Created By: Jbadder on May 31, 2012 Last Edited By: Jbadder on August 14, 2015
Troped

Hyper-prefix-ation

Where some words just can\'t be said by a character without adding a specific prefix or suffix to it.

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Trope
So a character wants to distinguish themselves from the rest of the pack. Catch Phrases are always a good way, since you don't need to see them in order to know who they are. But a single catch phrase is so boring.

The answer: just add a specific prefix/suffix onto words.

In some cases, they'll create new words with new meanings this way, but more often than not they're just the same word with that prefix/suffix tacked on, and no definition changes. Sometimes, also, other characters may start using these words as well, turning them into, in a manner, Borrowed Catchphrases or Share Phrases.

The ultimate of this trope is, unsurprisingly, McDonalds, who use their 'Mc' prefix on almost everything they sell. In their case, not only have their words made the general vernacular, but also their naming habits, as The Other Wiki has proven.

A Sub-Trope of Catch Phrase. If used often enough, Hyper-prefix-ation may become involuntary, ultimately turning into a Verbal Tic.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Naruto: The title character adds '-ettebayo' to the end of some words, and to the last word of just about every other sentence. The only explanation as to why is because his mom who died about an hour after he was born did the same thing with '-ettebane'

Live Action Television
  • Happy Days: Fonzie sometimes uses the suffix "-amundo" for emphasis: correctamundo, exactamundo, etc. When he was a Rogue Juror he even voted "not guiltyamundo."
  • Campier installments of the Batman franchise tend to prefix "bat" onto anything having to do with Batman. Examples include the phrase "same bat time, same bat channel", and the bat credit card.
  • Saturday Night Live: Adam Sandler's Opera Man from the early 90's would sing his commentary in an exaggerated Italian accent by adding "a" or "o" to the end of many of his words. (An example (from Wikipedia): About the LA Riots - "La Chiefa Policia, no dispatcha gendarme/ morono, no respondo/ no excusa, bagga doucha!")
  • Kenan & Kel: Throughout most of the first season, and some of the second, Chris had the habit of adding an extra preffix to his preterites, usually a "be" or "buh" sound, such as:
    "Kel, you be-bruised my bananas!"
    "How could you buh-lose a lottery ticket?"

Music
  • Snoop Dogg attaches '-izzle' to a lot of his words, although a fair bit of those words have half of them removed, e.g. "fo' shizzle" for "for sure".

Video Games
  • Final Fantasy X-2: According to Rikku's brother, Brother, she has a habit of doing this with human words, and even chides her for it. Most notably, her inclusion of, "iffic", to the word "disaster"; resulting in "disasteriffic".
  • King of Fighters: Yuri Sakazaki has a habit of ending nearly all of her sentences, and certain words, with "-tchi". It was originally a schtick her voice actress, Kaori Horie, came up with, which stuck and has since become a regular part of her character's speech pattern.

Western Animation
  • Total Drama Island Season 4: Revenge of the Island had Lightning, whose big thing was words starting with "Sha-" (including Shazam).
  • In Captain N: The Game Master, Kid Icarus (who should have been named Pit) tended to tack "-icus" on the end of words.
  • Due to the fact that he often speaks with a slight Speech Impediment (not unlike that of a 5-year-old), Mr. Bogus will often use the word "mondo" before adding the letter 'o' at the end of a word used after it in his sentences. Examples include "Mondo coolo", "Mondo safe-o", etc.
  • The Simpsons has two, by two different characters:
    • Homeric ma-infixation is an interesting application of Hyper-prefix-ation in that the particle "-ma-" is an infix (it is put in the middle of a word), producing words like saxomaphone and babamabushka. Homer, as you can guess, uses it a lot.
    • Flanders also adds "-diddly" to a few of his words.
  • Similar to the Homer Simpson example, Yogi Bear frequently calls picnic baskets "pic-a-nic baskets".

Other
  • In Dwarf Fortress forums, it's fairly common for players to refer to their dwarves as "Urist Mc(adjective or profession)". As in "Urist McMiner", "Urist McSpeardwarf", or "Urist McCannonfodder".

Real Life
Community Feedback Replies: 40
  • May 31, 2012
    Dawnwing
  • June 1, 2012
    Jbadder
    @Dawnwing: Included.
  • June 1, 2012
    reub2000
  • June 1, 2012
    azul120
  • June 1, 2012
    JonnyB
    Snoop Dogg seems to need to attach -izzle to everything. (Oftem throwing out the rest of the word except for the first consonant.)
  • June 1, 2012
    Alvin
    In Real Life, I've noticed how people aren't generally described as 'cuckoo' any more but 'cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs'.
  • June 1, 2012
    MiinU

