possible to simply take over an abandoned dwelling, or kill the former owner and make it your own. ''Morrowind'' uses them as rewards for climbing up in the hierarchy of certain factions; ''Daggerfall'' and ''Oblivion'' let you buy them if you have enough money. ''Skyrim'' is a bit of both--Gain a good reputation with a town, and the Jarl will allow you to buy a house there, or purchase land on which to build one in the ''Hearthfire'' expansion.
* AnInteriorDesignerIsYou: In each of the full 3D games (starting with ''Morrowind'',) it is possible for the player to place items in houses. However, the [[WreakingHavok wonky physics system]] added in ''Oblivion'' made it outright impossible to place more than one item anywhere in a room without knocking everything else about. Thankfully, [[GameMod modders]] came to the rescue creating mods specifically to make decorating your house easier. Come ''Skyrim'', Bethesda incorporated some of the ideas from the mods such as wall mounts, weapon racks, armor mannequins, and bookshelves, making this process much easier.
* AncientOrderOfProtectors: The order known as the Blades serves as the protectors of the Dragonborn, who are essentially person-shaped [[MacGuffin Mac Guffins]], sometimes [[PersonOfMassDestruction Persons of Mass Destruction]] and sometimes [[BarrierMaiden Barrier Maidens]].
* AnnouncerChatter: In the Imperial City's Arena in ''Oblivion''.
* AnnoyingArrows: Kind of justified from a game mechanic standpoint, as everyone has health points to take damage from. Doesn't stop it from seeming odd when a particularly powerful enemy's still attacking you with 20 arrows jutting out of his chest.
** Using a weak bow and arrow and stealth, you can end up shooting a target from the shadows and not killing them. Even with an arrow jutting ''[[BoomHeadshot out of their head]]'', they usually just wander about for a few seconds before declaring [[ArtificialStupidity "It must be nothing"]] and going back to whatever they were doing. With the arrow ''still in them.''
* ArmorAndMagicDontMix: Downplayed overall. Pure mage {{NPC}}s typically don't wear armor, as how effective it is depends mostly on your skill level with that armor class, and {{NPC}}s typically don't have many skill points outside of their class skills. However there's nothing that actually stops them from equipping it (look what happens if you cheat armor into their inventory in ''Morrowind''), and the series has always had several types of {{Magic Knight}}s on up to the heavy armor-wearing Battlemage. ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim'' add mechanics that gently encourage spellcasting characters not to wear armor (spell damage reduction varying by armor skill in the first case, and an Alteration perk that's only usable unarmored in the second), but it's still a valid choice.
* ArtifactOfDoom: Numerous examples: The Staff of Chaos, the Mantella, the Heart of Lorkhan, and the Mysterium Xarxes were all major plot elements. Other artifacts, such as Umbra, also qualify.
* ArtifactTitle: The Elder Scrolls are the namesake of the series, but they often only have a few plot specific uses per game and often afterwards become useless. [[spoiler: They don't appear at all in the first three games, and appear just once or twice in the most recent two, to do things like rewrite history, and to kick a god out of the stream of time.]]
** Actually something overlooked in Arena. The Queen of Rihad offhandedly remarks that she used an Elder Scroll to locate the first major dungeon "Fang Lair" for you. Though this has since been retconned seeing what the scrolls have since become. Unless the Queen is a Moth Priest.
* ArtificialAtmosphericActions: Present in ''Oblivion''. Less so in ''Morrowind'', but ''still'' there since the AI wasn't programmed to do many specific things. Many times the wandering AI will get stuck on something or try attacking you when their friend is in their way. Can also lead to a FunnyMoment or two... or three.
** It's worth mentioning that in ''Morrowind'', people's greetings to you would change depending on their affection to you. This sometimes leads to people breaking character.
** Potentially [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in the Shivering Isles, where everyone's insane.
* ArtificialStupidity: The series has long had issues with this, especially where dialogue is concerned. Certain phrases, especially once voiced dialogue started being used in the later games in the series, were repeated ad nauseam, often reaching MemeticMutation status. ("We're watching you, scum." "I saw a mudcrab the other day..." and "...until I took an arrow to the knee" come to mind.)
* BadassArmy: Plenty to go around.
** The Imperial Legions have forged no fewer than four empires spanning most or all of Tamriel at different points. As individual soldiers, they pale in comparison to the warriors of many of the other races, but their emphasis on training, discipline, and teamwork have allowed them to come out on top of the SoldierVsWarrior debate.
** Any army of Nords in general counts, but special mention to Ysgramor and his 500 companions. They managed to take on and nearly wipe out the entire civilization of the Snow Elves. Later, the Nords would create one of the first empires of the races of men under the leadership of the "Tongues," masters of the [[MakeMeWannaShout Thu'um]].
** When asked in-universe, many members of the Imperial Legion are quick to point out the respect they have for the Dunmer Great House Redoran, also known as the "Warrior House," who prides themselves on honor and martial prowess. When the legions under Tiber Septim were threatening to invade Morrowind, the Redorans were planning to defend Morrowind ''on their own'' after every other Great House chose to capitulate to the empire or remain neutral. (The armistice was signed between Septim and Vivec before the war went beyond minor skirmishes, however.) Then during the Oblivion Crisis, they led the defense of Morrowind and fought the Daedric forces to a standstill before they were eventually wiped out. (Though they make a comeback by ''Dragonborn''.)
* BarbarianLonghair: Used extensively with male Nords, given that they're basically expies of the Norse. Particularly prominent in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', which is set in their homeland.
* BarrierMaiden: Several examples in the series. Unusually for the trope, they are all male.
** ''Morrowind'' has the Tribunal who power the Ghostfence, a magical barrier that keeps Dagoth Ur and the Blight contained within Red Mountain. By the time of the game, due to being unable to replenish their divinity, only Vivec is powering the gate. Vivec is actually one twice, since his power also keeps the Ministry of Truth from crashing into Vvardenfell. [[spoiler: In large part due to the player's actions during the game, Vivec disappears early in the 4th era, causing the Ministry to continue its descent with its original momentum uninterrupted. The impact causes Red Mountain to erupt, destroying most of Morrowind.]]
** Martin in ''Oblivion'' is another. Like the other Emperors before him, he is the only person who can carry out the ritual that seals the barrier between the mortal world and Oblivion. [[spoiler: At the end, Martin sacrifices himself, sealing the barrier forever.]]
** Talos, the ascended god form of Tiber Septim, is revealed to be one in ''Skyrim''. [[spoiler: Following the events of the previous two games, he is the last thing keeping the mortal plane extant. This is why the Thalmor, who believe the destruction of the mortal plane will allow elvenkind to reclaim the immortality they lost long ago, have outlawed Talos worship, believing that if no one worships him, he will cease to be.]]
* BeatStillMyHeart: The Heart of Lorkhan, the "dead" creator god, is still beating away deep within Red Mountain. [[spoiler: At least until the events of ''Morrowind'']]. Depending on the storyteller, his heart ("divine center") was ripped out after he convinced/tricked the et'Ada (Aedra) into sacrificing much of their power to create Mundus, the mortal realm. Auri-El, one of those et'Ada, tied the heart to an arrow and fired it across Tamriel where it landed in modern day Morrowind, forming Red Mountain.
* BecomingTheMask: Both played straight and inverted thanks to the act of "Mantling." Essentially, to mantle someone, one must become so like them that there ceases to be a functional difference between the two entities; it seems that at this point the universe itself ceases to distinguish between the two, and they become one entity. Several famous examples:
** Tiber Septim and Lorkhan. Mantling is theorized to have been what caused Tiber Septim to become the deity Talos upon his death; he spent much of his life campaigning around Tamriel with the Numidium, which was originally constructed to draw power from the Heart of Lorkhan. While the Numidium in Tiber Septim's possession was powered by the Mantella, not the Heart, it is possible that so much time spent around and controlling the Numidium's power was enough for him to effectively mantle Lorkhan, and take his place among the Nine. [[spoiler: This also supports the theory of the Thalmor that the cessation of Talos would also end the mortal realm, as it was created by Lorkhan and the two are now the same entity.]]
** [[spoiler: The Champion of Cyrodiil and Sheogorath. The Champion of Cyrodiil was given the mantle of Sheogorath at the end of the Greymarch. The exact nature of this mantling is difficult to understand in full. Rather than acting like Sheogorath until the universe effectively combined the two entities, Jyggalag surrendered the Mantle, or role, of Sheogorath to the mortal Champion of Cyrodiil.]]
* {{BFS}}: Mostly averted. With a few exceptions, the weapons in the series have always had fairly realistic sizes, which make them seem small compared to most other video games.
* BigBad: Each game in the series has had one for the main quest, with others present for expansions and faction questlines. One main quest exception is ''Daggerfall'', where, due to the game's emphasis on GrayAndGrayMorality as well as having MultipleEndings, there is no definite big bad. Instead, it's whoever you choose to work with/against.
* BindingAncientTreaty: The Bosmer and their "Green Pact", which forbids the consumption of any kind of plant matter. Though Bosmer living outside of Valenwood appear to be exempt from it.
* BittersweetEnding: In ''Oblivion'' [[spoiler: Mehrunes Dagon and the Mythic Dawn cult that worships him are both defeated for good, and the gates of Oblivion are sealed forever, preventing any kind of Daedra invasion of the mortal world from ever happening again. The main hero is rejoiced across Cyrodiil as its savior and everyone rejoices. However, the disappearance of Martin Septim, Uriel Septim's bastard son, leaves the Septim line without an heir to assume the throne. [[strike:Though the Elder Council may be able to keep the Empire together, it is heavily implied that the Empire is far from out of the woods.]] The Empire falls, Morrowind especially being mostly destroyed by Vvardenfell's eruption and wars with Skyrim and Black Marsh. Not to mention the fact, that the main hero, eventually starts slowly transforming into the new Sheogorath. Retaining memories of his/her past self, yet adopts Sheogorath's personality and mannerisms (as well as insanity) becoming a tragic shell of what he/she used to be]]
* BlackAndGrayMorality: The series tends more toward GrayAndGrayMorality, but ''Daggerfall'' and the ''Tribunal'' expansion for ''Morrowind'' have their fair share of black. ''Daggerfall'', coming before PC games were subject to much censorship, even includes things like [[spoiler: Sentinel's king and queen burying their sickly firstborn son alive and the PlayerCharacter killing a child to cure him/herself or Lycanthropy.]] And then there is the series' BlueAndOrangeMorality, detailed below, which can look pretty black from ther perspective of a non-deity.
* BlackAndWhiteMorality: Not as common as shades of gray, but it exists. The main quest in ''Oblivion'' is a mostly straight-up good vs. evil adventure, as is the main questline of ''Skyrim.'' While there are some twists, the former is pretty much a tale of saving the world from all hell breaking loose, and the latter involves saving the world (and the afterlife!) from an evil dragon. They even illustrate this with the two good and evil dragons in a major fight being black and white, respectively. The gray shades come in when one considers many of the side quests, certain daedra, Skyrim's Civil War, and much of the game of ''Morrowind.''
* BlindSeer: Blindness and prophecy are two of the side effects associated with reading the titular scrolls.
* BloodKnight: Hircine is the Daedric Prince of this. [[spoiler:The entire plot of ''Bloodmoon'' turns out to be a plot for him to find a worthy foe.]]
* BloodyBowelsOfHell: Molag Bal's Daedric Plane of Coldharbour. It's a ruined parody of Tamriel, with every surface covered in bloody excrement. He ''is'' the Prince of Violation, so...
* BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Aedra, Daedra, and any mortal that ascends (Tiber Septim, the Tribunal, Mannimarco, et al).
** It's revealed in ''Skyrim'' that the Falmer, losing ground to the Nords fast, pleaded with the Dwemer for help. The Dwemer proceeded to feed them a fungus which made them blind, engineer their biology so they depended on the fungus to survive, and then keep them around as a slave race. The slaves rebelled, fighting an endless underground war against the Dwemer until they disappeared, leaving the Falmer as blind cave-dwelling beasts.
* BoringButPractical: Throughout the series, there are many exotic and interesting methods of killing enemies. However, at the end of the day, simply being proficient at stabbing, slashing, and/or bashing something to death with a melee weapon will always be extremely useful.
* TheCaligula: Pelagius the Mad certainly lived up to his name. He had extreme weight fluctuations and tried to hang himself at the end of a royal ball, among other things. When it was determined that he was no longer fit to rule, he was institutionalized, and, shortly before he died, he declared that dying would be illegal.
* CallASmeerpARabbit: Many examples, particularly when it comes to materials.
** An upper-tier material is called ebony, with no relation to the real-world wood. Instead, it is some manner of volcanic/metallic glass that can hold an incredibly sharp edge when shaped into a weapon, withstand heavy blows when used as armor, or is more valuable than gold when used as bullion. It's also hypothesized by lore students in the fan base to be the petrified blood of Lorkhan, since most of its deposits are around Red Mountain (which was the landing place of His heart).
** "Quicksilver," another name for real-life Mercury, is a ''solid'' mineral.
** "Corundum" is a metallic substance which can be formed into ingots, rather than the real-world crystal.
** Glass, which can be made into weapons or armor without shattering. This glass is similar to ebony above as it can be mined and is nothing like the material which shares its name. This is made even more confusing in ''Hearthfire'' as actual glass is available to buy from merchants to make windows for your home. However, the mineral used to make glass armor and weapons, malachite, is quite [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malachite real]].
* CardCarryingVillain: Egregiously so in ''Oblivion''. ''Morrowind'' was much more morally ambiguous, with even the local assassins' guild operating within legal framework and according to [[EvenEvilHasStandards a strict honor code]]. There was also less of the trope in ''Skyrim'' -- Alduin is an example, but the secondary conflict of the civil war is [[GrayAndGrayMorality much, much more ambiguous]].
** The Daedra can look like this at times -- their BlueAndOrangeMorality tends to focus on whatever their Sphere is... meaning Boethiah is a card-carrying betrayer, Mehrunes Dagon is a card-carrying destroyer, Molag Bal is a card-carrying enslaver/corruptor of mortals...
* CatFolk: Khajiit, with some zig-zagging throughout the series. In ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'', the playable Khajiit were a subspecies known as Ohmes-Raht Khajiit, which were basically humans with a few vague feline features. From ''Morrowind'' onwards, the dominant Khajiit sub-species has been the Suthay-Raht, which are your standard CatFolk. Though Khajiit can range from many many variations, depending on what the phases of the moons are when they are born. Whether rather human-like, the common anthropomorphic cats, giant jungle cats that are used as steeds for their own kind, [[note]] as proven in the spin-off novel, "The Infernal City" though continuity can be questioned [[/note]] or even common housecats. [[note]] also questionable as the in-game source stating this is said to be written by an UnreliableNarrator [[/note]]
* ChaosArchitecture: Geography and city layouts vary greatly between ''Arena'' and its sequels. Some in-game texts discuss events such as [[TimeCrash Dragon Breaks]] and the intervention of various gods in between games to justify/retcon this.
* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Each of the races have experienced this over the course of the series. In particular:
** In Arena Khajiit "are a fair-skinned people" who appear perfectly humanoid, and "legend has it" that they descend from cats. They would eventually become the series' CatFolk, because that's really more interesting. Some backstory about different types of Khajiit has since been [[{{Retcon}} made up to deal with the discrepancy]]. (See CatFolk above.)
** Originally, the Orcs were simple "hurr durr smash hoomies" {{Warhammer}}-style orcs with nothing particularly noteworthy about them (they weren't even '''playable''' in ''Arena'' or ''Daggerfall''). Beginning with ''Morrowind'', however, their characterization has shifted massively - they became an ''elf'' subspecies of all things (in what is actually a very clever ShoutOut to [[TheLordOfTheRings the grandfather of modern fantasy]]), and rather than just being dumb, they'd been severely marginalized for ages - even their god reflected this. The Imperial Legion of Uriel VII's time, among other things, however, helped them to begin to properly integrate into the Empire better - thus making them playable.
