History YMMV / JuliusCaesar

19th Apr '18 10:19:48 AM AdelePotter
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* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic: The 2018 National Theater production made great use of "We're Not Gonna Take It" by Twisted Sister.
18th Apr '18 11:04:10 AM littlemissbones
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** The 2018 National Theater production, which set everything in the modern day, with the various characters being played as [[{{Expy}} expies]] of [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed contemporary politicians]], played Cassius as a woman. Although no words are changed, save for the necessary pronouns, the way certain lines are said and scenes are staged add another potential motive for Cassius turning on Caesar, implying that sexism (which is notoriously rampant in politics) might have had something to do with it.

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** The 2018 National Theater production, which set everything in the modern day, with the various characters being played as [[{{Expy}} expies]] of [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed contemporary politicians]], played Cassius as a woman. Although no words are changed, save for the necessary pronouns, the way certain lines are said and scenes are staged add another potential motive for Cassius turning on Caesar, implying that sexism (which is notoriously rampant in politics) might have had something to do with it. It also adds another layer to Brutus shooting down Cassius's ideas to kill Mark Antony, keep Antony from speaking at Caesar's funeral, and not taking on Octavius, Antony, and Lepidus at Philippi, all of which leads to disaster for the Liberators.
13th Apr '18 11:35:52 AM AdelePotter
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Obviously Brutus, but also Caesar. Is he a skeptic who refuses to pay heed to the soothsayer (see ArbitrarySkepticism on the main page) or a highly superstitious figure who refuses to "beware" the Ides of March because it would be challenging fate and willingly goes to his destiny, only showing sadness at discovering Brutus among his killers? Or is he just too arrogant to pay heed to any warning of danger; or, is he worried about the threat but afraid of showing his fear out of concern for looking weak?

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
Obviously Brutus, but also Caesar. Is he a skeptic who refuses to pay heed to the soothsayer (see ArbitrarySkepticism on the main page) or a highly superstitious figure who refuses to "beware" the Ides of March because it would be challenging fate and willingly goes to his destiny, only showing sadness at discovering Brutus among his killers? Or is he just too arrogant to pay heed to any warning of danger; or, is he worried about the threat but afraid of showing his fear out of concern for looking weak? weak?
** The 2018 National Theater production, which set everything in the modern day, with the various characters being played as [[{{Expy}} expies]] of [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed contemporary politicians]], played Cassius as a woman. Although no words are changed, save for the necessary pronouns, the way certain lines are said and scenes are staged add another potential motive for Cassius turning on Caesar, implying that sexism (which is notoriously rampant in politics) might have had something to do with it.
10th Apr '18 6:09:36 AM momur
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** "It was/is all Greek to me." (For when someone can't understand something)
22nd Aug '17 7:28:43 PM JulianLapostat
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* MisaimedFandom: It provides no end of amusement to people who are students of history to laugh at the irony of unpopular politicians being placed in the role of Caesar. While hardly without controversy Caesar was a very popular man in his day. When most politicians were seen as increasingly inept, hiding behind their prose and uppity rich classicism to appear more sophisticated than they really were, someone as bold and as blunt as Caesar who told it like it was caught on very quickly with the average working Roman. He was immensely popular with the troops for winning many campaigns and paying them handsomely for their hard work. Caesar was even declared an enemy of the state for his devotion to his army, something that he rectified when he crossed the Rubicon. Making the deal even sweeter Caesar dedicated in his will that a large portion of his wealth be donated to the average Roman citizen, while hardly enough to make them rich, it was nevertheless a nice gesture. Some historians credit his death with the fall of Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, because the dictator/emperor powers that he could not use in life were handed down to his successors. Essentially by putting the face of a politician you don't like on Caesar, you're saying that politician is a popular populist official who led the country to greatness and whose death will lead to the downfall of the country as we know it -- hardly an insult. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement We'll leave which politicians this applies to up to your imagination.]]
10th Jul '17 4:33:14 AM GhostlyBrony
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* MisaimedFandom: It provides no end of amusement to people who are students of history to laugh at the irony of unpopular politicians being placed in the role of Caesar. While hardly without controversy Caesar was a very popular man in his day. When most politicians were seen as increasingly inept, hiding behind their prose and uppity rich classicism to appear more sophisticated than they really were, someone as bold and as blunt as Caesar who told it like it was caught on very quickly with the average working Roman. He was immensely popular with the troops for winning many campaigns and paying them handsomely for their hard work. Caesar was even declared an enemy of the state for his devotion to his army, something that he rectified when he crossed the Rubicon. Making the deal even sweeter Caesar dedicated in his will that a large portion of his wealth be donated to the average Roman citizen, while hardly enough to make them rich, it was nevertheless a nice gesture. Some historians credit his death with the fall of Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, because the dictator/emperor powers that he could not use in life were handed down to his successors. Essentially by putting the face of a politician you don't like on Caesar, you're saying that politician is a popular populist official who led the country to greatness and whose death will lead to the downfall of the country as well know it -- hardly an insult. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement We'll leave which politicians this applies to up to your imagination.]]

