History YMMV / StarTrekVoyager

4th Jul '17 1:46:57 PM N_Dreiling
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** And yet somehow, no one (at least on the Internet) appears to have shipped Seven of Nine and Ensign Wildman [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11705664/1/A-Fire-of-Devotion-Part-1-Louder-Than-Sirens until 2015]]. Considering how many ships there are for characters who didn't even appear in the same series (Janeway/Dr. Cruhser being a fairly common one), Seven and Samantha having shared at least one scene (Mortal Coil), AND Seven's friendship with Naomi, this seems like a natural fit.

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** And yet somehow, no one (at least on the Internet) appears to have shipped Seven of Nine and Ensign Wildman [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11705664/1/A-Fire-of-Devotion-Part-1-Louder-Than-Sirens until 2015]]. Considering how many ships there are for characters who didn't even appear in the same series (Janeway/Dr. Cruhser Crusher being a fairly common one), Seven and Samantha having shared at least one scene (Mortal Coil), AND Seven's friendship with Naomi, this seems like a natural fit.
4th Jul '17 12:13:14 PM N_Dreiling
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**And yet somehow, no one (at least on the Internet) appears to have shipped Seven of Nine and Ensign Wildman [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11705664/1/A-Fire-of-Devotion-Part-1-Louder-Than-Sirens until 2015]]. Considering how many ships there are for characters who didn't even appear in the same series (Janeway/Dr. Cruhser being a fairly common one), Seven and Samantha having shared at least one scene (Mortal Coil), AND Seven's friendship with Naomi, this seems like a natural fit.
19th Jun '17 3:17:40 AM OlfinBedwere
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* BrokenBase: The episode "Course: Oblivion" is either regarded as one of the best episodes of the series for its brutal gut-punch of an ending, or one of the worst by those who hated its precursor episode "Demon" and didn't like revisiting the concepts.

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* BrokenBase: BrokenBase:
**
The episode "Course: Oblivion" is either regarded as one of the best episodes of the series for its brutal gut-punch of an ending, or one of the worst by those who hated its precursor episode "Demon" and didn't like revisiting the concepts.


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** There's a split between fans who consider Seasons 1-3 to be better, and those who prefer Season 4-7. Those in the former group claim that whatever their quality, the earlier seasons at least tried to stay true to Creator/GeneRoddenberry's vision, and that the latter seasons betrayed said vision by instead going for the DarkerAndEdgier, more action-oriented style that [=DS9=] and ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' employed. On the other hand, those who prefer the newer seasons tend to point out that the show was in serious danger of cancellation by the end of Season 3, and that the ReTool for Season 4 ensured that the show got to the full seven-season run that the two previous ''Trek'' shows did.
15th May '17 12:36:17 PM SorPepita
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* FanonDiscontinuity: there are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy.
** Remember "Threshold," the episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.

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* FanonDiscontinuity: there There are a number of very silly {{Idiot Plot}}s, in the first two to three seasons in particular, that are written out of fan consciousness for the sake of mercy.
** Remember "Threshold," "Threshold", the episode where Tom Paris made it to Warp 10? The fans decided not to. In fact, [[CanonDiscontinuity even the series itself]] struck it off.



** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sacrosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).

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** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? reason. Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sacrosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).



** "Bride of Chaotica" is fueled by this trope, with the affectionate parody of [[Franchise/FlashGordon Flash Gordon]] films, the Ming the Merciless-inspired Doctor Chaotica, and Janeway openly being an evil overlord. [[SoBadItsGood And]] [[StylisticSuck it]] [[HamAndCheese is]] [[EvilIsHammy GLORIOUS]]! [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome There's even a moment when the holodoc, as the President of Earth, makes a joke about being unimpeachable]]. [[note]](This was soon after President Clinton was impeached[[/note]]

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** "Bride of Chaotica" is fueled by this trope, with the affectionate parody of [[Franchise/FlashGordon Flash Gordon]] films, the Ming the Merciless-inspired Doctor Chaotica, and Janeway openly being an evil overlord. [[SoBadItsGood And]] [[StylisticSuck it]] [[HamAndCheese is]] [[EvilIsHammy GLORIOUS]]! [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome There's even a moment when the holodoc, as the President of Earth, makes a joke about being unimpeachable]]. [[note]](This was soon after President Clinton was impeached[[/note]]impeached)[[/note]]