** The Dunmer (Dark Elves) were typical [[OurElvesAreBetter Drow wannabes]] in ''Arena''; this makes sense given that Tamriel started life as a [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons D&D]] setting. Their history and personalities began to get more complex starting with ''Daggerfall'', however, and ''Morrowind'' is more or less dedicated to transforming them into a very alien culture unlike anything else in Tamriel. These days, a lot of people might ''see'' some of them as "evil", but it's really just that [[BlueAndOrangeMorality their view of the world really is that different]]. Read the mind-blowing insanity that is the '' 36 Lessons of Vivec'' for a good example of this.
* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: A few examples.
** Training one's physical skills high enough can bring them to superhuman levels of ability. For example, one can train their Athletics to the point where they can outrun deer and out-swim fish, or train their Marksmanship to the point where time slows down while they are aiming.
** Use of the Thu'um. Anyone can learn to do it, if they're willing to dedicate decades of their life training to do so. In fact, it was one of the ancient Nords most powerful weapons and aided them immensely in their conquests. What makes those who are Dragonborn special is that they can do this innately.
* CharmPerson: Several useful and valuable spells have this effect.
* ChekhovsVolcano: Averted in that the Red Mountain from ''Morrowind'' never erupts, but instead simply keeps spewing ash, which in the world serves an entirely different purpose [[spoiler:until the book]]. Probably explains why the people of Morrowind have probably never seen a Pastel in their life, or anything that wasn't [[RealIsBrown smeared brown]]. (By the time ''Skyrim'' rolls around, the Red Mountain has erupted, destroying most of Vvardenfell in the process, which does make the entirety of ''Morrowind'' seem like a bit of a ShaggyDogStory.[[note]]Though s/he may not have saved Morrowind long term, s/he did stop a deranged PhysicalGod from conquering all of Tamriel with a HumungousMecha powered by the heart of a [[GodIsDead dead god]][[/note]] Oh, and it's implied the eruption was indirectly caused by [[NiceJobBreakingItHero the player's actions]] in ''Tribunal''.)
* ChivalrousPervert: "Oh, why I am just certain that Crassius Curio counts, dumpling, but it is sooooo nice to hear you say so yourself."
* ChoiceOfTwoWeapons: Too many different combinations possible.
* TheChosenOne: It's been played straight, zig-zagged, averted, subverted, and is frequently deconstructed depending on where you look; the series really is all over the place with this one. The various [[PlayerCharacter Player Characters]] have generally been the chosen one, as prophesied in the Elder Scrolls themselves, but the series lore has an act known as "Mantling," where if you do what the chosen one was supposed to do, whether you actually are him or not, you ''become'' the chosen one. ''Morrowind'' has an interesting zig-zag where it isn't clear if the PC really is the chosen one or TheUnchosenOne. In ''Oblivion'', [[spoiler: Martin]] is the chosen one while the PC is more his [[TheLancer Lancer]]/HyperCompetentSidekick.
* CircleOfStandingStones: Various types of magical stone formations dot the landscapes of Tamriel bestowing different blessings upon those who seek them out. Some, such as the Doom Stones in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', have specific requirements like only being usable at night or after a certain amount of renown is acquired.
* CityOfCanals: The city of Vivec from ''Morrowind''.
** [[WretchedHive Riften]] from ''Skyrim''
** As all cities in Arena are randomly generated, which can include canal-like rivers and lakes. any city can be considered this.
* ColonCancer: The tie-in books to ''Skyrim''' and ''Online'' that contain in-game lorebooks and art, with titles like ''The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - The Skyrim Library, Vol. 1: The Histories''.
* ConspiracyTheorist: A side quest in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' concerns a Bosmer named Glarthir who is convinced that several people in town are involved in a conspiracy against him, and wants the player to help him find proof.
** This is apparently a VERY common trait with the Dukes and Duchesses of Dementia.
* ContemptibleCover: The promo and cover art for ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' had [[RobLiefeld Rob Liefeld-esque]] female warriors dressed in outfits that consisted solely of a few black leather straps. The modern ''Elder Scrolls'' games from ''Morrowind'' onwards have been more sensible in that regard.
* ContinuitySnarl: A ''deliberate'' one, in that much of the background material is written from multiple points of view that often contradict one another in some way.
* CorruptChurch: The Tribunal Temple, though not always. Despite its dubious origins, it did a fair amount of good in its early days for the Dunmer people. Once the Tribunal members began to withdraw from the day to day affairs of the church [[spoiler:(to conserve their power after losing two of the tools of Kagrenac)]] and the mortal priests took over, things started to go downhill quickly...
** ReligionOfEvil: Dagoth Ur's Sixth House, the Mythic Dawn. In ''Oblivion'' there is a town called Hackdirt where the villagers are insane cultists who worship underground beings called "The Deep Ones" (Speculated to have to have in actuality been Falmer or Sload, or most likely Daedra since their bible seems to use Daedric lettering); the entire concept of this village, and the quest associated with it and even the title "Deep ones" themselves are all inspired from H.P Lovecraft's Novel "The Shadow Over Innsmouth"
* CosmicRetcon: The Warp of the West, most famously. Due to all of the different possible endings in ''Daggerfall'' which depended on the player's choices, the developers decided that, due to [[DeusExMachina divine interference]], ''all'' of the possible endings happened at once, ''within the same timeline''. Needless to say, the world became a bit messy after that.
** A less blatant example is the [[TimeyWimeyBall "Dragon Break" phenomenon]] where time goes all screwy for a bit, implied to account for some of the [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness differences between the earlier and later games in the series.]]
** Their tendency to mess with reality is the reason ''why'' Elder Scrolls are typically considered dangerous artefacts.
* CrapsackWorld: Alas, what Tamriel has essentially become after the conclusion of the ''Oblivion'' storyline. Pretty much ''everyone'' has shared a miserable fate.
** Not to mention the fact that people can't go half a mile anywhere without being attacked by wildlife, bandits, demons, undead, or monsters in general.
** Also, while in the real world people would debate whether the devil is real or not, in Tamriel not only is this concept real, but there are 16 variations of them. Even if random people have no desire to make deals with them, many times they seek out certain people forcing them to do their evil bidding or have horrible things happen to them. Or they just curse random people for fun.
* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Maybe. It ''is'' possible the Khajiit have a subrace looking like common housecats. That are quite powerful spellcasters. However, the book that mentions this notes that the source of the claim is [[UnreliableNarrator notorious for being unreliable with the truth]] (especially in ''that'' context -- it is the Bosmer, and the Bosmer have fought more than a few wars against the the Khajiit over the years), and that he personally doesn't believe it.
* CulturalPosturing: The Altmer and Dunmer are particularly fond of this.
** As of ''Skyrim'', the Altmer have taken this up several notches. Even to other Altmer.
* CursedWithAwesome / BlessedWithSuck/ BeneficialDisease: Corprus disease renders you permanently immune to all other diseases, boosts your strength, and stops you from ever aging. On the downside, it's also TheVirus, and eventually turns you into an EldritchAbomination.
** Vampirism. It grants players with increased speed, health, damage, etc and the ability to suck blood from people but makes them take damage out in the sun, and so ugly that people (including quest givers) will not talk to you.
*** ''Morrowind'' and ''Oblivion'' seem to handle vampirism in different ways. While in ''Morrowind'', you'll definitely get ostracized by virtually everybody (except the Telvanni, where you pretty much count as normal) no matter when you fed last, this is not the case in ''Oblivion''. There, you'll just get ostracized if you haven't fed for a few days, else you usually pass for human... or at least mortal.
**** A book recounts an example of this, in the form of a story about a man who sought advice on how to handle vampires of different sorts; a mysteriously helpful source would educate him as to the special traits of vampires in different areas, and the man would then go destroy those vampire clans. He later gets eaten by his source, who reveals, in order, that some clans of vampires could pass for human, and then that he, himself, was one such vampire and hadn't fed in a ''long'' time. (To spice things up, one game later you actually meet said hunter turned Vampire and put him out of his misery)
** Lycanthropy, once a night you turn into a several hundred pounds of flesh, fur, claws and teeth capable of killing even the most powerful creatures, but have to at least kill (devouring is optional depending on the game) a sentient humanoid every night or suffer crippling withdrawals when you return to normal. ''Skyrim'' also revealed that Werewolves, upon death, are kidnapped to Hircine's realm, even if they don't want to, for an eternity at Hircine's side as one of his pack hounds (which, if you're fine with all of the above, probably won't be an issue for you).
*** In addition to not receiving the well-rested bonus upon sleeping in your own bed.
** Daggerfall's werewolves were a massive double-edged sword. You got very very powerful stats. But you have to kill one person a month or else your stats will plummet to almost zero. So if your stats plummet while you're in a dungeon, you're screwed.
* DamnYouMuscleMemory: Go from any installment to ''any other'' installment and you'll run into this problem, guaranteed.
** This was the same on the PS3 which used the R2 key to move items, also remapped to use shouts. Coupled with natural lag on the PS3 at higher levels, and the lag brought on from processing the bytes that make up the items flying around the room, this can be incredibly agonizing.
** Also happens if you've been playing ''VideoGame/{{Fallout3}}'' or ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' which use the same engine and were developed by the same company, to the point they are sometimes considered sister series. These games feature ''similar'' controls to Oblivion and Skyrim, particularly in the overworld. However, open a chest and each game has a different response as to what is gonna happen.
* CuttingOffTheBranches: Done at the end of Daggerfall in regards to The Warp in the West, making all but one out of Daggerfall's seven endings canon at the same time, regardless of contradiction. Also If they ever make an Elder Scrolls VI, this will be an issue. As there is no canon winner of the civil war. And whichever side they do chose will heavily divide the fanbase.
* DangerousForbiddenTechnique: The Pankratosword technique, which is said to be why most (around 97+ %) of Yokuda (the place the Redguards used to live) sank. (To elaborate, through years of training and experience, Redguard swordsmen could become so skilled that they could [[FantasticNuke cut the uncuttable]] with their blades.)
* DarkerAndEdgier: ''Battlespire'' is possibly the darkest ES game, despite being only a spinoff. Unlike virtually every other game, you're utterly alone, trapped in a horrific [[FireAndBrimstoneHell Oblivion Realm]] filled with equally horrific monsters just waiting to tear you to pieces. Throughout the game, you are subjected to various nightmarish imagery, forced to fight against seemingly impossible odds as the BigBad viciously taunts you the entire time.
* DeaderThanDead: Several instances:
** In general, there are several cases in the series where you kill a powerful sorcerer/necromancer only to have him/her reconstitute as lich/wraith/etc. to be fought again.
** In ''Knights of the Nine'', where you must kill Umaril twice, first his body and then his soul. That's ''after'' he was [[SealedEvilInACan trapped in another dimension for centuries]].
** To fully kill a dragon, you must first destroy its body and then absorb its soul. While anyone of sufficient ability can do the former, only another dragon (or a dragonborn) is capable of the latter.
** When fighting Necromancers, they have a tendency to revive fallen allies as zombies (Though only once per ally)
* DeadStarWalking: Uriel Septim VII, voiced by Creator/PatrickStewart in ''Oblivion''.
* DeathOfAThousandCuts - Cliff Racers drove the ''dragons'' out of Morrowind despite being small annoying things that die quickly.
* DefeatingTheUndefeatable: The Gray Prince in ''Oblivion''. Alduin in ''Skyrim''.
* DeityOfHumanOrigin:
** The ALMSIVI and Talos of Atmora/Tiber Septim.
** Cyrodiilic legends have Arkay be one, but that ''[[UnreliableNarrator probably]]'' is a misinterpretation of the actual situation.
** Sheogorath heavily implies in ''Skyrim'' to have once been [[spoiler: The Champion of Cyrodiil]]. Which makes perfect sense, given the events of the ''Shivering Isles'' expansion to ''Oblivion''.
** An attempt by the Dwemer to do this is how they met their end. [[UnreliableExpositor It could also have been]] [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence a success]] or one of the many {{Jerkass God}}s in the setting killing them for their attempts.
* DeliberateValuesDissonance: This is sometimes seen in the in-universe writings, as well as character interaction.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Minor Daedra are fought and killed as regular enemies, especially in ''Battlespire'' and ''Oblivion''. There are also several times when you get to fight and kill a physical incarnation of one of the Daedra Lords, i.e. Mehrunes Dagon in ''Oblivion'', Hircine in the Bloodmoon expansion to ''Morrowind'' ([[ILetYouWin but he is going easy on you]]), Jyggalag in the Shivering Isles expansion to ''Oblivion'', and Molag Bal in ''Online''.
** Averted at the end of the main storyline in ''Oblivion'' when Mehrunes Dagon himself (not an avatar, ''[[PhysicalGod the real bloody thing]]'') appears in the Imperial City. You can fight him, but your attacks are so utterly ineffective that he doesn't even bother countering. Cue CrowningMomentOfAwesome from Martin.
** Defied with Sheogorath, [[spoiler: who any attempt to attack leads to a rather spectacular and untimely death. ]]
** Defied again in ''Battlespire'', where any attempt to attack Mehrunes Dagon results in instant death. Although you do banish him by striking him (once) with a sword, that's only the last of a chain of actions resulting in him getting banished (not killed).
** Justified with Jyggalag, as you had the powers of Sheogorath by that point.
** Played straight with Alduin in ''Skyrim'', as he is truly supposed to be unkillable. Although by the time you fight him properly [[spoiler:you have the heroes who banished him in the first place helping you out]], so perhaps it makes sense.
* DisproportionateRetribution: Azura toward the Chimer/Dunmer in the series' backstory. While everyone involved [[TheRashomon has their own version]] of exactly what happened at Red Mountain all those years ago, we do know that Nerevar ended up dead and the Tribunal (and Dagoth Ur) ascended to godhood. Neither of which Azura was happy about. She then ([[UnreliableNarrator possibly]]) cursed them with the dark skin and red eyes of the modern Dunmer. [[spoiler: Years later, she played a prominent role in guiding the Nerevarine to destroy the Heart of Lorkhan, and with it, the Tribunal's divinity. They all end up dead or disappeared, plunging Morrowind into chaos and indirectly leading toward its destruction with the subsequent Red Mountain eruption and Argonian invasion.]]
* DroppedABridgeOnHim: The fate of various characters/places in between games usually turns out to be rather sad and anticlimactic, if they're mentioned again at all. Those from ''Morrowind'' seemed to have gotten particularly harsh treatment when mentioned in ''Oblivion'' and especially ''Skyrim'', which [[spoiler: takes places after Vvardenfell, the island where ''Morrowind'' took place, was completely destroyed by an erupting Red Mountain.]]
* DrugsAreBad: Skooma and Greenmote. Inverted somewhat in that alcohol is worse and of negligible value, alchemic or otherwise, and the illegal drugs are very useful for alchemy.
** In the one quest involving Felldew, it's much, much worse than alcohol. Finishing that quest renders you largely immune to it, though.
** In Dawnguard, Redwater Skooma is even more dangerous than regular Skooma. It was used to knock people unconscious, have the Skooma dealers drag the people into the basement, then locked in cells to soon be turned into Vampire Thralls.
* DummiedOut: Exploration of the Construction Set files for the games shows that quite a bit of content is developed but never finished or implemented in the final product. Famous examples include the ability to join the Sixth House in ''Morrowind'' and the more complex Civil War questlines (with additional city battles) in ''Skyrim''. In many of the cases, enough of the code still exists for [[GameMod modders]] to complete it and implement it themselves.
