History Woolseyism / Anime

11th Feb '18 7:01:51 AM Keyseeker
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In Digimon Adventure Tri: Loss, there was a long sequence where all the digidestined were separated for a few minutes by an attack that transported them to different parts of the digital world. In the original Japanese, the scenes showing where everyone ended up were mostly just still, silent images with not much happening in the, except for one part where Agumon, Gomamon, Koushirou, and Yamato stood on train tracks and watched silently as a train almost ran them over. The characters were brought back together by some convenient portals a few seconds later, and the whole sequences seemed very boring and pointless. The English dub, on the other hand, added dialogue for the separated characters, creating banter between characters that normally don't get to interact much. The train scene was especially improved, since now instead of watching silently for a good thirty seconds as a train ran them down, Agumon and Gomamon argue about the train being a mirage the whole time.
24th Jan '18 5:47:24 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In ''[[Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion Evangelion: 1.0]]'', a particularly {{egregious}} example of AsYouKnow involving Ritsuko's explanation of Operation Yashima is turned into a sarcastic LetMeGetThisStraight, which is (somewhat) less jarring than the original and plays right into Ritsuko's personality and relationship with Misato.

to:

** In ''[[Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion Evangelion: 1.0]]'', a particularly {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example of AsYouKnow involving Ritsuko's explanation of Operation Yashima is turned into a sarcastic LetMeGetThisStraight, which is (somewhat) less jarring than the original and plays right into Ritsuko's personality and relationship with Misato.
17th Jan '18 8:10:14 PM StevieC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** In Asuka's first episode, and after her first bout of spoken German, she commands Shinji to "think in German". The Japanese version has him say "baumkuuhen", which is a type of German cake popular in Japan. The English dub replaces this with "Strudel? Bratwurst?", which are two German foods more familiar to Western audiences and gets the humor across better.

to:

*** In Asuka's first episode, and after her first bout of spoken German, she commands Shinji to "think in German". The Japanese version has him say "baumkuuhen", "baumkuchen", which is a type of German cake popular in Japan. The English dub replaces this with "Strudel? Bratwurst?", which are two German foods more familiar to Western audiences and gets the humor across better.
15th Jan '18 2:36:27 PM RCLeahcar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Woolseyism/YuGiOh''



