History Woolseyism / Anime

10th Feb '17 5:00:52 PM AirofMystery
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** An early episode of the English dub has Inuyasha tell [[BrattyHalfPint Shippo]] "[[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack Laugh it up, fuzzball!]]"
5th Feb '17 5:16:38 AM sotnosen95
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** During the Noah arc (where we see mroe of Seto and Mokuba's childhood, Seto challenged Gozaburo Kaiba to a game of chess and cheats to win, proving himself to be a clever boy to Gozaburo. While it actually ''is'' possible to cheat at chess (perform an illegal move or swapping pieces around without being caught), the dub changes this to Seto having studied Gozaburo's strategies and teaching himself how to counter them, proving his intelligence in a much more impressive (and fair) manner. Also adds some FridgeBrilliance as doing that sort of research to effectively beat someone and use their plans against them would be just the sort of strategies that a businessman like Gozaburo would approve and definitely seek out in an heri.

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** During the Noah arc (where we see mroe more of Seto and Mokuba's childhood, childhood), Seto challenged Gozaburo Kaiba to a game of chess and cheats to win, proving himself to be a clever boy to Gozaburo. While it actually ''is'' possible to cheat at chess (perform an illegal move or swapping pieces around without being caught), the dub changes this to Seto having studied Gozaburo's strategies and teaching himself how to counter them, proving his intelligence in a much more impressive (and fair) manner. Also adds some FridgeBrilliance as doing that sort of research to effectively beat someone and use their plans against them would be just the sort of strategies that a businessman like Gozaburo would approve and definitely seek out in an heri.heir.
4th Feb '17 4:52:29 PM DVB
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** In Japanese, Kaku has a lot of verbal tics associated with old people. The English dub has him frequently use more old-fashioned words than the other characters, like "nifty" and address Luffy and Nami as "champ" and "little miss" when he first meets them.

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** In Japanese, Kaku has a lot of verbal tics associated with Kaku's speech pattern is pretty formal and old-fashioned, lampshaded on him talking like an old people.man. The English dub has him frequently use more old-fashioned words than the other characters, like "nifty" and address Luffy and Nami as "champ" and "little miss" when he first meets them.
4th Feb '17 4:43:37 PM DVB
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** In order to be adopted by Gozaburo, Seto challenges him to a game of chess and cheats to win, proving himself to be a clever boy to Gozaburo. While it actually ''is'' possible to cheat at chess (perform an illegal move or swapping pieces around without being caught), the dub changes this to Seto having studied Gozaburo's strategies and knowing how to counter them, proving his intelligence in a much more impressive (and fair) manner.
** In Season 2, Marik wants to kill Dark Yugi and doesn't care about the Millennium Puzzle, while in the dub he wants to take the Millennium Puzzle from him and is only allowed to do so by beating him in a duel, by the laws of Ancient Egypt. This gave a convenient Hand Wave to the WhyDontYaJustShootHim? problem Marik has, he can't just kill Dark Yugi/banish him to the Shadow Realm, he has to beat him in a duel first, ''then'' he'll kill/banish him. Additionally with the Shadow Realm, Marik's plans to kill Dark Yugi were rather foolish in the original Japanese since Dark Yugi is an ancient spirit inhabiting the Millennium Puzzle, you effectively can't kill him by chopping off his legs or drowning him, you'll just kill his host. In the dub, Marik plans to send Dark Yugi to the Shadow Realm, so 4Kids made his death traps magical in nature and thus they pose a danger to him.