    Video games

    • Final Fantasy X-2: According to Rikku's brother, Brother, she has a habit of doing this with human words, and even chides her for it. Most notably, her inclusion of, "iffic", to the word "disaster"; resulting in "disasteriffic".
  • June 1, 2012
    Jbadder
    @MiinU & JonnyB: Added both your suggestions.
  • June 1, 2012
    KTera
    • In Dwarf Fortress forums, it's fairly common for players to refer to their dwarves as "Urist Mc(adjective or profession)". As in "Urist McMiner", "Urist McSpeardwarf", or "Urist McCannonfodder".
  • June 1, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Happy Days: Fonzie sometimes uses the suffix "-amundo" for emphasis: correctamundo, exactamundo, etc. When he was a Rogue Juror he even voted "not guiltyamundo."
  • June 1, 2012
    McKathlin
    • Campier installments of the Batman franchise tend to prefix "bat" onto anything having to do with Batman. Examples include the phrase "same bat time, same bat channel", and the bat credit card.
  • June 1, 2012
    NightNymph
    • Saturday Night Live: Adam Sandler's Opera Man from the early 90's would sing his commentary in an exaggerated Italian accent by adding "a" or "o" to the end of many of his words. (An example (from Wikipedia): About the LA Riots - "La Chiefa Policia, no dispatcha gendarme/ morono, no respondo/ no excusa, bagga doucha!")
  • June 1, 2012
    Jbadder
    @KTera, randomsurfer, McKathlin, NightNymph: Added your examples.
  • June 1, 2012
    elwoz
    The Mc- prefix is often used in Real Life to indicate something that is either a bit too brand-name (same idea as Trade Snark), a bit too bland, unappetizing, or mass-produced (playing on Mc Donalds' reputation for bland, unappetizing, mass-produced food), or both. I'm a little worried about the name being too specific for the trope you have in mind.
  • June 1, 2012
    NimmerStill
    Assuming this isn't covered somewhere else, there's "Homeric ma-infixation": Saxomaphone, viomalin, oboemaboe, tubamaba, babamabushka.
  • June 1, 2012
    CaveCat
    • Due to the fact that he often speaks with a slight Speech Impediment (not unlike that of a 5-year-old), Mr Bogus will often use the word "mondo" before adding the letter 'o' at the end of a word used after it in his sentences. Examples include "Mondo coolo", "Mondo safe-o", etc.
  • June 1, 2012
    Jbadder
    @CaveCat, NimmerStill: Added.

    @elwoz: Well, the title was intended as a starting point. Given that bit of information, it may also make the trope sound more like a cliche (which I don't think it is). So yeah, a better title may be required. I'll tag it and see what everyone says.
  • June 1, 2012
    Generality
    How is this different from a Verbal Tic?
  • June 2, 2012
    Jbadder
    @Generality: A Verbal Tic is, as the article states, involuntary, whereas McVocab is done deliberately and consciously. That said, McVocab can lead to the Verbal Tic if done often enough.
  • June 2, 2012
    randomsurfer
    In Moscow On The Hudson Vladimir gets a job at McDonalds and gets so caught up in the Mc- prefix he says to someone, "come back McSoon."
  • June 2, 2012
    Jbadder
    @randomsurfer: That sounds more like a Verbal Tic.
  • June 3, 2012
    reub2000
    • (Annoyed Grunt) is this in The Simpsons episode tittles. Sometimes spelled out as (Annoyed Grunt) in titles like E-I-E-I-(Annoyed Grunt), other time written as D'oh in titles like D'oh-in in the Wind.
  • June 6, 2012
    Jbadder
    @reub2000: That's not even a prefix, suffix or infix.
  • June 8, 2012
    DarkPrince
    Scooby Doo: Scooby-snacks anyone?
  • June 8, 2012
    CaveCat
    @Dark Prince: Not this trope.
  • June 8, 2012
    Alvin
    I thought I added this but don't see it. In The Simpsons Ned Flanders has sopmething I can't describe, frequently adding '-diddly' to the end of words, but more than that.
  • June 10, 2012
    Jbadder
    @Alvin: I'll add it; if you find more information, just add it here.
  • January 22, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Live Action TV
    • Kenan And Kel: Throughout most of the first season, and some of the second, Chris had the habit of adding an extra preffix to his preterites, usually a "be" or "buh" sound, such as:
      "Kel, you be-bruised my bananas!"
      "How could you buh-lose a lottery ticket?"
  • January 22, 2013
    marcoasalazarm
    Dunno if it would fit here, but on NCIS, Di Nozzo just LOVES to give Mc Gee one-shot 'Mc(whatever)' funny names. It just bounces back and forth between that and 'Probie' when he wants to use a nickname.
  • January 22, 2013
    StarSword
    ^That's The Nicknamer or something similar. He doesn't do this with anyone else.
  • January 22, 2013
    marcoasalazarm
    Yeah, but he does it so often (as in once an episode, at least) that it's surprising someone hasn't at least lampshaded it.
  • January 23, 2013
    Larkmarn
    So... how is this different than Verbal Tic? Verbal Tic isn't necessarily involuntary, and most of these examples are listed there.
  • January 23, 2013
    Bisected8
    It seems to have enough examples to work as a subtrope.

    It does need a better name though.
  • January 23, 2013
    CaveCat
    Maybe Vocabularical Tic as a better name?
  • January 23, 2013
    Bisected8
    What about Hyper-prefix-ation? To serve as a self demonstrating example.
  • January 23, 2013
    acrobox
    The Smurfs: 'Smurf' is a universal word that can be used as any part of speech (noun, adjective etc.), can replace words, or be used as a suffix or prefix.
  • January 23, 2013
    acrobox
    Naruto The title character adds '-ettebayo' to the end of some words, and to the last word of just about every other sentence. The only explanation as to why is because his mom who died about an hour after he was born did the same thing with '-ettebane'
  • January 24, 2013
    NESBoy
    • Similar to the Homer Simpson example, Yogi Bear frequently calls picnic baskets "pic-a-nic baskets".
  • January 24, 2013
    MiinU

    Video games

  • August 14, 2015
    Jbadder
    I've had this open for a while (so I'm aware this will constitute a long-dead bump), and I'm almost keen to hat this myself (at least, were it not or the fact that it hasn't been significantly edited in three years, and it'd come across as vain if I do). I like the new title, plus it seems to have plenty of examples. Would it be wrong of me to hat it? (I'm guessing someone will tell me there's a reason why it's been left for dead for so long.)

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=htnyibpcr6pyherafw0l1qie&trope=Hyperprefixation