History YMMV / StarTrekVoyager

19th Apr '17 12:07:13 AM ShorinBJ
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*** Chakotay is revealed in "Shattered" to have a hidden supply of Cider in one of the cargo bays for the last 7 years. No wonder he comes across as being wooden, spouts nonsensical mysticism at the strangest times, has questionable command abilities, and for the life of him ''can't'' land a shuttle without crashing it into something! Its entirely plausible that he's been secretly drunk for the entire trip. Although to be fair, if you were in Voyager's position- trapped on the opposite side of the galaxy, forced to work with the people who you were fighting against, assuming your people back home are being wiped out by the Cardassians, decades from resupply, knowing you'd never see home again, the imminent threat of cyborg zombies hanging over your head and with a very questionable person in charge- would you honestly be able to handle it without either going nuts or getting drunk?

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*** Chakotay is revealed in "Shattered" to have a hidden supply of Cider cider in one of the cargo bays for the last 7 seven years. No wonder he comes across as being wooden, spouts nonsensical mysticism at the strangest times, has questionable command abilities, and for the life of him ''can't'' land a shuttle without crashing it into something! Its It's entirely plausible that he's been secretly drunk for the entire trip. Although to be fair, if you were in Voyager's position- trapped position--trapped on the opposite side of the galaxy, forced to work with the people who you were fighting against, assuming your people back home are being wiped out by the Cardassians, decades from resupply, knowing you'd never see home again, the imminent threat of cyborg zombies hanging over your head and with a very questionable person in charge- would charge--would you honestly be able to handle it without either going nuts or getting drunk?



* BadassDecay: In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' a normal Borg cube was able to wipe out entire Federation fleet with barely a scratch. Here a heavily armored one is severely damaged by a single starship.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).

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* BadassDecay: In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' a normal Borg cube was able to wipe out an entire Federation fleet with barely a scratch. Here a heavily armored one is severely damaged by a single starship.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter later seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).



* BizarroEpisode: ''"Threshold."'' The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.

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* BizarroEpisode: ''"Threshold."'' The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one no one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.



** In particular 4--7 showcased greater consistency in Janeway's character and decreased the Ominicidal TriggerHappy aspects of her personality a fair bit. The story plots also became less stupid, to some degree, and Seven of Nine became a regular character as well (this coincided with less screentime for characters like Chakotay which really didn't hurt at all).

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** In particular 4--7 showcased greater consistency in Janeway's character and decreased the Ominicidal Omnicidal TriggerHappy aspects of her personality a fair bit. The story plots also became less stupid, to some degree, and Seven of Nine became a regular character as well (this coincided with less screentime for characters like Chakotay which really didn't hurt at all).



** Chakotay/Paris also has a sizable following. It's surprisingly easy to read their tension and Tom's protectiveness of Chakotay as the result of their being bitter ex boyfriends who still have feelings for each other.

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** Chakotay/Paris also has a sizable following. It's surprisingly easy to read their tension and Tom's protectiveness of Chakotay as the result of their being bitter ex boyfriends ex-boyfriends who still have feelings for each other.



** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sarcosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).

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** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sarcosanct sacrosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).



* MagnificentBastard: Seska disguises herself as a Bajoran, infiltrates the Maquis, is communicating with and slipping tech and information to the Kazon during most of her time serving with Voyager, isn't found out for a least a year, engineers a cover up that's almost successful, when she is discovered she had already planned out and executes an escape, forges an alliance with the Kazon Nistrum, has the faction leader Culluh basically as her puppet right from the start, is directly responsible for most of the Nistrum's victories, including the successful capture of Voyager at the end of season 2, and even after she dies she possessed the forethought to set a trap in one of the holodeck programs at some point during her possession of Voyager in an attempt to kill several members of the crew in the event they retook the ship that she put in just in case. In fact, over the entirety of the Voyager Seska is one of the very few truly cunning villains in the series to last more than an episode or 2.

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* MagnificentBastard: Seska disguises herself as a Bajoran, infiltrates the Maquis, is communicating with and slipping tech and information to the Kazon during most of her time serving with Voyager, isn't found out for a least a year, engineers a cover up that's almost successful, when she is discovered she had already planned out and executes an escape, forges an alliance with the Kazon Nistrum, Kazon-Nistrum, has the faction leader Culluh basically as her puppet right from the start, is directly responsible for most of the Nistrum's victories, including the successful capture of Voyager at the end of season 2, and even after she dies she possessed the forethought to set a trap in one of the holodeck programs at some point during her possession of Voyager in an attempt to kill several members of the crew in the event they retook the ship that she put in just in case. In fact, over the entirety of the Voyager Seska is one of the very few truly cunning villains in the series to last more than an episode or 2.