* ''Anime/YuGiOh'':
** During the filler season, the dubbing and 4Kids famous NeverSayDie policies probably had the unintended consequence of making Raphael ''continue'' to think HumansAreTheRealMonsters. In the original version, Dartz drove the cruise ship he was on with his family into a tidal wave and only he survived, lived on an island for awhile, then after he was rescued, decided HumansAreTheRealMonsters for no discernible reason. In the dub, however, Dartz drove the ship into a tidal wave, he was washed onto an island, then came back and his family supposedly ''forgot about him''. Just about ''anyone'' would MaddenIntoMisanthropy if your own family "moved on" and didn't seem to accept you even when you came back after ''xx'' years...
** Bakura from ''Franchise/YuGiOh'' also uses a polite speech pattern. The dub gave him a [[FakeBrit British accent]]. The creator of WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries, who is actually British, had a ''lot'' of fun with this, to the point where Bakura became the abridged series's BreakoutCharacter.
*** By contrast, the dub took Jonouchi's ruder speech pattern and gave Joey Wheeler a Brooklyn accent. The Abridged Series ran with this as well, making Joey the TropeNamer for BrooklynRage.
** During Yugi's duel with Mai in the original version, Yugi's mind was only focused on dueling Pegasus, causing him to become cocky and not take Mai seriously. In the dub, Yugi is holding back Yami because he's still traumatized by Yami nearly killing Kaiba in the last duel and isn't sure he can trust the spirit. The dub also foreshadows the fate of Pegasus's wife by having him give an internal monologue about it, which his VA Darren Dunstan delivers excellently. In the original version it was a filler conversation between Yugi's friends and Bakura.
** During the Noah arc (where we see more of Seto and Mokuba's childhood), Seto challenged Gozaburo Kaiba to a game of chess and cheats to win, proving himself to be a clever boy to Gozaburo. While it actually ''is'' possible to cheat at chess (perform an illegal move or swapping pieces around without being caught), the dub changes this to Seto having studied Gozaburo's strategies and teaching himself how to counter them, proving his intelligence in a much more impressive (and fair) manner. Also adds some FridgeBrilliance as doing that sort of research to effectively beat someone and use their plans against them would be just the sort of strategies that a businessman like Gozaburo would approve and definitely seek out in an heir.
** In Season 2, Marik wants to kill Dark Yugi and doesn't care about the Millennium Puzzle, while in the dub he wants to take the Millennium Puzzle from him and is only allowed to do so by beating him in a duel, by the laws of Ancient Egypt. This gave a convenient HandWave to the WhyDontYaJustShootHim? problem Marik has, he can't just kill Dark Yugi/banish him to the Shadow Realm, he has to beat him in a duel first, ''then'' he'll kill/banish him. Additionally with the Shadow Realm, Marik's plans to kill Dark Yugi were rather foolish in the original Japanese since Dark Yugi is an ancient spirit inhabiting the Millennium Puzzle, you effectively can't kill him by chopping off his legs or drowning him, you'll just kill his host. In the dub, Marik plans to send Dark Yugi to the Shadow Realm, so 4Kids made his death traps magical in nature and thus they pose a danger to him.
*** As a side-effect, when Marik had Yami Yugi duel the possessed Joey, [=4Kids=] did ''not'' censor the idea that the loser will be dragged into the sea chained to an anchor, or that if Yami Yugi refuses to duel Marik's minion will drop a crate from a crane onto Téa. So by making Marik's death traps magical, the one trap he used where it was obvious the loser would die had a more powerful impact and thus higher stakes. While being banished to the Shadow Realm certainly is nightmarish, it is still reversible, a chance to escape. Death though, is final.
** Pegasus' goal in the original is to recreate his wife via holograms, and to do that, he has to defeat Yugi to gain control of Kaiba Corp's technology. This made sense in the manga, but ''not'' in the anime [[AdaptationInducedPlotHole in which he already has access to advanced hologram technology.]] The dub changes it so that his needing to defeat Yugi is a little more necessary: he wishes to collect his Millennium Puzzle, along with the other Millennium Items, to bring back his wife's soul and put her inside a new mechanical body rather than a hologram. While a little convoluted for what amounts to just ''asking'' him for the item, it does work, especially at the end where it's revealed that collecting the seven items ''does'' indeed open a portal to the afterlife.