* DungAges: Tamriel went through their own version during the Interregnum, a 500 year span between the fall of the 2nd Empire under the Akaviri Potentates until the rise of Tiber Septim's 3rd Empire. And much like the real world "Dark Ages," this period wasn't as bad as it is made to seem. Yes, there was a lot of warring between petty kingdoms and many of the achievements of the fallen empire were lost, but factions like the Dark Brotherhood and Fighters Guild grew in popularity while many former enemies (Daggerfall/Hammerfell/Orsinium and Skyrim/Morrowind/Argonia) formed [[EnemyMine Enemy Mines]] to repel outside invaders (Reachmen and the Kamal, respectively,) showing that the former provinces of the empire could still work together when they had to.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The first couple games retained a lot of gameplay influence from D&D, but also notable is the appearance of Orcs as monsters instead of a playable race, and the appearance of Khajiit was decidedly humanlike instead of feline. The classic concept of Daedra also didn't appear until the second game, though the first did have ([[DemonicSpiders tough]]) enemies referred to as fire demons. The first two games also lacked the Imperial race, instead considering TheEmpire to be a melting pot of all races found elsewhere.
* EldritchAbomination: The Sixth House, and also some of the Daedra, Hermaeus Mora in particular. But especially Sithis, who is the primal Is Not according to the Dark Brotherhood.
* ElementalCrafting
* ElvesVsDwarves: In this universe, however, "dwarves" (Dwemer) are actually an extinct sub-species of elves (mer), the name "dwarf" being an [[UnreliableNarrator archaeological misnomer]].
** Played horribly straight with the Dwemer and the Snow Elves [[spoiler: The Dwemer offered the Snow Elves sanctuary from the Ancient Nords, only to enslave them and mutilate their bodes, slowly transforming them into the subterranean Falmer]].
* TheEmpire: PlayedWith, frequently and mercilessly. The Third Tamrielic Empire is constantly trying to centralize authority in Cyrodiil and to force Cyrodiilic law and culture on the provinces, but in many cases the "traditional customs" they're wiping away were really just an excuse for the locals to be oppressive and xenophobic. The conflict is especially played up in ''Morrowind'' and ''Skyrim''. ''Oblivion'' presents the Empire as unambiguously good, while ''Redguard'' presents it as evil (though not entirely unambiguously, given that the game ends with the main character brokering a treaty with better terms for Hammerfell's inclusion in the Empire). On the other hand, the Empire's main rival, the Aldmeri Dominion, plays the trope straight.
* EmptyLevels: Exists throughout the series. Taken UpToEleven in ''Oblivion'', where the LevelScaling was so broken that many veterans of the game avoid sleep at all costs so as to never level up. This was largely rectified in ''Skyrim'', though still possible there if you invest a lot of training and perk points in non-combat skills.
* EscortMission: Plenty in the series. After numerous complaints about the SuicidalOverconfidence and ArtificialStupidity of your followers in ''Morrowind'', the later games took steps to improve this by making (most) followers "essential" so that they could only be knocked out, not killed. ''Skyrim'' took it even further by allowing you to trade equipment with most followers to make them more combat proficient as well as give them instructions to make escorting them less burdensome. It is still not a perfect system, but it is improved.
* EvenEvilHasStandards: Most "evil" Guilds (such as the Thieves Guild and the Dark Brotherhood) have some sort of comradery or kinship that maintains you uphold a certain level of honor. (The BigBad of the Thieves Guild in ''Skyrim'' mocks this, as he sees no point to honor amongst thieves.) Some more specific examples:
** Although the Morag Tong is a guild of assassins, those assassins are sanctioned by the Dunmer government and have very strict rules as to whom you can or cannot murder.
** The Thieves Guild of ''Morrowind'' come out as ''good'' guys, thanks to being led by a somewhat Robin Hood-esque figure (with his own subset of 'steal this and give to this needy person' quests) and fighting against the native Camonna Tong (who are xenophobic racists as well as more murder-happy).
** In ''Skyrim'' it's revealed the Dark Brotherhood used to have standards but has degraded in that regard. The only rule they have now is if you kill a fellow guild member, you pay a 500 gold piece fine. They had even gotten in the habit of taking any jobs given to them as opposed to waiting for the Night Mother (since no one could hear her.)
* EverybodyHatesHades: Depends on the culture. Arkay is the Cycle of Life and Death; he is one of the Divines, and rather popular in other cultures. However, the Nords vilify him as Orkey, or "Old Knocker."
* EveryoneIsBi: Seems to be the case for much of Tamriel. Starting with ''Morrowind'', the response to many of the "Admire" persuasion options appears to be a response to a come-on or pickup line, regardless of the player character's gender or race. Taken UpToEleven in Skyrim, where every marriageable character can be married, once again regardless of the player character's gender or race. Seems to be a bit of a case of GameplayAndStorySegregation though, as in-universe gay couples not involving player characters are extremely rare, though there still doesn't seem to be any prejudice against them.
* EverythingsBetterWithRainbows: According to the [[http://www.imperial-library.info/content/pocket-guide-empire-first-edition-aldmeri-dominion First Pocket Guide]], Alinor has towers that are "designed to catch the light of the sun and break it to its component colors."
* EvilCounterpart: The Camonna Tong to the Thieves Guild in ''Morrowind''.
** Amusingly, [[AxCrazy the Dark Brotherhood]] [[ThereCanBeOnlyOne to the]] [[EvenEvilHasStandards Morag Tong]] in the same game. ''[[EvilerThanThou Both of which are assassin guilds]]''. Only the Morag Tong is playable, however, because the Dark Brotherhood is trying to kill you.
** Mannimarco and his Order of the Black Worm are pretty much the EvilCounterpart for Necromancers in general. No wonder Necromancy's been banned with psychos like them around...
*** As well as to the Mages' Guild in general.
** Also, the Aldmeri Dominion to the Cyrodillic Empire, by the time ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' starts.
* [[EvilAllAlong Evil]] [[NarratorAllAlong Protagonist All Along]]: The in-universe book ''Immortal Blood''. The master vampire hunter Morvarth Piquine consults the narrator for his considerable knowledge of vampire cults, never realizing that his knowledge is so great because the narrator is himself a vampire. At the very end, he reveals his nature to Movarth. [[spoiler: In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', you learn that Morvarth became a vampire himself.]]
* EvilSorcerer: Many, many examples. Jagar Tharn from the first game, being the most cliche example. Members of House Telvanni are encouraged to be Evil Sorcerers due to its rules about MightMakesRight and KlingonPromotion.
* FaceHeelTurn: If one can count the Empire as the "face" side of things, the provinces of Black Marsh and Elsweyr (home of the Argonians and Khajiit, respectively,) pull one off between ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim''. Specifically:
** The Argonians got much stronger by the will and leadership of their deities/creators, the Hist, to resist the Oblivion Crisis. They actually managed to drive back Mehrunes Dagon's armies back to Oblivion and close the portals. After Red Mountain's eruption, the Aldmeri Dominion influenced the Argonians to attack Morrowind and get revenge over centuries of slavery and to free the remaining illegal slaves there. Their profit was the further weakening of the Empire by losing two more provinces (Elseweyr was lost some time before this) in preparation for their invasion of Cyrodiil and Hammerfell.
** Through some clever manipulation, the Dominion convinces Elsweyr to abandon the Empire and join their side in the conflict as a client state.
* FantasticDrug: Moon Sugar and its derivative, Skooma.
* FantasticNamingConvention:
** The Imperials have a first name and a last name which both sound Latin, given their Romanesque culture. The latest installment, Skyrim, changes some Latin last names to Italian ones, reflecting the evolution of language.
** The Nords have a Norse or Germanic sounding first name and a clan name, or sometimes a first name and a nickname (you can tell the difference by the presence or absence of the "the" article; if there is one, it's a nickname, for example "Sild the Warlock". If there's no "the", it's a clan name, for example "Lars Battle-Born".
** The Bretons have a French-sounding name and last name (in the main Breton culture) or a single Celtic name (for the Reachmen). English-sounding name sometimes appears in books and references to pre-existing characters, due to the shift to French-sounding names not happening until ''Morrowind''.
** The High Elves and the Wood Elves have single "elvish" names, sounding vaguely like Tolkien's Quenya and Sindarin respectively. For example "Manwe" or "Glarthir".
** The Dark Elves have a first name and a last name with a characteristic "Dunmerish" sound (for example, Falanu Hlaalu, Nels Llendo, Hlireni Indavel). The Dunmer nobility also uses the name of their Houses as prefix to their names (for example, Redoran Hlaren Ramoran). The Telvanni Masters use one name only (Mistress Dratha, Master Neloth).
*** The nomadic Ashlanders, a 'primitive' culture of the Dunmer hinterlands, tended toward lengthier names with a Babylonian feel, such as Ashibael and Ahemmusa.
** The Khajiit have single names with prefixes and a PunctuationShaker, for example Ra'Virr, Dro'Zel. Sometimes no prefixes.
** Many Argonians have names, that refer to skill or profession or their race itself, such as "Scouts-Many-Marshes" or "Quill Weave" (A writer) or "Basks-In-The-Sun"
* FantasticNuke: The [[DangerousForbiddenTechnique Pankratosword]] technique mentioned above was [[UnreliableNarrator supposedly one]]. Its use is said to be why most of Yokuda, the original homeland of the Redguard, sank into the ocean. (Though other sources state that this is unlikely, and that the Redguard people left Yokuda to escape much more standard problems, such as a corrupt government.)
* FantasticRacism: Practically ''all'' of the major races of Tamriel hate (or are hated by) at least one other race, usually one from a neighbouring province. During the first four games, however, they were all ruled by one big, liberal empire, which kept the worst of it at bay. The Argonians and Khajiit were among the worst victims, being enslaved by the Dunmer even though slavery in the Empire is illegal outside of Morrowind. The Empire's ongoing collapse as of ''Skyrim'' has brought it all to the fore. Now, it's the exiled Dunmer getting the short end of the stick, suffering discrimination and abuse from nationalist Nords who blame all elves for the tyranny of the Thalmor.
** An oversight in the first game, many NPC's are programmed to insult your PC's race. Whether or not they share the same race.
* FantasticRankSystem: There's a set of ranks for each faction. The ranks for Imperial Legion and House Redoran in ''Morrowind'' are explicitly military, and they are nothing like real-world ranks, medieval or not. The Redoran ranks are, in fact, Dunmer titles of nobility, and they are also fantastic.
** Also noted, is when going up the ranks in The Stormcloaks, Ulfric named them himself, so accordingly, the higher you rank the more badass the titles become.
* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Changing depending on the game and/or point in history:
** Cyrodiil, in the first Pocket Guide to the Empire and ''Morrowind'' was a mix of Rome, Japan, and possibly China, with a bit of Venice (or Tenochtitlan) added to the Imperial City. In ''Oblivion'', they turned into a MedievalEuropeanFantasy with only a trace amount of Latin influence remaining. In ''Skyrim'', they are a mix of Italy (many of them having Italian names) and the Roman Empire.
** The Nords have much Norse influence, along with a vaguely Scottish axis of politics, and some Saxon organization of nobility. Their ancient culture also has a lot of ancient Egyptian influence, with sarcophagus and mummies.
*** Norse culture in particular seems to be a primary source of inspiration for much of the series' mythology. Parallels can be drawn between the dragon Alduin in ''Skyrim'' and the snake Jörmungandr in Norse mythology, both of whom act as heralds for the prophesied destruction of the world. Likewise, both Talos and Thor are similar in that they are both god-protectors of mankind, and are represented by a hammer-like symbol.
** High Rock, depending on the region, either has feudal French or English influence. In ''Skyrim'', a tribal Celtic angle has been introduced in the form of the Forsworn, whose cultural origins predate the current Breton norms.
** Morrowind is Mesopotamia with a hodgepodge of other influences sprinkled in, with the Ashlanders having some Mongolian influence. Their ancient culture shares some similarities with the biblical Israelites/Hebrews as well, with the prophet Veloth in the role of Moses and the messianic Nerevarine Prophecy.
** The Blades are an interesting cross between Japanese samurai and medieval knights. On the Japanese side, they use katanas, and Cloud Ruler Temple has some very Japanese architecture. However, their language and organization has much more in common with European knights. Their armor is a hodgepodge of Roman Lorica Segmentata and Japanese-style Lamellar, with a Greek Illyrian helm that as a back frill akin to a Japanese samurai's kabuto.
** Interestingly enough, by the time of Skyrim, Orcs seem to have become Fantasy Counterpart Native Americans. A once tribal people, who had their land stolen from them under threats of violence, and now live on compounds remarkably similar to reservations. The parallels aren't hard to see.
** Although we never see Akavir, it's apparently based on China and Japan.
* FantasyGunControl: The Dwemer had HumongousMecha [[RagnarokProofing durable enough to function after 3,000 years of neglect]] and the power to [[NiceJobBreakingItHero mess up the fabric of reality]], but never invented the musket.
** Gunpowder and cannons exists canonically (or is it [[IncrediblyLamePun cannonically]]?) but have only been used in-game once, by the East Empire Company against a band of pirates in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''.
** It's a setting where simple magic is far cheaper, and battlemages regularly adopt the role of heavy artillery. Even someone not-so-skilled in magic can learn to spittle out at least tiny fireballs with enough practice. Sure, there are some who are hopeless and could benefit from using a firearm, but even those people can just swing a Staff of Firebolt or something.
* FantasyKitchenSink: Even though the different races of Nirn may have different religions and forms of worship to varying Gods or representations of similar Gods, it's possible to experience the divine influence of all their religions, suggesting the coexistence of these Gods and divine constructs.
* FateWorseThanDeath: Anybody who dies while under the effects of a Soul Trap spell, has their soul sent to a Black Soul Gem. When this is used up (or just used with The Black Star), their soul is sent to the Soul Cairn, a depressing and tormenting plane of Oblivion, [[AndIMustScream which they are forced to walk in for all eternity.]]
* FictionalDocument: Hundreds of them, most all of which the player can read in-game. All of them are also written by authors of varying (non-zero) bias and knowledge levels.
* FinalDeath: Tamriel has seemingly every form of magic ''except'' resurrection. (One wizard did manage to bring [[spoiler:Falx Carius]] back to life in ''Skyrim's'' ''Dragonborn'' expansion, but it was only a half-success. (He was brought fully back as a living breathing average looking person, but the process drove him into complete insanity.) In another instance in ''Online'' [[spoiler:Prince Adrien of Evermore]] is resurrected by [[spoiler:a Harvester]]. However, he suffers a distinct change in personality, but it is unclear whether it is due to the nature of the magic, or because he believes Arkay resurrected him to lead an army of undead.
** Though not quite resurrection, the various gods do seem to reserve the right to reincarnate anyone at any time if they see it fit.
* FlavorText: Each games offers a lot of it, and in many forms.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: In ''Morrowind'', [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWuNf4gxwuM the first thing you hear]], even before the main menu appears, is the deep rumble of a beating heart. The rhythm continues throughout the whole piece, and, as the music plays during regular gameplay, permeates the entire island of Vvardenfell.
** If you're playing Skyrim for the very first time, without spoilers. At the beginning of Skyrim, when a "seemingly random" Dragon attacks Helgen, if you get close enough to it, the HUD labels it as "Alduin". 'Hmm... that name sounds important, I'd better remember that' Though this example is heavily lessened due to ItWasHisSled regardless.
* FreewareGames: ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' have been released as freeware on the Bethesda website - despite being glitchy and having the devs deny it would ever be re-released. They're still unplayable on modern systems without DOSBox (which is included in most of the file bundles), however.
** What the devs said, is now subverted. ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' are getting a retail release on September 10th in a bundle with the other three games for PC only.
* FreezeFrameBonus: While the camera pans over the library in the Redguard intro (and more clearly in the E3 trailer), one can pause on a set of five books with the following titles: The Elder Scrolls Arena, The Elder Scrolls Daggerfall, The Elder Scrolls Morrowind (which was in pre-production), The Elder Scrolls Oblivion, and The Elder Scrolls Romanelli (this is simply a meaningless placeholder name since Bethesda hadn't settled on "Skyrim" yet). The amazing thing is that Bethesda had already decided on "Oblivion" for a title as far back as 1998 (''The Elder Scrolls IV Oblivion'' being released eight years later) and the developers had also decided on making a fifth game in the future.