** Captain Ransom easily crossed this line when he started murdering aliens as a fuel source for his ship. IDidWhatIHadToDo is nowhere near a sufficient excuse, but he at least seems to realize this at some level and eventually under goes a HeelFaceTurn and HeroicSacrifice.

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** Captain Ransom easily crossed this line when he started murdering aliens as a fuel source for his ship. IDidWhatIHadToDo is nowhere near a sufficient excuse, but he at least seems to realize this at some level and eventually under goes a HeelFaceTurn and DeathEqualsRedemption HeroicSacrifice.



** Well, we also know now that the Klingon religion is true, or at least can be manifest - although that in itself might be a cause for ParanoiaFuel - which indicates that other religions are true as well. We also have verification that spirituality and unknown planes of existence exists as well, courtesy of "Sacred Ground", and that belief and faith do in fact have an impact on the real world. Now ''that'' is both awesome and insanely confusing, and now we can be absolutely sure that someone is out there watching the confusion and laughing their head off. Not that Q wasn't doing a wonderful job already...

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** Well, we also know now that the Klingon religion is true, or at least can be manifest - although manifested--although that in itself might be a cause for ParanoiaFuel - which ParanoiaFuel--which indicates that other religions are true as well. We also have verification that spirituality and unknown planes of existence exists as well, courtesy of "Sacred Ground", and that belief and faith do in fact have an impact on the real world. Now ''that'' is both awesome and insanely confusing, and now we can be absolutely sure that someone is out there watching the confusion and laughing their head off. Not that Q wasn't doing a wonderful job already...



** The writers seemed to forget that Kes dumping Neelix in "Warlord" wasn't real, since she was being possessed. Afterwards they're presented as broken up for real, with no further explanation. A scene was filmed for the episode "Fair Trade" to give some closure to the relationship, unfortunately it was cut due to time constraints.

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** The writers seemed to forget that Kes dumping Neelix in "Warlord" wasn't real, since she was being possessed. Afterwards they're presented as broken up for real, with no further explanation. A scene was filmed for the episode "Fair Trade" to give some closure to the relationship, unfortunately but it was cut due to time constraints.



** A variation: in "Gravity" the audience is supposed to agree with Tom Paris that the human way of being in touch with our emotions and having them in our lives is the right way, in contrary opposition to the Vulcan master who taught Tuvok to suppress his emotions. Paris has a real problem with accepting that Vulcans ''aren't'' humans. Vulcan emotions are far more volatile, erratic and all-consuming than human's (whose emotions are less violent), and for a Vulcan being in love can be ''legitimately'' destructive, and not in the metaphoric sense that humans use. Not to mention that ''other'' episodes of this show have Tuvok fully justify his emotional repression by demonstrating to people [[BewareTheQuietOnes what it looks like when he lets it go]]. (This is a fairly common writing mistake with Vulcans in general: they're frequently portrayed as being just super-stuck up, repressed humans rather than TheFettered.)

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** A variation: in "Gravity" the audience is supposed to agree with Tom Paris that the human way of being in touch with our emotions and having them in our lives is the right way, in contrary opposition to the Vulcan master who taught Tuvok to suppress his emotions. Paris has a real problem with accepting that Vulcans ''aren't'' humans. Vulcan emotions are far more volatile, erratic and all-consuming than human's humans' (whose emotions are less violent), and for a Vulcan being in love can be ''legitimately'' destructive, and not in the metaphoric sense that humans use. use.[[note]]They're not just assuming that their emotions are stronger; remember that Vulcans have mind-melded with humans, putting them in a position to compare their emotions[[/note]] Not to mention that ''other'' episodes of this show have Tuvok fully justify his emotional repression by demonstrating to people [[BewareTheQuietOnes what it looks like when he lets it go]]. (This is a fairly common writing mistake with Vulcans in general: they're frequently portrayed as being just super-stuck up, repressed humans rather than TheFettered.)



** This show had a horrible habit of introducing potentially interesting recurring characters and then either getting rid of them only a couple of episodes later or just never using them again. Carrey disappeared after the first season, Hogan was unceremoniously killed, Jonas was killed instead of imprisoned (where he could have made a good recurring anti-villain) and they phased out Wildman and Vorik for no reason. Interesting characters like Dalby, Chell, Suder, Lessing, Ceres, etc. were never used again after their introduction (with the exception of Chell, once, several years later, and not to the best effect; and Suder who was killed in his second appearance).

