History YMMV / FallOutBoy

20th Feb '18 1:56:07 PM GenreSavvyEldritch
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* DorkAge: Depending on where you stand on their backlog, it may have started as early as ''Infinity on High,'' but most people will say they started on a downward slope on ''Save Rock & Roll'' for varying reasons, mainly in terms of it being ironic that an album called such mainly features different styles of Pop Rock with electronic elements rather than varying styles of Rock. However, others will argue it started on ''American Beauty/American Psycho,'' which is mainly made up of songs that sample parts of others, has more electronics than the last album, and has an air of them not really working to make it their best. 'Uma Thurman' in particular is a song that shouldn't work on paper, with the disjointed lyrics that try to be female empowering based on Uma's roles in ''Pulp Fiction'' and ''Kill Bill'', yet samples the theme song of ''The Munsters'' rather than the theme of ''Pulp Fiction'', and has really bad mixed metaphors and lyrics that only sound good when sang back to back rather than having any coherent cohesion, but somehow works when you bring it all together in the mix. The rest of the songs are either ok, or are arena Rock songs meant to be hype anthems, 'Centuries' and 'Immortals' in particular.
** However, now we have ''MANIA'' being another source of contention on this, since it has songs that are considered terribly produced and/or underwritten, 'Young & Menace' being the primary example, as it skews off into directions that they ''never'' should've attempted, like the terrible pitch shifts, the overly-long choruses, and bad instrumentation on top of the ''heavy'' electronic elements. The backlash was so big that they were quick to say that that was the only song on the album like that, as to not scare more people off from checking out the album that didn't like it. There's also songs that have ''very'' repetitive lyrics, 'Stay Frosty', are underwritten, 'Champion,' or have really confusing lyrics, again, 'Young & Menace.' It also now feels like they're just cashing in on their prior success even more than the two albums before it. Not helping their case is that they delayed the release of the album by almost 4 months so that they could apparently work out the kinks, but it not really showing all that much in the final product. When the thing was actually delayed, it felt like they were just writing songs as they went ''after'' announcing the release date rather than being well into production before releasing it, which fuels the cash-in feel of the album. Now they're also even ''more'' accused of trying to be Music/Maroon5 than they've ever been; a band that sold out long ago and has been chasing current Pop trends, hoping to stay some semblance of relevant, but is actually growing less and less with each successive album. The only people defending them nowadays are the diehard fangirls, not many others.

to:

* DorkAge: Depending on where you stand on their backlog, it may have started as early as ''Infinity on High,'' but most people will say they started on a downward slope on ''Save Rock & Roll'' for varying reasons, mainly in terms of it being ironic that an album called such mainly features different styles of Pop Rock with electronic elements rather than varying styles of Rock. However, others will argue it started on ''American Beauty/American Psycho,'' which is mainly made up of songs that sample parts of others, has more electronics than the last album, and has an air of them not really working to make it their best. 'Uma Thurman' in particular is a song that shouldn't work on paper, with the disjointed lyrics that try to be female empowering based on Uma's roles in ''Pulp Fiction'' and ''Kill Bill'', yet samples the theme song of ''The Munsters'' rather than the theme of ''Pulp Fiction'', and has really bad mixed metaphors and lyrics that only sound good when sang back to back rather than having any coherent cohesion, but somehow works when you bring it all together in the mix. The rest of the songs are either ok, or are arena Rock songs meant to be hype anthems, 'Centuries' and 'Immortals' in particular.
** However, now we have ''MANIA'' being another source of contention on this, since it has songs that are considered terribly produced and/or underwritten, 'Young & Menace' being the primary example, as it skews off into directions that they ''never'' should've attempted, like the terrible pitch shifts, the overly-long choruses, and bad instrumentation on top of the ''heavy'' electronic elements. The backlash was so big that they were quick to say that that was the only song on the album like that, as to not scare more people off from checking out the album that didn't like it. There's also songs that have ''very'' repetitive lyrics, 'Stay Frosty', are underwritten, 'Champion,' or have really confusing lyrics, again, 'Young & Menace.' It also now feels like they're just cashing in on their prior success even more than the two albums before it. Not helping their case is that they delayed the release of the album by almost 4 months so that they could apparently work out the kinks, but it not really showing all that much in the final product. When the thing was actually delayed, it felt like they were just writing songs as they went ''after'' announcing the release date rather than being well into production before releasing it, which fuels the cash-in feel of the album. Now they're also even ''more'' accused of trying to be Music/Maroon5 than they've ever been; a band that sold out long ago and has been chasing current Pop trends, hoping to stay some semblance of relevant, but is actually growing less and less with each successive album. The only people defending them nowadays are the diehard fangirls, not many others.