* TheScrappy: The entire Kazon species basically constituted one of these on the first two seasons of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''; And in spite of the fact that the entire species seemed to be rock-stupid and technologically backwards, ''Voyager'' somehow managed not only to keep running into them, but to keep running into the ''same'' ones. Later in the series, the writers themselves took shots at the Kazon by revealing that the Borg took a pass on assimilating them on the grounds that doing so would undermine their perfection. Their role as a major power in the Delta quadrant seems an AssPull as well. On the first episode they are shown, they are depicted as a small nomadic slave-trading tribe always on the move to find vital water supplies... but the minute Neelix pisses them off, out comes the armada of ''Voyager''-level warships always on the Voyager's tail. It's almost like refusing change to a bum on the subway only to find you pissed off [[Film/TheGodfather Don Corleone.]]

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* TheScrappy: The entire Kazon species basically constituted one of these on the first two seasons of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''; And in spite of the fact that the entire species seemed to be rock-stupid and technologically backwards, ''Voyager'' somehow managed not only to keep running into them, but to keep running into the ''same'' ones. Later in the series, the writers themselves took shots at the Kazon by revealing that the Borg took a pass on assimilating them on the grounds that doing so would undermine their perfection. Their role as a major power in the Delta quadrant seems an AssPull as well. On the first episode they are shown, they are depicted as a small nomadic slave-trading tribe always on the move to find vital water supplies... but the minute Neelix pisses them off, out comes the armada of ''Voyager''-level warships always on the Voyager's tail. It's almost like refusing change to a bum on the subway only to find you pissed off [[Film/TheGodfather Don Corleone.]]



** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Maquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Maquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.

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** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Maquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Maquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; this, possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.
15th May '17 12:00:28 PM SorPepita
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*** Generally speaking there are two interpretations of Janeway: The self-flagellating, steely-but-compassionate woman who is doing everything in her power to get this crew back to their families, and one who is...''not.''

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*** Generally speaking there are two interpretations of Janeway: The self-flagellating, steely-but-compassionate woman who is doing everything in her power to get this crew back to their families, and one who is... ''not.''



* DesignatedVillain: Species 8472. Their initial appearance has Janeway decide to ally with the ''Borg'' to destroy them because...one Species 8472 soldier shot a warning shot off ''Voyager's'' bow, and Kes (a telepath with powers that are repeatedly unreliable and unstable) says that they're very angry and shouting xenophobic war cries telepathically.

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* DesignatedVillain: Species 8472. Their initial appearance has Janeway decide to ally with the ''Borg'' to destroy them because... one Species 8472 soldier shot a warning shot off ''Voyager's'' bow, and Kes (a telepath with powers that are repeatedly unreliable and unstable) says that they're very angry and shouting xenophobic war cries telepathically.



** At one point in "The Omega Directive", Seven solves a puzzle game that Harry is playing in about two seconds. Yes, she's a superintelligent Borg...but Harry's supposed to be an educated bridge officer! Even for Harry Kim this incident is pathetic.

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** At one point in "The Omega Directive", Seven solves a puzzle game that Harry is playing in about two seconds. Yes, she's a superintelligent Borg... but Harry's supposed to be an educated bridge officer! Even for Harry Kim this incident is pathetic.



** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas.... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.

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** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas....ideas... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.
15th May '17 10:07:44 AM SorPepita
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*** Meanwhile, ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters'' (a SharedUniverse on the ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' forums) interprets her as simply having been put by circumstances into an position well above her skill level. The 'verse further interprets her promotion to flag rank in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' with the common fanon assumption that she had been KickedUpstairs to keep her out of any further field command.

