History WMG / ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia

4th Aug '16 2:59:42 PM eaterofworlds
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[[WMG: Danny Devito's character from OneFlewOverTheCuckoosNest is Frank.]] We know that Frank has had multiple stays in mental institutions.

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[[WMG: Danny Devito's character from OneFlewOverTheCuckoosNest is Frank.]] We know that ]]
When he got out he honored McMurphy's memory by taking on his personality. Which could explain how different
Frank has had multiple stays is in mental institutions.
later seasons.
20th Jul '16 4:42:03 PM eaterofworlds
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[[WMG: Mac is a potential serial killer.]]
Dennis strikes more as an all talk but no action type. While he does have sociopathic tendencies he'd rarely act out on them but Mac has shown that he's capable of violent outburst and have came close to choking Dee to death once. Also Mac has tend to disturb even Dennis.
18th Jul '16 1:50:58 PM eaterofworlds
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** Given the tone of the series this would have made an excellent deconstruction of the group as a whole. Much like the Seinfeld finale. The only one that would come out of this on a positive light is Cricket. Who won a lawsuit that he filed against the crew for playing a part in the downfall that is his life. He wins the case and uses some of the money for surgery to repair the injuries the gang gave him then cleans himself up and leaves a better person.
15th Jul '16 1:01:18 AM tv12345
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We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other.

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We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else as said here.in expanded in one WMG point. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other.


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15th Jul '16 12:59:05 AM tv12345
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15th Jul '16 12:58:41 AM tv12345
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They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible and also a lot more mundane without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from what's shown alone. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".

to:

They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible and also a lot more mundane without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from what's shown alone.
We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other.
Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".
15th Jul '16 12:57:51 AM tv12345
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They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible and also a lot more mundane without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from that. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".

to:

They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible and also a lot more mundane without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from that.what's shown alone. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".
15th Jul '16 12:57:17 AM tv12345
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They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from that. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".

to:

They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible and also a lot more mundane without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from that. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".
15th Jul '16 12:56:16 AM tv12345
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[[WMG: The gang are unreliable narrators. The flanderizing in later seasons is an effect of this, because what we see on TV is not them realistically. ]]
They're cartoonish people. They were to begin with but have gotten more cartoonish as the seasons led on. In real life - without a room of writers constructing their dialogue - they'd be cringier and more depressingly, insufferably, irredeemably horrible without the comedic relief. So we can assume that there's a lot in their world that we're not getting from that. We definitely see that there's so much we don't see in the confessions from "The Gang Goes to Hell: Part 2". There's a RashomonStyle clash of perspective in "Who Pooped the Bed?" that suggests that the gang's perspectives are tenuous. The show has always followed closely to the gang's point of view with regard to them navigating the world. We know they're drunks which can account for skewed perspective, like someone else said here. They're also angry people who hate each other in a lot of ways. In "The Gang Group Dates", Dee says "go find the dirty one or the gay one", pointing to that being how they see each other. Them devolving more into unbearable 2-D versions of themselves could be read as a reflection of their interactions together. Like how Dennis has grown to hate Mac more and seems to be sick of him now. We don't really see a whole lot from any other side except for the grimaces on strangers' faces or the people who's lives they ruin. We don't see their internal monologues that would add more depth. We just now kind of got a sneak into that with "Being Frank".
15th Jul '16 12:15:31 AM tv12345
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** It is possible to have feelings during straight sex and be gay. Mac (along with the rest of the gang) is an emotionally immature, stunted, guy. It seems like it would be easy for him to become infatuated with someone or emotionally-dependent because he's so desperate and needy. Plus, Dee and Dennis's mom is the only example of that happening. That coupled with that we as the audience still don't know what was going on in Mac's mind during that incident is kind of flimsy. If anything, "The Storm of the Century" where Mac hides in the bunker enjoying gawking at the weatherwomen is more proof of any possible bisexuality. (Still, Rob McElhenney says that Mac is "straight-up gay" in an interview" but it is interesting.)

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** It is possible to have feelings during straight sex and be gay. Mac (along with the rest of the gang) is an emotionally immature, stunted, guy. It seems like it would be easy for him to become infatuated with someone or emotionally-dependent because he's so desperate and needy. Plus, Dee and Dennis's mom is the only example of that happening. That coupled with that we as the audience still don't know what was going on in Mac's mind during that incident is kind of flimsy. If anything, "The Storm of the Century" where Mac hides in the bunker enjoying gawking at the weatherwomen is more proof of any possible bisexuality. (Still, Rob McElhenney says that Mac is "straight-up gay" in an interview" but it is interesting.)
bisexuality.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WMG.ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia