History WMG / HarryPotterMain

2nd Jun '18 11:36:13 AM nombretomado
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* This belongs on the {{Darth Wiki}}.

to:

* This belongs on the {{Darth Wiki}}.
DarthWiki/DarthWiki.
4th May '18 6:21:05 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG:The Ministry of Magic is purposely keeping the Wizarding World ignorant of how the muggle world ''really'' is to prevent conquest-happy wizards from becoming unstoppable threats and to keep them under their rule.]]
Supposedly, the Wizarding World is purposely kept separate from the Muggle World to prevent the latter from decimating the former in a war and (presumably) prevent the latter from exploiting the former as a cure-all resource. While this may be true, there's also the added, underlying threat of what would happen if a wizard or witch suddenly came into possession and full knowledge of Muggle weapons and technology.

They say that against a wizard with a Killing Curse, a Muggle with a shotgun would win every time; imagine if said shotgun was enchanted and wielded by a deranged wizard. With the magic world completely inept in the ways of the non-magical folk, it ensures that they can't combine the best of both worlds and create an unstoppable weapon of mass destruction or invincible army to conquer ''both'' worlds. Plus, if wizards knew the ins and outs of Muggle society, technology, culture, etc., it's likely they'll pull an "Amish in the City" and abandon the old traditions for a more technomantic life, thus throwing the Ministry's carefully balanced iron grip on Wizarding society into jeopardy. Alternatively...
* There's no way a muggle with a gun would beat a wizard with a wand. A quick Expelliarmus would disarm him sraight away. Or if you don't feel like disarming him, which would be easy as hell, you could send a stunning spell or Perificus Totalus to knock him down. Or blast the gun out of his hands with Reducto. Or you could transfigure it into a rubber chicken. There must be some sort of spell that blocks physical objects, the shield charm for example. All relatively simple spells. Seriously, the muggle wouldn't stand a chance.
** Compare the length of time it takes to finish pronouncing a five-syllable pseudo-Latin word to the time it takes to pull a trigger. Also consider that wands only work at pistol range, and firearms can work at sniper rifle range. And this is all before we get into grenades, bombs, artillery...
*** Wandless magic. Once CallingYourAttacks is out, all bets are off. Also, the Weasley's "weapons-grade jokes": conventional smokescreen vs. pitch-black Peruvian Darkness Powder; hypnotism vs. extra-stregnth Daydream Charms; complicated disguise makeup vs. ''a hat that instantly makes your head invisible''. In terms of pre-packaged magic, wizards are at an advantage... after a pair of ''joke-loving teenagers'' put some thought into it. That ''no one'' thought to create some sort of "magic-bullet-proof vest" before probably falls into the WMG below.
*** Although most of those items are joke items, actual wizard combat powers doesn't seem to involve anything more powerful. Human (Muggle) science and technology is adaptive. Magic stagnates to the point that simple logic problems are considered drastic security measures.
*** Yeah, but at the same time the premise here isn't a muggle with a Gun. It's a wizard. With an enchanted gun. If a muggle with a gun is at a slight disadvantage (At best), a crazed wizard with a gun will have a significant advantage. If, some how, said wizard managed to avoid falling into the 'All important wizards are certifably insane' aspect of the Potterverse setting, well, Wizards are screwed.
*** Speaking of wandless magic, uncontrolled wandless "accidental magic" seems to protect young wizards from mundane accidents (Neville bouncing like a rubber ball when dropped out a window, etc.). Perhaps this isn't restricted to the young. If Hagrid thought it ludicrous that a car crash could have killed Lily and James Potter, the same might hold true for a bullet or a bomb.
*** If that's the case, then why do people banish things at eachother in duels?
*** Shield charms work to protect against moderate ''magic'', not physical impact. Furthermore, wizards have and have used swords. If a SWORD could work on a wizard, there is no reason to assume a gun wouldn't.
*** Only on magical creatures, and it was a highly magical goblin-made sword.
*** When Ron comes back in book 7, Harry uses a shield charm to keep Hermione from attacking him. If it works on humans, why wouldn't it work on bullets?
*** Because humans dont break the speed of sound? The most likely conclusion is that a strong enough shield charm would stop a bullet from a highpowered gun. And that enough bullets would break the shield, just like Magic does in the books.
*** A shield charm can save you from falling hundreds of feet. Bullets don't actually have all that much energy; they are merely pointed, thus exert a lot of pressure.
*** Isn't it mentioned somewhere that the threat of uncontrolled magic is virtually zero once a wizard's been fully trained? Neville, Harry et al. had no idea how to use their powers, hence all the involuntary magic. Once they know how to use it, the threat goes down.
* The same badass fanfic as last entry posited that the Ministry purposely censored all wizarding knowledge of technological process, starting sometime between World War I and the rise of Grindelwald. Effectively, this boils down to ''bitches don't know 'bout my atom bomb'' in later chapters. Wait...is the person writing these the author of that fic?
* It's worth noting, in all this FanWank, that there's something not taken into account, and that's that, while a Wizard might be more than a match for a muggle with a gun, a muggle with a highpowered sniper rifle firing on a wizard who doesn't know he's even around is probably going to come out on top. Even if a shield charm stopped every bullet ever, and you could get it up before someone could shoot, you're not going to be able to stop a bullet from someone you don't even know exists.
** This also goes the other way around; the Muggle with the high-powered sniper rifle is equally defenseless against a wizard who's scouted the area (magic would probably help a lot in finding a hidden sniper if you think it's a good precaution to check) and sneaks up behind him. This actually works against the WMG, however; all the wizards who would want to counquer the muggle world don't have this sense, they're too busy feeling superior to think about doing anything about the muggle with a gun than stand in front of him. The kind of wizard that's of the right mind to learn how the muggle world ticks and make this situation work for him would have no interest in doing so.
*** According to the epilogue, there is a Supersensory Charm.
*** Magic in Literature/HarryPotter actually has a hard time detecting non-magical objects. But this discussion is CompletelyMissingThePoint: There are about 10000 muggles for one wizard and those are '''definitely''' not the odds the Wizarding World wants to face. A wizard with a wand will not win over 10000 muggles with guns. A HP wizard is definitely not strong enough for that, so they defer to secrecy.
*** Mind you, ''all'' wizards can use magic, when all muggles are not soldiers...
*** Also, remember Moody's Foe-Glass? It seems actually quite ''simple'' to detect threats and enemies. It never says that the glass only detects wizards, and why would it? And this kind of magic surely can exist in spell form, or at least in more portable form.
** A related idea: A wizard builds his wand into a shotgun, thus enchanting every shot fired with a spell. An Avada Kedavra blast would mean that every little piece of buckshot carries an instant-death curse. This would be bad.
*** Yep. But it would be much harder for him to cast lots of other stuff. Even the darkest wizard wouldn't deprive himself of a shield charm.
* I'm imagining an shotgun that fires bullets enchanted with different spells. A shotgun shell that fires fiendfyre, a shotgun shell that fires the killing curse, or reducto. That's be awesome, someone should make that movie!
4th May '18 6:20:36 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG: Avada Kadavra is pure magic.]]

Magic interferes with electrical machines like an EMP. Humans also have many electric signals keeping us alive, but we are far more resilient and will survive an EMP blast as all our electronics are fried. However, given enough, even humans will die, although it takes a LOT. Avada Kedavra is just a bolt of pure magic. It doesn't have an intended purpose, it just is a green blob in it's purest form. It takes a lot of will to cast it, with the only piece of will strong enough is the desire to kill. In theory, a wizard could make it appear if they tried hard enough, but no wizard know it's true nature, and no one is testing it.

[[WMG: Magic is fueled by calories.]]
This explains why the students of Hogwarts eat three enormous feasts every day, and none of them, in fact no wizard that we see, is severely obese. A great many wizards are skinny, and those few who are somewhat overweight are not using their powers to their full potential, resulting in a buildup of magic and resultant fat. Such people include Molly Weasley (kills Bellatrix with relative ease when she gets serious) and Neville Longbottom (whether he's actually overweight is a matter of interpretation, but he's definitely not meeting his potential in the early books).
* Jossed. The reason the students are so thin (not all of them) is because in Hogwarts most of the classes are so far apart. You have children running across the castle from one class to the next and if you are running from the dungeons to the top tower then you will go through calories very quickly. I would think that a lot of magic would consume energy and using too much in one go would make you faint. Also some people are just bigger then others no matter how much exercise they do (my friend is a great example of this. She's more active and does more sports then most people and she's still considered 'fat').
[[WMG:If any Death Eater splinched when summoned by Riddle, s/he got AK'ed.]]
"What? Not determined enough to get here?"
* Voldemort was not the worst boss, as far as villains go. If anything, he didn't like killing those that he felt could be the slightest use to him. (Which may explain why he tried to recruit James and Lily as well as Neville before deciding to kill them outright.) He was probably more likely to torture or humiliate someone he felt had failed him. Hence, Crucio when a person had already left pieces behind. Yeeeeowch.