** In the dub of the Virtual World arc, Noah's research was on ways to expand the digital world across the internet to improve its capabilities, and Gozaburo used that research for his plan to digitize all of mankind so he could rule the virtual world as a GodEmperor of humanity. In the original Japanese anime, Noah's research was on how to use Kaiba Corps' weapons systems to destroy most of the world's major cities, killing all but 3% of mankind, and he conducted this project just to prove his capabilities as a superhuman. Then when Noah failed to defeat Seto in their duel, Gozaburo decides to put Noah's plan into action because... because. It's implied the two have begun to go mad with power from being in the virtual world and transcending their humanity, but still; ''ruling'' the world makes much more sense than ''destroying'' it, at least for the Kaibas. In addition, Noah had ''no idea'' Gozaburo was alive and inside the Virtual World in the original, which made no sense given how long he's been there and how much control he has over it. In the dub, Noah was always working for Gozaburo, rather than it being a HijackedByGanon situation.
** The duel with Bandit Keith (which is not in the manga) has Marik have Keith steal the Millennium Puzzle and then duel Yugi for it, as Yugi will be a much easier opponent to defeat without the Pharaoh's help. The Japanese version has Marik make Yugi and Keith duel so he can confirm that the Pharaoh sleeps in the Millennium Puzzle and Yugi is his host, things that, between his Tombkeeper upbringing and control of Keith's mind, he already knows anyway. The Japanese version also mentions Yami Yugi staying in the Millennium Puzzle and not helping Yugi because he senses Marik watching them. Not only is this a flimsy justification for him not getting involved, but the idea that Yami Yugi could take control of Yugi's body when he's not wearing the puzzle is a VoodooShark that raises a lot more questions. The dub simplifies this to "their bond is too weak for them to switch places without Yugi wearing the Puzzle."
** A minor point in the duel between Joey and Odion. Odion seals the Winged Dragon of Ra in the ark on his Temple of the Kings card, then tributes Mystical Beast Serket and pays half his Life Points to summon Ra, and all of Serket's ATK points transfer to Ra. The dub makes it sound like this is an effect of Temple of the Kings, circumventing the need to tribute three monsters to summon Ra and powering it up another way since it has no Tributes to gain ATK from. The Japanese anime (and the original manga as well) instead treat this like a normal Tribute Summon, with Serket acting as three Tributes since it had previously destroyed and absorbed three of Jounochi's monsters. Aside from this rule being ridiculous, it begs the question of what the point was to seal Ra in Temple of the Kings and why Rishid has to pay half his Life Points to summon it, when he could have just kept it in his hand and Tribute Summoned it normally.
** Again, in the Orichalcos filler arc (specifically, the Yami vs. Weevil rematch), the dub replaces Yami Yugi shouting "MONSTAH CARDO" with Creator/DanGreen's glorious poison-tipped snark. ([[LargeHam "THIS JUST ISN'T YOUR DAY!!!"]])
** There's also Shizuka whose name was translated as "Serenity" in America. Not sure how Honda became "Tristan" and Anzu became "Tea" though...
** The dub, {{Bowdlerization}} aside, had its quota of Woolseyisms. The theme naming of Yugi and Jounouchi (Yu + Jou = ''Yujou'', which means "friendship" in Japanese) was retained with Yugi and Joey; the Mei and Kyuu brothers (Meikyuu = Maze) were changed to Para and Dox (Paradox); and so on. Many jokes of the original version, which relied heavily on Japanese puns and cultural references, were changed fittingly for the dub, especially in the first season.
** Pegasus's DubNameChange was also notable. In the Japanese version, Pegasus was his given name, with his full name being Pegasus J. Crawford. The dub more appropriately made Pegasus his surname, and his first name became Maximillion, a fitting name conveying he is a man of great wealth and taste. Further cementing it as a Woolseyism, this was one of the few name changes that stuck for the English manga translation.
** The Shadow Realm, as a concept, was actually created by ''4Kids'' for the dub (so they can NeverSayDie as much as they can get away with). For a number of people, the idea of your body and soul being sent straight to the verse's equivalent to Hell, as opposed to simply dying, is much more terrifying. This especially works during the championship duel against Pegasus, where Yami warns an increasingly exhausted Yugi that if he keeps on fighting, "your soul will be shredded!"
15th Jan '18 2:33:54 PM RCLeahcar
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