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** In order to be adopted by Gozaburo, During the Noah arc (where we see mroe of Seto challenges him and Mokuba's childhood, Seto challenged Gozaburo Kaiba to a game of chess and cheats to win, proving himself to be a clever boy to Gozaburo. While it actually ''is'' possible to cheat at chess (perform an illegal move or swapping pieces around without being caught), the dub changes this to Seto having studied Gozaburo's strategies and knowing teaching himself how to counter them, proving his intelligence in a much more impressive (and fair) manner.
manner. Also adds some FridgeBrilliance as doing that sort of research to effectively beat someone and use their plans against them would be just the sort of strategies that a businessman like Gozaburo would approve and definitely seek out in an heri.
** In Season 2, Marik wants to kill Dark Yugi and doesn't care about the Millennium Puzzle, while in the dub he wants to take the Millennium Puzzle from him and is only allowed to do so by beating him in a duel, by the laws of Ancient Egypt. This gave a convenient Hand Wave HandWave to the WhyDontYaJustShootHim? problem Marik has, he can't just kill Dark Yugi/banish him to the Shadow Realm, he has to beat him in a duel first, ''then'' he'll kill/banish him. Additionally with the Shadow Realm, Marik's plans to kill Dark Yugi were rather foolish in the original Japanese since Dark Yugi is an ancient spirit inhabiting the Millennium Puzzle, you effectively can't kill him by chopping off his legs or drowning him, you'll just kill his host. In the dub, Marik plans to send Dark Yugi to the Shadow Realm, so 4Kids made his death traps magical in nature and thus they pose a danger to him.
25th Jan '17 10:15:25 AM PhantomDusclops92
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** The Italian dub gets everything right too. Along with jokes and puns being adapted in the correct way, some references were rewrote for the Italian audience: for example, when Excel is playing baseball against the team of monkeys, she starts singing the Italian opening for the ''Goku no Daiboken'' anime. Also, the Excel Girls, who in the original version are named after Yumiko Kobayashi and Mikako Takahashi (the singers of the show's opening), in the Italian dub are instead named after Federica De Bortoli and Perla Liberatori, Excel and Hyatt's Italian voice actresses.
2nd Jan '17 9:32:37 PM C2
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* One of the best-known but least-recognized Woolseyisms of all time: the title of ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell''. The original Japanese name is ''Kokaku Kidotai'' which translates literally to "''Mobile Armored Riot Police''". Not even the most ardent fans argue that the international title is not vastly superior and more fitting. It was Woolseyed by WordOfGod, no less.

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* One of the best-known but least-recognized Woolseyisms of all time: the title of ''Franchise/GhostInTheShell''. The original Japanese name is ''Kokaku Kidotai'' which translates literally to "''Mobile Armored Riot Police''". Not even the most ardent fans argue that the international title is not vastly superior and more fitting. It was Woolseyed by WordOfGod, no less.as the original Japanese printings used it as an English subtitle.
22nd Dec '16 11:10:45 PM Doug86
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** The shonen fighting anime was translated into Italian by Enrico Carabelli as ''"I Cavalieri dello Zodiaco"'' (''Zodiac Knights''). Trying to convey for Italian viewers the same sense of mystery and awe that classical mythology, which they are all too familiar with, inspired in the culturally distant Japanese, he cranked up the "epicness" of the dialogues, added quotes from classical Italian poems and '''Dante's Literature/DivineComedy''', and generally raised the stylistic level of all dialogues. Though he also introduced a number of inaccuracies and misinterpretations of the original plot, the dub had exceedingly good reception; and to this day many Italian fans say that they don't actually like ''Saint Seiya'', they like the ''Cavalieri''.

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** The shonen fighting anime was translated into Italian by Enrico Carabelli as ''"I Cavalieri dello Zodiaco"'' (''Zodiac Knights''). Trying to convey for Italian viewers the same sense of mystery and awe that classical mythology, which they are all too familiar with, inspired in the culturally distant Japanese, he cranked up the "epicness" of the dialogues, added quotes from classical Italian poems and '''Dante's Literature/DivineComedy''', Literature/TheDivineComedy''', and generally raised the stylistic level of all dialogues. Though he also introduced a number of inaccuracies and misinterpretations of the original plot, the dub had exceedingly good reception; and to this day many Italian fans say that they don't actually like ''Saint Seiya'', they like the ''Cavalieri''.
17th Dec '16 1:20:54 PM DVB
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** In the Japanese version, the money-wasting Yo-kai Spenp came from the "bubble era", an era in the late 1980s when real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated. The English dub changes this to him coming from the "yuppie era". Yuppies (short for young urban professionals), are well-paid young middle-class professionals who worked in the city and possessed a luxurious lifestyle, but the term has deragatory connoctations as it became associated with decadance, mindless consumption and shallowness. The term originated and mainly used in the 1980s, so the "yuppie era" works both only in maintaining Spenp's origin as the 1980s, but also the same connections to spending money haphazardly.