[[WMG: Magic is nothing but a misunderstood remnant of ancient alien technology.]]
The phenomenon called "magic" is all that remains of the technology from an alien race visiting the earth thousands of years ago. The aliens, much more advanced then even modern men, set up a quantum manipulation field, with which they could alter the environment and, given enough energy, even create things seemingly out of nothing. The energy sources of this field are scattered all through the world, in the form of strange artifacts or even geological formations, such as hills, seas or old rocks. A lot of those sources diminished in power or even disappeared, but the biggest source still remains: the Moon, which had its core altered to relay and power the alien technology.

After the aliens disappeared, human beings very gradually managed to tap into this quantum manipulation field. They did this using trial and error, inventing incantations that resemble the old auditory commands given by the aliens. Human beings generally need wands to focus their own life force to make the field aware of them. Also, not all people have this ability, only the descendants of those the aliens experimented with. The centaurs could also be the result of an experiment gone haywire, involving combining human beings with horses.

Certain combinations of chemicals can also cause interactions with the field, which is the cause of potions. Lastly, most of the strange creatures are the descendants of animals the aliens altered for their purposes.




[[WMG: Adva Kadavra is just a spell that stops hearts]]
In the books they they reaptly say that Adva Kadavra leaves no burn marks and to muggles it just looks like someones heart stops but it dose just stop it basically uses magic to stop the heart somehow.
* Probably not. Heart stoppage =/= instant death. You actually have a few minutes, and a wizard would have likely lucked into some magical method of re-starting the heart by this point. Not to mention that a heart attack (which is essentially what this is) would show up on a Muggle autopsy as a cause of death. It's more than likely that AK causes actual ''brain'' death.
* I think it stops all activity in the central nervous system instantly. The way magic disrupts electricity this focused spell just zaps the entire electrical signals of the entire central nervous system, like hitting a computer with an EMP. POW, brain, heart, all muscles, all of it just stops.



* Isn't this canon?

[[WMG:Galleons represent the actual amount of quantified magic in the world.]]
* Galleons are not created per se. The Goblins were able to cast a spell that created 1 galleon per calorie of magical energy in the world. Galleons can probably be physically counterfeited, however a casual magical scan would reveal that counterfeit was not an original. No new galleons can be created because there is only so much magic in the world. Now, having a galleon doesn't control any magic in the world, but the fact that the total galleons equals to the total magic in the world is why they are used as currency for purchasing magical items.However much magical energy was used that is how many galleons the thing costs...or at least that is the theory, of course black market trades are made all the time where the magical value of items is inflated or deflated for one reason or another.
* I always figured that there is a small circle of goblins who run Gringotts who each cast a spell that makes galleons. You can make a physical counterfeit galleon but no one wants to because doing so would get you cursed by the Goblins.

to:

* Isn't this canon?

[[WMG:Galleons represent the actual amount of quantified magic in the world.]]
* Galleons are not created per se. The Goblins were able to cast a spell that created 1 galleon per calorie of magical energy in the world. Galleons can probably be physically counterfeited, however a casual magical scan would reveal that counterfeit was not an original. No new galleons can be created because there is only so much magic in the world. Now, having a galleon doesn't control any magic in the world, but the fact that the total galleons equals to the total magic in the world is why they are used as currency for purchasing magical items.However much magical energy was used that is how many galleons the thing costs...or at least that is the theory, of course black market trades are made all the time where the magical value of items is inflated or deflated for one reason or another.
* I always figured that there is a small circle of goblins who run Gringotts who each cast a spell that makes galleons. You can make a physical counterfeit galleon but no one wants to because doing so would get you cursed by the Goblins.
canon?
22nd Apr '18 9:11:06 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG: Prophecies are in fact very powerful spells that manipulate the future, not tell it.]]

However they harness an even greater power than magic...they harness the power of self fulfilling prophecy. In other words 'prophets' are like people who understand psychohistory and every once in awhile they see how to control future events by saying certain cryptic things to certain people at certain times, and through that those people self fulfill the prophecy.

[[WMG: It's not incompatible with known physics.]]
A wand is a cold fusion reactor, with the "magical" core sustaining the reaction. Magic works by manipulating electric and magnetic fields, which is why advanced Muggle technology doesn't work near a lot of it - the constant changes in flux are the same as an EMP. And there are ways to do everything that we see a spell doing, with ''very'' precise manipulation of those fields. Apparition is traveling through higher dimensions - the crushing sensation is your cells suddenly having a much higher ratio of volume to surface area than they are supposed to. Time Turners use wormholes, and Divination is just the same effect the other way working differently.

[[WMG: Wizards are less powerful than other magical creatures because humanity isn't magic as a whole.]]



[[WMG: Arithmancy is the art of creating new spells]]
Which an only be done by incredibly dangerous experiemtation, eg: shouting random words , or an incredibly complex combination of maths and etymology.
*Jossed. Arithmancy is a magical discipline that studies the magical properties of numbers, including predicting the future with numbers and numerology.



[[WMG: The spell that Dumbledore cast at Voldemort at the end of [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix Order of the Phoenix]] was an Elder Wand-level Petrificus Totalus.]]
It's effects are never revealed, and it's listed under {{fate worse than death}}, so, it could be a Petrificus Totalus so powerful it trapped Voldemort for all eternity.
* [[AndIMustScream Holy shit...]]



[[WMG:Ambient magic has no effect on modern electronics on its own; [[Main/ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve the mental aspect of magic and the perpetuation of the myth that it does]] makes it so.]]
Electricity is a primal, elemental force, just like fire, light, earth, etc.; there are spells and incantations and potions that allow a witch or wizard to create or manipulate ''them'', so electricity should be no different. (Light and electricity are very similar forces...) Plus, the effect of ambient magic on electronics has been displayed rather unevenly throughout the book series; sometimes it shuts them down altogether, and sometimes it leaves them entirely unfazed. Supposedly, a laptop or cell phone won't work on the Hogwarts grounds, but a motorcycle or car would; why would lead-acid batteries be more resistant that lithium-ion batteries? And there's a department in the Ministry of Magic created specifically for the discovery and confiscation of magicked Muggle items.

Given that much of whether magic works a certain way is in the ''belief'' that it'll work that way, the only reason ambient magic in an area would affect electronics is because the wizarding world ''believes'' that it does; otherwise, like anything else not intended as the direct target, the effect of magic on such items is negligible at best.
** If magic truly stopped electricity from working, then the portion of London that contains the Ministry of Magic should be dealing with an irreversible blackout. It isn't. It's TOO MUCH magic which overwhelms electricity. This also means that too much electricity should cancel out magic. But if you keep them balanced, both should work fine.
*** One badass fanfic assumes that lots of magic can cancel out technology ''and vice versa'' and goes on from there - it's why satellites don't pick up Hogwarts. Long story short, there's a squib with a grudge trying to expose the magical world; to protect herself from the wizard manhunt she's started, she hides out on a tech college campus (it might have been MIT), where there's so much engineering and technology that ''magic doesn't work.'' It's much less goofy than it sounds.
** Whats it called?
* This Troper assumed that electronics didn't work on Hogwarts Grounds because they'd included anti-electronics spells in the wards around the school, intentionally so that muggle-borns get fully involved in the Magical world. They can make exceptions for teachers and lower the barrier during the summer, while the students are away. They made the wards, after all.
** I figured that they make electronics not work so that the muggleborn children are even more disconnected with their home lives. Not even a payphone anywhere, means they will not be speaking to their parents for months at a time, except through owl(and how many kids like writing letters), and never to their friends, it's not like they can send their muggle friends an owl. This also weans them off technology tv, computers etc, making them technologically illiterate, more embracing of a witch/ wizards lifestyle. Also making sure demonstrations of interesting tech will not be available to purebloods, thus not challenging their assumed betterness over muggles. this was probably cooked up by headmaster Black...
* Or it's simply that all that magic -which we know can make light and whatnot, ie. ''electromagnetic interference'', overwhelm electronic circuits and fry'em. A lead-based battery, with relatively short cables (compared to their diameter) connecting to the ignition wouldn't be affected, but the oh-so-delicate electronics just give up and spout the magic smoke of doom.
* Alternatively, Magic has no impact on Electronics. It's simply a myth that it causes them to cease functioning because Wizards lag so far behind the mundane world. Notably, we never see anyone TRY to get it to work in the stories other than Arthur Weasley.
* Alternatively alternatively, magic doesn't cancel out magic... ''when it's being used correctly''. Hogwarts is full of students struggling to master spells, potions, etc; the concentrated misuse of magic in a small enough area is enough to disable electronics.
** Triple alternatively, it's all a lie to keep students focused on the whole "learning" aspect of school instead of the "goofing off during class" one, like mundane schools banning cell phone usage, mp3 players, etc during school hours.
* Both the motorbike and the car that operated on Hogwart Grounds had been magically modified. They likely didn't run on electricity any more, the ignition system was probably magical after Sirius' and Arthur's tampering respectively.
** And there's also the Knight Bus, which also, clearly, has been magically modified, what which incredible acceleration, and the whole, things jumping out of its path trick.