* MisaimedFandom: Many a fangirl will appropriate the message of their music video for 'The Take Over, The Breaks Over', in that people grow and change, as a way to tell people who don't like their musical direction since 2013 that they're overreacting. However, that message was made when they were just trying to go for a more general Pop Punk/Alternative Rock sound and were still doing their own things with their sound. Their current musical style is trying way too hard to be with everything else that's happening in current Pop music, at the expense of both their writing and production of their music, to the point that criticisms include comparisons to Maroon 5's developments in recent years, who's fandom has come to the same conclusion about ''them,'' so a lot of the criticisms of their recent albums are pretty justified, especially since they're getting more mixed reactions since the first single for ''MANIA'' came out and was mostly hated by those who heard it for how it was produced (compounded by the fact that they quickly said that that song was the only one like it on the album, then they eventually delayed the album by around 4 months to make sure it was better than it was turning out, but the album still came out bad anyways). Thus the criticisms of "sellout" that's being lobbed at them hold more weight nowadays than they did in 2007, in which the only people that would hate their post-2005 output were people who preferred their Emo Pop style.



** Ever since 2015, their trend of making big and bombastic Pop songs, as well as Patrick's singing style (as well as general attitudes towards their band and making music) have gotten them comparisons to Music/Maroon5. So much so that they're quickly being labelled as the new them. Most of their newer material wouldn't be too out of place on a Maroon 5 album either, which makes this accusation all the more true.

to:

** Ever since 2015, their trend of making big and bombastic Pop songs, as well as Patrick's singing style (as well as general attitudes towards their band and making music) have gotten them comparisons to Music/Maroon5. So much so that they're quickly being labelled as the new them. Most of their newer material arguably wouldn't be too out of place on a Maroon 5 album either, which makes this accusation all the more true.either.
16th Feb '18 12:25:07 PM Scsigs
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** However, now we have ''MANIA'' being another source of contention on this, since it has songs that are considered terribly produced and/or underwritten, 'Young & Menace' being the primary example, as it skews off into directions that they ''never'' should've attempted, like the terrible pitch shifts, the overly-long choruses, and bad instrumentation on top of the ''heavy'' electronic elements. The backlash was so big that they were quick to say that that was the only song on the album like that, as to not scare more people off from checking out the album that didn't like it. It also now feels like they're just cashing in on their prior success even more than the two albums before it. Not helping their case is that they delayed the release of the album by almost 4 months so that they could apparently work out the kinks, but it not really showing all that much in the final product. When the thing was actually delayed, it felt like they were just writing songs as they went ''after'' announcing the release date rather than being well into production before releasing it, which fuels the cash-in feel of the album. Now they're also even ''more'' accused of trying to be Music/Maroon5 than they've ever been; a band that sold out long ago and has been chasing current Pop trends, hoping to stay some semblance of relevant, but is actually growing less and less with each successive album. The only people defending them nowadays are the diehard fangirls, not many others.

to:

** However, now we have ''MANIA'' being another source of contention on this, since it has songs that are considered terribly produced and/or underwritten, 'Young & Menace' being the primary example, as it skews off into directions that they ''never'' should've attempted, like the terrible pitch shifts, the overly-long choruses, and bad instrumentation on top of the ''heavy'' electronic elements. The backlash was so big that they were quick to say that that was the only song on the album like that, as to not scare more people off from checking out the album that didn't like it. There's also songs that have ''very'' repetitive lyrics, 'Stay Frosty', are underwritten, 'Champion,' or have really confusing lyrics, again, 'Young & Menace.' It also now feels like they're just cashing in on their prior success even more than the two albums before it. Not helping their case is that they delayed the release of the album by almost 4 months so that they could apparently work out the kinks, but it not really showing all that much in the final product. When the thing was actually delayed, it felt like they were just writing songs as they went ''after'' announcing the release date rather than being well into production before releasing it, which fuels the cash-in feel of the album. Now they're also even ''more'' accused of trying to be Music/Maroon5 than they've ever been; a band that sold out long ago and has been chasing current Pop trends, hoping to stay some semblance of relevant, but is actually growing less and less with each successive album. The only people defending them nowadays are the diehard fangirls, not many others.
16th Feb '18 12:19:27 PM Scsigs
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Added DiffLines:

