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First Person Movement
Moving in a video game in first person.


(permanent link) added: 2011-05-05 23:45:30 sponsor: DragonQuestZ (last reply: 2011-05-17 01:04:19)

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One of the best ways to avoid Camera Screw in a 3D video game is to put the camera on the eyes of the player character. That way the player controls where the camera goes, so if the player needs to see something, he/she can just turn the character that direction.

It's not perfect. Games can't intuitively turn the head independently of the body, so if you have to look to the side, you have to turn the whole body. And various limitations (both technical and practical) make the player not turn as fast as we can in Real Life, thus giving a "tank" feel to moving the character. Another issue is that in platforming, the view stays ahead when jumping, making it even harder to judge them. Some games get around this by having the view tilt down slightly when jumping.

While the earlier first person games allowed just turning, and walking forwards and backwards, recent games allow strafing, and looking up and down. The latter often uses Camera Centering.

Some games with mostly a third person view will go into first person when using certain weapons.

When done in games with vehicles, this view is referred to as the "cockpit view".

A Super Trope to First-Person Shooter (although actually a genre), Faux First Person 3D, First-Person Ghost.

Compare Always over the Shoulder (applying this movement to third person games), Jaws First Person Perspective.

Saving examples for another Sub-Trope I'm putting on ykttw, and then seeing what examples don't fit those. Otherwise this trope would be flooded with examples.
replies: 36

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