[[WMG: Unconscious Magic is Much More Effective Against Muggles.]]
We only ever see this kind of magic used against Muggles i.e. Harry Apparates away from bullies. However, this never happened against a wizard - Neville didn't do magic to save his parents, Harry doesn't Apparate away from Voldemort, etc. This would also tie in with the Muggle vs. Wizard scenario. Assume that a wizard can detect Muggle threats as they can the traces of magic, and a Muggle's a goner. Plus, a wizard world vs. Muggle world war would be a curbstomp battle in a wizard's favor: Apparate into the Heads of States' homes and capture them, break up supply lines, hide in Muggle-impenetrable areas, Transfigure armies' guns... the possibilities are endless. Finally, enchanted bulletproof vests, anyone?
* You do know that Harry and Neville were babies and didn't understand what was going on at the time right? Unconscious magic happens when the user is angry or scared, besides, who says Neville was even with his parents at the time? If he had been, the death eaters would probably have tortured him to insanity as well. It'd probably be far more effective in making the Longbottoms talk. Besides, wizards who use unconscious magic aren't going to be more effective as trained wizards, because trained wizards can direct their magic in a more effective manner.
* No, this makes perfect sense. If wizards have an instinctive use for magic that can leak out unconsciously, then it makes sense to assume they also have instinctive defenses against magic. So those little random bits of unconscious magic would be automatically and unconsciously blocked by wizards as well. Muggles having no magic would not be able to defend against these. So like all those times Hermione yelled at Ron, if he had been a muggle hey would have gotten zapped. This would also explain even more the need for the separation between the wizarding world and the muggle world, wizards are just inherently dangerous to muggles.

[[WMG: Magic makes wizards dumber.]]
Throughout the series, there are examples of wizards doing things that range from offbeat to wacky to downright mind-bogglingly dumb. And they show a remarkable lack of knowledge of anything Muggle -- Arthur Weasley has no concept of how a bus route would work, or how to work a telephone even though one entry into the Ministry of Magic building involves one! -- despite a sizable fraction of them having at least one Muggle parent or grandparent. This has to make you wonder. And then it turns out that electronics in the presence of ambient magic tend to have (in the best of cases) [[WalkingTechbane little glitches and skips]] ... and what is the human brain but a great big meat-based gadget passing a lot of electronic signals between its parts and pieces? It's only to be expected that a brain might not work quite as smoothly as it should when there's a lot of magic around. (The survival value thus conferred on magic blindness through improved brain function may explain why the magic gene hasn't made itself ubiquitous in the population at large.)
* The average wizard's ineptitude and insularity in regards to the muggle world that surrounds them may be [[TruthInTelevision Truth In Literature]]. Have you ever been to Quebec? In spite of being surrounded in their nation and all over its subcontinent by the two largest English-speaking nations on earth, not to mention being isolated from other francophones by an ocean, many Québecois go all the way through adulthood without knowing more than a lick of English. Modern-day speakers of various archaic British languages (Gælic, Cymric, Armoric, Manx, Cornish, etc…) might be even more precisely what Rowling was referring to.
** By "Cymric", do you mean Cymraeg? Like, Welsh? Sorry, nitpicky Welsh person speaking.
** It's an alternate term, or a general term for things having to do with Wales. (/also Welsh, for the record.)
* Maybe so many of the older, male wizards have beards because they don't trust themselves with big sharp razors? That is, they are too dumb not to cut themselves.
* Alternatively, given the size of the wizarding population and the number of pure-blood families still in existence, maybe it's just all the in-breeding.
* Further support comes from almost every muggle-born wizard being smarter. Hermione, Harry (a half-blood), even Tom Riddle (another half-blood despite what he tells people) - they all had a break every summer from magic brain-frying, in addition to having their important childhood brain development outside of wizard interference. The children of Purebloods are educated by wizards because of the Masquerade, and wizards are already dumber than muggles for environmental reasons; thus, the Pureblooded wizarding world is in a vicious cycle which is making it dumber and dumber every generation.
** Going even further, Dumbledore knows this, which is why he spends so much time in Muggle society and why he sent Harry to live in Muggle-world.
** This explains why Ron got progressively stupider and goofier as the series went on.
*** And that Brain-sucking jellyfish thing was beneficial in the long run, reversing the process to a degree by book 7.
* It's not necessarily magic that makes wizards dumber; it's the overemphasis and over-reliance on magic to wizards. To wizards, magic is pretty much everything (fear of muggles, discrimination of squibs and those with muggle parentage, etc.); as a result, they exclude such things as muggle sciences and a lot of the arts from their education. All they teach in Hogwarts is magic: no English, no live foreign languages, no art, no theatrics, no psychology, no humanities in general, no courses on ethics. The only mathematics is Arithmancy; the only history taught is Wizard history, and that is taught very badly. Not an intellectual group for a race that reads a lot. If they were, many pure-blood supremacists would be against the concept of the Hogwarts Express because the steam engine and railroad system are a muggle invention; but none of them have seemed to realise that.
** Reminds me of the "instinct vs. technology" aesop in ''{{Twister}}''. Also, maybe in the HP 'verse, wizards invented steam power, but it took muggles to get it going, so to speak.
** The children are taught those basic things until they were eleven, and it wasn't needed anymore once they went to a Wizard school. Maybe their brains developed quicker in Muggle studies, but then again that contradicts the whole theory.
*** Again, where do the children of Purebloods and other assimilated wizards learn these things?
*** And having a collective education level of an eleven-year-old about anything other than magic still explains a lot...
** We only know what Harry knows, so maybe courses like "Magical Art History" exist.
*** It's highly likely that "Magical Art" and/or "Magical Art History" exists in particular, given the unusual nature of the paintings at Hogwarts (which must require magic paint, canvases, brushes, and a vivid imagination in order to create). A "Magical Photography" class is also probable. There are Wizard rock bands, who presumably use magical abilities in their music-making, although it's never explained precisely how (is magical music "better" somehow?). There don't appear to be any music or art teachers at Hogwarts, though. Based on statistics, there are probably not many Wizard musicians/artists in Britain, and so young wizards interested in studying music or art would probably have to become someone's apprentice.
*** {{Word of God}} via The Marauder's Map (which Rowling supposedly drew herself) shows rooms like "music room" and things like "charms club" are mentioned, so it's possible they exist, just as extra-curricular activities. [[http://www.thinkgeek.com/geektoys/collectibles/e83e/?pfm=Search&t=marauder%26%2339%3Bs%20map Here's a link to a replica on ThinkGeek.]] And in the movies, it's implied that Flitwick is the choir teacher.
** This troper recalls how much worse his ability to do simple calculations got since being given his first calculator in middle school...
*** Precisely. How badly did your ability to spell decrease once you stopped getting assessed on it? Unless the teachers also correct any spelling, punctuation or grammer errors (unlikely), then the average wizard is going to write like a muggle sending a text. Their should be ''some'' class where wizards learn basic english and mathematics, just to get their heads above water.
* Or perhaps many wizards lack a decent capacity for critical thought due to their education at Hogwarts. Boarding school is a conformist place where standing out or thinking for yourself is a definite no-no. With no university or third level education to speak of, wizards and witches aren't going to be thinking outside the box. Consider the following points:
## Everyone was afraid of Voldemort when the Death Eaters did all the leg work.
## Some Death Eaters would have continued Voldemort's reign of terror when Voldemort disappeared, with it being business as usual.
## Being a Death Eater would be a lot harder, with many people going for the Dark Arts, homemade explosives, costly last stands, hit-and-run attacks, and vigilante work to make them pay, even using the same tactics they use.
## No one seemed to realise that a lot of Death Eaters attended Hogwarts when Dumbledore was teacher or headmaster, and aside from a few speeches, he and his staff did almost nothing to stamp out the rampant pure-blood supremacy or prevent students going to the Dark Side.
* You have a very good point there, especially if you consider that both Hogwarts and the ministry are keen on proclaiming their opinions on young ones.
* In the first book Hermionie even says 'Most wizards don't have an ounce of logic.' when faced with Snape's potion puzzle, which supports this theory.
* This is pretty much canon if you look at what Hogwarts actually teaches. They have a lot of pratical, technical, and vocational classes, but there's nothing in the way of culture or literature or language or critical thinking, or anything else that most modern places teach. And, when you get down to it, they were complaining about things like writing four inches of an assignment or by the end 'Two Feet'. That's... two pages. Hand written. With a quill. 3-5 pages, Typed, is pretty much the norm in most Highschool Level courses these days.
* ouch no wonder they were complaining their hands must have ached
* Yeah, it's much more likely that the wizarding worlds complete lack of common sense is more of a cultural thing- they aren't going to know things that are exclusive to a culture they deliberately segregate themselves from. Their way of life is different, and it seems normal to ''them'', the right way to go about things (sort of like how people in dysfunctional families sometimes have no idea they're actually dysfunctional, and don't know there's another way of going about things, which also means that the cycle can get repeated when the children grow up and start their own families... Not the most precise analogy, but good enough.) Although to add to the theory, I actually recently wondered myself whether or not magic ''does'' affect people's brains. Specifically, I wondered how wizards could be so stupid yet have such good memory. They learn all these spells, and seem to have to know how to brew all these potions by heart and so on, and it makes you wonder whether or not magic enlarges the parts of the brain involved in memory, and perhaps leads to other parts of the brain shrinking in response (maybe the part responsible for logic and decision making or something like that). I'm not sure whether of not their memory is only specialized in regards to ''spells'', but I think it makes sense. Hermione is renowned for brains and excellent memory- maybe she developed it and treasured it because among muggles such good memory is extraordinary and those around her likely praised her and encouraged her to capitalize on that gift, wheareas with wizards such a thing is normal and nothing out of the ordinary, and as such they weren't really encouraged in the same way Hermione was. Thus, ordinary grades. On the other end of the spectrum, we have Neville. Neville who was at first suspected to be a squib by his family- maybe his terrible memory is one of the reasons they thought he wasn't magical? (Even then, as far as I can remember, Neville doesn't seem to have trouble remembering spells and plant names- just other things.)
** It doesn't necessarily take magic to make the brain favor memorization over, say, logic. Mental skills reflect useage even under perfectly mundane circumstances, sometimes to a surprising extent.
* It's not stupidity, but a lack of logic and critical thinking skills. Classes seem to be teaching how to do things (cast spells, make potions, ect.) without explaining how things work. Combine the follow-the-leader educational system with a belief that the best way to solve a problem is to magically get rid of it. This also may explain why the wizarding world has such a static class structure: new and innovative ideas (like Fred and George's snackboxes) are not encouraged, and all education is standard, so most witches and wizards have no way to move up the socioeconomic ladder.
** By this logic then Snape, Dumbledore, the Flamels, and Minerva are all dumb when in fact they are all extremely smart or brilliant people. Snape is very logical and so is Dumbledore. You have to remember that the books are from Harry's point of view and as such we are not given the whole picture. Also, it's not that they are dumb it's they are dumb by our definition. Some people are technology dumb, like my 50+ year old mother for example. She's not an idiot or dumb by any means it's just that she is not very 'smart' when it comes to things I consider easy. Also Snape created spells, made his potions book better and his manner of speech are all show of an intelligent and creative man. He might not be able to use photoshop or use a computer very well but he's still not dumb, he's just dumb in my culture. Also culture plays into this too. They don't need computers, guns, etc. They use magic and what ever else so of course they will be un educated and confused by our muggle stuff. Just like I would be confused by how their wizarding world works. Also Harry himself isn't that intelligent. Harry constantly blames the same person for a few books, relies too much on Hermonie to figure things out and runs right into traps and such. Being half-blood (like Snape) or muggleborn means nothing it's just some are smarter then others. So I'm going to say Jossed since there are intelligent pure bloods and dumb Half-bloods/Muggle borns.