* FromBadToWorse: ''Oblivion'' leaves the Empire [[spoiler:without an heir and the entire future uncertain.]] Between the events of ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim'', [[spoiler: the province of Morrowind is destroyed and conquered by the Argonians, the Empire collapses and a reborn unified nation of the Altmer and Bosmer ascends in opposition to what remains, a large amount of Black Marsh is ravaged by Umbriel and its undead army, the nascent nation of Orsinium is sacked by the Bretons and Redguards (AGAIN).]] And most of this is in the first FORTY YEARS. There's another HUNDRED AND SIXTY until ''Skyrim'' takes place. A couple of decades before ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' takes place, the Empire is slammed by the Great War with the Aldmeri Dominion, which ends with Hammerfell forced to secede from the Empire and the worship of Talos being banned, which leads directly to the civil war in Skyrim which threatens to shatter the entire Empire. And then in ''Skyrim'' you can weaken the Empire further (by siding with the Stormcloaks in the civil war) and/or by assassinating the current Emperor.
* FungusHumongous: Vvardenfell and the Shivering Isles are covered in giant mushrooms. The Telvanni wizards live in giant mushrooms and other plants.
** In Skyrim, there is a gigantic underground dwarven city named Blackreach that is lit up partially by giant, glowing mushooms.
* GameBreakingBug[=/=]ObviousBeta: Unfortunately common. Each game in the series has had its fair share of issues when released, but thankfully, most are usually patched fairly quickly. (On PC, modders will usually put out [[GameMod Game Mods]] as unofficial patches until Bethesda is able to release official ones.) Some of the more notable examples:
** ''Daggerfall'' may be the shining example of ObviousBeta in video games. It ''couldn't actually be completed'' when it was first released due to bugs. Even with patches, it was still so prone to game breaking bugs that the developers eventually released an official tool entitled FIXSAVE.EXE which as its name implies was meant to repair errors in savegame files. Because they were too common to tell all affected players to restart the game. They also ended up publicizing some cheats, such as a dungeon teleportation spell, because the glitchy collision system in the engine tended to let people slip between the world geometry and into the void where they'd fall forever otherwise.
** ''Skyrim'' on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 had a save issue that would cause the game to bog down the more you discovered and larger the save file got. When the majority of locations had been discovered, the game was nigh-unplayable. This led to some controversy as ''Skyrim'' won awards and was highly praised by critics despite being virtually unplayable on one its systems.
* GameMod: Literally thousands of them are available on the internet. Each PC version of the game comes with a simple-to-learn and very flexible LevelEditor known as the "Construction Set." Mods are one of the biggest draws of the series and can increase the content of each game many times over, as well as fix bugs not covered by official patches.
** ''Morrowind'' in particular has an extremely active modding community, which has improved on every facet of the game and quintupled the content of an average copy. Up to and including ''fixes to the GameEngine itself''.
** ''Oblivion'' has an even larger one; there are no less than four overhaul mods for the game, and there are well over 15000 mods on the net. To expand this to even further ridiculous levels, there is a mod that actually combines the above four overhauls into one single mega-overhaul mod. Yes, ''Oblivion'' has [[RecursiveFanfiction mods for mods]].
** ''Daggerfall'' had some surprisingly large mods back in the day, and you can still find some of them floating around on some of the older ''Elder Scrolls'' sites.
** Bethesda even teamed up with {{Valve}} to create a mod distribution system on {{Steam}} for ''Skyrim'' mods.
* GameplayAndStorySegregation: Some of the in-game books describe situations that contradict how things work in the game. In some cases the books are "in-world" fictional, so this may simply be a case of simulated research failure. In other cases the books ''did'' present situations that [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration worked as they would in-game]]... for the game when it was first written, even as relevant game-mechanics were changed for the sequels. The size of the game worlds is also toned down to make the games reasonable sized, considering the Imperial Isle in Cyrodiil which houses the Imperial City is supposed to be around the size of Britain.
* GenderBender: A couple of Daedra Lords seem to have trouble having only one gender, and some switch between games and in-game lore.
** PhysicalGod Vivec claims to be both a male and a female. Once he even said he had kids with a rapist god (the tale of this includes a part where they compare the size of their "spears".) The Dissident Priests in ''Morrowind'' explain that Vivec just made most of that stuff up in order to appear more divine than "Some guy who stole his Godhood while betraying his friend". There are even some holes in his story, such as the aforementioned "Having kids with Molag Bal" as Daedra ''can't create life''. However, you can be sent on a quest by Molag Bal himself to banish a ''daughter'' of his back to his realm.
** Also, the Argonians. They're sequential hermaphrodites, meaning they can switch genders (Supposedly. The evidence is very loose and small). The time spent as either male or female is called a "life-phase".
* GenderIsNoObject: Ranges from being downplayed to being played straight depending on the specific game, but it is always present. The early games in the series had purely male generic guards, soldiers, bandits, etc. but named characters in these roles could be of either gender. The {{Backstory}} is also chock full of notable female monarchs, faction leaders, and great heroes.
* GentlemanThief: Your character can be this if you're a thief with high personality points. Even further in Daggerfall in which you can give your thief character the "Etiquette" skill.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The first two games in the series, ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'', had no censorship issue at all. ''Daggerfall'' had a surprisingly high amount of soft nudity in the game, even by 1996-97 standards, and even had a biography with an extremely graphic sex scene. (The "star" of said scene has a quest for you to steal the manuscript from this particular book of the series to prevent it from being published. You will not find it anywhere else. In ''Morrowind'', the book can be found but with the scene removed and a comment explaining it was edited at the behest of the Temple.) One of the (optional) Wayrest plotlines has you blackmail a prominent local lord with a letter showing that he's [[BrotherSisterIncest VERY CLOSE]] to his sister. [[YourCheatingHeart Who's married]]. However, with computer games becoming more scrutinized, the supposedly libertine Dunmer, according to ''Daggerfall'' books, became very prudish in ''Morrowind''. But censorship doesn't get everything.
** Metaphysical mumbo-jumbo is boring, right? Nobody will ever read the obscure and confusing ''Lessons of Vivec''. Sermon 14 of the series describe an orgy that happened when Vivec decided to teach "the ways of belly-magic" to the "King of Rape". There was much "biting of spears" and "piercing of the second aperture".
** One alchemist in ''Oblivion'' asks you about the punishment for necrophilia in Cyrodiil. "No reason, just curious." She'll be very happy if you tell her it's just a fine, even for repeated offenses. (Note that the alchemist was a Dunmer from Vvardenfell, where religious law gives ''any'' tampering with the remains of the deceased an ''extremely'' harsh sentence.)
** Moon Sugar and Skooma are {{Fantastic Drug}}s. 95% of ''Morrowind's'' vendors would not even deal with you if you had them in your inventory (although [[ArtificialStupidity you could simply drop it on the floor and nobody would say anything).]]
** It's quite obvious what Mirabelle Monet in Anvil gets up to behind closed doors. She even says that the beds in her inn are [[IncrediblyLamePun reserved for seamen]].
** And of course, everyone's favorite play, "The Lusty Argonian Maid".
*** ''Skyrim'' adds "The Lusty Argonian Maid, v2" in addition to the original, which is still in the game.
*** Now the ladies can get in on the Argonian-fetish with "The Sultry Argonian Bard, v1" added by Dawnguard.
** Haelga, owner of the bunkhouse in Riften and a notorious, um, "worshipper of Dibella", keeps a horker tusk under her bed. Consider the approximate size and shape of a horker tusk if you're confused.
* GodEmperor: Several.
** Tiber Septim, founder of the Septim Empire, ascended to godhood as Talos at the end of his life.
** Though they don't legally count themselves as emperors, the Tribunal of Morrowind are [[PhysicalGod Physical Gods]] who exert great influence over the affairs of the Dunmer. [[spoiler: At least until [[PlayerCharacter the Nerevarine]] brings an end to that...]]
** From the backstory is the immortal tiger dragon, Tosh Raka, leader of the Ka Po' Tun, an Akaviri race as of yet unseen in the games themselves.
* GodInHumanForm: Many instances.
** Whenever one of the Aedra or Daedra manifests in Mundus, it is usually as an avatar fitting the trope. For example, in ''Morrowind'', three of the Divines (including Talos as "Wulf") are encountered this way. Sanguine as "Sam Guevenne" is a Deadric example from ''Skyrim''.
** A historical example are the "Shezarrines," famous heroes in Imperial/Nordic history who are believed to be connected to Lorkhan ("Shezzar" being the Cyrodiilic name for Lorkhan.) Pelinal Whitestrake, Hjalti Early Beard, Harrald Harry Breeks, Wulfharth, and Talos are some of the many heroes thought to be Shezarrines.
** The [[PlayerCharacter player characters]] from ''Morrowind, Oblivion'', and ''Skyrim'' qualify as well.
*** The Nerevarine [[spoiler: catches the Corprus Disease and has the negative effects cured. Corprus is also known as the "Divine Disease" and was created by Dagoth Ur using power from the Heart of Lorkhan. The Nerevarine keeps the disease and positive traits (immunity to other diseases, being TheAgeless,) even after the Heart is destroyed, leaving him/her with a permanent connection to the divine.]]
*** The Champion of Cyrodiil [[spoiler: takes the mantle of Sheogorath, Daedric Prince of [[MadGod Madness]], at the end of ''Shivering Isles''. When encountered in ''Skyrim'', Sheogorath is heavily implied to be the Champion, now a full blown god.]]
*** The Dragonborn [[spoiler: is a rare individual born with the immortal soul of an Aedric dragon, and all of the benefits that brings. (The ability to absorb the souls of other dragons and an inherent understanding to use the Thu'um.]]
* GodIsDead: The creator god Lorkhan ([[IHaveManyNames aka Shor, Shezzar, Sep, Lorkhaj]].) Though there are many different creation stories, his inclusion is one of the few consistent elements. He is generally better regarded by the races of men than by the elven races, who view him as a trickster. (The Altmer have a particular dislike for him.) After he convinced the et'Ada (Aedra) to create Mundus (the mortal realm,) he was killed and his "divine center" (heart) removed. It was tied to an arrow and launched across Tamriel by Auri-El, one of those et'Ada, where it landed in modern day Morrowind and formed Red Mountain. The moons are said to be his rotting corpse and his spirit was forced to wander Mundus, occasionally taking form as a "Shezzarine," great champions of mankind.
* GoMadFromTheRevelation: [[spoiler:Almalexia does ''not'' take the loss of her godhood well in ''Tribunal.'']]
** Those who are able to read the eponymous Elder Scrolls the way they were meant to be read, but lack the special mental training to keep things under control [[spoiler:or who lack some special trait like being the Dovahkiin and thus having a soul outside time]], will go quite mad. Another effect is being struck blind; training just decides when and how long it persists (and it can be permanent). It's said that even people who study the ''nature'' of the Scrolls, not the Scrolls themselves, go insane with almost monotonous regularity.
** The Moth Priests, who ''do'' have both the reading skills and mental control, are still a little bit off. Every one of them loses their sight with time.
** This can be said for those who give in to Sheogorath's will, and embrace the insanity.
* GravityBarrier: Attempted in ''Oblivion,'' but imperfect because of all the glitches that game had. There was a back-up InvisibleWall behind the barrier.
* GrayAndGrayMorality: Every game has various factions struggling against each other, but there is almost never a "right" side in any conflict. You can usually choose a side or remain neutral.
* TheGreatestStoryNeverTold: Poor Martin. [[spoiler: His sacrifice will be a footnote.]]
* GreenHillZone: Most games start the player off in a place fitting the trope. (The Ascadian Isles in ''Morrowind'', central Cyrodiil in ''Oblivion'', Whiterun Hold in ''Skyrim''.)
* GuardingThePortal: The ''Oblivion'' gates.
* HalfHumanHybrid: Averted. Almost all the major races descend from one ancient race from the Dawn era, so they're largely compatible with each other genetically. In fact, one race of Men, the Bretons, are descended from a host of human/elf mongrels born to Elven lords and human concubines, and eventually outpopulated the purebreds in the region. In most cases, it's the race of the mother that determines what the child will be.
* {{Hammerspace}}: The Bound Item spells basically consist on pulling an InfinityPlusOneSword (or axe or mace or bow or dagger or suit of armour) from Hammerspace.
** The only real limit on what you can carry is your Strength attribute. The PC can also carry multiple heavy weapons, suits of armour, literally enough food to feed an army, a library's worth of books and magic scrolls, millions of (effectively weightless) separate coins, hundreds of arrows, bolts, throwing knives and ammunition, dozens and dozens of sets of clothing, hundreds of potions, and many, many more items.
*** And in ''Skyrim'', that's just the limit for running; if you don't mind being forced to walk or ride everywhere, your carry capacity is effectively limitless.
* HandicappedBadass: Several.
** The Moth Priests, who are blind from reading the Elder Scrolls, are all the more powerful for it.
** Tiber Septim, early in his campaigns, could use the power of the Thu'um. However, a failed assassination attempt left him with his throat slashed and unable to speak in more than whisper. That still didn't stop him from completing his conquest of Tamriel.
** Several famous heroes have been missing an eye. St. Jiub is one famous example, as well as Hakon One Eye and Olaf One Eye from Nordic history. A massive scar over one eye is often a frequent option for [[PlayerCharacter Player Characters]] during creation, and it doesn't hinder them a bit.
* HappyEndingOverride: No matter how happy then ending, future games in the series almost always override it by showing the consequences of the player's actions on the world.
** Following ''Arena'', [[spoiler: the coup is stopped and the true emperor returned to the throne, but later games show that irreparable damage has been done to the empire, sending it on a downhill path to it's eventual dissolution following ''Oblivion''.]]
** Each of ''Daggerfall's'' [[spoiler: mutually exclusive endings is shown to have happened simultaneously due to a [[TimeCrash Dragon Break]]. While peace is temporarily brought to the region, the PlayerCharacter is dead, High Rock's various factions (including Orsinium) eventually fall back into strife, and the King of Worms ascends to godhood only to return and cause problems during the Oblivion Crisis.]]
** ''Morrowind'' may get the worst of it. [[spoiler: As a result of the player's actions, the Tribunal are cut off from their source of divinity and two of the three are killed. When Vivec disappears early in the 4th era, the rogue moon over Vivec City resumes its descent with its original momentum, causing Red Mountain to erupt and destroy Vvardenfell along with a good portion of Morrowind. The Argonians then invade prior to the events of ''Skyrim'', putting an end to the entire Dunmer way of life.]]
** ''Oblivion'' ends with [[spoiler: the seals between Oblivion and the mortal plane closed forever, but no Septim on the throne. Wars break out, provinces secede, and by the time of ''Skyrim'', only three remain (with the third, Skyrim, in the midst of a civil war.)]]
** Only time will tell what future games have in store for Tamriel after ''Skyrim'', but we do that [[spoiler: Alduin will eventually fulfill his role of ending the world one day, as evidenced by his soul not being absorbed after the Dragonborn defeats him. This defeat is only temporary.]]
** The expanded universe novel "The Infernal City" chronicles that giving [[NiceJobBreakingItHero Umbra to Clavicus Vile]] caused a chain of events that eventually [[spoiler: created an evil floating city, that turns everyone under it's shadow into a zombie army]]
* HardCodedHostility:
** Bandits are always hostile to everyone.
** The Sixth House and the Camonna Tong in ''Morrowind''. The latter is disputable, since you can (kinda) work for them during the Fighters Guild questline, but the former is indisputable and it's glaringly obvious that despite Dagoth Ur's constant invitations to join his cause, there's no real way to do it.