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** This show had a horrible habit of introducing potentially interesting recurring characters and then either getting rid of them only a couple of episodes later or just never using them again. Carrey Carey mostly disappeared after the first season, Hogan was unceremoniously killed, Jonas was killed instead of imprisoned (where he could have made a good recurring anti-villain) and they phased out Wildman and Vorik for no reason. Interesting characters like Dalby, Chell, Suder, Lessing, Ceres, etc. were never used again after their introduction (with the exception of Chell, once, several years later, and not to the best effect; and Suder who was killed in his second appearance).



** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female Captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas.... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.

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** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female Captain, captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas.... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.



** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Marquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Marquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.

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** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Marquis) Maquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Marquis Maquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.



** On the surface, Neelix is nothing more than an arrogant lying incompetent asshole, and most fans hate him, feeling that he was little more than a prototype of Jar-Jar Binks. However, while his species was xenophobic, arrogant, and generally incompetent to begin with, many of his kind were killed when his home planet was vaporized in a violent war with another race- made worse by the fact he was a cowardly war deserter that suffered survivor's guilt because he only survived due to having run off to another planet. His time as a junk scavenger placed him under the watch of the Kazon, and the woman he loved was not only abused by the Kazon but only had a life span of 9 years. Try as he might to help the crew in their situation he often annoyed them. He lost his lungs to the Vidiaans and had to receive an emergency transplant from Kes just to survive. At one point a transporter accident bonds him and Tuvok into one being (with "Tuvix" being a bad example- he had to be "killed" just to save the two that made him). Kes eventually broke up with him due to his abusive and hyper-jealous treatment of her, and Neelix was consistently stuck inflicting his incompetence on Tuvok, which eventually caused him to snap and chew out Tuvok- Tuvok did learn to be a bit more tolerant of Neelix's persistent incompetence, though. Then as Voyager moves out of the area of space he knows he finds himself feeling even more useless and commits a criminal act hoping to get a useful map. On one mission he is killed, his only salvation being Borg nanoprobes that revive him but sends him into a temporary depression, believing that he is merely a reanimated corpse and that the "real" Neelix died. Dealing the the possibility than Samantha Wildman may die led to extreme troubles in dealing with Naomi Wildman. The series didn't really let up on treating him like a punching bag until his final episode in which he meets a colony of Talaxian refugees and stays with them shortly before Voyager returns home.

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** On the surface, Neelix is nothing more than an arrogant lying incompetent asshole, and most fans hate him, feeling that he was little more than a prototype of Jar-Jar Binks. However, while his species was xenophobic, arrogant, and generally incompetent to begin with, many of his kind were killed when his home planet colony was vaporized in a violent war with another race- made race--made worse by the fact he was a cowardly war deserter that suffered survivor's guilt because he only survived due to having run off to another planet. His time as a junk scavenger placed him under the watch of the Kazon, and the woman he loved was not only abused by the Kazon but only had a life span of 9 years. Try as he might to help the crew in their situation he often annoyed them. He lost his lungs to the Vidiaans Vidiians and had to receive an emergency transplant from Kes just to survive. At one point a transporter accident bonds him and Tuvok into one being (with "Tuvix" being a bad example- he example--he had to be "killed" just to save the two that made him). Kes eventually broke up with him due to his abusive and hyper-jealous treatment of her, and Neelix was consistently stuck inflicting his incompetence on Tuvok, which eventually caused him to snap and chew out Tuvok- Tuvok Tuvok--Tuvok did learn to be a bit more tolerant of Neelix's persistent incompetence, though. Then as Voyager moves out of the area of space he knows he finds himself feeling even more useless and commits a criminal act hoping to get a useful map. On one mission he is killed, his only salvation being Borg nanoprobes that revive him but sends him into a temporary depression, believing that he is merely a reanimated corpse and that the "real" Neelix died. Dealing the with the possibility than that Samantha Wildman may die led to extreme troubles in dealing with Naomi Wildman. The series didn't really let up on treating him like a punching bag until his final episode in which he meets a colony of Talaxian refugees and stays with them shortly before Voyager returns home.
18th Mar '17 1:47:59 PM Fighteer
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18th Mar '17 1:47:33 PM system
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17th Mar '17 6:21:40 PM Worffan101
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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).
** The writing crew were aware of Neelix's base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E7Parturition "Parturition"]] was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom. That didn't quite work as planned - it resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent much of the episode being hateful towards Tom because of [[CrazyJealousGuy his psychotic jealousy.]]