[[WMG: Magic is a public utility]]
Just like water or the electrics. You pay your utility bill, the Ministry pipes magic to you. That's why the Weasley's being poor matters; they can't afford the magic. Harry has a trust fund (the Gringrots vault) paying the bills, or maybe Hogwarts foots the bill for its own magic (as is likely the case for Muggle students).
* And there's a limited (either total or slowly regenerating) supply, which is why the Wizards want to keep the whole thing secret.
** Imagine the "Magic Crisis" and "The War on Voldemort:Is it just for Magic" headlines.
* It exists naturally at low levels as a kind of background radiation; this is not enough to power an adult witch or wizard, but it is enough to get an untrained kid started. The ability to use magic is inborn but must be reinforced at an early age. This would help explain several things about both muggle-borns and squibs:
** The presence of muggle-born witches and wizards - no adult magic-users to monopolize the magic supply, which allows the kids with magical potential to develop. Also, muggle-born and muggle-raised kids seem to be stronger, on average, than wizard-raised kids, possibly because they learned early on to do more with less.
** Squibs tend to show up in pureblood families - wizarding children with naturally low sensitivity to magic may have trouble getting any at all if they're surrounded by a large family of magic-using adults. This explains why Ron and Neville both seemed to have trouble in their early years at Hogwarts but ended up being fully capable wizarding adults - both came from large families (Ron's immediate family was large, and it sounds as if Neville spent a lot of time with large amounts of his extended family as a small child), which lessened the amount of magic available to them.
* The idea of their always being little magic to use could explain the small global population of wizard and witches
* Can't be the Ministry controlling the supply though, otherwise how could condemned criminals (like Sirius, not to mention Voldemort himself) use magic if the Ministry could just cut them off?
* I don't know. In one of the books it mentions magical food doesn't actually provide nourishment, and we've all seen spells eventually wear off. Perhaps the Weasleys house is built from regular construction materials, and the magic keeping it up has to be periodically topped up. And isn't the currency gold-based? If so, that also explains why poor wizards exist: it's the only element that can't be transfigured. (Well, it ''can'' be, but not everyone has a Philosopher's Stone.)



[[WMG: Dumbledore's unidentified spell in The Order of the Phoenix was meant to destroy or remove Voldemort's soul]]
The spell is only performed once, never connects, and is described rather impressively. Voldemort retorts that it is foolish that Dumbledore not seek to kill him, to which Dumbledore responds that there are other ways to destroy a man. When "destroy" is used in reference to people, and death itself can be referred to, "destroy" implies something horrible such as complete mental breakdowns or worse. Given the stories' emphasis on the Soul, destroying Voldie's soul makes the most sense. Include that the prophecy indicates that Dumbledore can't kill Voldemort (although the sixth book {{Josses}} how accuracte prophecies are), and ''destroying'' Voldemort to leave Harry to finish off seems reasonable.
* But then, if this spell connected, Dumbledore would probably become a Dementor by doing the same thing they do.
** There are so many alternatives... To say, the spell could have worked by forcing Voldemort to feel remorse for his (many) sins. Comicbook/GhostRider uses it a lot, and works.
** That's what this troper thought as well. Hasn't it been said that forcing Voldemort to feel remorse would kill him or cause extreme pain, or something to that effect?
* Bearing in mind that Voldemort's body contained only 1/7 of his soul (so the spell wouldn't have done anything except dely his rise further) and Dumbledore's hatred of Dementors, this seems unlikely. Something to do with love, or the remorse idea above, seem far more useful and in character.
** Technically, Voldemort only had 1/128 of his soul left in him...
*** You forgot [[spoiler: Harry, the accidental horcrux. That makes 8 horcruxes, hence he only has 1/256th of a soul left]].
*** Actually, it is 1/128.[[spoiler: If there are 8 horcruxes, the last two would both be 1/128 or half of the 6th horcrux (1/64) in order to add up to a whole soul]].
** Nowhere is it etched in stone that every single successive horcrux split leaves the soul in an even, neat division by perfect mathematical fractions. In fact, probably the split is uneven ''in favor of'' the part of his soul left in his body, since this is explicitly said to be the central part of him now.



[[WMG: The amout of magic in the world is finite and will eventully be used up]]
the world population of wizards is small because there would not be enough magic to fuel the community if it was larger. The difficault to use spells are only difficault because wizards have to gather a lot of magic for their use. Also squibs; like in another WMG are low sensitivity individauls who can't store enough magic to use their abilities.