* HealingShiv: The Dagger of Friendship and Truncheon of Submission.
* HeelFaithTurn: Jurgen Windcaller in the backstory. He, like the other leaders of the ancient Nord army which invaded Morrowind, used the Thu'um as a weapon. Despite this advantage, the Nord army was still annihilated at Red Mountain by a coalition of Dwemer and Chimer. Afterwards, he reflected on the defeat and came to the conclusion that it was a punishment from the gods for misusing the Voice. Jurgen would use the defeat as inspiration to discover the Way of the Voice and found the Greybeards.
* HegemonicEmpire: Tamriel, while initially forged with the iron fists of Imperial Legions, is held together only through massive schemes of the last Emperor. It finally falls apart prior to the fifth game.
* HeroesFightBarehanded: In the series you can make a hero who fights barehanded. Though ''Skyrim'' makes it ''much'' harder, as there are very few and limited options to get better at it.
* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Martin]] in ''Oblivion''.
* HideYourChildren: Every installment except for ''Daggerfall'' and ''Skyrim''. ''Daggerfall'' once provided the example image for the trope, but it's now on the [[ImageLinks/HideYourChildren Image Links]] page instead.
* TheHighQueen: Azura and Almalexia, both heavily deconstructed. Even before those two, it was heavily subverted and deconstructed in Barenziah's unofficial biography.
* HitAndRunTactics: On the highest difficulty, this is possibly your best bet in ''Oblivion''. Screw the heavy armour and sword, normal clothes, a bow and high speed and athletics stat are your best bet for survival. Oh, and spells, for the mages out there. Of course, you then have to worry about archers and spell casters, but its better than certain death at the hands of overpowering melee opponents. Indeed, the game so heavily favours the patient, stealthy approach that a good sneak/archer can make it through 90% of the game without ever experiencing melée (or even ''risking'' melée).
* HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt: Eras in the Elder Scrolls calendar are defined by important events; the Fourth Era beginning after the events of ''Oblivion''.
* HumansAreAverage: Averted, the three human races all are noticeably tilted to physical or magical abilities. JackOfAllStats are the Dunmer. Imperials come closest to it, though. While their primary slant is social skills/swordsmanship, they don't have any particularly deficient attributes and can be perfectly functional in a nice variety of builds.
* HumansAreWarriors: Played straight by the Nords, Redguard, and Imperials, though the Imperials tilt more toward the [[SoldierVsWarrior soldier side]] of things. The only exception are the Bretons, who are the result of Man/Mer interbreeding thousands of years in the past. The Bretons do make rather [[SquishyWizard non-squishy]] [[MagicKnight Battlemages]], however.
* HumongousMecha: The Dwemer were fond of creating them. Because everything they made was built to last, some are still up and running thousands of years later.
** The Numidium is one. It was created by the Dwemer to be a PhysicalGod powered by the Heart of Lorkhan. It is gifted by the Dunmer to Tiber Septim as part of the armistice to join Morrowind to the Empire, and Septim uses it (powered by the Mantella) to complete his conquests. It shows up to play a major part in ''Daggerfall''.
** Akulakhan is being built by Dagoth Ur from Numidium's blueprint. [[spoiler: It, along with the Heart, is destroyed by the Neravarine in ''Morrowind'']].
** The "Imperfect" is one created by Sotha Sil to guard his Clockwork City.
** Parts of unfinished mechas can be found often in Dwemer ruins throughout the series.
* HundredPercentHeroismRating
* HyperspaceArsenal: You can carry enough to supply an army.
* ImmortalProcreationClause: It's never made clear exactly how long Elves live, but they evidently live much longer than humans do. Thus, elven races have a much lower birth rate, and the fertility of both males and females is greatly reduced, and children are very scarce. Interracial couples are more likely to produce offspring, though - i.e an elven man would have a considerably higher chance of impregnating a human woman, and an elven woman would be much more likely to become pregnant from a human man, rather than a man of her own race.
* ImmortalitySeeker: Something that characterizes Elven (''especially'' High Elven) ways of thinking, since [[OurElvesAreBetter TES elves actually are not immortal]]. According to their version of the origin myth, the creation of the plane of Mundus was a cruel trick and deception on the part of evil gods (which are, in most human tellings of the stories, hero-gods and champions of Men), which severed the Elves from immortal, spiritual life. Thus the elves (again, ''especially'' the High Elves) try to regain their lost immortality.
* IncrediblyLamePun: In ''Morrowind'', the [[spoiler:Boots of Blinding Speed]], of course!
** In ''Oblivion'', the [[spoiler:Ring of Burden]].
* InfinityPlusOneSword: In ''Morrowind'', it is possible to upgrade Goldbrand - which is itself one of the hardest items to get in the game, to a superpowered version called Eltonbrand. The method of getting it is so circuitous and involved, and there are [[GuideDangIt no clues to figure it out on your own - you need to look it up online]]. But it's definitely well worth having.
** Then there's Trueflame and Hopesfire in ''Tribunal''. They're fast, light, durable, capable of immense amounts of damage with minimal effort on your part, and they're ''[[IncendiaryExponent on fire]]''.
* InstantArmor: The 'Bound Armor' spells allows you to summon a full suit of Daedric Armor, to quickly de-squishify your SquishyWizard.
** Particularly noticeable in ''Oblivion'', where the Daedric Cult you spend most of the main quest-line fighting, makes heavy use of Bound-spells - usually appearing as fully-armored monsters, and then disintegrating into cloaked corpses when you take them down.
* ItsProbablyNothing: For something hyped so much, the AI in ''Oblivion'' is pretty stupid, dismissing arrows stuck in them as the wind.
** This remains in ''Skyrim''.
* InfoDump: The series has an incredibly rich and complex backstory, so much of the information needed to understand the story of the game is thrown at you in one of these. The games have been getting better about it over time though, blending it in much more seamlessly as you go along. And that's without mentioning all of the side quests and in-game books which are full of even more information that is completely optional to read and learn.
* JustBetweenYouAndMe - [[spoiler:Almalexia]] at the end of ''Tribunal''.
* KatanasAreJustBetter:
** Katanas in ''Morrowind'' are only surpassed by claymores; the high-ranking Orcish armour also looks very Japanese. Goldbrand can be further upgraded to Eltonbrand, a definite [[InfinityPlusOneSword Infinity +1 Katana]] of near GameBreaker quality.
** Mostly subverted in ''Oblivion'', though. Orcish armour now looks like stuff out of a gladiator movie, and Akaviri Katanas and Dai-Katanas are excellent starting weapons but nowhere near the cream of the crop. That said, one of the best obtainable weapons, Goldbrand, is an enchanted katana won from a Daedra Lord's quest. It's not ''quite'' an InfinityPlusOneSword, but it's close.
* KleptomaniacHero: Pretty much encouraged by the games themselves. Especially so for players who join the Thieves Guild. (In the later games where stolen goods can only be sold to a fence, this becomes even more important if you want to play this way.) Basically, if it's not nailed down, it can be stolen by someone smart/lucky enough.
* LastOfHisKind: There is one [[spoiler:Dwemer to be found]] in ''Morrowind'', but he's [[spoiler:been horribly mutated by corprus disease and has had his lower body replaced by a mechanical spider-like contraption.]]
** An Argonian in ''Skyrim'''s Dark Brotherhood is the last of the Shadowscales, Argonians born under the sign of The Shadow who are sent to the Dark Brotherhood.
** ''Dawnguard'''s main quest ultimately leads you to the last [[spoiler: true Snow Elf, who avoided his race's gradual transformation into the Falmer]].
* LevelGrinding: Often, skills outside of the standard combat abilities require major level grinding or obscene amounts of gold in order to increase.
** Taken to a new extreme in ''Skyrim'', where one can make a couple thousand "hide" items to increase their Smithing skill to 100 easily.
* LawfulStupid: The Imperial Guard can be outright ''vicious'', even for minor infractions. Mostly due to [[ArtificialStupidity AI limitations]], though. The town guards of ''Skyrim'' are more lax, and will merely note "Wait, I know you" if you've committed minor crimes. Also, if you're with the Thieves Guild, [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney you can bribe them to look the other way]].
** And then pickpocket it back when they turn away.
* TheLawOfConservationOfDetail: The five major games are a shining example of this trope. ''Arena'' has a ludicrously humongous world the size of Europe, but most of the villages that are not major or plot-significant are automatically generated. ''Daggerfall'' later limted the world to only part of two provinces, Hammerfell and High Rock, but made the world way more detailed and less repetitive, ''Morrowind'' then scaled further down to part of the eponymous province while making every single village significant and adding all sorts of detailed features to the terrain. ''Oblivion'', while ''slightly'' bigger by raw space than ''Morrowind'', is less detailed, as everything not related to geography is randomly generated outside of towns. ''Skyrim'' is about the same size as ''Oblivion'', but the level of detail is noticeably higher -- the majority of locations, even random, out-of-the-way dungeons, will probably have some unique features or a quest.
* LegendaryWeapon: The Daedric Artifacts (at least those that are weapons) are the most legendary weapons. Each is associated with a particular Daedric (daemonic, more or less) deity and passes from owner to owner according to the wishes of those deities. Famous ones include the hammer Volendrung, the dagger Mehrunes' Razor, the Mace of Molag Bal, the sword Dawnbreaker and the staff Wabbajack.
* LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards: Played with throughout the series. Making a class's specialization "Combat" (and Stealth in ''Morrowind'') wastes a good number of skills (as there is no point in multiple weapon types, making the bonus wasted), while "magic" specialization has none of the skills contradict. Of course, the abundance of enemies with Reflect spells and/or magical resistances means that being able to bash/slash/stab things to death will always remain useful. The "wizard" types also usually come with a bad case of [[SquishyWizard squishiness]] unless you spread your skill points around, which of course lowers the ceiling on your magical abilities (or at makes it take longer to reach that ceiling.) Basically, in most of the games, whatever combat style you prefer is viable if you're willing to put in a little work.
* [[TravelingAtTheSpeedOfPlot Living At The Speed Of Plot]]: ''Elder Scrolls'' elves live as long as the writers need them to--they've never [[WordOfGod officially]] clarified elven lifespans, and it's impossible to piece together a consistent picture of elven lifespans from the lore.
* LizardFolk: The Argonians. ''Arena'' also had lizard men deemed too brutish to be related to the Argonians, but they have not appeared in later games.
** Design-wise, Argonians have gotten less "Lizard" and more "Dinosaur" with every game. ''Morrowind'' featured them with similar features to iguanas and frilled lizards, whereas ''Skyrim's'' Argonians have a distinctly velociraptor-like look about them, with forward-facing eyes and even feathers.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Each game has hundreds of unique (in the [[FlatCharacter loosest]] [[OnlySixFaces sense]]), individual characters to interact with, plus dozens more in the back story.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfSidequests: Sidequests have been the focal point of the series ever since ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]''.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' [[JustifiedTrope justifies it]], as the player is supposed to get a cover ID as a freelance adventurer.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'s'' sense of urgency for the main quest makes a stark contrast with the still sidequest focused gameplay.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' integrated the sidequests with the main quest; the "Civil War" questline was a fully fledged B-plot which tied into the main one (with some parts of each changing based on progress in the other).
* LockpickingMinigame: In the post-''Morrowind'' installments, lockpicking is framed as a minigame. All locks can be opened if you find a matching key ([[PlotLock some locks]] can ''only'' be opened this way), but otherwise, you must use lockpicks to try and pick them. Lockpicks are cheap and break easily on a failed attempt (except at highest SkillScore levels or when using the unique Daedric artifact called "Skeleton Key").
* LongRunner: ''TES'' is the oldest continuous WesternRPG series at the moment, having survived the mid-90ies genre crisis that killed off all of the competition (''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'', ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic'', the VideoGame/GoldBox...) and still going strong.
** The companies making those competing games also ended up going out of business (3DO) or dissolved by parent companies (Origin Systems). Meanwhile Bethesda ended up growing into a larger company ([=ZeniMax=] Media) and maintained their independence.
* LostTechnology: Dwemer SteamPunk. To note, the Dwemer studied and learned to alter the "Earthbones," which are basically the laws of nature. By manipulating them, they could build their creations to last in a way that none of the other races have been able to match.
* MadGod: Sheogorath.
* MadScientist: Wizards and sorcerers take on this this role in the setting, and there is certainly no shortage of them in each game. Special mention goes to the Dwemer, who combined their incredible ability as enchanters with SteamPunk technology. The sophistication of their creations is still unmatched by the other races of Tamriel despite them having vanished thousands of years ago. (Even their disappearance is thought to be a result of their experimentation gone awry in some way.)
* MadnessTropes: Too many of those appear in ''Shivering Isles'' (which conveniently takes place in the realm of the Mad God) to list them here individually.
* MagicIsMental: Throughout much of the series, the schools of magic were always tied to "mental" attributes (Intelligence, Willpower, Personality.) Additionally, the Mages Guild (or local equivalent) always doubles as the guild for scholars.
* MagicKnight: Most games include a few player classes that mix both martial and magical skill specializations. The best example is probably the Battlemage, a heavily-armored warrior equally comfortable with spells and blades.
* MagicalSociety: The Mage's Guild, which players can join. ''Skyrim'' also has the College of Winterhold.
* TheManBehindTheMan: Mehrunes Dagon, Daedra of Destruction, is usually the one ultimately behind the {{Big Bad}}'s various hijinks threatening the mortal world in the various games. Specifically ''Arena'', ''Battlespire'' and ''Oblivion''. There's also some evidence to suggest that [[TheManBehindTheMan Man Behind The Divine Eldritch Abomination Embodiment Of Destruction Mehrunes Dagon]] himself is Akatosh, ''Chief God of the Imperial Pantheon!''
* MassMonsterSlaughterSidequest: Pops up on occasion. Frequently crosses over with TwentyBearAsses as you aren't simply killing the monsters, but collecting their OrganDrops for the quest giver.
* MasterOfNone: Medium Armor in ''Morrowind'' is the worst armor type, having few obtainable sets and nothing comparable to the best options for light and heavy.
** At least partially fixed in Tribunal, with the addition of Adamantium armor. But the sheer difficulty in obtaining a full set - you are forced to scrounge in dungeons for various 'veins' of ore surrounded by high-level monsters and then are forced to pay out the nose for each individual piece to even be made - means that its still not as easy to obtain as, say, Glass armor, the best light armor set. Or you could commit, you know, ''murder''.
* MayflyDecemberRomance: Just about any relationship between mer and man would count, but the relationship between Barenziah and Tiber Septim is a canon example (also a MayDecemberRomance, incidentally).
* MeaningfulName: Zurin Arctus' The ''Art of War Magic'' is, naturally, written in a style reminscient of Sun Tzu's ''TheArtOfWar''.
* MedievalEuropeanFantasy: Every game other than ''Oblivion'' subverts this to some degree, some more than others. ''Skyrim'' zig-zags it a bit by being a ''Northern'' European Fantasy. ''Morrowind'', easily the most alien game in the series, invokes this a little with its Imperial settlements, but they exist largely to contrast just how different the rest of Vvardenfell is in comparison.
* MedievalStasis: Technological progress seems to be completely nonexistent in that universe. The games span ''centuries'' of history, and none include an engineer, inventor or scholar that is not a mage or an alchemist. And [[CrapsackWorld unlike some other fantasy settings]], that universe has known significant periods of peace, prosperity and development, and has its share of daring merchants, crafty blacksmiths, visionary scholars, and other people that usually make progress happen just by existing and meeting. And the whole thing is especially weird considering the abundance of partly functional LostTechnology (Dwemer, Ayleid, etc.) everywhere you go; there is no explication why at least part of it could not be studied and eventually replicated. (You can meet a few people studying it -- mostly mages -- but they never come up with anything really interesting, except of course the occasional PointlessDoomsdayDevice.)
* MetafictionalTitle: The series as a whole.
