Created By: ABNDT on October 14, 2011

Magneto was his name-o

Creating a name by tacking the letter "O" onto a pre-existing word

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Trope
Needs a Better Title

Need a code name? Just pick a word appropriate to your abilities or temperament, add "O" to the end (or replace the end if that sounds better), and you're ready to go! This naming convention shows up a lot among superheroes.

Note that the rest of the character's name must be a significant word or variant of such. Rambo's name might end in O, but he is not an example of this trope.

Examples:

Community Feedback Replies: 28
  • October 14, 2011
    KingZeal
    "Magneto" is an actual word. Likewise, electro- and cerebro- are accepted scientific prefixes.

    • Metamorpho, plays this trope straight, however.
  • October 14, 2011
    UglyShirts
    Lion-O from Thundercats would probably fit.
  • October 14, 2011
    DameDesDouleurs
    In an episode of South Park, Cartman disguises himself as a robot named "AWESOM-O".
  • October 14, 2011
    Karalora
    Don't forget about Bizarro.
  • October 14, 2011
    wanderlustwarrior
    "Name-O Was His Name-O" would be a great title to me.

    Don't forget about Batzarro, either.
  • October 14, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Gosh, I read a short story not too long ago but I don't remember the name. It was about a low level super who wanted to be a hero but due to a combination of factors he had to be a villain. Amongst the factors was, IIRC, that the hero union wasn't accepting any new members, and that his name was [something]O, which is usually a villainous formulation.

  • October 14, 2011
    TonyG
    Freakazoid villain Invisibo, who got the name from Freakazoid because it sounded better than his real name (which escapes me at the moment).
  • October 14, 2011
    dyson88
    From DC we also have Computo, Chemo, Metallo and Starro.
  • October 14, 2011
    HiddenFacedMatt
    ^^^^ It would be preferable to the current one, but it does seem a little redundant.
  • October 14, 2011
    ChickInTheMoonlight
    Shouldn't this also include names with "a" at the end? I can't think of an exact example at the moment, but I know it happens fairly often (mainly as a female version of the trope).
  • October 14, 2011
    ChickInTheMoonlight
    If names ending in "a" work, there is Azula from Avatar: The Last Airbender. Azul is Spanish for "blue." Azula's fire-bending is colored blue, which also ties into her cold and fierce personality.
  • October 14, 2011
    foxley
    • The Marvel Universe also has Aiero, Chemistro, Elektro (a giant robot rather than the Spider Man villain), Mentallo, Obnoxio the Clown, and Pyro (although that is a recognised word element)>
    • The DCU also has Amazo, Prince Evillo, Mano, Titano, and Universo.
  • October 14, 2011
    JonnyB
    ^^^ I agree with the -a ending for females. (I think this is a legacy of Latin.)

    Not to be confused with (but compare) El Spanish O.
  • October 15, 2011
    LordGro
    As a title, I would prefer just "Name-o".
  • October 15, 2011
    DaibhidC
    • Justice League Europe once fought a Mad Artist called Deconstructo.
    • Another DCU one: Eclipso.
    • Lampshade Hanging in a Justice League Of America Annual backup story, in which Starro assembles the O-Squad.
      Starro:We villainous few share two common bonds -- The burning desire to enslave the Earth over the charred remains of the hated Justice League...
      ...and our names all end in "O".
  • October 15, 2011
    GreenMachine
    Speaking of Muto, I remember seeing an ad in a Nintendo Power a long time ago for a game titled Dr Muto. It was a Gamecube game, if I remember right.

    Edit: Obviously, it must have been a failure of a game, because it appears we don't have it. (I wouldn't have gotten it either way, because it was rated M, and I still feel uncomfortable with upper T rated games).
  • October 15, 2011
    Micah
    • The Marx Brothers, especially Harpo (who played the harp), and Chico (the chick-chaser). The origins of "Groucho", "Zeppo", and "Gummo" are less clear, but also seem to follow this trope.
  • October 15, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Groucho was grouchy and wore a grouch-bag, Gummo wore gum soled shoes, Zeppo was named after a famous chimp of similar name.
  • December 18, 2011
    Octagon8
    bump
  • December 18, 2011
    Micah
    ^^Unless it was because Groucho was named for the comic strip character of the same name, Gummo liked to act like a gumshoe detective, or "Zeppo" is a mutation of "Zeb" or "zeppelin". Like I said, less clear.
  • December 18, 2011
    GuesssWho
  • December 18, 2011
    randomsurfer
    The "was his" part of the proposed titles will get this shot down by Fast Eddie as "dialogy." Name O is nice and SPOONy.
  • December 18, 2011
    hevendor717
    There was a villain on The Tick named Destroyo.
  • December 19, 2011
    MidnightMan
  • December 20, 2011
    Met
    ^^According to George Burns and other sources, a zep was a zeppelin sandwich (like sub for submarine sandwich), Groucho was his personality, and Gummo was from gumshoes (sneakers).
  • December 20, 2011
    Grain
    I like Name O.
  • December 20, 2011
    TiggersAreGreat
    There is that song "Bingo was his Name-O", but it's hard to say if the dog's name is supposed to be Bing with "o" added at the end, or if it's Bingo, like the song says.

    Literature

    In Death series: The books Survivor In Death and Innocent In Death have little kids putting "o" at the end of words. This creates words like "crap-o", "what-o", and "lame-o". The implication is that kids do this to sound impressive.
  • December 21, 2011
    Sligh
    What about "Guyo" "Charactero" or "Persono" for titles?

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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=eux58kdxm39j4qthcse1ac9o