* DorkAge: Depending on where you stand on their backlog, it may have started as early as ''Infinity on High,'' but most people will say they started on a downward slope on ''Save Rock & Roll'' for varying reasons, mainly in terms of it being ironic that an album called such mainly features different styles of Pop Rock with electronic elements rather than varying styles of Rock. However, others will argue it started on ''American Beauty/American Psycho,'' which is mainly made up of songs that sample parts of others, has more electronics than the last album, and has an air of them not really working to make it their best. 'Uma Thurman' in particular is a song that shouldn't work on paper, with the disjointed lyrics that try to be female empowering based on Uma's roles in ''Pulp Fiction'' and ''Kill Bill'', yet samples the theme song of ''The Munsters'' rather than the theme of ''Pulp Fiction'', and has really bad mixed metaphors and lyrics that only sound good when sang back to back rather than having any coherent cohesion, but somehow works when you bring it all together in the mix. The rest of the songs are either ok, or are arena Rock songs meant to be hype anthems, 'Centuries' and 'Immortals' in particular.
** However, now we have ''MANIA'' being another source of contention on this, since it has songs that are considered terribly produced and/or underwritten, 'Young & Menace' being the primary example, as it skews off into directions that they ''never'' should've attempted, like the terrible pitch shifts, the overly-long choruses, and bad instrumentation on top of the ''heavy'' electronic elements. The backlash was so big that they were quick to say that that was the only song on the album like that, as to not scare more people off from checking out the album that didn't like it. It also now feels like they're just cashing in on their prior success even more than the two albums before it. Not helping their case is that they delayed the release of the album by almost 4 months so that they could apparently work out the kinks, but it not really showing all that much in the final product. When the thing was actually delayed, it felt like they were just writing songs as they went ''after'' announcing the release date rather than being well into production before releasing it, which fuels the cash-in feel of the album. Now they're also even ''more'' accused of trying to be Music/Maroon5 than they've ever been; a band that sold out long ago and has been chasing current Pop trends, hoping to stay some semblance of relevant, but is actually growing less and less with each successive album. The only people defending them nowadays are the diehard fangirls, not many others.
9th Feb '18 3:09:23 PM Scsigs
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Added DiffLines:

* MisaimedFandom: Many a fangirl will appropriate the message of their music video for 'The Take Over, The Breaks Over', in that people grow and change, as a way to tell people who don't like their musical direction since 2013 that they're overreacting. However, that message was made when they were just trying to go for a more general Pop Punk/Alternative Rock sound and were still doing their own things with their sound. Their current musical style is trying way too hard to be with everything else that's happening in current Pop music, at the expense of both their writing and production of their music, to the point that criticisms include comparisons to Maroon 5's developments in recent years, who's fandom has come to the same conclusion about ''them,'' so a lot of the criticisms of their recent albums are pretty justified, especially since they're getting more mixed reactions since the first single for ''MANIA'' came out and was mostly hated by those who heard it for how it was produced (compounded by the fact that they quickly said that that song was the only one like it on the album, then they eventually delayed the album by around 4 months to make sure it was better than it was turning out, but the album still came out bad anyways). Thus the criticisms of "sellout" that's being lobbed at them hold more weight nowadays than they did in 2007, in which the only people that would hate their post-2005 output were people who preferred their Emo Pop style.
26th Jan '18 1:20:23 AM Scsigs
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* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: "Novocaine" from ''AB/AP'' and "The Phoenix" from ''Save Rock and Roll'' have the exact same electronic-influenced instrumentations. Gets better with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7Pvl9zOPZ0 this]] remix of them where they blend so perfectly into each other, you'd confuse the two if you weren't already familiar with them.

to:

* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: "Novocaine" from ''AB/AP'' and "The Phoenix" from ''Save Rock and Roll'' have the exact same electronic-influenced instrumentations. Gets better with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7Pvl9zOPZ0 this]] remix of them where they blend so perfectly into each other, you'd other. You'd probably confuse the two if you weren't already familiar with them.


Added DiffLines:

** Ever since 2015, their trend of making big and bombastic Pop songs, as well as Patrick's singing style (as well as general attitudes towards their band and making music) have gotten them comparisons to Music/Maroon5. So much so that they're quickly being labelled as the new them. Most of their newer material wouldn't be too out of place on a Maroon 5 album either, which makes this accusation all the more true.
22nd Jan '18 8:57:51 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** Patrick, what are you doing on [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Cy4Z1dXSZQ a Weekend Nachos song]] doing hardcore screaming? Trohman also guested on "Hometown Hero" on that same album; ironically, that song was an ''extremely'' venomous attack on Wentz, calling him a sold-out, washed-up has-been who "peaked at 23 years old"...as in around the time ''Take This to Your Grave'' came out. ''Yikes''. To make the guest spots on that album even more strange, the entire album is fairly indicative of the trends that cropped up in Chicago hardcore that lead Pete, Patrick, Andy, and Joe to bail from that scene and start Fall Out Boy in the first place. However, it ''is'' known that Fall Out Boy as a whole still keeps in touch with many of their old hardcore friends, to the point where Andy played for the crust/metalcore act Enabler during Fall Out Boy's hiatus. "Jock Powerviolence" (the song that Stump appears on) is a more general attack on people who accused Weekend Nachos of being a bandwagon act despite the fact that powerviolence was never a commercially viable genre to begin with. Stump's passage reads like it could have just as easily been aimed at the people who called Fall Out Boy sellouts and "industry whores"[[note]]"I stopped trying to be cool a long time ago/I laugh to myself as I see you come and go/make up rules for your friends to live by/I'll keep doing things my way while you fucking cry"[[/note]].

