History YMMV / TheGratefulDead

15th Nov '17 1:10:50 AM CassandraLeo
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** Rock critic Robert Christgau speculated that one of the main reasons the May 8, 1977 show at Cornell University is so loved is that it has no “Drums” or “Space” section. This is arguably a case of Christgau’s BiasSteamroller showing itself, as there are plenty of well-loved Dead shows that have one or both of those, but he may be correct that its lack of either of these is one reason it’s gained a cultural cachet beyond Deadheads.
14th Nov '17 2:13:15 AM CassandraLeo
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* FridgeBrilliance: “Friend of the Devil” was introduced as a fast-paced bluegrass-influenced tune on ''Music/AmericanBeauty''. By the mid-’70s, it was retooled with a much slower reggae arrangement. The first line of the chorus is, “I set out running but I take my time”; the song evolved in the exact same way.
14th Nov '17 2:02:21 AM CassandraLeo
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* EpicRiff: Again, a veritable goldmine of them; indeed, their epic riffs are often the main reasons their songs are ear worms. Not just on guitar, either - bassist Phil Lesh certainly could contribute his share as well (the bass line on “Truckin’” is probably just as much an EpicRiff as the guitar is). And for that matter, some of their drum patterns are pretty much Epic Riffs too - when Hart and Kreutzmann come out of a drum solo to go into “Not Fade Away”, you’ll know exactly what song is coming up before any of the other instruments come back in.

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** Their arrangement of “Big River” is somehow even more infectious than Music/JohnnyCash’s original.
* EpicRiff: Again, a veritable goldmine of them; indeed, their epic riffs are often the main reasons their songs are ear worms. (“Terrapin Station” alone probably has about five of them.) Not just on guitar, either - bassist Phil Lesh certainly could contribute his share as well (the bass line on “Truckin’” is probably just as much an EpicRiff as the guitar is). And for that matter, some of their drum patterns are pretty much Epic Riffs too - when Hart and Kreutzmann come out of a drum solo to go into “Not Fade Away”, you’ll know exactly what song is coming up before any of the other instruments come back in.


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* HoYay: Arguably, anytime Donna sings along with the male vocalists on a love song, since they're basically all directed towards women.
17th Oct '17 12:21:26 AM thelivingtoad
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* ItsPopularNowItSucks: The surprise success of “Touch of Grey” was a mixed blessing for the band and longtime Deadheads who were known for their peaceful, mellow hippie attitudes with nothing seriously bad happening at shows to…[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfFG33IROLM Maybe this video will explain it a little better]].

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* ItsPopularNowItSucks: The surprise success of “Touch of Grey” was a mixed blessing for the band and longtime Deadheads who were known for their peaceful, mellow hippie attitudes with nothing seriously bad happening at shows to…[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfFG33IROLM Maybe this video will explain it a little better]]. As a result, many longtime fans took out their disgust on the song itself, which was previously a well-liked concert favorite for years before the band recorded it. This has largely subsided since Jerry Garcia died, and the song now has a much better reputation, but it isn't uncommon to find older fans who do not like "Touch of Grey" or the ''In the Dark'' album.
30th Sep '17 4:12:29 PM CassandraLeo
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** Paul Buckmaster's (Music/EltonJohn, amongst others) string arrangements on ''Terrapin Station''. They're sometimes considered to clash with the songs themselves, and the band members themselves didn't like them; Garcia in particular complained that the rhythms of his arrangements for the title suite clashed with the song's rhythm: Buckmaster and producer Keith Olsen "changed it from a dotted shuffle to a marching 4/4 time". The song was never performed in its exact studio configuration live, though the first three movements were part of the band's set list until 1987. "Terrapin Transit", "At a Siding" (with no lyrics), and "Terrapin Flyer" were performed once (on March 18, 1977 at Winterland, San Francisco); the final segment, "Refrain", was apparently never performed.

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** Paul Buckmaster's Buckmaster’s (Music/EltonJohn, amongst others) string arrangements on ''Terrapin Station''. They're They’re sometimes considered to clash with the songs themselves, and the band members themselves didn't didn’t like them; Garcia in particular complained that the rhythms of his arrangements for the title suite clashed with the song's song’s rhythm: Buckmaster and producer Keith Olsen "changed “changed it from a dotted shuffle to a marching 4/4 time". time”. The song was never performed in its exact studio configuration live, though the first three movements were part of the band's set list (with an extended instrumental coda) stayed in rotation until 1987. "Terrapin Transit", "At the band’s dissolution. “Terrapin Transit”, “At a Siding" Siding” (with no lyrics), and "Terrapin Flyer" “Terrapin Flyer” were performed once (on March 18, 1977 at Winterland, San Francisco); the final segment, "Refrain", “Refrain”, was apparently never performed.performed live.
30th Sep '17 3:58:52 PM CassandraLeo
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* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: “Comes a Time”, a gorgeous Garcia/Hunter ballad that also doubles as a TearJerker.
-->Been walkin' all mornin', went walkin' all night\\
I can't see much difference between the dark and light\\
And I feel the wind and I taste the rain\\
Never in my mind to cause so much pain\\
\\
Comes a time when the blind man takes your hand\\
Says, "Don't you see?\\
Gotta make it somehow on the dreams you still believe\\
Don't give it up, you got an empty cup\\
That only love can fill, only love can fill, only love can fill"
30th Sep '17 3:44:30 PM CassandraLeo
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* EpicRiff: Again, a veritable goldmine of them; indeed, their epic riffs are often the main reasons their songs are ear worms. Not just on guitar, either - bassist Phil Lesh certainly could contribute his share as well (the bass line on “Truckin’” is probably just as much an EpicRiff as the guitar is).