* MisplacedVegetation: Evidently Tamriel's a hybrid of Europe and America, because they not only have cacti, but nightshades growing amongst the edible ones like potatoes and tomatoes, and corn amongst other things. See AllDesertsHaveCacti.
* TheMole: [[spoiler:The leader of the Fighters Guild to the Camonna Tong in ''Morrowind''.]]
* MoneyForNothing: In general, it is usually quite easy to acquire far more money than you'd realistically be able to spend. Most of the best items and equipment are found or given as rewards rather than purchased. High level enchantments, custom magic spells, and high level training for skills can be quite costly, but the price is still easily covered by doing a dungeon dive or two. Expect to see many players running around with hundreds of thousands or even millions of gold yet nothing to spend it on.
* MultipleEndings: ''Daggerfall'' had seven possible endings depending on your actions in the game; ''Morrowind'' takes at least five of them as {{canon}} through a CosmicRetcon known as a "Dragon Break." The entire region ''Daggerfall'' takes place in experienced the "Warp in the West" and in the course of three days, 44 citystates become four, someone became a lich, a god and a man at the same time causing all three to exist, orcs joined the Empire, the Underking was laid to rest, and the Hero (you) died.
* {{Murder Inc}}: A considerable number of organizations qualify, including the Morag Tong (a government-sanctioned assassin's guild in Morrowind Province) and the Dark Brotherhood (a fully criminal offshoot of the former).
* NeedleInAStackOfNeedles: The ''Shivering Isles'' expansion.
* NonCombatEXP: The series uses a levelling system which gives the player experience for doing a given task (so you level up in sneak if you sneak, destruction magic for killing things with magic and so on) and awards levels (with respective stat increases, as well as perks in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'') every 10 ranks (so you could become quite high level by doing nothing but sneaking, smithing and [[TalkingTheMonsterToDeath learning to talk really well]]).
* NoobCave: Each main series game either starts the player out in one, or has one accessible shortly after character creation. Usually, it includes a tutorial and give the player his/her first set of equipment.
** Morrowind subverts this, as there is no tutorial dungeon, though there is a cave close by the starting town where you can practice fighting and such, but it is completely optional.
* NoodleIncident: The Republic of Hahd was this for the Summerset Isles and the Septim Empire.
* NumericalHard: Changing the difficulty slider in ''Oblivion'' only changes your damage multiplier against your enemies and your enemies' damage multiplier against you. This allows for an engine exploit on 100% difficulty, as even though you do only one-sixth base damage to your enemies and they do six times base damage to you, allies and summoned creatures do not suffer from this.
* OddJobGods: Among the many ones in the pantheons you can find Stuhn (God of Ransom) and Malacath (Patron of the Spurned and Ostracised) and Peryite (The Daedric Taskmaster, who essentially makes sure everything that doesn't have a place in Oblivion is taken care of).
** Malacath also happens to be the patron deity of the orcs, historically one of the most oppressed peoples in Tamriel. Additionally, as Trinimac, he was a major player in the creation of the Mundus, severing the Heart of Lorkhan. This is [[{{AllThereInTheManual}} All In The Manual]], of course.
* OlderIsBetter: Ancient Elven and Dwemer gear is better than modern gear. Dwemer were known to tinker with the laws of reality in order to make their creations last a really, really long time.
* OmnicidalManiac: Mannimarco, Dagoth Ur, Mehrunes Dagon... let's just say it has its fair share and leave it at that.
* OnceAnEpisode:
** Every game except ''Daggerfall'' begins with the PC as a prisoner, and ''Daggerfall'' still has a starter dungeon.
** Once the games moved away from RandomlyGeneratedLevels, each has had an early faction quest playing with the RatStomp trope. (''Morrowind'' plays it straight with the first Fighters Guild quest, ''Oblivion'' subverts it with the first Fighters Guild quest, and ''Skyrim'' plays it straight with a [[WakeUpCallBoss nasty surprise]] early in the Thieves Guild quest line.)
** [[EasterEgg M'aiq the Liar]] has appeared in every game starting with ''Morrowind'', dispensing TakeThatAudience and TakeThatUs shots.
* OneStatToRuleThemAll: Before ''Skyrim'' did away with attributes, Endurance was this because it determined your starting health and your health gain per level. Unless you wanted a really [[SquishyWizard squishy character]], it was essential. The official game guide for ''Morrowind'' even suggested making Endurance one of your primary attributes (which gave it a big bonus at the start of the game) regardless of your race or class. This also made "The Lady" a very popular birthsign in ''Morrowind'' and ''Oblivion'' since it gave an additional bonus to Endurance in those games.
* OnlySaneMan: Sheogorath's Chamberlain, Haskill, seems to literally be the only sane man in the ''Shivering Isles'', although his straight-laced demeanour is an aberration in itself. There is also an NPC named Uungor in Bliss who insists he is not insane, [[HeWhoFightsMonsters but is so obsessed with proving this and so paranoid that the other residents of the Isles are trying to drive him insane that it counts as insanity]].
* OpeningTheSandbox: Happens ''very'' early on compared to most series. Usually happens right after character creation and escaping the NoobCave, which can be mere minutes into the game.
* OppositeSexClone: Divayth Fyr's "daughters" in ''Morrowind''. They're also his [[ScrewYourself wives.]]
* OrwellianEditor: The name and address of the ''RPG Codex'', one of the bigger sources of criticism of ''Oblivion'', cannot be posted on the official forums, as the auto censor treats it as a swear word.
* OtherworldlyAndSexuallyAmbiguous: While all of the Daedra princes (a loose analog of Demon Lords And Archdevils, only with Blue And Orange Morality) lack a default sex, most do appear consistently as one specific sex. Exceptions are Boethiah, who seems switch between genders at will, and Mephala, who has been described as being a hermaphrodite (as was her "anticipation" in ''Morrowind'', Vivec.)
* OurElvesAreBetter: They certainly seem to think so. And each race of elves seems to think of itself as better than the rest, ''especially'' the Altmer (high elves.)
* OurElvesAreDifferent: First off, they refer to themselves collectively as Mer. More specifically, our Wood Elves (Bosmer) are cannibals, our Dark Elves (Dunmer) aren't particularly evil, our High Elves (Altmer) are snobbish jerks at best and genocidal Nazis at worst, our Orcs (Orsimer) are a sub-breed of Elves and aren't wholly evil, our Snow Elves (Falmer) used to be really advanced but were driven to barbarism, and see {{Our Dwarves Are Different}} below.
* OurDemonsAreDifferent: Daedra. Scholars in-universe don't even like the label demon, since they're really all {{Eldritch Abomination}}s with BlueAndOrangeMorality. The things actually ''called'' demons are a race native to Akavir.
* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Subverted rather ingeniously. TES Dwarves (Dwemer, a race of Elves) actually ''are'' very dwarfy - they're reclusive, they live in underground strongholds carved into the mountains, they're superb metalsmiths and engineers, they don't get along with the (other) mer, and they have big, long beards. Bethsoft managed to keep the archetype almost completely intact, yet the way in which a simple change of the visual portrayal makes it new and unique and exciting again is quite remarkable.
** And they're also as extinct as the dinosaurs. Despite being so much more technologically advanced than everyone else in the world, for some mysterious unexplained reason they all died out, and all the Dwemer are officially dead and gone by the time the Elder Scrolls games take place. The prevailing theory is that they essentially [[BrownNote Brown-Noted]] themselves out of existence. That's what happens when you start [[AllMythsAreTrue screwing with the fabric of reality]], especially when that reality includes {{Physical God}}s to be offended by your hubris. Another theory is that they succeeded in [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence ascending to a higher plane of existence]]. (How could the mortals left behind tell the difference?)
** Their size is also ingeniously subverted. According to historical evidence, they were no smaller than the average Mer. The reason for their "Dwarf" name was due to giants interacting with them and viewing them as short. This eventually made it into common knowledge of all of Tamriel.
* OurOrcsAreDifferent: They started out as [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien]] Orcs, but [[CharacterisationMarchesOn evolved into Blizzard Orcs]] later on.
* OurVampiresAreDifferent: Vampire characteristics vary between games, but each are consistently unique in some way.
** More specifically, Vampire characteristics vary between region to region. To list a few, vampires in Skyrim have dens under frozen lakes, and attack their victims from under the ice (without breaking it), vampires in Black Marsh capture victims alive and keep them in a magicka-induced coma, and vampires in Valenwood, depending on the tribe, disintegrate into mist, eat people whole, prey on children, take their place and then kill the whole family, or are indistinguishable from normal people unless seen in candlelight.
* OurWerebeastsAreDifferent: Features a variety of therianthropic creatures, including werewolves, wereboars, werebears, werecrocodiles, werelions, werevultures and even weresharks; though only the first three have ever made an appearance in the games (the others are only mentioned in game lore), and werewolves are the only type of lycanthrope the player can ever become.
** OurWerewolvesAreDifferent: In ''Daggerfall'', werewolves transform once a month. In ''Morrowind'' (or rather ''Bloodmoon''), they transform every night. Both varieties have to feed (i.e. kill a sentient NPC) at least once per transformation or gradually lose health. In ''Skyrim'', werewolves may transform once a day, and stay transformed as long as they eat [=NPCs=]. This comes at the cost of magic, healing, and the inventory system in general, while in wolf form.
* TheOverworld: The series boast some of the largest Overworlds in gaming
** In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', the Vvardenfell island is a single continuous explorable location, dotted with countless entrances to smaller dungeon and indoors levels.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'' is similar to ''Morrowind'', except that entire cities are also rendered as smaller sub-levels accessible from the overworld.
* PassionIsEvil: You have deities called the Aedra and Daedra. The Aedra represent aspects such as Time, Life, Beauty, Commerce and Air--all natural things which have little to do with emotions. The Daedra, however, represent things like Deceit, Desires, Knowledge, Competition, The Spurned, Ambition, Manipulation, Madness, Domination, etc--or things sparked or perpetuated by emotions.
* PathOfInspiration: The Sixth House.
* PayingInCoins: In The Elder Scrolls series, this seems to crop up when you buy more expensive items (such as houses in ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim''). Since there is no higher integer to the currency than the septim [gold coin], you would be dumping at least 5000 coins in the lap of the local steward just to get a foot on the property ladder.
* PettingZooPeople: Argonians and Khajiit, LizardFolk and CatFolk respectively. There's also a few other "animal" races in the lore, such as the ape people/Imga, monkey people/Tang Mo, slugmen/Sloads, and the extinct fox people/Lilmothiit, but only the Argonians and Khajiit have appeared in the main series, and the only one of the others to appear in ''any'' game are the Sloads (one can be found in ''Redguard'', as a villain).
* PhysicalGod: Almost too many to count. Some of the more prominent examples:
** Any of the Daedric Princes when they appear as an avatar in Mundus. Some of the more powerful lesser-Daedra may also qualify.
** Dagoth Ur and the Tribunal, who were mortals who ascended to godhood by tapping into the Heart of Lorkhan.
** Tiber Septim (possibly by [[BecomingTheMask mantling]] Lorkhan/Shor/Shezzar) ascended to become the god Talos upon his death.
** [[spoiler: The [[PlayerCharacter Player Characters]] from ''Morrowind'', ''Oblivion'', and ''Skyrim'' all acquire or are born with attributes fitting the trope by the end of their games. See GodInHumanForm above for more.]]
* PietaPlagiarism: A large statue in the town of Chorrol in ''Oblivion''.
* PlantPerson: Dryads and Spriggans.
* PoweredByAForsakenChild: Depending on how empathic you are, normal Soul Gems can qualify for this seeing as how they use a monster's soul to power magical items. Black Soul Gems certainly fit the trope, being that they use the souls of mortal races to power magical items. Mortal souls count as Grand Souls, which can make the most powerful enchantments.
* PowersThatBe: The Daedra & The Nine Divines, Sithis may qualify too.
** It was alluded too in Skyrim by Boethiah, a Daedra, that this may not be the case.
* PlayableEpilogue: These games do not really end until you get bored of exploring.
* PragmaticVillainy: With only a few exceptions, the Thieves Guild doesn't allow killing... It's bad for business.
* ProudWarriorRace: The Orcs/Orsimer, as well as the Redguards, although to a slightly lesser extent. Redguards usually dislike magic, with a Redguard Mage in ''Oblivion'' claiming that its common belief that "If you use magic, you're either Weak, or Wicked" in Hammerfell... There is an exception for Destruction magic though, they're a warrior culture who happens to think that more damage is a GOOD thing regardless of the source.
** This is rather true in Daggerfall, which takes in place Hammerfell and Highrock, as if you join the Mages Guild, your reputation with every other faction plummets.
** The Nords may also count, if not for the fact that they're less ProudWarriorRace and more ''Drunken'' Warrior Race.
*** The Nords of Skyrim will actually ridicule [[KlingonScientistsGetNoRespect most magic users]].
** The [[HornedHumanoid Dremora]] are a Daedric race that focuses on [[BloodKnight combat]], crafting powerful weapons and [[SpikesOfVillainy fearsome]] [[ScaryImpracticalArmor armor]], [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and being]] [[ChewingTheScenery exceptionally]] [[LargeHam hammy]] [[EvilIsHammy warriors]].
* {{Precursors}}: The Ehlnofey for every race ''except'' the Argonians, which are descended from ancient sentient trees called Hist.
** In addition to those, we have the Aldmer (the First Elves) of Aldmeris, who are the ancestors of all the modern Elvish races (particularly the Altmer), and the Nedes of Atmora, who are the ancestor race of the humans except the Redguard (who come from Yokuda).
* PrisonEpisode: These games tend to involve prison settings early on.
* PurelyAestheticGender: For about 99% of each game, gender is completely aesthetic. In the pre-''Skyrim'' games with character attributes, the starting attributes were slightly different between genders of the same race, and there is the occasional quest (or set of quests) only available to (or is slightly different for) one gender, but these are only a very small minority. Really, the gaming experience is the same regardless of your character's gender. Taken UpToEleven in Skryim, where (thanks to EveryoneIsBi) every single marriageable character can be married regardless of your character's gender.
* RandomlyGeneratedLoot: Subverted. Equipment appears to follow the "X weapon of Y" naming format [[note]][craftsmanship] weapon of [adjective corresponding to a power level]ous [enchantment effect]]ing, to be exact.[[/note]], however it only RandomlyDrops and has its enchantment scaled to the player's level.
** ''Morrowind'' averts it with loot outside of containers, which is hand placed and never changes. Savvy veteran players can find extremely high level loot well before it will start being randomly generated in containers this way.
* TheRashomon:
** The entire creation mythology in the ''Elder Scrolls'' universe is significantly different between cultures, but all follow a very similar pattern.
** In ''Morrowind'', The Tribunal Temple, Vivec (giving a different account than the Temple which worships him,) Azura, Dagoth Ur, the Ashlanders, and the Dissident Priests all recount Nerevar's final days and death at Red Mountain in different, highly contradictory ways. The Dissident Priests alone have several differing accounts — that is, one of the things they criticize the Temple for is being so sensitive about different accounts of the events at Red Mountain, so they've taken it upon themselves to gather as many different accounts as they can. They don't make any claim to know which account is true, though they phrase things in a way that make clear that they find something off about the Temple's story.
* RealIsBrown: ''Morrowind'', which has a plague in the story which has robbed the countryside of all colour and replaced it with a depressing brown. As with everything in ''Morrowind'', there's a [[GameMod mod]] for that.
** ''Skyrim'' is somewhat similar, though Real Is Grey might be a more appropriate description. Especially notable when comparing weapons and armor (except dwemer) to the previous games. Steel blades no longer shine like in ''Oblivion'', Elven gear is dark brown-greenish rather than gold-greenish, the shiny mithril and adamantium are nowhere to be found, glass is dark blue-greenish rather than neon, ebony now has grey details rather than yellow and daedric armor notably has far less red detailing than it did in ''Morrowind''.
