Created By: DenisMoskowitz on October 14, 2013 Last Edited By: DenisMoskowitz on October 28, 2013

Radical Dynamic Shift

First verse quiet, second verse loud

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Trope
"You know: full band entry, fortissimo, while maintaining apparent volume on the vocal track." -Fountains of Wayne Hotline by Robbie Fulks

Musical Trope. Trope Namer is the song "Fountains of Wayne Hotline" by Robbie Fulks, in which the term "Radical Dynamic Shift" is defined as above, poking fun at the band Fountains of Wayne for overusing it. It generally comes after a quiet first verse, where the first chorus or second verse is suddenly much louder or fuller, and is often accompanied by a squeal of feedback.

Classically, this is known as "sforzando forte".

Subtrope of Subdued Section. This trope is about starting soft and then getting (and staying) loud, as opposed to quiet sections in the middle or end.

Examples

Music
  • In the Robbie Fulks song "Fountains of Wayne Hotline" the singer does one "broken-down" verse, then calls the eponymous hotline to figure out where to go next. "Gerald" suggests the Radical Dynamic Shift, as above. The singer hangs up and with a squeal of feedback the entire band joins in.
  • Fountains Of Wayne songs
    • "Mexican Wine": The first verse has only a guitar and the first chorus only a keyboard. Then feedback as the singer says "yup" and the full band enters.
  • Everclear song "Santa Monica (Watch the World Die)": the first verse and chorus feature only a guitar with a drum coming in after a few bars. After the first chorus the guitar gets crazier and the vocals screamier.
  • DragonForce song "EPM"
Community Feedback Replies: 26
  • October 15, 2013
    Arivne
    Rewrote the examples and description as per out standard style.
  • October 15, 2013
    DAN004

    ...Though, when I think about it, what's the thing higher in the second verse? The volume, or the pitch? Cuz I see the latter more often.
  • October 15, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    Clarified the examples - Mexican Wine is by Fountains of Wayne themselves.
  • October 15, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    Hmm, would this be a subtrope of Subdued Section?
  • October 15, 2013
    m8e
    These are Zero Context Examples. How do these songs shift? When do the shift happen? Is there a squeal or not? Any other context?
  • October 15, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    Thanks - I added what I could with my limited knowledge of musical terminology.
  • October 15, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Removed the Red Links.
  • October 15, 2013
    m8e
    ^Why? Red Links isn't bad, it makes it easier to make new pages.

    Quoting the Red Link page: "Links to works that don't yet have pages will also show up as red. However, they'll automatically shift to blue when the page is created, so don't be afraid to link to works this way—it makes it easier for when someone eventually writes it up."
  • October 15, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ Whoops, my bad, I didn't actually know that. Sorry, I changed it back.
  • October 15, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    Added subtrope section and explanation of difference.
  • October 16, 2013
    MetaFour
    A bit of overlap with Song Style Shift too.
  • October 16, 2013
    kjnoren
    This is described as a media-specific trope, but the name gives no such indication. I'm also unsure if it needs to be media-specific.
  • October 16, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    Do you know of a work in another medium that would apply?
  • October 16, 2013
    DAN004
    This is pretty much a Music Trope.
  • October 16, 2013
    kjnoren
    ^^ Not necessarily, that's why I'm unsure.

    My main trouble is that I fear the name will be a cause of I Thought It Meant, since there is no indication on how the context of the name is to be interpreted. Even once I know it's supposed to apply to music, it gives me a feeling of a bunch of words simply stacked together.
  • October 16, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    As much as I like the name and the reference to the trope namer, it could be renamed to Subdued Start for clarity.
  • October 16, 2013
    m8e
    This is a Music Trope but it could appear in any media that contains music. For example in the Theme Tune of a series.
  • October 17, 2013
    Unknown Troper
    Music
    • Pat Benatar's Hell Is For Children uses a softer voice on the verses as these are sung from the children's perspective. The refrain is sung loud and nasty as a wake-up call to society: if people do nothing to intervene, then child abuse will continue unimpeded.
  • October 17, 2013
    DAN004
    I'd pretty much like Sfozando Forte.
  • October 17, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    There are some "soft verse, loud chorus" examples in Subdued Section - it's not clear if those belong there, here, or in their own trope. Thoughts?
  • October 17, 2013
    kjnoren
    Would this apply? The most common version of Through valleys and over hills (a World War One Russian song) usually set with a very soft start, a very loud middle, and then a tapering off to a very soft end.
  • October 23, 2013
    DenisMoskowitz
    No responses in a few days - are people still interested or should I just add a section to Subdued Section?
  • October 23, 2013
    henke37
    • Friendship Is Magic: Swetiebelle's hijack of Fluttershy's "Hush now, quiet now" is a lot louder than how Fluttershy began the song.
  • October 23, 2013
    j21
    • Fun.'s signature song "We Are Young".
  • October 24, 2013
    j21
  • October 28, 2013
    babymoondancer
    • Lou Reed's "Perfect Day". Goes from almost pianissimo in the verses to forte in the chorus, then back to soft in the coda.
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