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** In the Japanese version, the money-wasting Yo-kai Spenp came from the "bubble era", an era in the late 1980s when real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated. The English dub changes this to him coming from the "yuppie era". Yuppies (short for young urban professionals), are well-paid young middle-class professionals who worked in the city and possessed a luxurious lifestyle, but the term has deragatory connoctations as it became associated with decadance, mindless consumption and shallowness. The term originated and mainly used in the 1980s, so the "yuppie era" works both not only in maintaining Spenp's origin as the 1980s, but also the same connections to spending money haphazardly.
17th Dec '16 1:19:57 PM DVB
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*** As a side-effect, when Marik had Yami Yugi duel the possessed Joey, [=4Kids=] did ''not'' censor the idea that the loser will be dragged into the sea chained to an anchor, or that if Yami Yugi refuses to duel Marik's minion will drop a crate from a crane onto Téa. So by making Marik's death traps magical, the one trap he used where it was obvious the loser would die had more impact in the dub banishment to the Shadow Realm is a slap on the wrist, death, that's final.

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*** As a side-effect, when Marik had Yami Yugi duel the possessed Joey, [=4Kids=] did ''not'' censor the idea that the loser will be dragged into the sea chained to an anchor, or that if Yami Yugi refuses to duel Marik's minion will drop a crate from a crane onto Téa. So by making Marik's death traps magical, the one trap he used where it was obvious the loser would die had a more powerful impact in the dub banishment and thus higher stakes. While being banished to the Shadow Realm certainly is nightmarish, it is still reversible, a slap on the wrist, death, that's final. chance to escape. Death though, is final.



** Pegasus's DubNameChange was also notable. In the Japanese version, Pegasus was his given name, with his full name being Pegasus J. Crawford. The dub more appropriately made Pegasus his surname, and his first name became Maximillion, a fitting name that conveys his wealth and taste. Further cementing it as a Woolseyism, this was one of the few name changes that stuck for the English manga translation.

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** Pegasus's DubNameChange was also notable. In the Japanese version, Pegasus was his given name, with his full name being Pegasus J. Crawford. The dub more appropriately made Pegasus his surname, and his first name became Maximillion, a fitting name that conveys his conveying he is a man of great wealth and taste. Further cementing it as a Woolseyism, this was one of the few name changes that stuck for the English manga translation.



** In the Japanese version, the money-wasting Yo-kai Spenp came from the "bubble era", an era in the late 1980s when real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated. The English dub changes this to him coming from the "yuppie era". Yuppies are people who have well-paying jobs and live a luxurious lifestyle. Coincidentally, this also took place in the 1980s.

to:

** In the Japanese version, the money-wasting Yo-kai Spenp came from the "bubble era", an era in the late 1980s when real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated. The English dub changes this to him coming from the "yuppie era". Yuppies (short for young urban professionals), are people well-paid young middle-class professionals who have well-paying jobs worked in the city and live possessed a luxurious lifestyle. Coincidentally, this also took place lifestyle, but the term has deragatory connoctations as it became associated with decadance, mindless consumption and shallowness. The term originated and mainly used in the 1980s.
1980s, so the "yuppie era" works both only in maintaining Spenp's origin as the 1980s, but also the same connections to spending money haphazardly.
10th Dec '16 3:34:56 PM bowserbros
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** The dub also evidently has Osaka assume Chiyo-dad to be Bill clinton instead of a former prime minister. Either way... it's an [[EpicFail epically-failed spot check]] as there's no way that cat looks like ''any'' politician.

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** The dub also evidently has Osaka assume Chiyo-dad to be Bill clinton UsefulNotes/BillClinton instead of a former prime minister.Yoshirō Mori. Either way... it's an [[EpicFail epically-failed spot check]] as there's no way that cat looks like ''any'' politician. One element of the joke falls flat though: Chiyo-dad took offense to being compared to Mori, who was widely disliked and best remembered for his numerous gaffes, while Clinton was a rather popular president during and after his tenure; a better comparison nowadays would be to UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush, who was also gaffe-heavy and left office as one of the worst-regarded presidents to date.



