Created By: LOAD on November 4, 2011 Last Edited By: LOAD on September 23, 2015

Predator Blood Lust

A predator seems more interested in killing than actually eating

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Carnivores aren't that bad in real life. Everything needs to eat to survive, and they just so happen to need to eat meat. But try telling that to fictionland. Here, predators kill to kill and hunt to hunt. A lion sees a herd of zebra? Slaughter them all, but don't eat any(or only eat a couple bites of each). A T. rex sees some raptors? Pick them up, bite, let go.

See also Super-Persistent Predator where a predator seems very picky about it wants to eat.

Film
  • The raptor-type dinosaur pack from the CGI King Kong seem more interested in chasing down anything that moves than in stopping to eat the brontosaurs they'd already killed.
  • The monsters in Deep Rising supposedly fed on liquified human remains, but really seemed much more interested in fucking around with the protagonists and generally being bastards than what you might expect from a carnivorous invertebrate.

Live Action
  • In Dinosaur Revolution the Torvosaurus kills an entire herd of stegosaurs(genus needed) and only appeared to have taken a bite out of each.
Community Feedback Replies: 20
  • November 4, 2011
    Lumpenprole
    True to life; predators such as weasels and foxes used to be infamous for getting into chicken coops and killing every bird inside. Coyotes will kill domestic cats and dogs simply out of territoriality. Sharks are known to go into "feeding frenzies" where they'll bite anything and everything.
  • November 4, 2011
    fulltimeD
    The monsters in Deep Rising supposedly fed on liquified human remains, but really seemed much more interested in fucking around with the protagonists and generally being bastards than what you might expect from a carnivorous invertebrate.
  • November 4, 2011
    LOAD
    Dinosaur Revolution the Torvosaurus kills an entire herd of stegosaurs(don't recall the genus at the moment) and only appeared to have taken a bite out of each.
  • November 5, 2011
    SharleeD
    The raptor-type dinosaur pack from the CGI King Kong seem more interested in chasing down anything that moves than in stopping to eat the brontosaurs they'd already killed.

    In a Truth In Television example, Ron and Julie, captive-bred tiger siblings, were trained to hunt prey for themselves, in hopes that a species dying out in Asia might be preserved on a secure reserve in Africa. Upon reaching adulthood, they got so caught up in the excitement of a hunt that they killed several antelope, one after another, never stopping to eat.

    Note that the "T. rex picks up raptor but doesn't eat it" scenario may well have been justified, as predators often refrain from eating smaller carnivores they've killed out of territorial imperative. Leaving the carcass of a slain rival predator lying around may warn others like it to stay off the killer's turf, or else.
  • November 5, 2011
    Tambov333
    Also to note that in all the Real Life examples, the prey are packed together in a small place, unable to scatter. From the predator's POV, that becomes "Die, die, die already! Oops, where did all the meat come from?"
  • November 10, 2011
    pcw2727
    Very common in giant reptile monster movies

    Anaconda has a snake relentlessly pursuing a boat in order to engulf all of its passengers despite the fact that a single human should have left it fed for a month.

    The same is true of most of the giant Gator movies. In one example (I wanna say lake placid but can't remember) the gator actually pursued the cast for miles after they left the water.

    Pretty much any movie that shows a cold blooded animal eating more then a person a week is falling prey (pun) to this trope.

    Averted in the first two Jurassic Park films it is openly stated by Dr. Grant that the dinosaurs are just animals, not monsters and for the most part they behave as such. In The Lost World they directly mention that the T-Rex will leave them alone for a while after it eats someone.
  • November 23, 2011
    TBeholder
    ^^ Except feeding frenzies. Which is a routine of many predators much larger than their prey -- eat until too full to catch anything, rest until really hungry, repeat.
  • November 24, 2011
    Tambov333
    ^Except I just desribed exactly what feeding frenzies are about.
  • January 10, 2012
    LOAD
    bump
  • January 10, 2012
    Ryuuma
    Almost all the Super Persistant Predator type. Actually this could be a good justification for it. Also, in Barbara Hambly's Sunwolf books, the demons of Wenshar can't actually eat or physically feed, but they're addicted to pain and fear, which push them to tear apart, kill and maim humans and animals alike.
  • August 7, 2012
    LOAD
  • August 7, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    Also, Real Life example: domestic cats that are allowed outside tend to hunt, even if they are well-fed.
  • August 7, 2012
    JonnyB
    The large ice creature in Star Trek killed the large-but-not-quite-so-large creature that was chasing Kirk - but inexplicably turned to try to chase scrawny little Kirk down instead of feasting on the large carcass it already had killed.
  • October 5, 2012
    LOAD
    Bump.
  • October 5, 2012
    elaphe26
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surplus_killing Wolves, Orcas, Spiders and other wild animals in their natural habitat do this as well. It's well documented in Real Life.
  • October 6, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    In D&D leucrottas are infamous for this. They have all the predatory instincts of an animal but unfortunatelly they are naturally evil and smart enough to actually enjoy the kill. Even druids will try to kill them on sight as they are actually worse to the environment than humans.
  • October 6, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    Also in D&D, demons. The Abyss suffers from a bad case of More Predators Than Prey but still remains a "stable ecosystem" because most of its inhabitants don't need to eat at all - they hunt each other for the pleasure of tearing living creatures with their teeth.
  • July 15, 2014
    JesseMB27
    Web Original
    • An episode of the Fine brother's React series, "Youtubers react to 'Bunnies can fly...Proof!'", subverts the mentality of Carnivores are Bastards. After the Youtube video makers featured have watched a video of a rehabilitated wild rabbit set free only to be swiftly taken by a hawk, Harley Morenstein mentions that for those who like all animals, including predatory ones, that some have to eat prey animals to survive, to which is labeled as "Harsh, but Truth".
  • July 15, 2014
    Morgenthaler
    Contrast Non Malicious Monster. Compare Blood Knight, Sadist.

    Anaconda is very blatant about this, claiming that Anacondas enjoy the thrill of the hunt so much that they regurgitate their prey just to hunt and kill more even more.

    Jurassic Park plays this straight with the raptors and the spinosaurus, both of which toy with their prey for kicks.

    The Blob: The Blob in the 80s version is presented as an intelligent predator which likes to lay traps for its victims, or taunt others by holding up partially devoured ones.
  • September 23, 2015
    satostari
    Also from King Kong: The T-Rexes. One actually has a dead lizard which must weigh several hundred pounds IN ITS MOUTH, but drops it to chase down 120-pound Ann Darrow.

    Also, the Rexes continue to go after Ann even after Kong begins defending her. Predators don't do that unless they're starving. The risk is too great-that's why lions wait for the one slow antelope.

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