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*** Meanwhile, ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters'' ''The War of the Masters'' (a SharedUniverse on the ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' forums) interprets her as simply having been put by circumstances into an position well above her skill level. The 'verse further interprets her promotion to flag rank in ''Film/StarTrekNemesis'' with the common fanon assumption that she had been KickedUpstairs to keep her out of any further field command.
11th May '17 1:30:08 PM sabremeister
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**** Where did he get the cider? All of his personal effects would have been on the Maquis ship when they were brought to the Delta Quadrant, and no one would take the trouble to beam out things-that-weren't-people-whose-lives-needed-saving in the middle of a battle before the ship was destroyed.
28th Apr '17 7:19:57 PM jogirard
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** During "Favorite Son", the Nasari's ship name is the [[Film/StarTrek Nerada]].
19th Apr '17 12:07:13 AM ShorinBJ
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*** Chakotay is revealed in "Shattered" to have a hidden supply of Cider in one of the cargo bays for the last 7 years. No wonder he comes across as being wooden, spouts nonsensical mysticism at the strangest times, has questionable command abilities, and for the life of him ''can't'' land a shuttle without crashing it into something! Its entirely plausible that he's been secretly drunk for the entire trip. Although to be fair, if you were in Voyager's position- trapped on the opposite side of the galaxy, forced to work with the people who you were fighting against, assuming your people back home are being wiped out by the Cardassians, decades from resupply, knowing you'd never see home again, the imminent threat of cyborg zombies hanging over your head and with a very questionable person in charge- would you honestly be able to handle it without either going nuts or getting drunk?

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*** Chakotay is revealed in "Shattered" to have a hidden supply of Cider cider in one of the cargo bays for the last 7 seven years. No wonder he comes across as being wooden, spouts nonsensical mysticism at the strangest times, has questionable command abilities, and for the life of him ''can't'' land a shuttle without crashing it into something! Its It's entirely plausible that he's been secretly drunk for the entire trip. Although to be fair, if you were in Voyager's position- trapped position--trapped on the opposite side of the galaxy, forced to work with the people who you were fighting against, assuming your people back home are being wiped out by the Cardassians, decades from resupply, knowing you'd never see home again, the imminent threat of cyborg zombies hanging over your head and with a very questionable person in charge- would charge--would you honestly be able to handle it without either going nuts or getting drunk?



* BadassDecay: In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' a normal Borg cube was able to wipe out entire Federation fleet with barely a scratch. Here a heavily armored one is severely damaged by a single starship.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).

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* BadassDecay: In ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' a normal Borg cube was able to wipe out an entire Federation fleet with barely a scratch. Here a heavily armored one is severely damaged by a single starship.
* BaseBreakingCharacter: Neelix got this ''bad.'' A lot of very young Trekkies supposedly loved him and his endless supply of cheer and goofball charm (though that's certainly not universal). Many adults found him boorish, incompetent, and overbearing (his fumbling of duties in "Basics Part 2", resulting in two deaths as a direct result of his incompetence in a field that he claimed expertise in, being a major target of scorn). His hatedom is second only to [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Wesley Crusher]] in Trek circles, yet he doesn't ''quite'' count as TheScrappy since kids loved him so much, and it is worthy of note that latter later seasons smoothed out his edges a bit ("Once Upon A Time" even had the actor add in a little bit where Neelix looks ''surprised'' that anybody could ''genuinely'' be happy to see him).



* BizarroEpisode: ''"Threshold."'' The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.

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* BizarroEpisode: ''"Threshold."'' The crew's latest go-home plan involves a drive capable of infinite speed, which when tested on a shuttlecraft prompts Tom Paris to mutate into a giant space salamander, kidnap Janeway, turn her into a salamander too, and settle down on some random planet to have space salamander babies. It's small wonder no-one no one ever mentioned it again. Plus, at episode's end they actually have a way home, ''and'' a cure for the problem it caused.



** In particular 4--7 showcased greater consistency in Janeway's character and decreased the Ominicidal TriggerHappy aspects of her personality a fair bit. The story plots also became less stupid, to some degree, and Seven of Nine became a regular character as well (this coincided with less screentime for characters like Chakotay which really didn't hurt at all).

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** In particular 4--7 showcased greater consistency in Janeway's character and decreased the Ominicidal Omnicidal TriggerHappy aspects of her personality a fair bit. The story plots also became less stupid, to some degree, and Seven of Nine became a regular character as well (this coincided with less screentime for characters like Chakotay which really didn't hurt at all).