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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix BaseBreakingCharacter:
**Neelix
got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many universal--some young viewers found him annoying and his makeup design terrifying). Most adults found him boorish, incompetent, emotionally abusive (his rabid jealousy and overbearing clingy attitude towards Kes in season 2 won him no fans), incompetent (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). scorn), and overbearing (Neelix won considerable early hate for managing to get a regulation in place banning people aboard ''Voyager'' from cooking their own food in "State of Flux"). It didn't help that ''multiple'' episodes involved Neelix bringing something disgusting onto the ship that then ''broke'' said ship and caused the {{Technobabble}} problem of the week. His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids allegedly loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).
** *** The writing crew were aware of Neelix's base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E7Parturition "Parturition"]] was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom. That didn't quite work as planned - it resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent much of the episode being hateful towards Tom because of [[CrazyJealousGuy his psychotic jealousy.]]]]
*** Incredibly, this managed to get even ''worse''; Season 2's finale (and season 3's premiere), "Basics", established that Neelix was completely incompetent in every part of a field that he claimed to be an expert in (namely, survival), in a situation that got ''multiple'' people killed as a result of his lies.
*** Fortunately, the writers eventually recognized that Neelix was an annoying tool, and so he was thankfully much reduced in role (often having no more than a couple of lines per episode outside of each season's Neelix-centered episode) in later seasons. Most of these episodes did have Neelix's cooking as a recurring HateSink for the characters, though.



* ContestedSequel: Just scan this page. ''TAS'', ''TNG'' and ''[=DS9=]'' don't take anywhere near this much flak; the only TV show entry that does is ''Enterprise''.

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* ContestedSequel: Just scan this page. ''TAS'', ''TNG'' and ''[=DS9=]'' don't take anywhere near this much flak; the only TV show entry that does is ''Enterprise''.''Enterprise'', and ''Enterprise'' doesn't have anywhere near this many defenders. Essentially, ''Voyager'' is the BaseBreaker of the entire ''Star Trek'' franchise.



* ExpectationLowerer: Ensign Harry Kim. Easily the least useful person aboard the ship. Even Neelix can lay claim to motivating the crew to do their best, or wheezing out a campfire song from time to time. Harry can't even get laid on the ''holodeck'' -- that's how socially repressed he is. One tryst with a TOS-style space babe left him with a venereal disease... and Janeway wouldn't let him hear the end of it (''"I wanted to leave a '''lasting''' impression"''). Oddly considering his manic desperation to get back to Earth, it is Harry who is [[YouGetMeCoffee assigned to the ship]] in "Future's End" whilst the others get to romp around in L.A. (And Harry Kim in command of ''Voyager'' is every bit as thrilling as you imagine.) He never wins one single ''Kal-toh'' game against Tuvok in their seven-year voyage, and Icheb only wins by disregarded Harry's seasoned 'advice'. After a while you begin to wonder if the show runners have it out for Garrett Wang.

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* ExpectationLowerer: Ensign Harry Kim. Easily the least useful person aboard the ship. Even Neelix can lay claim to motivating the crew to do their best, best (if only to get away from Neelix), or wheezing out a campfire song from time to time. Harry can't even get laid on the ''holodeck'' -- that's how socially repressed he is. One tryst with a TOS-style space babe left him with a venereal disease... and Janeway wouldn't let him hear the end of it (''"I wanted to leave a '''lasting''' impression"''). Oddly considering his manic desperation to get back to Earth, it is Harry who is [[YouGetMeCoffee assigned to the ship]] in "Future's End" whilst the others get to romp around in L.A. (And Harry Kim in command of ''Voyager'' is [[SarcasmMode every bit as thrilling thrilling]] as you imagine.) He never wins one single ''Kal-toh'' game against Tuvok in their seven-year voyage, and Icheb only wins by disregarded Harry's seasoned 'advice'. After a while you begin to wonder if the show runners have it out for Garrett Wang.



** Thankfully finally {{averted}} in VideoGame/StarTrekOnline. In the ''Delta Rising'' expansion, ''[[TheCaptain Captain]]'' Harry Kim is a competent, confident, experienced leader and one of the most popular characters in the story arc.



** Remember "Threshold," the episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.
** "Twisted" wasn't even well liked by the ''actors'' - in particular, it's Robert Picardo's least favorite episode.

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** Remember "Threshold," the episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] might have struck it off.
off (there's a reference in a later episode to Tom having never traveled at transwarp, but the wording is debatable).
** "Twisted" "Twisted", [[RandomEventsPlot an episode without a point or cohesive plot]] that was written by infamously incompetent writer [[HateSink Kenneth Biller]], wasn't even well liked by the ''actors'' - in particular, it's Robert Picardo's least favorite episode.