[[WMG: Squibs are a little more magical than Muggles]]
Muggles can't enter Hogwarts. Filch, who is a Squib, works there, so he obviously can. Squibs are probably able to see things Muggles don't see. They may also have some sort of ability to communicate with animals, especially cats.
* Wasn't this um confirmed in the books? And even so this doesn't seen like WMG so much as stating the obvious



[[WMG: Hogwarts is somewhat sentient.]]
The castle has over time used the enormous amount of magic inside it to form some sort of consciousness. It would explain why Dumbledore always seems to know everything that's going on there. The castle obviously does, and he - as the headmaster - is tied to the castle to the point where he knows what the castle knows.
* I think this has been all but verified by Rowling.
* I believe this theory, because if Hogwarts is sentient, who knows, it could an {{Eldritch Abomination}}, which make the story creepier, and [[NightmareFetishist I love creepy things]].
* At the least, the Room of Requirement is definitely intelligent.
* You guys are gonna love this [[http://www.toplessrobot.com/2009/08/fan_fiction_friday_hogwarts_and_a_giant_squid_in_f.php one...]]
* In the Prisoner Azkaban Harry does note that Professor Flitwick is teaching the doors to recognize a photo of Sirius meaning that this theory is very likely.
* It probably doesn't even realize its sentience. It's alive, but more like an animal than a thinking being.

[[WMG: Hogwarts magically ''seems'' to have a larger student population than it actually has.]]
A thousand years of magical classes have come through its halls, leaving a good bit of residual magic. Hence though the actual student population may vary from year to year, there always ''seems'' to be students around the corner, behind you, everywhere - though if you actually forced yourself to look there would be nothing. This varies by time of day - the halls are crowded and noisy when they are expected to be crowded and noisy, but it doesn't get noisy in the middle of the night. So when the book mentions ''throngs'' of students it's actually just some students and the ''feeling'' that there are many more around. This residue reacts to emotions, so when Harry ''feels'' like the school hates him, most of the real students really don't take a side but the phantom throngs reflect Harry's feelings about how everyone else feels about him.



[[WMG: Hogwarts is bewitched so that all students are confronted with a mystery to solve each year.]]
This happens the same way the DADA teaching spot is cursed -- it guarantees the teacher ''will'' be forced to leave after a year, but from completely external, logical reasons. In the same way, a completely accounted for and external mystery will present itself to every student. For example, a fellow student has a problem that he is hiding, and his friends spend the year figuring it out what it is. The books detail Harry, Ron and Hermione's particular mystery. All the other students are investigating similar, but much less consequential ones. This is why no seems to think it remarkable, bizarre, or huge news that the trio have these massive adventures every year -- they're just wowed by the ''type'' of adventure, because their's are always more mundane. Possibly, one of James, Sirius, and Peter's was figuring out that Remus was a werewolf.
* I suppose Ginny certainly had a mystery of her own in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets Chamber of Secrets]]''. And what Malfoy went through in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince Half-Blood Prince]]'' might loosely count as a mystery.
** This is my favorite WMG ever, and [[FridgeBrilliance makes perfect sense]].
** If the school came up with Cedric's and Myrtle's mysteries, it's more Fridge Horror...
*** Those two failed to solve their mystery.
* Percy was assigned the exact same mystery as the Trio in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets Chamber of Secrets]]'', with the same clues and connections to the main players (It was his sister, and his girlfriend was petrified), but failed to solve it. Possibly he was supposed to work with the Trio.
* And a student named Tom Riddle once took a year to learn his heritage, another year to find the Chamber of Secrets, another year to learn how to become immortal...
* And obviously a large group of students had several offscreen in the last book, namely, what the heck Harry was doing, how do we stop the insane people who are running our school, and whose side is Snape really on? Possibly different students got assigned different mysteries, and perhaps there's an untold story about some third-year Hufflepuffs who figured out Snape was a good guy.



[[WMG: Just like a wizard can do magic without saying the spell, they can also simply think the wand movements.]]
In the first book and movie, Flitwick tells them to "swish and flick" for wingardium leviosa. More complicated spells you would assume would require more complicated movements, but you never see anyone ever actually doing them.
* It could be that they are just never mentioned, and Rowling does mention several times people "flourishing their wands" in heated duels, suggesting that they are flicking wands about in complicated fashions.
** Confirmed. It's called Wandless magic and it's been done several times in the series by only the most powerful of wizards. Snape, for example, has done some Wandless magic through out the book. The thing is that Wandless magic is so difficult because you have to be powerful and it takes LOTS of practice. No everyone can do it and it extremely rare. To do it without the wand and speaking is called: Wandless Wordless magic. Snape can do that too. As can Albus Dumbledore.



[[WMG: Slytherin isn't always the "evil" house.]]
It depends largely on the student body at the time. There are phases where the rash and jock-ish Gryffindors are the most antagonistic, same with the Ravenclaws, who would mock the other houses for being stupid. Hufflepuff probably does this the least.
* Except Hufflepuff would be the most likely to gang up on an individual. Remember, 'Puffs stick together.



[[WMG: The Ministry of Magic is a dictatorship]]
There are no elections - new ministers are picked from the Ministry elite. The mainstream media (The Daily Prophet and the Wizarding Wireless Network) pretty much say whatever the Ministry says. People are arrested and held without trial (see Stan Shunpike).
* Good theory. However, in ''Deathly Hallows"", durind the Potterwatch scene; Lee tells Kingsly he has his vote for Minister.
** Which, if not a joke, would make Wizarding Britain ''more'' directly democratic than the U.K., in which the Prime Minister is appointed by the monarch from within the dominant party in the (elected) House of Commons.



[[WMG: Slytherin House was much 'worse' than usual during Harry Potter's school days for a very simple reason.]]
A large portion of Slytherin House were probably not just children/grandchildren of Slytherins, but (grand)children of the first generation of Death Eaters, who obviously had all of the pureblood supremacy, except cranked UpToEleven. This is obviously confirmed with [[GenerationXerox Malfoy, Crabbe, and Goyle,]] so it would probably follow with many of the Slytherin children, to an even greater degree than other generations.



[[WMG: Hogwarts is a House Elf sanctuary.]]
* When Hogwarts was founded, one of the Founders, most likely Helga Hufflepuff, decreed that any house elves who were "freed" and had no where else to go could come to hogwarts for work and the headmaster of the time had to welcome them. It explains why Hogwarts has so many, why they like it there so much, and why both Dobby and Winky both ended up there after being freed by their respective masters (other than Dumbledore's tendency to pick up strays). This means that if Hermione wants to fight for Elf rights, she's starting in the wrong place.



[[WMG: The House Cup point values are deliberately skewed to give and take points in greater amounts as students age.]]
A first year is expected to have a bit of leeway, so they get a few points taken off when they get in trouble. However, older students have gotten used to that sort of point reduction and should know better, so they get more points taken away for infractions, and are given more points (when they ''are'' given points) for having supposedly had to use more ingenuity/luck to stand out instead of simply getting points for following the rules.



[[WMG: There were many other traits - not all of them positive - associated with each house that factored into the Sorting process. The Sorting Hat and staff just didn't talk about them.]]
* Gryffindors were known for being brave and chivalrous, but also were capable of being brash, stubborn, and even cocky at times. James and Sirius are prime examples. Even characters like Fred and George were brash in a sort of endearing way.
* Ravenclaws have a reputation for being knowledgeable and quick-witted, but seemed to have a tendency toward mental and emotional problems - not to mention they had little luck in maintaining relationships (romantic or otherwise) with people. Luna was obviously presented in a sympathetic light, but it's very possible she wasn't all there in the head. Cho had obvious problems handling her emotional issues, and even Roger Davies, a minor character, had hints of being a bit too obsessed with dating girls for his own good (was Fleur's date in ''Goblet of Fire'', asked Cho out but was turned down, and then was seen not long afterward with a new girlfriend in ''Order of the Phoenix''). It's also notable that it took both Cho and Luna (if you're following the movie canon as well) more time to find husbands than it did for anyone else.
* Hufflepuffs are seen as hardworking, trustworthy, loyal, and fair, but they tended not to stand out without extra effort. That may indicate a lack of luck, a lack of charisma, or both. This may or may not have been part of Cedric's reason for entering the Triwizard Tournament, but that's a completely different WMG.
* And then you have Slytherin. Cunning, strategic, and ambitious - in other words, people that knew what they wanted and also tended to know how to get it. Let's forget the reputation for turning out dark wizards for a second and observe some of the personality traits. Yes, Slytherins tended to be more willing than others to step on people in order to get what they wanted; but Slytherins valued more than anything their connections - whether it was with their pure-blood ancestry or great wizards and witches around them. As a result, though, they seemed to be an even more closed social circle than the other three houses. Occasionally you would see Gryffindors interacting socially with Hufflepuffs and Ravenclaws, and vice versa. But Slytherins only interacted positively with other Slytherins.