----
Works with their own page:
* ''Woolseyism/DragonBallZ''
----
15th Jan '18 2:31:19 PM RCLeahcar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/DragonBallZ'':
** When Bandai began releasing action figures of the series, they romanized the name of Goku and Vegeta's alien race, Saiya-jin ("person/people of Saiya"), into "Saiyan" on the packaging of the figures. This term would later be used in the English adaptations of the anime and manga (save for the [[SoBadItsGood infamously bad]] Speedy dub, which used the rather literal translation of "Saiya people").
** Unfortunately, in the Brazilian dub they originally just kept "Saiya-jin", adopting the "Saiyans" term only a few arcs later. Why is it bad? Because in Portuguese, it sounded something like "jean skirt", so for a good part of the anime they were called as a feminine wardrobe piece (granted, certain characters ''are'' named after womens' garments, but still)... but at least they made a nice Woolseyism out of "Saiya-jin" in GT, when Palace/Paris is asked by a possessed Goten about Saiya-jins, she mistakes it for, well, a jeans skirt.
** The European Portuguese dub, being based on the French version, doesn't have a lot of room to play, so they said "Screw everything, this is now a GagDub!" This came about because the characters would very frequently keep speaking after their lines ended, so they improvised to not make it a HongKongDub. Sometimes, they didn't even have lines for that part. This includes numerous fourth wall and pop culture references, and characters using many [[UnusualEuphemism Unusual Alternative Words]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ij2_8L3PoM0 Just watch it for yourself.]][[note]] Warning: You may need to know Portuguese.[[/note]]
** Fat Buu also did so in the Funimation dub, in the episode where Goku showcases Super Saiyan forms (debuting [=SSJ3=]) he mishears it, asking "Super... Saiya-jin?" This may have just been gibberish in the booth, but upon repeated viewings, it sounds far to similar for it not to be a subtle reference for the fans of the Japanese version.
** The Latin American Spanish dub, however, didn't seem to decide itself on one or the other at first, and liked to throw around both "Saiyans" and "Saiya-jin" ("Saiyan" and "Saiyajines", in their corresponding translated versions) at least once every two episodes. They get better, though, and end up deciding on a Spanish-ization of the Japanese name ("Saiyajines").
** In one episode, Goku went to Hell and encountered Oni wearing shirts with the letters HELL. In the dub, this was {{Bowdlerise}}d so that the shirts said HFIL which stood for Home For Infinite Losers. HFIL has caught on as an in-joke amongst fans.
** Which made for quite a funny joke later in the dub. At the beginning of the Otherworld Tournament saga, the Grand Kai asked Goku to take care of some business in H-F-I-L. Goku didn't quite know what he meant and King Kai reminded him about the Home For Infinite Losers and said "He's very fond of acronyms."
** The translators of the original ''Dragon Ball'' were clearly having fun with the dialogue. Sample line concerning the shape-shifting pig Oolong as a beach umbrella: "This sure beats baking in the sun!" "That's me, bacon' in the sun..."
*** Also, Oolong saying "The world's most comfortable pair of underwear" instead of "The panties of a hot babe". Let's just say...the most comfortable pair of underwear makes it sound even ''more'' funny.
** The Blue Water dub of the Dragon Ball anime had a good way of doing this bit. Pilaf starts asking for "supreme..." [rule over the earth, etc.], then Oolong finishes with "COMFORT, IN A PAIR OF UNDERWEAR!"
** Also from Dragon Ball, when Yamcha get's a accidental peek at a naked Bulma while looking for Dragon Balls, he simply mutters "mounds, mounds". The Blue Water dub of the anime had him say "Not Dragon Balls, definitely not Dragon Balls."
** Commands from Emperor Pilaf: "The others have escaped, too?! I want them all! [[Series/DoctorWho EXTERMINATE! EXTERMINATE!]]"