** Season 3 is commonly felt to be at least a little better than the first two seasons, with the "Future's End" two-parter in particular being considered to be where the show's overall quality started to drastically improve (in no small part due to the Doctor getting his mobile emitter). Seasons 4--7 are widely regarded as a major improvement.

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** Season 3 is commonly felt to be at least a little better than the first two seasons, with the "Future's End" two-parter in particular being considered to be where the show's overall quality started to drastically improve (in no small part due to the Doctor getting his mobile emitter). It also helps that the Kazon, widely considered the most pathetic villains in Trek, were left behind. Seasons 4--7 are widely regarded as a major improvement.



** In addition, those less popular characters like Chakotay, Harry Kim and Neelix had the traits that people found annoying toned down. Chakotay's MagicalNativeAmerican mysticism faded away and he acted more normal (with a couple of exceptions, like the lucid-dream episode); Harry became less of a "dweeb" and started to stand up to Tom more, and earned command of night shifts; and Neelix's obnoxious traits were somewhat reduced as he took up the kindness and responsibilities of being a morale officer (this due largely to breaking up with Kes in Season 3, and later Kes leaving the ship, so he couldn't remain so jealous of her). It also helped that Neelix got less screen time and at one point even ''recognized how annoying he was'' in "Once Upon A Time"--ironically an episode where Neelix was being relatively innocuous.

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** In addition, those less popular characters like Chakotay, Harry Kim and Neelix had the traits that people found annoying toned down. Chakotay's MagicalNativeAmerican mysticism faded away and he acted more normal (with a couple of exceptions, like the lucid-dream episode); Harry became ''somewhat'' less of a "dweeb" and started to stand up to Tom more, and earned command of night shifts; shifts (though he was still not promoted); and Neelix's obnoxious traits were somewhat reduced as he took up bits of the kindness and responsibilities of being a morale officer (this due largely to breaking up with Kes in Season 3, and later Kes leaving the ship, so he couldn't remain so jealous of her). It also helped that Neelix got less screen time and at one point even ''recognized how annoying he was'' in "Once Upon A Time"--ironically an episode where Neelix was being relatively innocuous.



* HateSink:
** Neelix is one for most adult fans, who can't stand his odious behavior.
** The writing staff gets most of the flak from those who don't like Voyager. Brannon Braga is especially reviled for writing [[EpicFail Threshold, widely considered to be the worst Trek episode of all time]].



** To be fair, Janeway ''does'' spend an awful lot of time alone with Seven. A lot of these scenes are without obvious sexual subtext; but many, such as the scene where Janeway discusses romance with Seven as Seven pins one of Janeway's rank pips back on...are not.



** "Bride of Chaotica" is fueled by this trope, with the affectionate parody of [[Franchise/FlashGordon Flash Gordon]] films, the Ming the Merciless-inspired Doctor Chaotica, and Janeway openly being an evil overlord. [[SoBadItsGood And]] [[StylisticSuck it]] [[HamAndCheese is]] [[EvilIsHammy GLORIOUS]]! [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome There's even a moment when the holodoc, as the President of Earth, makes a joke about being unimpeachable]]. [[note]](This was soon after President Clinton was impeached[[/note]]

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** "Bride of Chaotica" is fueled ''fueled'' by this trope, with the affectionate parody of [[Franchise/FlashGordon Flash Gordon]] films, the Ming the Merciless-inspired [[LargeHam Doctor Chaotica, Chaotica]], and Janeway [[EvilIsSexy Janeway]] openly being an evil overlord. [[SoBadItsGood And]] [[StylisticSuck it]] [[HamAndCheese is]] [[EvilIsHammy GLORIOUS]]! [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome There's even a moment when the holodoc, as the President of Earth, makes a joke about being unimpeachable]]. [[note]](This was soon after President Clinton was impeached[[/note]]impeached, likely making this an ad-lib by Picardo)[[/note]]



** Intentional in "Bride of Chaotica" with the Captain Proton hologram, which is fueled by pure NarmCharm.
* StatusQuoIsGod: The series is infamous for this; ''Voyager'' itself never suffers permanent damage outside of two specific 2-parters (the damage from "Year of Hell", which is wiped away by the timeline reset, and the Borg modifications from "Scorpion", which last into "The Gift"). Several important character episodes (for example, "Real Life") are never mentioned again. And careful viewing can show severe writing inconsistencies (the range of the ship's communications in "Coda" and "Resolutions", for example--two episodes written by the same author--and the data downloaded into the ship's memory banks in "Twisted" that is never mentioned again). They got better about this in later seasons, but the magic ship repairs continued.