** Chakotay/Paris also has a sizable following. It's surprisingly easy to read their tension and Tom's protectiveness of Chakotay as the result of their being bitter ex boyfriends who still have feelings for each other.

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** Chakotay/Paris also has a sizable following. It's surprisingly easy to read their tension and Tom's protectiveness of Chakotay as the result of their being bitter ex boyfriends ex-boyfriends who still have feelings for each other.



** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sarcosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).

to:

** To this day, the fandom still argues whether Janeway blowing up the Array was the right call because even a short-lived species deserves to live, or a boneheaded move that stranded her crew for no good reason? Even close analysis of the script is somewhat ambiguous, thanks to late rewrites by Jeri Taylor that muddled the issue from what seems to be simple pragmatism (the script indicates that despite sending Tuvok to figure out its workings, Janeway is physiologically incapable of operating the array) to unusually-justified moral grounds (Janeway's actual reasoning for blowing up the damaged, already likely unusable array is to protect the Ocampa, which is not only a technical violation of the Prime Directive that Janeway claims to hold sarcosanct sacrosanct but also sort of pointless as due to their screwy biology the Ocampa will go extinct within a couple of centuries at the absolute most).



* MagnificentBastard: Seska disguises herself as a Bajoran, infiltrates the Maquis, is communicating with and slipping tech and information to the Kazon during most of her time serving with Voyager, isn't found out for a least a year, engineers a cover up that's almost successful, when she is discovered she had already planned out and executes an escape, forges an alliance with the Kazon Nistrum, has the faction leader Culluh basically as her puppet right from the start, is directly responsible for most of the Nistrum's victories, including the successful capture of Voyager at the end of season 2, and even after she dies she possessed the forethought to set a trap in one of the holodeck programs at some point during her possession of Voyager in an attempt to kill several members of the crew in the event they retook the ship that she put in just in case. In fact, over the entirety of the Voyager Seska is one of the very few truly cunning villains in the series to last more than an episode or 2.

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* MagnificentBastard: Seska disguises herself as a Bajoran, infiltrates the Maquis, is communicating with and slipping tech and information to the Kazon during most of her time serving with Voyager, isn't found out for a least a year, engineers a cover up that's almost successful, when she is discovered she had already planned out and executes an escape, forges an alliance with the Kazon Nistrum, Kazon-Nistrum, has the faction leader Culluh basically as her puppet right from the start, is directly responsible for most of the Nistrum's victories, including the successful capture of Voyager at the end of season 2, and even after she dies she possessed the forethought to set a trap in one of the holodeck programs at some point during her possession of Voyager in an attempt to kill several members of the crew in the event they retook the ship that she put in just in case. In fact, over the entirety of the Voyager Seska is one of the very few truly cunning villains in the series to last more than an episode or 2.



** Captain Ransom easily crossed this line when he started murdering aliens as a fuel source for his ship. IDidWhatIHadToDo is nowhere near a sufficient excuse, but he at least seems to realize this at some level and eventually under goes a HeelFaceTurn and HeroicSacrifice.

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** Captain Ransom easily crossed this line when he started murdering aliens as a fuel source for his ship. IDidWhatIHadToDo is nowhere near a sufficient excuse, but he at least seems to realize this at some level and eventually under goes a HeelFaceTurn and DeathEqualsRedemption HeroicSacrifice.



** Well, we also know now that the Klingon religion is true, or at least can be manifest - although that in itself might be a cause for ParanoiaFuel - which indicates that other religions are true as well. We also have verification that spirituality and unknown planes of existence exists as well, courtesy of "Sacred Ground", and that belief and faith do in fact have an impact on the real world. Now ''that'' is both awesome and insanely confusing, and now we can be absolutely sure that someone is out there watching the confusion and laughing their head off. Not that Q wasn't doing a wonderful job already...

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** Well, we also know now that the Klingon religion is true, or at least can be manifest - although manifested--although that in itself might be a cause for ParanoiaFuel - which ParanoiaFuel--which indicates that other religions are true as well. We also have verification that spirituality and unknown planes of existence exists as well, courtesy of "Sacred Ground", and that belief and faith do in fact have an impact on the real world. Now ''that'' is both awesome and insanely confusing, and now we can be absolutely sure that someone is out there watching the confusion and laughing their head off. Not that Q wasn't doing a wonderful job already...