** Several lines in the ''Dragon Ball'' movies were {{Woolseyism}}s. For instance, Doore originally didn't say anything when he was almost successful in crushing Gohan's head in the Japanese version, but the dub added in a line where Doore stated that his crushing Gohan's head is what he calls his "Can-Opener Attack". In Super Android 13, probably the movie with the most woolseyisms, The dub added in an exchange between Krillin and Oolong about waiting in line/cutting in line while waiting for a fashion show that ultimately didn't exist that was not said in the original Japanese version. Also, Androids 14 and 15 (as well as the titular form of the main villain) were originally for the most part silent, but the dub gave them a lot more lines, some of which added in hilarity. The store clerk who attempted to stop them in the department store was originally trying to greet them, but was changed to him stopping them in the dub. Logically, this made a lot more sense, considering that the androids also briefly destroyed some TV screens as well as caused collateral damage down in the town. Additionally, there's a scene at the very end of the film where Vegeta and Piccolo are sitting opposite each other on a patch of ice before a fish jumps, ending the movie. The two are completely silent in the Japanese version, but in the dub, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUumQ2SFW9k this]] happens. Broly's "Is that another word for a Coffin" response to Goku's requesting for a handicap was also a woolseyism.
** The dub also changes Vegito's description of himself as the "strongest candy in the universe" to "a jawbreaker, the strongest piece of candy there is".
** One of the perks of Funimation dubbing Dragon Ball Z multiple times (including the DVD versions and Dragon Ball Kai) is they get lots of practice getting the jokes just right. In their dub of Kai, while waiting on Goku to make it to the fight with Nappa, King Kai remarks "They should call him SLOW-KU!" In an earlier episode, when Goku barely avoids falling off Snake Way (since in Kai the filler episode where he accidentally falls into Hell is omitted), he says a snarky "Note to self: don't go to Hell." The trend continues in ''Super'' where they have voiced their characters for so long they get know just what to say in certain situations, such as King Kai warning Vegeta that Beerus is coming with the phrase "That means no fighting, no insulting, no [[PersonAsVerb Vegeta-ing of any kind!]]"
** Creator/ChristopherSabat has admitted that he finds the idea of Yamcha continuing to hang around Bulma and Vegeta even after Bulma dumped him to be hilariously awkward, and alters some of their lines to reflect this. For example, during Bulma's birthday party in ''Super'', Bulma asks him to join her and he replies, in the original Japanese, "I don't want to go to some stupid party." In the English dub, the line becomes "Oh, sure, let's go see ''Yamcha''!"
** The Italian dub changed a few names around, always in such a way to give the meaning of the original name. Highlights are "Kakaroth" being changed into "Kaarot" ("carota" is Italian for "carrot". Also, "Kakaroth" sounds uncomfortably close to "cacca", the Italian word for "poo") and the Demon King Piccolo being called "Al Satan".
** In the Japanese version of the original '"Dragon Ball'', when calling Goku for the first time, the announcer misreads the kanji for Son Goku as Mago Gosora. In the English dub of the anime, where AlternateCharacterReading isn't a thing, he mispronounces Goku as gah-kay-ahh. Likewise, in the English localization of the manga version, he mispronounces Son Goku as Song Oku.
14th Jan '18 9:32:31 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'': It [[GagDub took to mocking]] the {{serious business}} of the show in the third season. On a merely functional note, Manjyoume uses '[[JapanesePronouns ore-sama]]' which wouldn't translate at all, but is a bit important to his character. So instead he [[ThirdPersonPerson calls himself]] [[SpellMyNameWithAThe 'The Chazz']] to mark the arrogance/absurdity of it.