to:

* MisaimedFandom: It provides no end of amusement to people who are students of history to laugh at the irony of unpopular politicians being placed in the role of Caesar. While hardly without controversy Caesar was a very popular man in his day. When most politicians were seen as increasingly inept, hiding behind their prose and uppity rich classicism to appear more sophisticated than they really were, someone as bold and as blunt as Caesar who told it like it was caught on very quickly with the average working Roman. He was immensely popular with the troops for winning many campaigns and paying them handsomely for their hard work. Caesar was even declared an enemy of the state for his devotion to his army, something that he rectified when he crossed the Rubicon. Making the deal even sweeter Caesar dedicated in his will that a large portion of his wealth be donated to the average Roman citizen, while hardly enough to make them rich, it was nevertheless a nice gesture. Some historians credit his death with the fall of Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, because the dictator/emperor powers that he could not use in life were handed down to his successors. Essentially by putting the face of a politician you don't like on Caesar, you're saying that politician is a popular populist official who led the country to greatness and whose death will lead to the downfall of the country as well we know it -- hardly an insult. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement We'll leave which politicians this applies to up to your imagination.]]
10th Jul '17 4:29:12 AM GhostlyBrony
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Added DiffLines:

* MisaimedFandom: It provides no end of amusement to people who are students of history to laugh at the irony of unpopular politicians being placed in the role of Caesar. While hardly without controversy Caesar was a very popular man in his day. When most politicians were seen as increasingly inept, hiding behind their prose and uppity rich classicism to appear more sophisticated than they really were, someone as bold and as blunt as Caesar who told it like it was caught on very quickly with the average working Roman. He was immensely popular with the troops for winning many campaigns and paying them handsomely for their hard work. Caesar was even declared an enemy of the state for his devotion to his army, something that he rectified when he crossed the Rubicon. Making the deal even sweeter Caesar dedicated in his will that a large portion of his wealth be donated to the average Roman citizen, while hardly enough to make them rich, it was nevertheless a nice gesture. Some historians credit his death with the fall of Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, because the dictator/emperor powers that he could not use in life were handed down to his successors. Essentially by putting the face of a politician you don't like on Caesar, you're saying that politician is a popular populist official who led the country to greatness and whose death will lead to the downfall of the country as well know it -- hardly an insult. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement We'll leave which politicians this applies to up to your imagination.]]
18th Jun '17 2:33:29 PM Eagal
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18th Jun '17 2:33:15 PM Eagal
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** The point is Rome was already beyond healing before the assassination attempt, this desperate last-minute action done by a mix of opportunists and led by a WellIntentionedExtremist proves too little and too late. The play in later eras, along with Coriolanus, was often used by left-wing and liberal artists to warn against decay and corruption of government and civic society. Creator/OrsonWelles' anti-fascist version of Caesar was one among many examples that showed, how Brutus was the TragicHero of democracy.
6th May '17 5:52:17 AM Dragon101
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Obviously Brutus, but also Caesar. Is he a skeptic who refuses to pay heed to the soothsayer (see ArbitrarySkepticism on the main page) or a highly superstitious figure who refuses to "beware" the Ides of March because it would be challenging fate and willingly goes to his destiny, only showing sadness at discovering Brutus among his killers? Or is he just too arrogant to pay heed to any warning of danger?

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Obviously Brutus, but also Caesar. Is he a skeptic who refuses to pay heed to the soothsayer (see ArbitrarySkepticism on the main page) or a highly superstitious figure who refuses to "beware" the Ides of March because it would be challenging fate and willingly goes to his destiny, only showing sadness at discovering Brutus among his killers? Or is he just too arrogant to pay heed to any warning of danger?danger; or, is he worried about the threat but afraid of showing his fear out of concern for looking weak?
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.JuliusCaesar