Created By: Cuchulainn on December 10, 2011

Gazpacho Soup Gaffe

Person complains about the state of something, not realizing that's the way it's supposed to be.

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The Trope Namer is Red Dwarf, where Rimmer is haunted by an incident where he sent gazpacho soup back to be heated up, not realizing it's supposed to be served ice cold.
Community Feedback Replies: 54
  • December 10, 2011
    SeanMurrayI
  • December 10, 2011
    AaronAAardvark
    If I had to guess what this was about from the name, I would've thought the gaff involved confusing "Gazpacho" and "Gestapo".
  • December 10, 2011
    Bisected8
  • December 10, 2011
    JonnyB
    Happens in Batman Returns. Alfred serves Bruce Wayne vichyssoise, and he complains it's cold.
  • December 10, 2011
    Cuchulainn
    AaronAAardvark- You just made that up.
    Bisected8- Way too vague.
  • December 10, 2011
    AaronAAardvark
    Actually, I've seen it occur before in one of the entries in this book. Apparently, one student wrote in a paper that people were rounded up into Nazi concentration camps by the "Gazpacho".

    Even if I did make it up, this name would still be terrible.
  • December 10, 2011
    Ryusui
    Pick a common gag and name it after that. Like, in this case, My Gazpacho Is Cold. (Not to be confused with My Hovercraft Is Full Of Eels.)

    You might want to pick something that's easier to spell than "gazpacho" if you don't want a bunch of red links, of course.
  • December 10, 2011
    Generality
    I've seen characters humourously reacting to a dish that is served on fire (usually by finding a fire extinguisher), but I can't name any concrete examples.
  • December 10, 2011
    Freezer
    Seen It A Million Times in a variant: someone complains that the fish on/in their sushi is raw.
  • December 10, 2011
    Freezer
    See also: Fee Fi Faux Pas.
  • December 10, 2011
    Duncan
    In Witches Abroad, Granny Weatherwax is upset when the cook sets her Crepe Suzette on fire, and Nanny Ogg reports that (other) cooks got upset when she wanted her Steak Tartare well-done.
  • December 10, 2011
    Nocturna
    For a name, maybe something along the lines of Complaining About The Raw Sushi?
  • December 10, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    Gourmet Unfamiliarity Gaffe

    Includes also:

    • Knowing Escargot is a fancy-schmancy French dish, but being freaked out when served a plate of snails.
  • December 10, 2011
    abk0100
    Gazpacho is a good name. It seems like half the time this trope is used, Gazpacho is involved. I don't think the site needs to be dumbed down for the people who think that Gazpacho has something to do with Nazis. On the other hand, I guess sushi would work just as well.

    There's also the common invokation (or inversion?) of this trope. Someone points out a totally valid problem with their food, and the waiter responds with "Actually, that dish is supposed to be burnt and taste bad. That's how people with refined pallets like it." I'm sure Fawlty Towers did that once or twice, but I can't remember what the specific instance was.
  • December 10, 2011
    SeanMurrayI
  • December 10, 2011
    foxley
    Can cross over with Dinner Order Flub.
  • December 10, 2011
    BlackDragon
    Popped up briefly in Valkyrie Profile, near the beginning when Arngrim has a meeting with a thinly-disguised Princess Jelanda at a fancy local-equivalent-of-japanese Restaurant, and she winds up flipping out over several of the dishes, including the raw sushi and the Natto.