** When Bandai began releasing action figures of the series, they romanized the name of Goku and Vegeta's alien race, Saiya-jin ("person/people of Saiya"), into "Saiyan" on the packaging of the figures. This term would later be used in the English adaptations of the anime and manga.
** Unfortunately, in the Brazilian dub they originally just left the Saiyajin of the japanese, adopting the Saiyans only a few arcs later. Why is it bad? Because in Portuguese, it sounded something like "jean skirt", so for a good part of the anime they were called as a feminine wardrobe piece (granted, certain characters ''are'' named after womens' garments, but still)... but at least they made a nice Woolseyism out of Saiyajin in GT, when Palace/Paris is asked by a possessed Goten about Saiyajins, she mistakes it for, well, a jeans skirt.

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** When Bandai began releasing action figures of the series, they romanized the name of Goku and Vegeta's alien race, Saiya-jin ("person/people of Saiya"), into "Saiyan" on the packaging of the figures. This term would later be used in the English adaptations of the anime and manga.
manga (save for the [[SoBadItsGood infamously bad]] Speedy dub, which used the rather literal translation of "Saiya people").
** Unfortunately, in the Brazilian dub they originally just left the Saiyajin of the japanese, kept "Saiya-jin", adopting the Saiyans "Saiyans" term only a few arcs later. Why is it bad? Because in Portuguese, it sounded something like "jean skirt", so for a good part of the anime they were called as a feminine wardrobe piece (granted, certain characters ''are'' named after womens' garments, but still)... but at least they made a nice Woolseyism out of Saiyajin "Saiya-jin" in GT, when Palace/Paris is asked by a possessed Goten about Saiyajins, Saiya-jins, she mistakes it for, well, a jeans skirt.



** Fat Buu also did so in the Funimation dub, in the episode where Goku showcases Super Saiyan forms (debuting [=SSJ3=]) he mishears it, asking "Super... Saiyajin?" This may have just been gibberish in the booth, but upon repeated viewings, it sounds far to similar for it not to be a subtle reference for the fans of the Japanese version.
** The Latin American Spanish dub, however, didn't seem to decide itself on one or the other at first, and liked to throw around both "Saiyans" and "Saiyajin" ("Saiyan" and "Saiyajines", in their corresponding translated versions) at least once every two episodes. They get better, though, and end up deciding on a spanish-ization of the japanese name ("Saiyajines").
** In one episode, Goku went to Hell and encountered Oni wearing shirts with the letters HELL. In the dub, this was {{Bowdlerise}}d so that the shirts said HFIL which stood for Home For Infinite Losers. HFIL has caught on as an in joke amongst fans.

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** Fat Buu also did so in the Funimation dub, in the episode where Goku showcases Super Saiyan forms (debuting [=SSJ3=]) he mishears it, asking "Super... Saiyajin?" Saiya-jin?" This may have just been gibberish in the booth, but upon repeated viewings, it sounds far to similar for it not to be a subtle reference for the fans of the Japanese version.
** The Latin American Spanish dub, however, didn't seem to decide itself on one or the other at first, and liked to throw around both "Saiyans" and "Saiyajin" "Saiya-jin" ("Saiyan" and "Saiyajines", in their corresponding translated versions) at least once every two episodes. They get better, though, and end up deciding on a spanish-ization Spanish-ization of the japanese Japanese name ("Saiyajines").
** In one episode, Goku went to Hell and encountered Oni wearing shirts with the letters HELL. In the dub, this was {{Bowdlerise}}d so that the shirts said HFIL which stood for Home For Infinite Losers. HFIL has caught on as an in joke in-joke amongst fans.



** The translators of the original ''Dragon Ball'' were clearly having fun with the dialogue. Sample line concerning the shapeshifting pig Oolong as a beach umbrella: "This sure beats baking in the sun!" "That's me, bacon' in the sun..."

