Created By: Zeyphr on January 14, 2014 Last Edited By: DoctorFluffy on May 6, 2014

G-Face

A character is subject to high speeds and has their face distorted.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Wanda: "Oh no! He's broken the Sound Barrier!
Cosmo: "And the squishy face barrier!"
—A Fairly Oddparents comic found in Nick Magazine.

As the laconic version states, this trope is when a character's face is distorted due to G-force/speed, like in "The Amazing World Of Gumball" where Gumball and Darwin are riding a fire extinguisher and their faces become distorted from the speed. Do we already have this trope?


Examples:

Anime and Manga

Film—Animated
  • Toy Story has Woody getting his face hilariously distorted by from riding a rocket-boosted RC car in the climax of the story.

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons: When Homer becomes an astronaut, during zero-g training his face morphs into Popeye's. During the actual shuttle launch Homer's face becomes that of Richard Nixon.
  • In the second act of the Mr. Bogus episode "Lights, Camera, Bogus", Bogus hitches a ride on a model spaceship that his younger cousin Brattus has boarded, before the spaceship then takes off all over the prop room. Bogus ends up getting his face distorted and stretched out due to the spaceship possibly travelling at Mach 3.
  • Occurs in Spongebob Squarepants episode "Rock Bottom" where his face distorts as the bus he's in plunges down the pit where Rock Bottom resides.
Community Feedback Replies: 31
  • January 14, 2014
    randomsurfer
    The Simpsons: When Homer becomes an astronaut, during zero-g training his face morphs into Popeye's.
  • January 14, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Anime and Manga
  • January 14, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    I can't think of it. Did you submit this to Lost And Found?

    Another example: "Sonic Rainboom", when Rainbow Dash pulls off the titular move to save Rarity.
  • January 14, 2014
    HellKillUsAll
    In the same Simpsons episode, Homer's face becomes that of Richard Nixon during the shuttle launch.

    Also happens to Pinky And The Brain in "Where No Mouse Has Gone Before".
  • January 14, 2014
    CaveCat
    Western Animation
    • In the second act of the Mr Bogus episode "Lights, Camera, Bogus", Bogus hitches a ride on a model spaceship that his younger cousin Brattus has boarded, before the spaceship then takes off all over the prop room. Bogus ends up getting his face distorted and stretched out due to the spaceship possibly travelling at Mach 3.
  • January 14, 2014
    DAN004
    Nah, I don't think we have this trope.

    • Occurs in Spongebob Squarepants episode "Rock Bottom" where his face distorts as the bus he's in plunges down the pit where Rock Bottom resides.
  • January 14, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    • Toy Story has Woody getting his face hilariously distorted by from riding a rocket-boosted RC car in the climax of the story.

    also G-Face is ambiguous, you know, G-Spot Face?

    how about G Force Face?
  • January 15, 2014
    Arivne
    The trope Centrifugal Farce covers the use of this trope in a centrifuge, but not other situations.

    "Characters subjected to the centrifuge will appear to be traveling at Ludicrous Speed, complete with comically flapping lips, eyeballs bugged out, and squashed faces."

    When this trope is launched, it should be mentioned on that page.
  • January 15, 2014
    Snicka
    ^^ Agreed. Let's call this G-Force Face. (By the way, do the guinea pigs in G Force ever have this happening to their face?)
  • January 15, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ AFAIK, no.
  • January 15, 2014
    Snicka
    ^ In that case, if the new name is indeed G-Force Face, the last sentence of the description should be: "Not To Be Confused With the face of any character in G Force. Or G Force Guardians Of Space."
  • March 11, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Any more examples?
  • March 12, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Updated draft with examples.
  • March 12, 2014
    TonyG
    Happens to Roger Rabbit in the short "Roller Coaster Rabbit", as the roller coaster makes his initial descent, his cheeks and eyelids flapping far behind his face.
  • March 12, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    This has actually happened a few times (in pseudo-real life) inTop Gear when the presenters have driven fast cars with the windscreen down.

    Probably also worth noting that the distortion is due to air resistance and not the G-force at all, though I still like the name.
  • March 12, 2014
    lavalyte
    This is often simulated by blowing compressed air into actors' faces.
  • March 13, 2014
    nitrokitty
    I feel like this overlaps with Centrifugal Farce.
  • March 13, 2014
    StrixObscuro
    Film - Live Action
    • One of the animated sequences in Tank Girl shows the titular girl experiencing an extremely exaggerated, full-body version of "g-face" while racing her new tank.
    • In Spies Like Us, the two main characters are subjected to a g-force simulator.

    Live-Action TV
    • In one episode of Home Improvement, Tim and Al undergo astronaut training, including a g-force simulator. Their faces get stuck in "g-face" mode for a few minutes afterwards.
  • March 14, 2014
    nitrokitty
    Centrifugal Farce covers this already.
  • March 14, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ that involves actual centrifuges. this one covers everything else. also, while they are both Comedy Tropes they are used for different things. this is for fast travel distorting people's faces Played For Laughs, that one is "centrifuge training machine used for humor/drama", as with the Moonraker example.
  • March 14, 2014
    DracMonster
  • March 14, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Is the sponsor still around?
  • May 3, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Bump.
  • May 5, 2014
    bitemytail
    Centrifugal Farce already has a couple examples that don't use a centrifuge (see the Sandlot example).

    Tropes Are Flexible.
  • May 5, 2014
    nitrokitty
    It says in the description of Centrifugal Farce that it covers more than just centrifuges, making this trope redundant. Motion To Discard.
  • May 5, 2014
    AgProv
    Howard Wolowitz, the world's most unlikely astronaut, in The Big Bang Theory when under training and going into space.
  • May 5, 2014
    MrL1193
    Even though Centrifugal Farce says it's supposed to cover scenarios like these, I just don't think it is doing or will do a very good job of it as it is. The basic premise of that trope seems to be more focused on the actual device, with the bit in the description about other scenarios tacked on almost as an afterthought. The description also doesn't mention that those "other scenarios" need not include spinning, which the name heavily implies is necessary. That is going to be a major obstacle to any development of the examples beyond spinning devices. (It's probably why the examples listed here aren't all on the Centrifugal Farce page already.)

    We probably could cover all these scenarios with just one trope, but if that one trope is going to be Centrifugal Farce, I think some repair work (mainly a better name and a less centrifuge-focused definition) will be needed.

    EDIT: Actually, upon further examination, I'm noticing that every single example on Centrifugal Farce includes spinning. Perhaps it would be better to leave Centrifugal Farce alone and add this as a separate (but closely related) trope that focuses on the characters rather than the device/situation and doesn't require spinning.
  • May 6, 2014
    bitemytail
    ^ Or we could not bloat TV Tropes with things that are The Same But More Specific.
  • May 6, 2014
    NESBoy
    • Happens to Marcel Pourseau the warthog during the downhill skiing event in Animalympics.
  • May 6, 2014
    MrL1193
    ^^Correct me if I'm wrong, but I would expect total overlap going one way between the tropes if this were actually a case of The Same But More Specific. What I'm actually seeing, however, is that you can have spinning without the funny face and you can have the funny face without spinning.

    Centrifugal Farce claims to cover "more than just centrifuges," but on closer inspection, I don't think that means "other ways a character can get a funny, distorted face." What it really means is "other devices that spin." (For instance, your Sandlot example is about a "fast spinning carnival ride.") The heart of the trope is the spinning; the character getting a funny face can be one of the effects, but that's not what the trope is actually about.
  • May 6, 2014
    Daefaroth
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=agtha4xaexi9uys6fewwc4zb