to:

** Patrick, what are you doing on [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Cy4Z1dXSZQ a Weekend Nachos song]] doing hardcore screaming? Trohman also guested on "Hometown Hero" on that same album; ironically, that song was an ''extremely'' venomous attack on Wentz, calling him a sold-out, washed-up has-been who "peaked at 23 years old"...as in around the time ''Take This to Your Grave'' came out. ''Yikes''. To make the guest spots on that album even more strange, the entire album is fairly indicative of the trends that cropped up in Chicago hardcore that lead Pete, Patrick, Andy, and Joe to bail from that scene and start Fall Out Boy in the first place. However, it ''is'' known that Fall Out Boy as a whole still keeps in touch with many of their old hardcore friends, to the point where Andy played for the crust/metalcore act Enabler during Fall Out Boy's hiatus.hiatus and is back with his old bandmates in Racetraitor as of 2017, in addition to having played for various other hardcore and powerviolence acts during his time in Fall Out Boy. "Jock Powerviolence" (the song that Stump appears on) is a more general attack on people who accused Weekend Nachos of being a bandwagon act despite the fact that powerviolence was never a commercially viable genre to begin with. Stump's passage reads like it could have just as easily been aimed at the people who called Fall Out Boy sellouts and "industry whores"[[note]]"I stopped trying to be cool a long time ago/I laugh to myself as I see you come and go/make up rules for your friends to live by/I'll keep doing things my way while you fucking cry"[[/note]].
12th Dec '17 9:16:32 AM Anddrix
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* VindicatedByHistory: ''Folie a Deux'', which was adored by critics and a ''massive'' LoveItOrHateIt upon its release (causing some pretty epic FanDumb over it), has rapidly become one of their more popular and well-loved albums since the end of the hiatus. Doesn't hurt that ''Save Rock And Roll'', which was almost universally adored by the fandom, sounds rather similar...or the fact that it's a natural move from ''Infinity on High'' and has legitimately good songs, especially when you appreciate the social commentary or the self referential lines Pete wrote about his life at that point. There's so much emotion poured into the lines and songs on both Patrick's and Pete's parts that it's hard not to get into what each song is trying to say. Unfortunately, there are still ''some'' fans that don't like it, but they've had broken bases with every one of their albums, so it's nothing new. Even more unfortunately for the fans that like ''Folie'', the band is still rather reluctant to embrace it due to the backlash it got in its first release.

to:

* VindicatedByHistory: ''Folie a Deux'', which was adored by critics and a ''massive'' LoveItOrHateIt ''massively'' divisive upon its release (causing some pretty epic FanDumb over it), has rapidly become one of their more popular and well-loved albums since the end of the hiatus. Doesn't hurt that ''Save Rock And Roll'', which was almost universally adored by the fandom, sounds rather similar...or the fact that it's a natural move from ''Infinity on High'' and has legitimately good songs, especially when you appreciate the social commentary or the self referential lines Pete wrote about his life at that point. There's so much emotion poured into the lines and songs on both Patrick's and Pete's parts that it's hard not to get into what each song is trying to say. Unfortunately, there are still ''some'' fans that don't like it, but they've had broken bases with every one of their albums, so it's nothing new. Even more unfortunately for the fans that like ''Folie'', the band is still rather reluctant to embrace it due to the backlash it got in its first release.
7th Sep '17 10:31:54 AM Scsigs
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** Basically, if you give their music a try, be prepared to be one of these fans, or none of these fans, as their fanbase has become so fractured over the years from their genre shifts, sound changes, and other things, that you're liable to start a flamewar with just about anything you may say about any of their material.
7th Sep '17 10:29:20 AM Scsigs
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** In addition, many fans are growing likings to it for at least being some form of ''Rock'' music as they delve further into the Pop rabbit hole they've dived head first into, what with less focus on their main instruments, their lyrics generally lessening in quality over time, and other reasons they may have.
15th Jun '17 8:04:38 AM MikaHaeli8
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Added DiffLines:

** "I Don't Care" from ''Folie a Deux'' is ''strongly'' reminiscent of "Personal Jesus" by Depeche Mode.
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