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** The translators of the original ''Dragon Ball'' were clearly having fun with the dialogue. Sample line concerning the shapeshifting shape-shifting pig Oolong as a beach umbrella: "This sure beats baking in the sun!" "That's me, bacon' in the sun..."



** Several lines in the ''Dragon Ball'' movies were Woolseyisms. For instance, Doore originally didn't say anything when he was almost successful in crushing Gohan's head in the Japanese version, but the dub added in a line where Doore stated that his crushing Gohan's head is what he calls his "Can-Opener Attack". In Super Android 13, probably the movie with the most woolseyisms, The dub added in an exchange between Krillin and Oolong about waiting in line/cutting in line while waiting for a fashion show that ultimately didn't exist that was not said in the original Japanese version. Also, Androids 14 and 15 (as well as the titular form of the main villain) were originally for the most part silent, but the dub gave them a lot more lines, some of which added in hilarity. The store clerk who attempted to stop them in the department store was originally trying to greet them, but was changed to him stopping them in the dub. Logically, this made a lot more sense, considering that the androids also briefly destroyed some TV screens as well as caused collatoral damage down in the town. Broly's "Is that another word for a Coffin" response to Goku's requesting for a handicap was also a woolseyism.

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** Several lines in the ''Dragon Ball'' movies were Woolseyisms.{{Woolseyism}}s. For instance, Doore originally didn't say anything when he was almost successful in crushing Gohan's head in the Japanese version, but the dub added in a line where Doore stated that his crushing Gohan's head is what he calls his "Can-Opener Attack". In Super Android 13, probably the movie with the most woolseyisms, The dub added in an exchange between Krillin and Oolong about waiting in line/cutting in line while waiting for a fashion show that ultimately didn't exist that was not said in the original Japanese version. Also, Androids 14 and 15 (as well as the titular form of the main villain) were originally for the most part silent, but the dub gave them a lot more lines, some of which added in hilarity. The store clerk who attempted to stop them in the department store was originally trying to greet them, but was changed to him stopping them in the dub. Logically, this made a lot more sense, considering that the androids also briefly destroyed some TV screens as well as caused collatoral collateral damage down in the town.town. Additionally, there's a scene at the very end of the film where Vegeta and Piccolo are sitting opposite each other on a patch of ice before a fish jumps, ending the movie. The two are completely silent in the Japanese version, but in the dub, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUumQ2SFW9k this]] happens. Broly's "Is that another word for a Coffin" response to Goku's requesting for a handicap was also a woolseyism.



** One of the perks of Funimation dubbing Dragon Ball Z multiple times (including the DVD versions and Dragon Ball Kai) is they get lots of practice getting the jokes just right. In their dub of Kai, while waiting on Goku to make it to the fight with Nappa, King Kai remarks "They should call him SLOW-KU!" In an earlier episode, when Goku barely avoids falling off Snake Way (since in Kai the filler episode where he goes to hell is omitted), he says a snarky "Note to self: don't go to hell."

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** One of the perks of Funimation dubbing Dragon Ball Z multiple times (including the DVD versions and Dragon Ball Kai) is they get lots of practice getting the jokes just right. In their dub of Kai, while waiting on Goku to make it to the fight with Nappa, King Kai remarks "They should call him SLOW-KU!" In an earlier episode, when Goku barely avoids falling off Snake Way (since in Kai the filler episode where he goes to hell accidentally falls into Hell is omitted), he says a snarky "Note to self: don't go to hell." Hell."



*** Another fine example comes from ''All-Star Battle'', where [[Manga/DiamondIsUnbreakable Josuke Higashikata]] (Part 4)'s Stand was changed from [[Music/PinkFloyd Crazy Diamond]] to Shining Diamond, preserving the reference and avoiding any legal entanglements.

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*** Another fine example comes from ''All-Star Battle'', where [[Manga/DiamondIsUnbreakable Josuke Higashikata]] (Part 4)'s Stand was changed from [[Music/PinkFloyd [[Music/WishYouWereHere Crazy Diamond]] to Shining Diamond, preserving the Music/PinkFloyd reference and avoiding any legal entanglements.
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