to:

* ''Anime/YuGiOhGX'': It [[GagDub took to mocking]] the {{serious business}} of the show in the third season. On a merely functional note, Manjyoume uses '[[JapanesePronouns '[[UsefulNotes/JapanesePronouns ore-sama]]' which wouldn't translate at all, but is a bit important to his character. So instead he [[ThirdPersonPerson calls himself]] [[SpellMyNameWithAThe 'The Chazz']] to mark the arrogance/absurdity of it.
20th Dec '17 2:09:58 PM Kytseo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The dub also changes Vegito's description of himself as the "strongest candy in the universe" to "a jawbreaker".

to:

** The dub also changes Vegito's description of himself as the "strongest candy in the universe" to "a jawbreaker".jawbreaker, the strongest piece of candy there is".


Added DiffLines:

** In the Japanese version of the original '"Dragon Ball'', when calling Goku for the first time, the announcer misreads the kanji for Son Goku as Mago Gosora. In the English dub of the anime, where AlternateCharacterReading isn't a thing, he mispronounces Goku as gah-kay-ahh. Likewise, in the English localization of the manga version, he mispronounces Son Goku as Song Oku.
30th Nov '17 4:24:17 AM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The shonen fighting anime was translated into Italian by Enrico Carabelli as ''"I Cavalieri dello Zodiaco"'' (''Zodiac Knights''). Trying to convey for Italian viewers the same sense of mystery and awe that classical mythology, which they are all too familiar with, inspired in the culturally distant Japanese, he cranked up the "epicness" of the dialogues, added quotes from classical Italian poems and '''Dante's Literature/TheDivineComedy''', and generally raised the stylistic level of all dialogues. Though he also introduced a number of inaccuracies and misinterpretations of the original plot, the dub had exceedingly good reception; and to this day many Italian fans say that they don't actually like ''Saint Seiya'', they like the ''Cavalieri''.
*** Notably, the first four movies were later re-released with a more faithful translation. Fans did not appreciate at all, and newer products either get two dubs, one in Carabelli's style and one more faithful to the original, or the Carabelli-style dub only.
** On a similar note, the (''really'' good, voice-acting wise) Latin American Spanish Mexican dub of ''Saint Seiya'' used the Italian opening translated into Spanish, and to this day, any Mexican born between 1985 and 1990 insists that the good opening is the one from ''Caballeros del Zodiaco''.
** Brazilian dub's Saga's laugh. Even if you don't speak Portuguese, you'll find it memorable. The redubbing did it as good as the original, and put a professional rock band to adapt the original Japanese openings into a nice Metal-driven Portuguese version, instead of the J-rock in the original version. It's claimed to be one of the best versions in the world, because not only includes the Woolseyisms of the Italian and Mexican versions, but adapt their own as well.
** And then, there's Saga's "morra, Seiya" (Die, Seiya), which sounds extremely awesome and hammy as wells.

to:

** The shonen fighting anime was translated into Italian by Enrico Carabelli as ''"I Cavalieri dello Zodiaco"'' (''Zodiac Knights''). Trying to convey for Italian viewers the same sense of mystery and awe that classical mythology, which they are all too familiar with, inspired in the culturally distant Japanese, he cranked up the "epicness" of the dialogues, added quotes from classical Italian poems and '''Dante's Literature/TheDivineComedy''', and generally raised the stylistic level of all dialogues. Though he also introduced a number of inaccuracies and misinterpretations of the original plot, the dub had exceedingly good reception; and to this day many Italian fans say that they don't actually like ''Saint Seiya'', they like the ''Cavalieri''.
***
''Cavalieri''. Notably, the first four movies were later re-released with a more faithful translation. Fans did not appreciate at all, and newer products either get two dubs, one in Carabelli's style and one more faithful to the original, or the Carabelli-style dub only.
** On a similar note, the (''really'' good, voice-acting wise) Latin American Spanish Mexican dub of ''Saint Seiya'' used the Italian opening translated into Spanish, and to this day, any Mexican born between 1985 and 1990 insists that the good best anime opening is the one from ''Caballeros ''Los Caballeros del Zodiaco''.
** Brazilian dub's Saga's laugh. Even if you don't speak Portuguese, you'll find it memorable. The redubbing did it as good as the original, and put a professional rock band to adapt the original Japanese openings into a nice Metal-driven Portuguese version, instead of the J-rock in the original version. It's claimed to be one of the best versions in the world, because not only includes the Woolseyisms of the Italian and Mexican versions, but adapt their own as well.
**
well. And then, there's Saga's "morra, Seiya" (Die, Seiya), which sounds extremely awesome and hammy as wells.
26th Nov '17 7:42:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Manga/SayonaraZetsubouSensei'', Rin uses [[JapaneseSiblingTerminology onii-sama]] to refer to her brother, the protagonist. Fansubs translated this as "dear brother", which works to humorous effect, as she generally uses the term in not very affectionate contexts (i.e. "did that [[CatchPhrase leave you in despair]], dear brother?")

to:

* In ''Manga/SayonaraZetsubouSensei'', Rin uses [[JapaneseSiblingTerminology [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseSiblingTerminology onii-sama]] to refer to her brother, the protagonist. Fansubs translated this as "dear brother", which works to humorous effect, as she generally uses the term in not very affectionate contexts (i.e. "did that [[CatchPhrase leave you in despair]], dear brother?")
This list shows the last 10 events of 540. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Woolseyism.Anime