** Garrett Wang openly complained about Harry Kim's utter lack of character development and being constantly written as the EnsignNewbie right up to the end of the series seven years into the journey. The ''Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch'' series and ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' rapidly moved to fix this, starting with jumping him two grades to lieutenant, and ending with him in command of the USS ''Rhode Island'' in ''STO'''s ''Delta Rising'' expansion (as he had in the alternate future in "Endgame").

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** Garrett Wang openly complained about Harry Kim's utter lack of character development and being constantly written as the EnsignNewbie right up to the end of the series seven years into the journey. The ''Literature/StarTrekVoyagerRelaunch'' series and ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' rapidly moved to fix this, starting with jumping him two grades to lieutenant, and ending with him in command of the USS ''Rhode Island'' in ''STO'''s ''Delta Rising'' expansion (as he had in the alternate future in "Endgame"). [[AuthorsSavingThrow Captain Harry Kim was one of the best-received characters in that expansion, receiving praise for his staunch morality, excellent voice acting, and professionalism]].


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** Tuvix, from the episode "Tuvix". This could've been a multi-part subplot with a special guest actor that punched the audiences in the emotional gut. But instead Tuvix is a generic "wows everybody but is TooCoolToLive" character who dies at the end of the episode.


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** "Real Life". The Doctor [[TearJerker watches his daughter die before his eyes]]. It's probably the single most traumatic event a parent can experience. The writers could and ''should'' have had a field day with this, bringing it up in the next few episodes and having call-backs in later seasons...but [[StatusQuoIsGod it was never mentioned again]].
** "Unity". This episode should have been a masterpiece. The return of the Borg in all their menacing glory! A society of ex-drones who have formed a [[VideoGame/MassEffect geth-like]] HiveMind to cope! Surely we will have action, adventure, and a game-changing event in the series, right? No. What instead happens is the Borg cube just sits there, most of the episode is exposition and bland dialogue, and the events are never mentioned again. This episode was so hated that producer Jeri Taylor admitted in publicity materials for "Scorpion" that that two-parter was intended as something as an apology for the boring "Unity".
** "Tuvix". This plot should have been great and it's easy to see how. Stretch the Tuvix plot out as a subplot of 3-4 other episodes, have the audience get used to the character...''then'' bring Tuvok and Neelix back. That way the audience actually cares about Tuvix and is shocked and genuinely saddened when he dies. Instead, the status quo is maintained, and Tuvix's death has little emotional punch.
17th Mar '17 9:43:28 AM wyattte
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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this bad. A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him). The writing crew were aware of his base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode "Parturition" was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom, but instead resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent the entire episode being hateful towards Tom because of his psychotic jealousy.
* BizarroEpisode: ''Threshold''. The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.

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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this bad. ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).
**
The writing crew were aware of his Neelix's base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode "Parturition" [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E7Parturition "Parturition"]] was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom, but instead Tom. That didn't quite work as planned - it resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent much of the entire episode being hateful towards Tom because of [[CrazyJealousGuy his psychotic jealousy.
jealousy.]]
** Due to the inconsistent characterization and some questionable decisions, Kathryn Janeway is probably the most base-breaking of the ''Star Trek'' captains, with a significant hatedom contrasted with a ''diehard'' fandom. See DesignatedHero below.
* BestKnownForTheFanservice: Seven Of Nine got one of the show's best character arcs and was the focus of many well-liked episodes, but let's get real here - to much of the audience, Seven and her {{Stripperific}} catsuit fell under this trope.
* BizarroEpisode: ''Threshold''. ''"Threshold."'' The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.



** Picardo has the Midas touch. The Doctor is simply the best thing about ''Voyager'' (beyond some sterling moments with the female cast), and one only has to take Picardo and inject him into a sister show ([=DS9=]) or movie (''First Contact'') for brilliance to be assured! The Doctor was easily the most consistently-written character, and one of the few who actually evolved over the years.

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** Picardo has the Midas touch. The Doctor is simply the best thing about ''Voyager'' (beyond some sterling moments with the female cast), and one only has to take Picardo and inject him into a sister show ([=DS9=]) or movie (''First Contact'') for brilliance to be assured! The Doctor was easily the most consistently-written character, and one of the few who actually [[CharacterDevelopment evolved over the years.]]
14th Mar '17 7:29:24 PM jogirard
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** Chakotay aids Janeway in contacting her animal guide early in Season 1, and it's represented as a tokay gecko. [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E5 Not the first time Janeway is going to be associated with lizards during the course of the show...]]