[[WMG: Hogwarts Castle was initially build as a refuge for wizards and witches.]]
The year 1000 AD, the year of the school's founding, was mainly dominated in Britain by the blood-soaked battles between the Saxons, Britons, Vikings, and anyone else who cared to join. Naturally, the wizarding folk of Britain would want to avoid this, and they did so by hiding in the spacious, well-fortified, spell-soaked castle of Hogwarts. In time, the refuge that was Hogwarts Castle saw the arrival of children, and they needed to be taught the magical arts. The founders themselves began giving lessons to some of the children, and once things in the mainland calmed down, Hogwarts morphed from a stronghold to a school.



[[WMG: The giant squid in the lake at Hogwarts is there for a reason.]]
It might be guarding something within the lake, or was made to keep the violent aquatic residents of the lake in line. [[EpilepticTrees Or maybe it really is Godric Gryffindor, who's a giant squid Animagus, and returns to his former self on the eleventh hour of every night.]]
* It could be a [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Tentacruel]]. Not sure what a Japanese magical creature would be doing in Britain, though.
* Since I don't think they there are freshwater squids it might be another gaint Kelpie that likes to think it's a squid



[[WMG: Hogwarts had several "upgrades" throughout it existence.]]

In the year 1000 A.D. there were no stone castles anywhere in Europe, nor did they have any of the fully metal armors we read about and see in the castle. What they had was wooden castles and only chain male armor. However, many of these simple wooden forts were constantly upgraded and rebuilt throughout the middle ages as new siege technology demanded better walls and fortifications. It would stand to reason that wizards would do the same to their "fortress," adding towers and thicker walls. Sometimes in the late middle ages, the castle stopped having it's physical defenses increased, since England was becoming a much more peaceful country and the school was confusing enough to navigate without constantly adding to it, so the castles remained in the form we see it today, with only minor magical upgrades to the schools defenses done by powerful headmasters when they were bored or times of war.
* Alternately, it was ''because'' of magic that magical castles already had access to these upgrades.
* This is of course absolutely TruthInTelevision for a school building. Finding one more than, say, 50 years old that ''hasn't'' been added on to, renovated and/or modernized is the exception, not the norm.
* Not to mention it's heavily implied if not stated outright that the Burrow was similarly built in stages as the Weasley family's needs changed (i.e. as they had more children and the children they had grew up).

[[WMG: The layout of Hogwarts is enchanted by the same magic fueling the Room of Requirement.]]

Think about it. We know now that there seems to be a mode of five students of each gender to a year, per house. We know now, for example, that the five boys that entered Gryffindor house in 1991 were Harry himself, Ron, Neville, Dean Thomas, and Seamus Finnigan. It's also implied that students stay in the same room their entire school careers, barring any special circumstances. But there's no way there could be exactly five wizards and five witches for each new year across the board. TT is prepared to bet that, like in most post-bellum situations, there were [[GladToBeAliveSex baby booms]] in the wizarding population right after Voldemort's first (1981) and second (1998) falls, which would have presumably produced larger wizarding classes being accepted into Hogwarts. In short, '''''there had to be at least one instance where more or less than 5 boys or 5 girls entered the same house at Hogwarts in one year.''''' How would the school prepare for this except for dormitories magically altering themselves to fit the needs of the student populace? Otherwise there would probably be letters sent out that sound a lot like, "Congratulations on being a wizard/witch, but you're S.O.L. because Hogwarts doesn't have the space for you this year."



[[WMG: Wizarding Britain is North Korea for Wizards.]]



[[WMG:The Statute of Secrecy is the work of exactly 1 wizard (or possibly witch)]]
The Statute was imposed by a single wizard who used False Memory Charm to
mind control other wizards into believing the necessity of secrecy and of mind controlling
others to believe the necessity etc, by completely rewriting their personalities.
This sets off an exponential cascade, and explains
why, say Qing Dynasty and Tokugawa Shogunate wizards would bother with what foreign wizards wanted.
For clarity:1 wizard becomes say,10 then 100 then 1000 etc. up to "All wizards who didn't realize what was
happening and hide"



[[WMG: The Chamber of Secrets wasn't originally in the girl's bathroom.]]
Originally, maybe it was just some secluded area or a lounge for say, Slytherins. Or maybe a public bath or something. The entrance to the Chamber of Secrets was a fountain. Sometime in the early 20th century or late 19th century a couple liberal wizards decided that Indoor Plumbing was a ''good'' thing and that it was a necessary change to Hogwarts. (Or maybe it was directly or indirectly ''invented'' by wizards.) During this process, a couple lounges or worthless rooms were changed into bathrooms and connected to the sewers. Unknowingly, the fountain that later became a sink became the entrance to the Chamber of Secrets.
* This still doesn't explain why the sink was a fake, with a mechanism to explicitly open the passage, why it was a passage in the first place and not a 5cm diameter pipe....
*** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanitation_in_ancient_Rome The ancient Romans had potable water and ways to remove waste]] I imagine the castle's upgraded itself since then, to modern toilets and sinks as opposed to latrines and dug sewers with stone pipes.



[[WMG: Voldemort also jinxed the Griffindor/Slitheryn relationship]]
Just like how he jinxed the Defense Against Dark Arts position. That's why the two get along better after the end of the series.



[[WMG: In defense of the incompetence and unethical nature of the Ministry of Magic]]
* So, the series does not portray the Ministry in a good light and leads one to realize how fucked up and corrupt the wizardings world is. However in it's defense, let's not forget that about 10 years ago Voldemort's coup-de-tat effectively destroyed the Ministry. What we are seeing is not the Ministry of Magic and the Wizarding World as it has been for thousands of years but more of a post-apocalyptic, or more like, post-mad max Wizarding World that is still in the throes of recovery from Voldemort's facist rule. The Courts were corrupt because the old courts had been eradicated and replaced by Voldemort's fascist courts, when he was overthrown they had to throw together a policing and court system to try and incarcerate all the Death Eater's still running around AND maintain the masquerade. That thrown together court system is still the foundation for the modern wizarding world court system which as we saw is easily corrupted, because it was formed to be a swift justice machine. The Daily Prophet is the obvious political media tool of the government because under voldemort ALL media was suppressed, not just suppressed utterly destroyed. After Voldemort's overthrow the Ministry wanted to get the media built again and created, or re-started the Prophet. The Ministry seems to be interfering in Hogwarts because the Ministry has had to rebuild the curriculum and the entire educational system away from one designed to produce oppressed fascists. What we see in the time frame of the Harry Poter universe is what has happened when what were once emergency recovery governmental systems that were right for the time are now becoming corrupted government systems. Even so it is still caught in the throes of conspiracy fueled paranoia, a paranoia fueled by the fact that the worst case scenario did in fact happen. The Death Eaters were a conspiracy, and they were overthrown or at least resisted by the Order of the Phoenix which was itself a secret society and probably the subject of several pro-voldemort conspiracy theories, "No, I swear to you, Dumbeldore's forming a secret army to overthrow the government", was probably once scoffed at by some Death Eaters as paranoid nonsense once and we see how that turned out. "I think Tom Riddle may be the Heir Slytherin" was probably scoffed at as well. So the adults in this world have reason to still be paranoid, and routinely engaged in shady behind the scenes movements seeking to exert control over the government while trying to pretend that all is well in an effort to make it be so.
* Basically what we're looking at is not a weak and corrupt government per se, but rather a government that has been severely, nearly fatally damaged and is still recovering.
* And it still retains some medieval ethics in their as well, which maybe were falling out of vogue but re-gained a foothold during the rise of Voldemort. Things such as using children in blood sports like Quidditch or the Tri Wizard Tournament, which is why this was the first year you had to be 17 to enter, openly having house elf slaves, etc.
* And as we see a significant portion of the Ministry and of the wealthy were and really still are Death Eaters. Even though they can't use their facist tactics anymore they are still now members of the legitimate government, and can still use legal means to uphold their underlying agenda of racism and facism.
* And though still allowing house elf slavery shows some despicable practices still allowed in the wizarding community, but the rest of their near outright oppression of other species such as dementors, centaurs, giants, dragon preserves, etc is necessary to maintain the masquerade. But in the hands of Voldemort this necessary evil of the masquerade was united with out right oppression and racism, and that legacy is still with them.




