Created By: Ghilz on January 21, 2012 Last Edited By: StarSword on June 29, 2013

Omniscient Source Of Answers

Something our character regularly consult to get answers to their questions.

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Trope

From this thread. Super Trope to Akashic Records, Magical Database (Rename Pending), Great Big Book of Everything, Database Of The Supernatural (Currently in YKTTW), Voice with an Internet Connection and (sometimes) Mission Control.

Needs a Better Description. Needs a Better Title.

The Omniscient Source Of Answers is something our characters regularly visit to get some information. On police procedural, this can be the various databases that lets them identify clues and find the suspect. It can be a figure the character turns towards to figure out what to do.

Examples:

  • The Great Dragon in Merlin, especially in the first two seasons mostly existed to tell Merlin what's going on and what he should be doing to resolve the plot. Gaius has taken over the "explaining the threat of the week is" duties in more recent seasons.
  • The Batcomputer for Batman is pretty much his one stop shop for whatever plot-relevant information he might need.
  • Giles from Buffy the Vampire Slayer often became this.
Community Feedback Replies: 22
  • February 8, 2012
    chicagomel
    Giles on Buffy The Vampire Slayer might fall into this.
  • February 8, 2012
    elwoz
    Voice With An Internet Connection is another subtrope, and sometimes so is Mission Control.
  • February 10, 2012
    Unknown Troper
    The Wizard of Oz. The computer in Spielberg's A.I.
  • February 11, 2012
    Catbert
    If this is going to be a supertrope, you need to create an indexed list of the subtropes within the body of the description.
  • February 11, 2012
    JoeG
    • Fraggle Rock: The Fraggles, Doozers, and Gorgs all agreed that Margery the Trash Heap was the person to go to for advice or information on any subject.
    • Police Squad: Johnny the shoeshine boy was Lt. Drebin's favorite snitch, who always had information about the Mystery Of The Week (for a price). After Drebin got his information, we always saw Johnny giving someone else information for money, for instance explaining to a priest about life after death.
  • June 5, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Bump to top. Action needed.
  • June 5, 2013
    arbiter099
    Encyclopedia Exposita seems related.
  • June 5, 2013
    robinjohnson
  • June 6, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • Phineas J Whoopee is the go-to guy for Tennessee Tuxedo And His Tales. Whoopee's three-dimensional blackboard is a huge help in illustrating principles of physics.

    Literature
    • Baker Street legend Sherlock Holmes was routinely sought out by persons in distress.
    • Boy detective Encyclopedia Brown usually solves a mystery in only two or three strips.
  • June 6, 2013
    Prfnoff
    Knowledge Broker looks like another subtrope.
  • June 6, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Film

    • Mr. Universe in Serenity was a recluse who accessed and monitored data and communications from around the 'Verse and was a resource Malcolm could call on for hard-to-obtain information.

    Live-Action TV

    • On The X Files, Agents Mulder and/or Scully would often consult with "the Lone Gunmen", a group of three hackers and tech afficionadoes who were heavily into U.F.O. and conspiracy lore, if they needed to obtain information via hacking, have an artifact analyzed, or reference their research.
  • June 6, 2013
    Tokoz
    Good Magician Humphrey's book in the Xanth novels can answer literally any question, despite having apparently no inherent magic, and never being updated. Humphrey, the author, apparently needs the massive volume because he's old and forgetful.
  • June 6, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Live-Action TV

    The Great Machine on Epsilon 3 (the planet which the Babylon 5 station orbited) had the capability to monitor signals from all over its region of the galaxy. Commander Ivanova used it to locate potential allies among the First Ones during the Shadow War, and while she was plugged into it she stumbled upon an old secure communication between Vice President Clark and Mr. Morden right before the Earthforce One explosion that killed President Santiago, which was key evidence that Clark was in on the assassination plot (episode "Voices Of Authority").

    (not sure if this counts because the Machine wasn't used routinely for information, just that one time as far as we're shown, but it also had other capabilities which the Babylon 5 heroes used--such as opening a temporal rift, or providing power to boost Voice of the Resistance transmissions all over Human space.)
  • June 7, 2013
    Chabal2
    Madame Luca in Dragon Quest VI directly tells you where you need to go next, down to "talk to everybody in town".
  • June 7, 2013
    TheHandle
    • Harry Potter has taught us that most of the difficult answers that will save your life can be found in the library. Failing that, ask a Professor. As long as it isn't the Defense Professor or Snape, they should have helpful intel.
  • June 7, 2013
    Chernoskill
    • In the The Matrix trilogy, the Neo visits the Oracle to get answers about his destiny.
  • June 25, 2013
    Chao
    The name is a bit unwieldy, how about "The Oracle"?
  • June 27, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Due to the tropes surrounding the Greek oracle, the word connotates prediction rather than knowledge.
  • June 27, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • Parodied during DePatie-Freleng's The Ant And The Aardvark cartoon "Technology, Phooey," which has the aardvark assemble a sentient machine to advice him on how to catch an ant. When all the machine's ideas fail, the aardvark grumbles, " ... for a computer, you stink!" The machine replies, "Who said I was a computer? I'm an automatic pop-up toaster. And I'll prove it." The aardvark gets pelted with a pile of toast.
  • June 28, 2013
    Arivne
    This character may also be a Mr Exposition or (if a computer) an Expositron 9000.

    In a horror movie, they could be a Haunted House Historian.
  • June 28, 2013
    Clevomon
  • June 29, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    ^ Needs context. It actually depends on the medium:
    • In the Pokemon anime, the Pokedex is the digital encyclopedia with all public knowledge of all species. Trainers occasionally need to get updated hardware/software, and sometimes the only information available is "no data available." In the games, it's the player's goal to fill up the Pokedex by capturing as many species as possible.
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