** The writers seemed to forget that Kes dumping Neelix in "Warlord" wasn't real, since she was being possessed. Afterwards they're presented as broken up for real, with no further explanation. A scene was filmed for the episode "Fair Trade" to give some closure to the relationship, unfortunately it was cut due to time constraints.

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** The writers seemed to forget that Kes dumping Neelix in "Warlord" wasn't real, since she was being possessed. Afterwards they're presented as broken up for real, with no further explanation. A scene was filmed for the episode "Fair Trade" to give some closure to the relationship, unfortunately but it was cut due to time constraints.



** A variation: in "Gravity" the audience is supposed to agree with Tom Paris that the human way of being in touch with our emotions and having them in our lives is the right way, in contrary opposition to the Vulcan master who taught Tuvok to suppress his emotions. Paris has a real problem with accepting that Vulcans ''aren't'' humans. Vulcan emotions are far more volatile, erratic and all-consuming than human's (whose emotions are less violent), and for a Vulcan being in love can be ''legitimately'' destructive, and not in the metaphoric sense that humans use. Not to mention that ''other'' episodes of this show have Tuvok fully justify his emotional repression by demonstrating to people [[BewareTheQuietOnes what it looks like when he lets it go]]. (This is a fairly common writing mistake with Vulcans in general: they're frequently portrayed as being just super-stuck up, repressed humans rather than TheFettered.)

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** A variation: in "Gravity" the audience is supposed to agree with Tom Paris that the human way of being in touch with our emotions and having them in our lives is the right way, in contrary opposition to the Vulcan master who taught Tuvok to suppress his emotions. Paris has a real problem with accepting that Vulcans ''aren't'' humans. Vulcan emotions are far more volatile, erratic and all-consuming than human's humans' (whose emotions are less violent), and for a Vulcan being in love can be ''legitimately'' destructive, and not in the metaphoric sense that humans use. use.[[note]]They're not just assuming that their emotions are stronger; remember that Vulcans have mind-melded with humans, putting them in a position to compare their emotions[[/note]] Not to mention that ''other'' episodes of this show have Tuvok fully justify his emotional repression by demonstrating to people [[BewareTheQuietOnes what it looks like when he lets it go]]. (This is a fairly common writing mistake with Vulcans in general: they're frequently portrayed as being just super-stuck up, repressed humans rather than TheFettered.)



** This show had a horrible habit of introducing potentially interesting recurring characters and then either getting rid of them only a couple of episodes later or just never using them again. Carrey disappeared after the first season, Hogan was unceremoniously killed, Jonas was killed instead of imprisoned (where he could have made a good recurring anti-villain) and they phased out Wildman and Vorik for no reason. Interesting characters like Dalby, Chell, Suder, Lessing, Ceres, etc. were never used again after their introduction (with the exception of Chell, once, several years later, and not to the best effect; and Suder who was killed in his second appearance).

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** This show had a horrible habit of introducing potentially interesting recurring characters and then either getting rid of them only a couple of episodes later or just never using them again. Carrey Carey mostly disappeared after the first season, Hogan was unceremoniously killed, Jonas was killed instead of imprisoned (where he could have made a good recurring anti-villain) and they phased out Wildman and Vorik for no reason. Interesting characters like Dalby, Chell, Suder, Lessing, Ceres, etc. were never used again after their introduction (with the exception of Chell, once, several years later, and not to the best effect; and Suder who was killed in his second appearance).



** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female Captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas.... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.

to:

** What strikes immediately about "Caretaker" is the amount of promise it shows. You’ve got a well-cast female Captain, captain, a crew consisting of outlaws, misfits, refugees, a grouchy holographic Doctor, and a ship which is lost and alone in an uncharted area of space. Surely this is going to be an exciting return to the days of TOS? "Caretaker" boasts a huge budget for the time and sets up its characters and the series ethos with aplomb. But apparently the fellows in Paramount and UPN's marketing department had other ideas.... While the series had numerous moments of greatness, it was ultimately a frustrating and unsatisfying experience for nearly everyone involved.



** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Marquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Marquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.

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** The episode "Worst Case Scenario" has an excellent plot hook: Torres (a former Marquis) Maquis) finds a holodeck program hidden away in the computer which depicts a Marquis Maquis revolt on Voyager. It's later revealed that it was designed by Tuvok as a way to train security to handle such a scenario. The episode completely fails to do ANYTHING interesting with this; possible because the character (by that point) didn't have the depth to make the episode interesting. SF Debris also noted on this one how sad it was that by this point, the supposed major hook of the show in having Starfleet and Maquis forced to work together had become such a non-issue that Tuvok literally had to write his own fanfiction for it to be explored at all.



** On the surface, Neelix is nothing more than an arrogant lying incompetent asshole, and most fans hate him, feeling that he was little more than a prototype of Jar-Jar Binks. However, while his species was xenophobic, arrogant, and generally incompetent to begin with, many of his kind were killed when his home planet was vaporized in a violent war with another race- made worse by the fact he was a cowardly war deserter that suffered survivor's guilt because he only survived due to having run off to another planet. His time as a junk scavenger placed him under the watch of the Kazon, and the woman he loved was not only abused by the Kazon but only had a life span of 9 years. Try as he might to help the crew in their situation he often annoyed them. He lost his lungs to the Vidiaans and had to receive an emergency transplant from Kes just to survive. At one point a transporter accident bonds him and Tuvok into one being (with "Tuvix" being a bad example- he had to be "killed" just to save the two that made him). Kes eventually broke up with him due to his abusive and hyper-jealous treatment of her, and Neelix was consistently stuck inflicting his incompetence on Tuvok, which eventually caused him to snap and chew out Tuvok- Tuvok did learn to be a bit more tolerant of Neelix's persistent incompetence, though. Then as Voyager moves out of the area of space he knows he finds himself feeling even more useless and commits a criminal act hoping to get a useful map. On one mission he is killed, his only salvation being Borg nanoprobes that revive him but sends him into a temporary depression, believing that he is merely a reanimated corpse and that the "real" Neelix died. Dealing the the possibility than Samantha Wildman may die led to extreme troubles in dealing with Naomi Wildman. The series didn't really let up on treating him like a punching bag until his final episode in which he meets a colony of Talaxian refugees and stays with them shortly before Voyager returns home.

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** On the surface, Neelix is nothing more than an arrogant lying incompetent asshole, and most fans hate him, feeling that he was little more than a prototype of Jar-Jar Binks. However, while his species was xenophobic, arrogant, and generally incompetent to begin with, many of his kind were killed when his home planet colony was vaporized in a violent war with another race- made race--made worse by the fact he was a cowardly war deserter that suffered survivor's guilt because he only survived due to having run off to another planet. His time as a junk scavenger placed him under the watch of the Kazon, and the woman he loved was not only abused by the Kazon but only had a life span of 9 years. Try as he might to help the crew in their situation he often annoyed them. He lost his lungs to the Vidiaans Vidiians and had to receive an emergency transplant from Kes just to survive. At one point a transporter accident bonds him and Tuvok into one being (with "Tuvix" being a bad example- he example--he had to be "killed" just to save the two that made him). Kes eventually broke up with him due to his abusive and hyper-jealous treatment of her, and Neelix was consistently stuck inflicting his incompetence on Tuvok, which eventually caused him to snap and chew out Tuvok- Tuvok Tuvok--Tuvok did learn to be a bit more tolerant of Neelix's persistent incompetence, though. Then as Voyager moves out of the area of space he knows he finds himself feeling even more useless and commits a criminal act hoping to get a useful map. On one mission he is killed, his only salvation being Borg nanoprobes that revive him but sends him into a temporary depression, believing that he is merely a reanimated corpse and that the "real" Neelix died. Dealing the with the possibility than that Samantha Wildman may die led to extreme troubles in dealing with Naomi Wildman. The series didn't really let up on treating him like a punching bag until his final episode in which he meets a colony of Talaxian refugees and stays with them shortly before Voyager returns home.
18th Mar '17 1:47:59 PM Fighteer
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