[[WMG: The REAL reason Slytherin is so prejudiced]]
* Voldemort attended Hogwarts in the 1940s. In real life at the time, many or most people held racist views. This may have been the case in the Wizarding World as well, with most people being at least somewhat prejudiced against Muggles and Muggleborns. This was the case in all four houses. However, since Tom Riddle created his pureblood supremacy movement, most of his recruits were Slytherins, simply because most of Riddles associates at the time were Slytherins. Therefore, just as racist views gradually faded away through generations in real life, the same happened in the Wizarding World for the other three houses. But while the members of the other houses simply held those views, many of the Slytherins were members of an organisation who actively enforced them, and so while these views faded away for the other houses, the Death Eaters made sure they were preserved in their own children. Perhaps any of the early Death Eaters who were not in Slytherin encouraged their children to get in there in order to socialize with likely future allies.




* So that would mean the best defense against magic would be a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage Faraday Cage.]]
22nd Apr '18 9:05:01 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG: Peter Pettigrew is pulling a [[GameOfThrones Varys]].]]

to:

[[WMG: Peter Pettigrew is pulling a [[GameOfThrones [[Literature/GameOfThrones Varys]].]]



** The other poster was saying that if Harry and Hermione hadn't gone back in time, the trio, Sirius and Snape would all be dead (or rather soul-sucked) since the time-traveling Harry wasn't there to save them. Hence, Harry couldn't have gone back in time to save them without having already been saved, resulting in a paradox which can only work in a "there was no first time" universe. Therefore, alternate timelines are impossible in the PotterVerse.

to:

** The other poster was saying that if Harry and Hermione hadn't gone back in time, the trio, Sirius and Snape would all be dead (or rather soul-sucked) since the time-traveling Harry wasn't there to save them. Hence, Harry couldn't have gone back in time to save them without having already been saved, resulting in a paradox which can only work in a "there was no first time" universe. Therefore, alternate timelines are impossible in the PotterVerse.Potterverse.



[[WMG: The PotterVerse will become an [[TheUnmasquedWorld Unmasqued World]] following Voldemort's fall]]

to:

[[WMG: The PotterVerse Potterverse will become an [[TheUnmasquedWorld Unmasqued World]] following Voldemort's fall]]



[[WMG: Wizards are [[ImmuneToBullets Immune to Bullets]].]]

to:

[[WMG: Wizards are [[ImmuneToBullets Immune to Bullets]].ImmuneToBullets.]]



So yeah, basically the SCPFoundation.

to:

So yeah, basically the SCPFoundation.
Wiki/SCPFoundation.



[[WMG: Tom Riddle used a [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal crude Cruciatus Curse]] on Amy Benson and Dennis Bishop]]

to:

[[WMG: Tom Riddle used a [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal crude Cruciatus Curse]] Curse on Amy Benson and Dennis Bishop]]



[[WMG: It's not incompatible with known physics.]]
A wand is a cold fusion reactor, with the "magical" core sustaining the reaction. Magic works by manipulating electric and magnetic fields, which is why advanced Muggle technology doesn't work near a lot of it - the constant changes in flux are the same as an EMP. And there are ways to do everything that we see a spell doing, with ''very'' precise manipulation of those fields. Apparition is traveling through higher dimensions - the crushing sensation is your cells suddenly having a much higher ratio of volume to surface area than they are supposed to. Time Turners use wormholes, and Divination is just the same effect the other way working differently.

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[[WMG: It's not incompatible with known physics.]]
A wand is a cold fusion reactor, with the "magical" core sustaining the reaction. Magic works by manipulating electric and magnetic fields, which is why advanced Muggle technology doesn't work near a lot of it - the constant changes in flux are the same as an EMP. And there are ways to do everything that we see a spell doing, with ''very'' precise manipulation of those fields. Apparition is traveling through higher dimensions - the crushing sensation is your cells suddenly having a much higher ratio of volume to surface area than they are supposed to. Time Turners use wormholes, and Divination is just the same effect the other way working differently.
22nd Apr '18 12:28:07 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG: Ravenclaw and Hufflepuff houses produce fewer significant wizards because Godric Gryffindor and Salazar Slytherin rigged the Sorting Hat.]]
It's stated that the Sorting Hat originally belonged to Gryffindor, that the sorting system was his design, and that he was close friends with Salazar Slytherin, while Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff had a separate friendship on their own. Sorting people by personality was actually a ruse concocted by Gryffindor and Slytherin, designed to screw over Ravenclaw and Hufflepuff by having the Sorting Hat sort most children with the greatest potential for influence and power to Gryffindor and Slytherin, leaving Hufflepuff and Ravenclaw with the stooges and the oddballs. Occasionally the Sorting Hat will put someone of relevance in the other two houses or an unworthy in Slytherin or Gryffindor to divert attention from the hoarding that the two male founders were doing in order to extend their influence over the future ruling classes of wizarding Britain.



[[WMG: Bravery itself is not the defining value of Gryffindor House.]]
One of the sorting hat's songs includes the line: Said Gryffindor, "We'll teach all those / With brave deeds to their name." Notice how this line specifies that those taught by Gryffindor have brave deeds to their name. But why specify “with brave deeds to their name”? Why not just say those who are brave? It could just be poetic license, not meant to be thought about too much, or it could be the key to explaining why certain characters do belong in Gryffindor, while others, that people often think should have been, do not. Let’s assume for the sake of argument that this line was a deliberate word choice that reveals something about Gryffindor values. This line makes a very subtle distinction which seems to imply that Gryffindor values the fame and glory of bravery more than bravery itself. Or, to put it another way, the appearance of bravery seems more important than the bravery itself.
* This explains why Pettigrew, though he was quite cowardly in actuality, truly did belong in Gryffindor. In fact, Pettigrew did become “known for his brave deeds”; ie: his renown for confronting Sirius Black and dying nobly trying to avenge his friends. It doesn’t even matter that it was all a sham; the loophole in the Gryffindor house is that it values the appearance and glory of bravery even more than actual bravery.
* This also explains why Severus and Regulus though they were both extremely brave, belonged in Slytherin. They didn’t seek honor and glory for their bravery. In fact, they deliberately tried to cover up and hide their bravery Theirs was the type of bravery that is subtle and hidden, the opposite of the Gryffindor’s showy bravery. To them, glory and recognition were subservient to achieving their ultimate goals, which makes them perfectly Slytherin at heart, which is not such a bad thing after all.
* As a last bit of evidence, consider how Gryffindor seems the most boisterous and extroverted of all the houses, indicating that it tends to attract the kind of people who like attention as typified by characters like Fred, George, James, and Sirius.
* Just to be clear, I am not claiming that bravery isn’t important in Gryffindor, but that Gryffindor seems to especially value the type of bravery that is ornate and that gets noticed. Consequently, those who appear brave, or want to appear brave for the fame and glory, can also find a place in Gryffindor.
* This brings up the perspective of each House having it's "light side" and "dark side" aspects. For example some people would ask why make a House of evil, Slytherin. It's not that Slytherin House is inherently evil, it's that it was taken over by the dark side. While we see Gryffindor as a 'good' house, from the stories we hear about James and the Marauders we can see an aspect of what the dark side of Gryffindor could look like. So perhaps a deeper part of the backstory is that Voldemort wasn't just infiltrating the wizarding world at large, but his teachings and dark influence were entering Hogwarts as well, and bringing out the dark side in the student houses where it could. Dumbeldore was able to form the Order of the Phoenix and brings the Gryffindor's back into the light.
** The fight between Dumbeldore and Voldemort would have, in the beginning, been a very 'cold war' sort of conflict between the two of them as the each try to subtely out influence the other in Hogwarts.






[[WMG:Slytherin house was only kept open so that the sociopathic wizard children aren't mixed with the general population. It's the "special ed" section of the school.]]
Of course, it backfired; by now, it's become tradition, and nobody remembers the real purpose of the House.
* Maybe the "special ed" class was made into Hufflepuff since there's not much mention of it or what the common room is like in the books and the Sorting Hat said they'd take anyone who dosen't fit the other three houses' qualities.
* There are more qualities than courage, ambition, and wisdom, though. And given that later interviews suggest Hufflepuff's fairly comfortable as opposed to Slytherin's dungeons, well...