* RealityIsUnrealistic: Response to some of the criticisms of the [[LizardFolk Argonians]] being plantigrade in ''Daggerfall'', ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim''. Actually... ''Morrowind'' is the most unrealistic, seeing as reptilians and amphibians walk plantigrade in real life.
** For those of us without a medical degree, plantigrade is walking with the foot flat against the ground as opposed to walking on the toes with the heel raised (digitgrade). The latter is used in ''Morrowind''.
* RecklessSidekick, LeeroyJenkins: The [=NPCs=] in {{Escort Mission}}s, including a [[LampshadeHanging lampshading]] in which one of them goes charging straight into a deathtrap. Also the various Guild sidekicks in ''Oblivion''.
** The Dark Brotherhood sidekicks in ''Oblivion'' deserve a special mention - considering they're all highly-skilled ''assassins'', they have a remarkably poor understanding of stealth and tend to charge headlong into battle as soon as they spot an enemy. Sensible players kill their DB sidekicks right away to save time (and loot the bodies).
* RecurringRiff: Starting with ''Morrowind'', the "Elder Scrolls theme". Dun dun dun, dun dun dun, dun dun dun, da da dun dun dun...
* RedSkyTakeWarning:
** The Deadlands of Mehrunes Dagon (the realm of Oblivion) in ''Oblivion.''
** Also the skies over Red Mountain in ''Morrowind'', especially during a particularly nasty ash storm.
* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Possible to avert, but difficult... Eldamil in ''Oblivion'' makes a HeelFaceTurn just in time for a [[ZergRush Mook Rush]] followed by a battle with TheDragon.
* RegeneratingMana
* ReptilesAreAbhorrent: The Argonians, despite being no worse than the other playable races in general, are long-standing victims of FantasticRacism. This trope is also [[InvokedTrope invoked]] to emphasize the average Tamrielic denizen's fear and hatred of the Akaviri snake-men/Tsaesci.
* RockMonster: Storm Atronach are conglomerations of floating boulders in a more-or-less humanoid shape.
* RuleThirtyFourCreatorReactions: InUniverse with ''The Real Barenziah'', a novelized biography of the Queen Mother of Morrowind that in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' had a notorious case of {{Getting|CrapPastTheRadar}} IKEAErotica [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Past the Radar]] (namely, Barenziah having sex with a Khajiit so he'd induct her into the ThievesGuild). In later games the Tribunal Temple had it censored, but by some reports Barenziah herself actually enjoyed the books and is friends with the author.
* RunningGag: Most of the games begin with the player character imprisoned. And your sweetrolls keep getting stolen (The Sweetroll reference has been in almost every game in the series, usually seen in the Questionnaire at the start, but it's more of a Bethesda running gag since they even snuck it into Fallout3)
* SacredBowAndArrows: Auriel's Bow, wielded by the god of the same name.
* SceneryPorn: A staple of the series. Each game tends to have some of the best scenery graphics by the standards of when it was released, and each new one significantly ups the ante from the previous. The modding community further contributes with their own graphics upgrades, such as Dagger XL and the Morrowind Graphics Extender.
* ScrewDestiny: People meant to be heroes are able to do this, up to and including out and out defying the futures predicted by the Elder Scrolls themselves.
** The Elder Scrolls tend to write themselves as prophecied heroes left their mark on the world. Before being fixed, they're blank or ever-changing. There's also the idea that it's not so much the hero that fulfills the prophecy, but that it's the one that fulfills the prophecy that becomes the hero. ''Morrowind'' features a crypt for failed attempts.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: You are able to murder people all you want and just pay a fine for it. You can literally steal something, pay the guard to leave you alone, murder the shopkeeper, pay a fine, kill the guard (if you're lucky), pay the fine, then murder a random person on the street, pay the fine, take a nap on said street next to their corpse, then pay the fine....
** However, you can't murder people who're important to the story: in ''Morrowind'', you receive a message that says "You've doomed the world" and have made the game {{Unwinnable}}.
** Technically, you can still win, it's just difficult and you'll probably need to look it up online to figure out how.
* ScrewYouElves: Much of Tamriel's history can be summed up as "elves and men fighting," or sometimes "elves fighting other elves." The first empire of the races of men actually got it's start as a rebellion against their elven masters. Relations between the Human and Elven races were better, but still somewhat strained during the Third Era. By the Fourth Era, the Altmer have taken over much of Tamriel and are doing their best to restore the pre-Empire human/elf dynamic. Needless to say, the humans are pretty pissed about this.
** Not just Man but also Argonian, Khajiit and other Mer are pretty pissed off with the Thalmor. [[MySpeciesDothProtestTooMuch Even a great deal of Altmer despise them]].
* SerratedBladeOfPain: Daedric weapons.
* ShopliftAndDie: Any shopkeeper in the franchise fits, although with the way the game is programmed and the inconvenient locations of stealable items, it's more like "accidentally pick up a random object when trying to access the shopkeeper and die".
** This is extremely prominent in Arena, as the guards will kill you on sight for just failing to pick a lock. While in Daggerfall it's much much more lenient as you actually go to trial and can defend yourself, depending on how high your personality skill is. Though if you're in The Dark Brotherhood or Thieves guild, they can intimidate the judge into letting you go.
* SidequestSidestory: The games typically have the main quest, the standalone sidequests, and major story arcs consisting of sidequests for each big faction in the setting (Fighters Guild, Mages Guild, Thieves Guild, etc.). The latter are often almost as expansive as the main quest.
* SilverHasMysticPowers: Weapons made of silver are one of the few ways to hurt ghosts. Depending on the game, silver weapons are also more effective against other supernatural entities as well (daedra, undead, vampires, werewolves, etc.)
* TheSingularity:
** An amusing side effect of a GameBreaker in ''Morrowind'' is the ability to turn yourself into a one-man Singularity. Craft intelligence-enhancing potion. Use intelligence boost to craft better intelligence-enhancing potion. Repeat until intelligent enough to craft a weapon capable of killing the final boss in one hit. It was also possible to make spells that did this - hike up the damage and other stats enough and the mana cost became so stupidly high it ran full circle and you could have a low-level mage chucking out magical nukes like they were Spark.
** ''Skyrim'' lets you do the same, though this requires ''two'' skills: alchemy and enchanting. Craft alchemy potion to improve enchanting. Use that to enchant gloves and helmet and rings and necklaces to boost alchemy. Rinse and repeat until satisfied, then use both ridiculously-boosted skills to enchant equipment to improve smithing and brew smithing-boosting potions. Go visit a blacksmith and forge an iron dagger that can one-shot the final boss.
** ''Skyrim'' also lets you do the same much faster with the infamous Fortify Restoration exploit. Make a set of clothing (head/gloves/ring/necklace) with Fortify Alchemy and equip it. Make a Fortify Restoration potion. Drink it, and un- and re-equip your gear, then make another Fortify Restoration potion and repeat several times. Once you have [[http://cloud-2.steampowered.com/ugc/884106516298709611/83C005F518F6288FB05708BFEC55BF2E0A8DDCB6/ sufficiently high numbers]] (which with the right Alchemy perks only takes a few iterations), make Fortify Smithing and [[http://cloud-4.steampowered.com/ugc/884106516298735321/43DC5A4548BC95E8BCBE0D4D350DE0B3CC6902DC/ Fortify Enchanting]] potions, which can now be used to enchant gear that [[http://cloud-2.steampowered.com/ugc/884106516298881581/3E707070A5A3ABDB65CDE1091BB936FE712447B8/ completely negates magicka cost]]/gives you millions of HP/instant hit point or [[http://cloud-4.steampowered.com/ugc/884106516308428553/1318D8CC60413CD12F4784593266A90F3DB4656B/ magicka regeneration]]/complete immunity to certain types of damage, and to improve said gear and weapons to the point that even Alduin dies in one hit... or just plain ''crashes the game''.
* SkeletonKey: The Skeleton Key artifact, an unbreakable lockpick that fortifies your "security" skill, has appeared in every main game of ''The Elder Scrolls'' series so far, as an artifact primarily associated with the Daedric Prince Nocturnal.
* SomewhereAnEquestrianIsCrying: Tamriel's horses can take quite a bit of abuse from the player with almost no ill effects, although most horses will eventually die.
* SpaceCompression: Averted in ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall''. The other games in the series, however, use this trope for good reason. (''Daggerfall'' also has a fast travel mode... and unless you want to go crazy, you'll have to use it to get everywhere.)
* SpectralWeaponCopy: The conjuration school of magic usually has spells which can summon daedric weapons (the most powerful basic weapon type) and armour for a short time. ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' takes this further, by having summoned weapons actually appear ghostly (in previous games they used the same models/sprites as more permanent versions of the weapons).
* SpontaneousWeaponCreation: You can use the "Bind [weapon]" spells to summon the most powerful generic equipment in the game for a while.
* StealingFromTheHotel: Your character can do this. Prior to ''Skyrim'', no repercussions result; in ''Skyrim'', the innkeeper can send a few hired goons after you if you do so.
* SteamPunk: The Dwemer ruins.
* StylisticSuck: [[EnsembleDarkhorse Crassius Curio]]'s plays.
* SuddenlyVoiced: The Dremora you encounter in ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim'' can talk in English. [[EvilIsHammy And they make up for their previous voicelessness with some great lines,]] [[ChewingTheScenery uttered in the most over-the-top manner possible]].
** The Golden Saints also fall under this trope, since they were all silent during their debut in ''Morrowind'', and began speaking in the ''Shivering Isles'' expansion of ''Oblivion''.
* SurpassedTheTeacher: You can find trainers who can automatically increase your skills for money (rather than grinding). However, each skill has a trainer for each rank of experience in that skill and can only train you 5 times. If you ask for training when you're too high level then they'll say something to the effect of this trope.
* TakeThat: M'aiq the Liar in ''Oblivion'': "People always enjoy a good VideoGame/{{fable}}. M'aiq has yet to find one, though. Perhaps one day."
** M'aig returns in ''Skyrim'', still delivering these to devs and players alike.
* TakeThatAudience: The ''Daggerfall'' manual has this line "People who play role-playing games need more than some pretty graphics and nonstop action to whet their claymores; they want depth and character and wit and drama. They want the thickest, most involving novel that they've ever read translated to their 15" screen, with themselves as the hero. That's what I love about people who play role-playing games. [[UnpleasableFanbase They're so reasonable]]."
** M'aiq, even before ''Oblivion'', was basically telling people asking for all sorts of features to implement the game to just can it.
* TakeThatUs: M'aiq [[RunningGag again]], in ''Skyrim''. "[[WelcomeToCorneria M'aiq saw a mudcrab the other day]]. Horrible creatures."
* TalkingIsAFreeAction: In most of the games talking, lockpicking, looting and checking your inventory freezes time.
** Particularly noticeable in the ''Oblivion'' main quest when a character stops to have a conversation with you ''while being chased by assassins.'' He even says "I think they're behind me!" [[FailedASpotCheck with his assailant clearly visible, frozen in place, behind him.]]
** Averted only in ''Skyrim'' - talking does not pause the world around you. Feel free to chat about the Civil War while a dragon burns everything around you. Although enough chaos and battle happening nearby will usually distract [=NPCs=] and automatically end the conversation.
** The problem was present in ''Morrowind'', but minimized since there was so little voice acting--mostly you got sick of [[WelcomeToCorneria the same few snippets of dialogue]]. Things are much worse in ''Oblivion'', as there's much more voiced dialogue, and to save money the number of voice actors for the 20 race/gender combinations was halved to ten.
*** One of the more amusing examples is an old man who asks you to find his sons and help them fight off goblins. His sons, naturally, are both males of the same race, and when you first meet them they begin holding a conversation with each other that you can listen in on. Since they're the same race and gender, they sound identical, and this is made even more strange by the fact that, unlike most [=NPCs=] (who simply have random conversations using stock greetings and responses when they run into each other), this example of an actor TalkingToHimself was ''fully scripted.''
** As noted by ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation'', in ''Oblivion'' a single character will sometimes have two completely different voice actors. An old beggar woman on the street croaking at you for coins will switch to a far younger and less infirm woman when you actually stop to talk to her.
*** The beggars are definitely the most {{egregious}} example, mainly because they forgot to record and/or actually implement beggar-specific versions of certain generic NPC dialogue. [[HiddenDepths Or you might think that the Beggars just ham it up with the infirm voice to get more money.]]
** There's one Priest you can talk to who lapses into a completely different voice unlike any other found in the game for just one line, but you can still tell it's the same voice actor who does Imperial males. This gives the impression that initially, certain [=NPCs=] were supposed to have slightly different accents or pitches, but the idea was scrapped early on.
** The entire problem was thankfully averted in ''Skyrim'', for the most part. There are now more like four or five voice actors for each gender of each race, so you're much less likely to hear two [=NPCs=] conversing in the same voice. Nearly all of the plot-important characters also have their own voice actors whose other roles are minimal.
*** There's still a fairly limited pool (much bigger than ''Oblivion'', but still). It's just that instead of being assigned by race and gender, they're more closely tied to age and social standing. It's also helped by the fact that there are no more random conversations, all instances of NPC chatter are scripted events that come off as more natural. Though it is noticeable that orcs, Khajiit, and Argonians are still limited to one voice actor per gender, though this is probably because they're the least common races in the game.
*** Particularly, players will soon get used to Generic Nord Male, Suspect Sounding Shopkeeper, and Ah-nold Impersonator among the male voices.
* TechDemoGame: Both ''Morrowind'' and ''Oblivion'' were the ''VideoGame/{{Crysis}}'' of their eras.
** Even ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' were this when they came out - both of their graphical capabilities were beyond their time. It may not seem like it since they're obviously way outdated now, but they're really great by early-mid 90's standards. (''Daggerfall'' was a ''little'' dated, though. The developers even put in a TakeThat at fancy graphics in the readme.)
* TheSpymaster: Caius Cosades in ''Morrowind'', Jauffre in ''Oblivion''.
* TheUnreveal: We never find out exactly who the Night Mother really is (sort of, her origins are a minor point in the ''36 Lessons of Vivec''), or ''what'' Sithis really is.
** [[MindScrew Sithis Is Not.]] ([[UnreliableNarrator At least according to some sources]].)
** Also, exactly what did happen to the Dwemer? It was never revealed in-game explicitly (but hints were there) and had to be explained by one of the writers: [[spoiler:They became the skin of Numidium.]]
* TheyCallHimSword: The powerful sword Umbra is cursed and tends to possess its owners, resulting in them becoming obsessed with the sword and adopting its name as their own.
* ThievesGuild: In ''Daggerfall'', ''Morrowind'', ''Oblivion'', and ''Skyrim''.
** ''Morrowind'' has two, though the second one, the Cammona Tong, isn't joinable (they are a bunch of xenophobes, and you're a foreigner).
** Mentioned by random characters in ''Arena,'' but not actually shown.
* ThirdPersonPerson: Most of the Khajiit speak this way. Argonians also occasionally slip into this. Where it gets weird is when the Khajiit don't deign to reveal their own name: they just say "Khajiit," like a nameless merchant's guard saying "Khajiit is just a guard and has no wares to sell."
* ThrivingGhostTown: The Imperial City and Vivec are each home to ''maybe'' 200 unique [=NPCs=], while settlements like Gnaar Mok have an apparent population of about ''five''.
** This trope is averted in ''Daggerfall'', where settlements are realistically sized and have appropriate populations. Of course, they're also randomly generated... with multiple citizens who are virtually ''clones'' of each other. And let's be frank - most of them aren't useful in the least bit.
* ThrowingYourSwordAlwaysWorks: How the Snow Prince was finally slain. (By a 12 year old girl, no less.)