to:

* EpicRiff: Again, a veritable goldmine of them; indeed, their epic riffs are often the main reasons their songs are ear worms. Not just on guitar, either - bassist Phil Lesh certainly could contribute his share as well (the bass line on “Truckin’” is probably just as much an EpicRiff as the guitar is). And for that matter, some of their drum patterns are pretty much Epic Riffs too - when Hart and Kreutzmann come out of a drum solo to go into “Not Fade Away”, you’ll know exactly what song is coming up before any of the other instruments come back in.
29th Sep '17 7:17:36 PM CassandraLeo
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** Paul Buckmaster's (Music/EltonJohn, amongst others) string arrangements on ''Terrapin Station''. They're sometimes considered to clash with the songs themselves, and the band members themselves didn't like them; Garcia in particular complained that the rhythms of his arrangements for the title suite clashed with the song's rhythm: he and producer Keith Olsen "changed it from a dotted shuffle to a marching 4/4 time". The song was never performed in its exact studio configuration live, though the first three movements were part of the band's set list until 1987. "Terrapin Transit", "At a Siding" (with no lyrics), and "Terrapin Flyer" were performed once (on March 18, 1977 at Winterland, San Francisco); the final segment, "Refrain", was apparently never performed.

to:

** Paul Buckmaster's (Music/EltonJohn, amongst others) string arrangements on ''Terrapin Station''. They're sometimes considered to clash with the songs themselves, and the band members themselves didn't like them; Garcia in particular complained that the rhythms of his arrangements for the title suite clashed with the song's rhythm: he Buckmaster and producer Keith Olsen "changed it from a dotted shuffle to a marching 4/4 time". The song was never performed in its exact studio configuration live, though the first three movements were part of the band's set list until 1987. "Terrapin Transit", "At a Siding" (with no lyrics), and "Terrapin Flyer" were performed once (on March 18, 1977 at Winterland, San Francisco); the final segment, "Refrain", was apparently never performed.
29th Sep '17 7:16:20 PM CassandraLeo
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** Fans generally don't speak too highly of 1978's {{disco}}-influenced ''Shakedown Street'', which is a borderline case of FanonDiscontinuity. The previous year's ''Terrapin Station'', which also had some disco influence, is more warmly regarded, though still considered a flawed effort. Most songs from both albums are much more highly regarded in live performances, and indeed, 1977 in particular is regarded as one of the band's golden ages in live performance, with several candidates for Best Show Ever appearing that year. 1980's ''Go to Heaven'' is also sometimes considered part of the band's studio Dork Age.

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** Fans generally don't don’t speak too highly of 1978's 1978’s {{disco}}-influenced ''Shakedown Street'', which is a borderline case of FanonDiscontinuity. The previous year's year’s ''Terrapin Station'', which also had some disco influence, is more warmly regarded, though still considered a flawed effort. Most songs from both albums are much more highly regarded in live performances, and indeed, 1977 in particular is regarded as one of the band's band’s golden ages in live performance, with several candidates for Best Show Ever appearing that year. 1980's This may be at least partially because ''Terrapin Station'' producer Keith Olsen insisted that they rehearse its material repeatedly until they could play it flawlessly; while they understandably chafed at this, since they had a reputation for never performing songs the same way twice, it probably also resulted in their live performances from the era being tighter than usual. 1980’s ''Go to Heaven'' is also sometimes considered part of the band's band’s studio Dork Age.
29th Sep '17 7:11:43 PM CassandraLeo
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** ''Dylan & the Dead'' is basically never spoken of by fans of either artist; sometimes it’s even considered the worst release by either of them. Oddly, they’re considered to have had much better performances together than the versions that appear on the album, so it’s not clear why those particular recordings were selected.

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** ''Dylan & the Dead'' is basically never rarely spoken of by fans of either artist; sometimes it’s even considered the worst release by either of them. Oddly, they’re considered to have had much better performances together than the versions that appear on the album, so it’s not clear why those particular recordings were selected. However, even it still has its defenders.
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