    Not that I blame her, mind. I mean, have you ever taken a close look at some Natto? That stuff is NASTY! >.<
  • December 10, 2011
    Dawnwing
    How about My Sushi Is Raw? That way, I think a lot more people would guess what the trope's about based on the name - after all, the name is all you see in an index. Sushi is a lot more widely known than Gazpacho, I would think.
  • December 10, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
  • December 11, 2011
    Cuchulainn
    Also, I'm sure people have complained about their Sake being warm.
  • December 11, 2011
    TheChainMan
    There's a Penny Arcade comic mocking critics of Enchanted Arms who complained about doing that all RPG do.
  • December 11, 2011
    randomsurfer
    In The Jerk the eponymous Jerk takes his girl to a French restaurant. First he complains about the wine (a 1966 Bordeaux), demanding "fresh" wine instead. Then he complains about the snails on his date's plate (escargot) - it's bad enough that they can't keep snails out of the food, but there are so many you can't even see the food.
  • December 11, 2011
    Ryusui
  • December 11, 2011
    TwinBird
    Nothing that sounds like dialogue. And it's specific enough it could be misleading.
  • December 12, 2011
    Frank75
    Seconding Complaining About The Raw Sushi.
  • December 12, 2011
    Stratadrake
    Still too specific. Avoid (like the plague) naming broad tropes after specific examples of themselves.
  • December 12, 2011
    PDL
    Does a character mistaking a finger bowl for soup count?
  • December 13, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    I'm thinking Archie Bunker made a similar complaint about vichyssoise. Admittedly, it's been a while since I saw the show.
  • December 14, 2011
    abk0100
    Here's that penny arcade comic: http://penny-arcade.com/comic/2006/09/06
  • December 14, 2011
    Debatra
    Requesting clarification: is this trope specifically about food, or is it for any situation where someone unknowingly complains about something being as it should be?
  • January 14, 2016
    MentalMouse42
    Another real-world example via "Not Always Right": http://notalwaysright.com/tip-of-the-entree-iceberg/27669 . This one features a cold meat entree called potjevleesch (described fully at Wikipedia).

    For the name, I tried searching for it as "Gazpacho Incident" (parallel to Noodle Incident), and was surprised not to find it.
  • January 14, 2016
    MentalMouse42
    More responses to prior comments:

    Stratadrake: In this case, the specific example is so common and widely recognized, I'd say it's reasonable to name it after the case.

    Debatra: I'd say the "usual" context would be food; if Bisected8's Mistaken For Wrong or Misplaced Criticism actually had trope articles (and why isn't there something in that vein? It does seem a natural trope...), then Gazpacho Incident would be its sub-trope for food-specific cases.
  • January 14, 2016
    DAN004
    Please name this with simple English.

    I like breadth so Mistaken For Wrong gets my vote.
  • January 15, 2016
    randomsurfer
    Big Night: In the opening scene a couple is at the restaurant. Secondo comes over to ask how everything is and they say it's fine, but she wants a side order of spaghetti and meatballs to go with her meal. Secondo tries to explain that in the risotto dish she ordered the rice is already a starch, and having spaghetti with it would be gastronomically redundant. She says that's fine, she just wants a plate of spaghetti and meatballs to go with her meal.
  • January 15, 2016
    zoop
    My 2 cents: 1) Mistaken For Wrong is probably the best name, and 2) make it clear from the description that it's not only about food, and not only about complaining. For example, if a character points out that the tires on a race car are too smooth. They're not complaining, just pointing out something they believe to be a mistake.
  • January 15, 2016
    69BookWorM69
    I've seen this a lot with vichyssoise. I think there's one in Murdoch Mysteries between William and Julia. It's a bit of a class thing, since she's a doctor's daughter and from a wealthy family (well-travelled, speaks French and is familiar with French cuisine, etc.) and he is from humbler origins. I'll look it up and write a proper example when I have time.

    Perhaps the description should make it clear what's going on in terms of a character's unfamiliarity? It's usually some combination of lack of experience or unfamiliarity that may be explained by socio-economic factors.
  • January 15, 2016
    robinjohnson
    I'll third Complaining About The Raw Sushi, although "My Sushi Is Raw" is plainly better, grumble grumble.
  • January 15, 2016
    zoop
    If a person does this all the time, they are a Know Nothing Know It All.
  • January 15, 2016
    Skylite
    "My Sushi is Raw" sounds like Dialogue.

    And I think Dan meant brevity rather than breadth?

    Also this trope has a bit of Snobs Versus Slobs about it because other than sushi, which has gone pretty mainstream, the majority of these dishes are still high end five-star restaurant fare. Also mentioned above when pointing out the unfamiliarity is due to socioeconomic factors.

    so Refined Palate Problem might also work because Complaining About The Raw Sushi is unwieldy long to me.

    Mistaken For Wrong is brief enough but not clear enough in my opinion.