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** Chakotay aids Janeway in contacting her animal guide early in Season 1, and it's represented as a tokay gecko. [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E5 [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS2E15Threshold Not the first time Janeway is going to be associated with lizards lizards]] [[SoBadItsGood during the course of the show...]]
14th Mar '17 7:27:50 PM jogirard
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** In "Dark Frontier", when Magnus tells a young Annika(in the flashback scene) to put down the Borg cube model, he tells her it's "not a toy"- it actually is a toy, the Borg cube made by Playmates.

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** In "Dark Frontier", when Magnus tells a young Annika(in Annika (in the flashback scene) to put down the Borg cube model, he tells her it's "not a toy"- it actually is a toy, the Borg cube made by Playmates.


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** Chakotay aids Janeway in contacting her animal guide early in Season 1, and it's represented as a tokay gecko. [[Recap/StarTrekVoyagerS1E5 Not the first time Janeway is going to be associated with lizards during the course of the show...]]
12th Mar '17 4:06:44 PM wyattte
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** Neelix, actually. He has a tragic backstory of losing his family in a war where he [[DraftDodging dodged the draft]] because he was afraid to die, and he had to spend years trying to survive in a hostile region any way he could. His initial purpose is to be the crew's guide, but the ship eventually passes beyond the regions he's familiar with--leaving him questioning his purpose and where to go from there. That had the makings of a character with pathos and complexity. Instead, we got a comic relief Scrappy who barely got any CharacterDevelopment outside of what was just mentioned.

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** Neelix, actually. He has a tragic backstory of losing DarkAndTroubledPast where he lost his family in a war where he [[DraftDodging dodged the draft]] because he was afraid to die, and he then had to spend years trying to survive in a hostile region any way he could. His initial purpose is to be the crew's guide, but the ship eventually passes beyond the regions he's familiar with--leaving him questioning his purpose and where to go from there. That had the makings of a character with pathos and complexity. Instead, we got a pompous, comic relief Scrappy goofball who spent the first couple of seasons with a creepy jealous streak, and barely got any CharacterDevelopment outside of what was just mentioned.
11th Mar '17 10:15:17 PM wyattte
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* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this bad. A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though other fans remember hating him from an early age). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, annoying, a jerk, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since apparently kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him). The writing crew were aware of his base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode "Parturition" was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom, but instead resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent the entire episode being hateful towards Tom because of his psychotic jealousy.

to:

* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this bad. A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though other fans remember hating him from an early age). that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, annoying, a jerk, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since apparently kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him). The writing crew were aware of his base-breaking tendencies, and the season 2 episode "Parturition" was intended to be an AuthorsSavingThrow, written solely to put the kibosh on an unflattering LoveTriangle arc with Kes and Tom, but instead resulted in Tom Paris being a mature adult while Neelix spent the entire episode being hateful towards Tom because of his psychotic jealousy.



* ContestedSequel: Just scan this page. ''TAS'', ''TNG'' and ''[=DS9=]'' don't take anywhere near this much flak; the only TV show entry that does is ''Enterprise'', and ''that'' show made its fifth episode into a [[DudeNotFunny 45-minute rape joke]].

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* ContestedSequel: Just scan this page. ''TAS'', ''TNG'' and ''[=DS9=]'' don't take anywhere near this much flak; the only TV show entry that does is ''Enterprise'', and ''that'' show made its fifth episode into a [[DudeNotFunny 45-minute rape joke]]. ''Enterprise''.



* FanonDiscontinuity: there are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy. Remember that episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.

to:

* FanonDiscontinuity: there are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy.
**
Remember that "Threshold," the episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.
** "Twisted" wasn't even well liked by the ''actors'' - in particular, it's Robert Picardo's least favorite episode.



** Captain Braxton's defining line "A leads to B, and B leads to C" will never sound the same again in a post-[[Film/TheHumanCentipede Human Cendipede]] world. Made worse/funnier by the fact that Braxton is, in a way, a mad scientist.

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** Captain Braxton's defining line "A leads to B, and B leads to C" will never sound the same again in a post-[[Film/TheHumanCentipede Human Cendipede]] Centipede]] world. Made worse/funnier by the fact that Braxton is, in a way, a mad scientist.



** "Unimatrix Zero", despite being one of the painfully badly-written episodes of the entire series, at least opens with a really nice shot of eye candy, and the Borg costumes for Janeway, Torres, and Tuvok deserved more screen time.

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** "Unimatrix Zero", despite not exactly being one of the painfully badly-written episodes of the entire series, most well-liked episodes, at least opens with a really nice shot of eye candy, and the Borg costumes for Janeway, Torres, and Tuvok deserved more screen time.



*** Garret Wang, Harry Kim's actor, who loves Trek and is generally a nice guy in RealLife, but was constantly screwed over by the writers.


