Created By: Aminatep on May 25, 2011 Last Edited By: Aminatep on September 1, 2013

Narrator Catchphrase

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Trope
I am still on the fence whether or not it's tropable.

A fairly specific type of catchphrase, where the narrator uses a specific phrase at various points throughout the story. Always overlaps with Author Catchphrase if the narrator is an Author Avatar.

Examples:

  • Ciaphas Cain's "If only had I known what was waiting here, I would probably [insert cowardly or suicidal action]" and many others.
    • Notably different from Author Catchphrases like "What is?", "frak", etc.
    • Amberly has a a share of Editor Catchphrases, too.
  • Lemony Snickett's "a word which here means"
  • Alcatraz Series - The series is full of them. For example, every book begins with "There I was..."
  • Powerpuff Girls:
    • "The city of Townsville!"
    • "Once again, the day is saved, thanks to... the Powerpuff Girls!"
In The Wheel of Time series, every book's first chapter begins "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth comes again. In one Age, called the Third Age by some, an Age yet to come, an Age long past, a wind rose [in some place]. The wind was not the beginning. There are neither beginnings nor endings to the turning of the Wheel of time. But it was a beginning.", with the place the wind rose from being given to suit the events to be described in the book.
Community Feedback Replies: 13
  • May 25, 2011
    Auxdarastrix
    • Alcatraz Series - The series is full of them. For example, every book begins with "There I was..."
  • May 25, 2011
    jaytee
    Sure seems like The Same But More Specific to me, but I'm intrigued nonetheless.
  • May 25, 2011
    Flioro
    • Powerpuff Girls:
      • "The city of Townsville!"
      • "Once again, the day is saved, thanks to... the Powerpuff Girls!"
  • May 25, 2011
    Aielyn
    In The Wheel Of Time series, every book's first chapter begins "The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth comes again. In one Age, called the Third Age by some, an Age yet to come, an Age long past, a wind rose [in some place]. The wind was not the beginning. There are neither beginnings nor endings to the turning of the Wheel of time. But it was a beginning.", with the place the wind rose from being given to suit the events to be described in the book.
  • May 26, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Stan Lee: "Face front, true believers!"
  • May 26, 2011
    HumanaUox
    Twilight Zone: Rod Serling's "submitted for your approval"
  • May 26, 2011
    cityofmist
    Slaughterhouse Five: 'So it goes.' Every time someone dies.
  • May 26, 2011
    Aminatep
    jaytee, there's distinction.

    Catchphrase is a character's characterization. Narrator Catchprase isn't, unless the character is a narrator. If anything it's closer to a running gag. Again, Cain archive is a really nice example, because there are differences clearly seen. Mitchell has catchphrases like "What is?", Cain as a narrator has several such as "little did I know", Cain himself as a character has catchprases too, and Amberly as a second narrator also has her share.
  • May 26, 2011
    Auxdarastrix
    Honestly, I like this because I wrote up the Alcatraz Series and I couldn't find a good trope that fit all the Narrator Catchphrases that Alcactraz (a First Person Smartass narrator) uses.

    The question is how to clearly distinguesh this from Author Catchphrase. I see one but I'm not sure how to spell it out. The distinction is clearest when you actually have a first person narrator or an audible narrator in a audio-visual work, thus having a narrator who has a distinct style and identity from the author. Author Catchphrase seems to imply it is used consistently throughout the author's body work, irregardless of the specific narrator for a particular work.
  • July 9, 2011
    Andygal
    Pushing Daisies has "The facts were these...."
  • July 19, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    @ Auxdarastrix Perhaps the distinction is in the narration: a first person narrator using a specific phrase would be this trope, and a third person (especially a third person omniscient) narrator would make it an Author Catchphrase. A first person narrator is a persona/character that is somewhat distinct from the author.
  • March 4, 2012
    CrystalBlue
    Bump.
  • September 1, 2013
    XFllo
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=66jy5k6j4pdhqrq9q0o6160v