  • January 15, 2016
    StarSword
    ^Okay, seriously, screw "it sounds like dialogue" as a name objection. The problem with Stock Phrases as trope titles had to do with people taking a trope named after a common phrase and thinking the trope was people using the phrase (e.g. thinking You Have Failed Me was "Alice says 'you have failed me'" rather than "Alice kills Bob for failing"). I can't think of one single solitary instance of a character saying the line My Sushi Is Raw, never mind enough times for it to be a common phrase. A Stock Phrase kinda sorta has to be, you know, stock.

    Rant dealt with, the problem I have with any variant of the sushi name is that it makes it seem like this is only to do with food, as can be seen in the comments debating over what food to use instead of looking at the far-broader Laconic. Doesnt Realize Its Correct, maybe?
  • January 15, 2016
    StarSword
    Also, how in the Nine Hells did this get two hats already? It's one line about a trope namer; that is nowhere near launch-ready.
  • January 15, 2016
    Skylite
    I don't disagree, Star Sword, but my understanding was that trope titles shouldn't sound like dialogue because they're too easily mistaken for stock phrases.
  • January 15, 2016
    DAN004
    That, and it has happened with some tropes before. Some dialogue-sounding non-Stock Phrase tropes got renamed because of misuse, because of the damn titles.

    Yes, Skylite, breadth. Broadness. It doesn't have to be food, or complaining. (Brevity too, thanks.)

    Again, either Mistaken For Wrong or Doesnt Realize Its Correct gets my vote.

    Reality Is Unrealistic and Aluminum Christmas Trees in particular are really related here, but I can't word it.
  • January 16, 2016
    MetaFour
    Intended Audience Reaction is also related. Any time the creator wants the audience to react negatively to a character or event, it's guaranteed that some proportion of the audience will think the creator was aiming for a positive reaction but screwed up.
  • January 16, 2016
    zoop
    Also related to Eskimos Arent Real.
  • January 17, 2016
    AgProv
    Mike Harding did stand-up comedy routines about eating unfamiliar food. He built one routine on Indian restaurants: bemoaning those big white fluffy chappatis they serve. They look good and they're steaming hot but they're incredibly chewy, you're there for ages. note 
    • Harding's other foray into sophisticated food was Posh Parties, in which he taks about being the in-vogue working-class act invited to sophisticated parties in places like Alderley Edge and Wilmslow and Bramhall, where there are wunches of bankers. Harding wilfully pretended to misunderstand;
    (On seeing olives for the first time): Don't eat them little green grapes with the red middles. Whatever you do. Sour as buggery! Must have spat out two dozen looking for a good 'un...
    On caviare) And the jam. The blackcurrant jam. That's a trap that is. Spread it on your bread, it tastes like bloody fish! What sort of blackcurrant jam is that?
  • January 18, 2016
    randomsurfer
    In Ray Stevens' song "Gourmet Restaurant" the narrator complains that the vichhyssois and gaspacho soups are both cold, the Steak Tartare is underdone, and the Cherries Jubilee is on fire. He's also not too sure about the soup du jour, he hears they change that every day.
    Now I can understand chocolate eggs, and chocolate bunny rabbits, but a chocolate moose? Ain't never gonna catch on...
  • January 18, 2016
    DAN004
    ^ Maybe he meant chocolate mousse.
  • January 18, 2016
    BKelly95
    If this is no longer specifically about food:

    Live Action Television
    • At one point of the Star Trek The Next Generation episode "Relics" (where the Enterprise-D meets Scotty from the Original Series), Scotty takes a look around Engineering and points out what he thinks are problems. Geordi is quick to tell him that's the way they're supposed to be now. For example: he tells them that their dilithium crystals are cracking and Geordi tells him they're supposed to be cracked.
  • January 19, 2016
    Skylite
    Dan: the play on words between the sound-alike of moose (animal) and mousse (dessert) is the point of the joke in the Ray Stevens song.
  • January 19, 2016
    DAN004
    ^ Yay I get it right. :D
  • January 19, 2016
    DAN004
    Yo, this sure needs hell of alotta work. If nobody's gonna volunteer, I'd grab this.
  • January 19, 2016
    randomsurfer
    ^x5@Dan: I wasn't explaining the joke; but yeah. See Fun With Homophones.
  • January 19, 2016
    BreadBull
    I know dialogue titles are discouraged but I really think Its Supposed To Be Like That is a nice one.

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