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*** Garret Wang, Harry Kim's actor, who loves Trek and is generally a nice guy in RealLife, but was constantly screwed over by the writers.
24th Feb '17 10:33:59 AM Anddrix
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*** Website/SFDebris depicts her as an oversexed, tyrannical, TriggerHappy lunatic who abuses her crew as she carves a swath of destruction and ruination through the Delta Quadrant. (a joke, a sort of {{Flanderization}} to add to his menagerie of transvestite Harry, cannibalistic Neelix, polymath Tom, and office clerk Borgs, along with other caricatures from TNG and ENT). Chuck occasionally uses Mulgrew's take on Janeway as well, interpreting her condemnation of Captain Ransom in "Equinox" as a [[YouAreWhatYouHate projection of guilt]] for her own questionable actions. Even more interestingly, he speculated that Janeway's fake identity in "Workforce" — toiling away in obscurity at a dead-end job and entertaining the possibility of a second love — was fueled by a subconscious desire to escape the burden she's been shouldering for over six years.
--->"People have their limits, period. Picard had his in 'Family', or Sisko had his in 'Emissary'. Given the choice between watching your crew die one after the other—year after year—with home still decades away and a self-imposed isolation, or thinking that she could've resigned and taken a job on Earth with a husband and a pile of dogs, well... There's a lot of days where the former makes the latter ''look pretty damn good.''"
*** In his ''Franchise/StarWars'' crossover, ''Fanfic/TheUnitySaga'', he exposes her depressive side [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone when she realizes the consequences of her brief interaction with the Galactic Empire]].



** Website/SFDebris reinterpreted [[http://sfdebris.com/videos/startrek/v892.php "Demon"]] and [[http://sfdebris.com/videos/startrek/v913.php "Course: Oblivion"]] as an unintended commentary on the Prime Directive. Janeway carelessly breaches it in "Demon" by [[spoiler:letting the Silver Blood copy ''Voyager'''s crew and become sentient]], and as a result, in "Course: Oblivion" [[spoiler:an entire species is wiped out without a trace]].



** Jeri Ryan (Seven of Nine) and Robert Picardo (The Doctor) are so multi-talented that they can carry the entire show by themselves, as they have shown on repeated occasions. The rest of the crew is there to shout out [[MandatoryLine "Shields at 42%]]" or somesuch.
--->'''[=SFDebris=]''': Now it's just our hero and her plucky hologram sidekick. *''Series/RedDwarf'' theme plays*

to:

** Jeri Ryan (Seven of Nine) and Robert Picardo (The Doctor) are so multi-talented that they can carry the entire show by themselves, as they have shown on repeated occasions. The rest of the crew is there to shout out [[MandatoryLine "Shields at 42%]]" or somesuch.
--->'''[=SFDebris=]''': Now it's just our hero and her plucky hologram sidekick. *''Series/RedDwarf'' theme plays*



* FanonDiscontinuity: there are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy. Remember that episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to (Except when it is used for snark by reviewers, such as in WebSite/SFDebris and his ''Voyager'' reviews.) In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.

to:

* FanonDiscontinuity: there are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy. Remember that episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to (Except when it is used for snark by reviewers, such as in WebSite/SFDebris and his ''Voyager'' reviews.) to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.



*** "Non Sequitor". Harry gives up his hot, horny fiance and successful job to try a suicidal plan to be back with Tom Paris again. To quote WebSite/SFDebris, "[[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Damn it, there's nothing gay about this!]]"

to:

*** "Non Sequitor". Harry gives up his hot, horny fiance and successful job to try a suicidal plan to be back with Tom Paris again. To quote WebSite/SFDebris, "[[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Damn it, there's nothing gay about this!]]"



** As Website/SFDebris notes, ''Voyager'' had some genuinely good ideas and a decent premise, but the show was ultimately damned by writers who kept deciding to play it safe and preferred StatusQuoIsGod to NothingIsTheSameAnymore.



** Website/SFDebris points out in his review of "Scorpion," one of the show's best regarded episodes, that a major reason it works so well is that, with its emphasis on the incredible danger faced by a lone Starfleet ship in hostile territory and serious disagreements between the crew members, it's what ''the entire show'' was supposed to be like.



** Harry, the young naive "dweeb," who gets killed, tortured, diseased, etc. probably more than any other character. [[WebSite/SFDebris Poor dumb Harry.]]

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** Harry, the young naive "dweeb," who gets killed, tortured, diseased, etc. probably more than any other character. [[WebSite/SFDebris Poor dumb Harry.]]
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