* TinyGuyHugeGirl: The [[OurElvesAreBetter wood elves]]. Female bosmer are as tall as Imperials, while the males are [[OneHeadTaller nearly a full head-height shorter]]. Though this is averted as of ''Skyrim'', where there's no notable height disparity between male and female wood elves (females are still taller, but not by nearly as much).
** Male Golden Saints and Dark Seducers are the same height as Imperials, whereas the females are as tall as Altmer and Dremora, which are the tallest races (playable or otherwise) in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''.
* TokenEvilTeammate: Mehrunes Dagon is one of the few Daedric Princes that can be considered pure evil, or at least comes the closest to being pure evil. Naturally, he's the main antagonist of several games, including ''Battlespire'' and ''Oblivion''. A few others are extremely not-nice like Molag Bal (whose deal is "Domination," and often "rape") or the ones that see humans more as playthings than people, but the rest can be chalked up to "an elemental force of will that's not inherently good or evil on its own."
** Even Mehrunes Dagon has some positive features; aside from being the god of destruction, he's also the god of change and rebellion- this is in contrast to Boethiah, who is very specifically the god of ''unlawful'' overthrow of authority, despite being considered one of the "good" daedra by the dunmer. Molag Bal, however, is generally agreed to have no positive qualities at all.
* TomeOfEldritchLore: Several.
** The eponymous Elder Scrolls. Frequently referred to as "fragments of creation," they are completely irrefutable recordings of history/alternate history; what did happen, what could have happened, what might happen. Even the falsehoods in them are true. ''Especially'' the falsehoods, as is pointed out several times in the series. Reading them completely untrained will yield just some weird chart that looks like it has constellations on it, with odd glyphs printed over (or under?) the chart. An incompletely trained reader (knows just enough to hurt themselves) will end up getting something out of it but likely useless, and their eyesight is gone. A well-trained reader can glean much and eventually regain their eyesight... for a finite number of times before their sight is gone for good. Even those who merely study the scrolls, never actually using them, are driven to complete madness with alarming regularity.
*** The power of the Elder Scrolls is so great, their truths so irrefutable, that not even the machinations of a daedric prince can overcome them; that's how [[spoiler: the curse on the Gray Cowl of Nocturnal is broken in the Thieves' Guild quest]] in ''Oblivion''. In ''Skyrim'', [[spoiler: you get to read one yourself to gain knowledge of a dragon shout lost to time; it turns out you don't read the scroll, you see events happen as if the scroll was a window to another (possibly alternate) time. Trying to read the scroll outside of the Time-Wound temporarily robs you of vision — and the reason you only suffer that much is because you have the soul of a being that exists partially outside of time, not unlike the Elder Scroll itself. Even the Dragons like Paarthurnax and Alduin himself fear the Elder Scrolls' power. Turns out that they don't just reveal events, they can alter reality as well; with no recourse left, the ancient Nordic heroes who faced Alduin invoked the power of an Elder Scroll to "cast Alduin out of time", postponing his reckoning until the age where Skyrim (the game, not the province) takes place. The residue from that event was the Time-Wound mentioned above.]]
** The Mysterium Xarxes, an artifact of Mehrunes Dagon. The ''Oblivion'' script notes actually call for Martin, the most knowledgeable major character on the subject, to react as if given "a handful of glowing plutonium" when he receives the Xarxes. It's just that sort of book.
** The Oghma Infinium, which means "infinite wisdom," is bound in skin and is owned by Hermaeus Mora, the Daedric prince of fate and forbidden knowledge.
* TookALevelInBadass: The entire Argonian race goes through one following the events of the Oblivion Crisis. The Argonians worship the Hist, sentient trees native to the Black Marsh, and drink sap from this Hist which can cause physical and mental changes in the Argonians. Following the crisis, the Hist began making the Argonians stronger and more aggressive, preparing them for the wars to come. This also works to justify their change in appearance throughout the series, especially from ''Morrowind'' (where they looked more like dopey iguanas) to the LizardFolk of ''Oblivion'', and then to the Velociraptor Folk of ''Skyrim''.
* TooAwesomeToUse: For archers, the higher level arrows (Ebony, Daedric), mainly before ''Skyrim'''s DLC, Dawnguard where you can make your own, can be this. Because they're in short supply where you can maybe find them being carried by the odd Dwemer Sentinel they're very rare and best saved for bosses instead of random enemies.
* TooStupidToLive: Anyone who has ever thought it would be a good idea to betray a Daedric Prince. In ''Skyrim'' alone there are three or four.
** One example is a nameless female thief in the in-game book "Purrloined Shadows" She spies on a witch coven summoning the Daedric Prince Nocturnal. Why? To mug her of course? She is shown to be shocked by the nature of the mission she was given, and it turns out [[spoiler: she was set up to get caught from the very beginning]] so when someone says "Hey let's rob a Daedric Prince while surrounded by her coven of worshipers" don't listen.
** Also a special mention to the priest who is not only stupid enough to worship Boethiah, the Daedric Prince of treachery who has a habit of murdering his worshippers for kicks, but in the process desecrates the altar of [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Molag Bal]], Daedric Prince of enslavement and domination. Needless to say, he comes to a bad end.
* TrainingDummy: In the Fighter's Guild quarters.
* TrivialTitle: The eponymous artifacts are only a background element in the [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena first]] [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall three]] [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind games]] and play only a small role in one side questline in [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion the fourth]]. However ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' has one as an important piece of the puzzle in the main quest: [[spoiler:it allows you to travel back in time to learn the [[BrownNote Dragonrend]] Shout]].
* UnidentifiedItems: A low Alchemy skill prevents the player from determining the properties of alchemical ingredients. In some games, such as ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', ingredients that the player has not used in experiments always have unknown properties. However, tasting the ingredients exposes the player to diluted version of their powers -- as opposed to the stronger powers of potions brewed from these ingredients -- so it's almost always safe to taste them. The worst that might happen is having your health drained by a sliver for five seconds... in a game where you have RegeneratingHealth.
* UniqueEnemy: These are liberally sprinkled throughout the games. In ''Oblivion'' there's the unicorn, the giant mudcrab, the giant slaughterfish and the painted trolls who inhabit their own unique little pocket dimension that looks nothing like the rest of the game.
* UniqueItems: Daedric artefacts are the most obvious, but there are multiple examples of quest rewards and unique NPC equipment, many of which have their own textures. [[http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Main_Page The Unofficial Elder Scrolls Pages]] maintains a list of unique items for each game.
* UnreliableCanon: In ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe, canon is an almost meaningless concept. Bethesda refuses to invalidate your choices about [[FeaturelessProtagonist who your character is]] and [[WideOpenSandbox what he/she does]]. Therefore, there is no definitive version of the Nerevarine/Champion/Dragonborn, etc. and very few canonized events (the main quest line usually being an exception.) Additionally, all in-game information, books, and historical records are [[UnreliableNarrator biased]] or otherwise unreliable or contradictory, with the implication that AllMythsAreTrue and everyone is right in spite of the contradictions. From a meta-perspective, canon is complicated by the fact that the majority of the lore that elucidates the nature of the world of Tamriel comes from the work of an ex-dev and were written in an unofficial capacity after he left the studio. Many lore-scholars within the fandom actually consider his work ‘more’ canon than the published games themselves, and the fact that the games reference and quote these works (due in part to said ex-dev still doing some freelance contract work on the series) adds to the confusion. Rather than become frustrated, fans tend to embrace this ambiguity as one of the more fascinating elements of the series.
* UnreliableNarrator: Most of the series lore is based on this, for several reasons.
** The character is given a limited perspective of events before talking to the player character. An example would be someone like the Fighter's Guild Grandmaster in ''Oblivion'', or most of the random {{NPC}}s in ''Morrowind''.
** The in-game book was written by a limited-perspective character. This is the most common, but also easiest to spot. For example, most accounts of Nerevar's death in ''Morrowind'', the ''Commentaries'' in ''Oblivion'', or also from ''Oblivion'' the "Guide to City X" books.
** Widespread propaganda, such as Biography of Barenziah, History of the Empire, and the Tribunal's account of what happened to Nerevar.
** Deliberate lies and half-truths. Vivec embodies this one.
** Even the player characters have been said to be this by a developer.
* {{Unwinnable}}: Both forms. You could kill important [=NPCs=] and get a message saying it's unwinnable; quests could be made unwinnable due to glitches, and ''Daggerfall'' could be made ''completely'' unwinnable due to glitches that would make the main quest unwinnable.
** Heck in ''Daggerfall'' every main quest you get, you have an option to decline it. Which if you do you can't get the request again thus can't advance the game (Why did they put that option in again...?) and in at least two main quests, if you don't finish them within a certain amount of days they become void and you cannot advance.
* UnwittingPawn: The plot of ''Morrowind'' is possibly Azura trying to get back at the Tribunal by having the Nerevarine destroy the source of their power. Not exactly a villainous example, but still.
** Unless, of course, you perceive what happens AFTER ''Morrowind'' as her revenge on the Dunmer for abandoning her.
** Also pretty much the whole Main Quest of ''Tribunal''. Though the player can be pretty aware of what he's doing, he [[ButThouMust has no choice but to go along with it]].
** ''Anyone'' who is (mis)fortunate enough to catch the attention of a Daedra, a dragon, Sithis, or any other deity. Heck, even the player character is not immune, as the Daedric Princes will typically use you to play their hands against each other and their enemies. In fact, the hero of [[LegacyOfKain another game series]] summed it up perfectly: "What game is this, where every player on the board claims the same pawn?"
*** Though at the end of the Sanguine Quest in Skyrim, Sanguine outright states that he was drawn to The Dragonborn for s/he "stood out" though he had no idea why s/he stood out, which is why he tested The Dragonborn with the drinking game.
* UselessItem: The decorative clutter which can't even be sold in unmoded ''Oblivion'' and obviously serves this purpose. ''Morrowind'' has the Feather/Burden effects, which do what they say they do (reduce/add weight carried), except that Fortify/Damage Strength is easier to obtain the basic effect for, costs the same, is more effective (5 times as much), and modifies melee damage and jumping on top of that; ''Oblivion'' tries to rectify it with premade spells being more effective in Feather's favor and basing movement speed on weight carried instead of percent of encumbrance, but while no longer useless, isn't exactly useful.
* UtilityMagic: "Alteration" magic is mostly this. Spells that let you levitate, spells to make your weight limit go up, spells to open locks, provide light or walk on water; it's basically all about enhancing your mobility and your ability to explore.
* VerbalTic: The Argonians tend to refer to other races as 'prey', going so far as to greet you by saying things like 'the prey approaches'.
* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Used in-universe. [[spoiler:In the immediate aftermath of the main quest, talking to Nords or Orcs reveals that there's already a novel chronicling you and Martin's adventure in production called The Fall of Dagon.]]
* VestigialEmpire: The Tamrielic Empire, as of ''Skyrim''. Jagar Tharn's kidnapping of the Emperor in ''Arena'' set off a political chain reaction that has been gradually unraveling TheEmpire over the course of the sequels.
* WarpWhistle: Many different types in ''Morrowind''. The two most common are spells/scrolls that teleport you to either the nearest Nine Divines temple or the nearest Tribunal-worshipping temple. Since Fast Travel returned to ''Oblivion'' and ''Skyrim,'' from the first two games, it seems WarpWhistle has gone the way of the dodo.
* WeaponsKitchenSink: You can find dealers selling claymores, longswords and wakizashis at the same time. These weapons are actually used by a number of different cultures throughout Tamriel. Nords and Orcs tend to like Claymores, Redguards use longswords, and Wakizashi come from Akavir. There are many exceptions, but odds are SOMEONE wants to buy that Orcish Longsword and Akavir Katana.
* WeirdnessCensor: People get stuck trying to walk through each other. Guards ignore people trying to punch you out, but when/if you do it, they immediately report your crime. Guards walk away after you pay them money to go away after you murdered someone on the streets. You stick a knife into peoples' back and they just walk around like nothing happened. Guards try to murder ''each other'' and they don't mind. You wake up and there's a zombie inside your room and the person you're bunking with doesn't mind.
* WelcomeToCorneria:
--> "[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Halt!]]"
--> "[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind We're watching you, scum...]]"
--> "[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Stop right there, criminal scum!]]"
--> "[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion I saw a mudcrab the other day.]]"
--> "[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim I used to be an adventurer like you. Then I took an arrow to the knee.]]"
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The Medusa enemies from the original game were never used or mentioned again. Which is rather tragic, as they would have looked awesome in Skyrim (Figuratively)
* WideOpenSandbox: The openness of the games is one of the series greatest and most famous attributes. Usually, shortly after character creation, you are free to go wherever you want and do whatever you want. It is possible in each game to play for hundreds of hours just exploring and doing side quests without evening starting the main quest.
* WillOTheWisp:
** A mid-level monster encounter in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''. They're incorporeal like ghosts (meaning they can only be hurt with magic, weapons made of [[SilverHasMysticPowers silver]] or [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs magic weapons]]) and have lightning based magic.
** In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' and ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsOnline'', there are glowing hostile creatures called Wisps, which are found near feminine, ghostlike beings called Wispmothers. Unlike the Will-o-the-Wisps in ''Oblivion'', these can be hurt by any kind of weapon. Killing a Wispmother disperses the Wisps surrounding her.
* WithThisHerring: One quest in ''Morrowind'' has you dispatched by Sheogorath to kill a giant bull netch using the "Fork of Horripilation", which, despite its grandiose (sounding - it means goosebumps) name, is merely [[strike:''a dinner fork'']] a '''''cursed''''' ''dinner fork''.
** Mentioned again in ''Oblivion'', in a quest where you must get the fork back from a bunch of zealots who've stolen the deified eating utensil.
* WizardingSchool: The Arcane University, The College of Winterhold, and, to a lesser extent, the Mages Guild in general. The Battlespire counted too, until the events of the eponymous game.
* WordOfDante / WordOfSaintPaul: Bethesda Software developers have posted a number of [[http://www.imperial-library.info/content/obscure-texts "obscure texts"]] on the forums which don't appear in-game but are generally accepted as canon (or at least as canon in-universe texts).
* WreakingHavok: ''Oblivion''.
* {{Wutai}}: Though it's never shown in any of the games, Akavir, in at least architecture and art style, seems to be one with tiger people, snake people, monkey people and [[OneOfTheseThingsIsNotLikeTheOthers Ice Demons]] that are apparently the origin of the Katana style blades in the various games. Bizarrely the ''Redguards'' (who look like Earth Humans of African descent and have a civilization reminiscent of the Middle East) had a samurai-esque class (Sword singers) that at one point had the ownership of swords restricted to them (with the really skilled even having the title "Sword Saint") on their original homeland of Yokuda (which [[UnreliableNarrator may]] have been destroyed by rogue sword saints splitting an atom with their swords).
* YouAllMeetInACell: All the games in the main series, with the exception of ''Daggerfall'', start with the player character as a prisoner. In ''Skyrim'', you are about to be executed when [[VillainousRescue a dragon shows up]].
* You CantArgueWithElves and ScrewYouElves: Because of the way the story is delivered, it could go either way. Watch for FanDumb if you say one or the other, because the other side will come down on you.
** Considering the actions of the Thalmor in ''Skyrim'', many players are taking joy in attacking Altmer on sight.
* YourSoulIsMine: Part of the enchanting system.
* YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters: Some Daedra are generally seen as 'good' (for example, Azura), some are generally seen as 'bad' (for example, Mehrunes Dagon). The difference lies mainly in how compatible their specific BlueAndOrangeMorality is with the survival and prosperity of man and mer civilization.
** An obvious example in ''Skyrim'', what with the Empire viewing the Stormcloaks as vicious extremists and their leader Ulfric as a dishonorable kingslayer. The Stormcloak supporters see Ulfric as a hero, defending the Nord way of life and deserving to rule Skyrim.
*** There's also the Forsworn, who the Nords think of as wild madmen but who see themselves as fighting for the freedom of the Reach.

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