[[WMG: Slytherin doesn't have more evil people than the other houses; it's evil members are just more ambitious.]]
There are immoral people in all four houses. But, only a really ambitious immoral person would rise to become a murderer, or a dark lord, like Voldemort. In real life, most sociopaths are not violent, because nothing is motivating them to do anything violent, though they will do smaller cruel things to others. There are Hufflepuffs, Gryffindors and Ravenclaws who would sell their mothers into slavery if they thought it would benifit themselves. But they don't try to take over the world or kill anyone, because they aren't ambitious enough.
* Looking out for yourself above others is specifically said to be, a Slytherin trait, as much as ambition is. I generally agree with your logic overall, though.
** Except looking out for yourself above others is not really a Slytherin trait. Slytherins take care of each other, ''Ravenclaws'' are the backstabbing ones.
* This is probably canon; I mean, look at Wormtail--clearly an evil person, but can't stand up for himself to save his life and always follows around the bigger, more powerful people. And he's a Gryffindor.
* The Slytherin house probably wasn't ALWAYS the dark wizard house. Or at least considered such. In the years shortly following the founding of Hogwarts it was probably know as the conservative/isolationist house. Considering the traits associated with being Slytherin, the house probably became known as the house for future politicans, spies, and aristocrats - and who likes them? (JK) It's probably not until the Wizarding Wars start that Slytherin starts to become known as the 'dark/evil' house. Give the Harry Potter world enough time and a lack of dark lords and I'm sure the stigma against the house will fade back to the usual.



[[WMG: Gryffindors and Slytherins normally leave each other alone.]]
The two houses have a long history of being completely awful to one another; because of this, members of the two houses tend to avoid each other. In each house are a few complete jerks who go out of the way to screw with members of the other house, becoming representative of it in the process. As a result, each House seems to the other to consist only of the most evil students to the other.
** To clarify this a bit: as observed in [[TheMovie the movies]], Slytherins and Griffindors will happily associate with everyone ''except'' each other.
** There are several things that could explain why this is true: for one thing, the obvious fact of the books being from Harry's perspective means we see the Slytherins at their worst, because he commands such a high profile that he attracts excessive attention anyway, both good and bad. Also, the Malfoy wields a great deal of influence, and given the way Harry snubbed him, some of his year-mates probably found it easier to fall in line. (This ties in with a related argument that less Slytherins are Death Eaters than it appears, for similar reasons: the ones who aren't feel less reason to antagonize Harry, and so simply don't interact with him much and get little screen time.)
*** Probably an even better explanation - Slytherin has as many "evil" or unsavory characters as it does because it is filled with the children of Death Eaters, a wave of kids loyal to their parents and/or bent on revenge. If Harry had joined Hogwarts in any other generation (besides the one immediately before his), he probably wouldn't have found so many antagonistic Slytherins. This may or may not extend to his kids' terms, as some of the children of Death Eaters may have held grudges to adulthood, while others did not (I.E, Malfoy's lack of antagonism).



[[WMG: HufflepuffHouse is actually the most dangerous one.]]
According to the Sorting Hat, Hufflepuff gets the students that are the most hard-working, loyal, and ''trustworthy.'' It would stand to reason that they'd be taught magic that's too dark to be entrusted to a Slytherin. They're tailor-made to be the black ops of the Ministry of Magic, and if one in a million of them do go bad, ''they never get caught.'' After all, who would suspect a Hufflepuff?
* So while Aurors are like a cross between the CIA and Green Berets, and mostly come from Gryffindor, there's an even ''more'' secretive group of back ops members (possibly related to the Unknowables) comprised almost soleley of Hufflepuffs? Cool.
* Tonks was a Hufflepuff. Hmmm.
** So was Hogwart's champion, Cedric.
* Also, their mascot is a flippin' badger: They SEEM all cute and cuddly and harmless... until they rip your face off. The honey badger is the most fearless creature on the planet, and can take bites from a friggin' ''cobra'' and all that happens is it takes a freaking nap, and goes ''right back to eating the cobra'' like nothing happened. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4r7wHMg5Yjg Honey badger don't give a shit indeed]]. Nothing can stop them. Fear the Hufflepuffs. Fear them.
* Alternately, they could make up the majority of the Unspeakables. If Aurors are the Black Ops of the wizarding world, then the Department of Mysteries' 'Unspeakables' would have to be something like Area 51. As Book 5 clearly shows, the Department of Mysteries deals with stuff that's [[UpToEleven abnormal even by wizarding standards]], and they are ''sworn to secrecy.'' Note how Hufflepuffs are often the 'forgotten' house among the four. Not to say that a Gryffindor couldn't do the job, but Gryffs would probably tend toward being more on the frontlines. Additionally, one of the apparent 'weaknesses' of Gryffindor is that some of its members have a tendency to be brash, bullish, or even outright cocky.
* Or, instead, ask yourself who exactly they are 'loyal' to? They're loyal to Hufflepuff. Nothing more, nothing less. It's obvious...they're the ''wizard mafia''.



[[WMG: The reason for all of those empty classrooms and that there are maybe eight teachers for the entire school, ten or twelve if the AP classes get their own specialist?]]
There used to be a lot more teachers, and probably but not necessarily a lot more students, but most of the teachers would have been involved with the wars against Grindlewald and Voldemort. Especially since they and the best students would be most likely to join the Order of the Phoenix or the Aurors, who had the highest death rates during the last war, many of Hogwart's faculty ended up dead during the forties and seventies. There are so many spare rooms, not just because of fluctuations in population over the thousands of years Hogwarts was probably planned to run (ChaosArchitecture could have solved for that, and probably did), but also because many of the classrooms were places to hold other advanced and optional classes, and split up the houses into their own classes instead of having doubles classes all the time. In another few decades (or more, since wizards live so much longer than nonmagical humans and thus require longer to be considered a master of a craft), they might be able to hire up more teachers, split up the doubles classes (or put doubles classes on a rotating schedule, since it probably encourages inter-house fraternization), and go to having a Defense Against the Dark Arts curriculum with multiple specialists who teach shorter terms instead of a single teacher giving completely different aspects of the [=DAtDA=] lessons each year.

* That completely makes sense, when you think about it: comparable to the "lost generation" in post-WWI France (an enourmous hole in the population where all the young men who should have been starting families were dead); considering that the books suggest the first war went on a lot longer than the second, the entire Wizarding population might be a lot smaller than it ought to be (which would explain a lot in and of itself, like how almost every adult seems to know one another).

Or they're not classrooms. Don't forget, Hogwarts was founded when witchburnings were a reality. So given that Hogwarts is a CASTLE which are typically built to hold off invading armies, which magically defenses, it's entirely possible that it was built to fit as many people as possible just in case. If you're gonna hide in magical castle from the crazies wanting to burn you alive, you would want some room and not be crammed into very limited space. Or it could both this possiblity and the one above. Who says there can only be one explanation?


[[WMG: There is no curse on the [=DAtDA=] professorial post, it was planned that way.]]
The reason that no teacher has held the job for more than a single year in a row since Tom Riddle asked for it is because no teacher has held the job for more than a single year in a row since the class was founded. Instead of trying to find one, decent, well-rounded teacher and teach a little bit about lots of things each year, they hire a new specialist each year and work on a five to seven year cycle of subjects ([=GenEd=], Specific Spell Defense and Charmbreaking, Mythical Creatures above level 3 [and thus not suited for Care of magical Creatures], Paranoia [defense against general spells and scrying]...) Maybe there was a Poison and [=Mind/Body=] Altering Substances Defense subclass, but it got absorbed into Potions and Snape got locked out of the job he became potions master to get to. Lockhart not doing his job and the war and job snatchings going on from book five onwards probably screwed up the curriculum a bit.
21st Apr '18 10:00:50 PM nombretomado
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* Probably Chamber of Secrets, five years ago, where his being clearly in love with Penelope Clearwater resulted in quite a few OutOfCharacterMoments from Percy.

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* Probably Chamber of Secrets, five years ago, where his being clearly in love with Penelope Clearwater resulted in quite a few OutOfCharacterMoments [[OutOfCharacterMoment Out-of-Character Moments]] from Percy.
21st Apr '18 10:00:06 PM nombretomado
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Never once did the RoR reveal itself to Harry and the crew in all the capers they got into. Once Neville wanted to get involved the room reveals itself to him so that HE can train. Which is why the climactic moment in the training montage is when Neville finally learns how to stun someone. Once Neville joins Dumbeldore's Army the room now acts as their HQ, secret hiding place and hiding place of a Horcrux because by helping Harry succeed the room helps Dumbeldore's Army succeed so that Neville can have his dramatic moment and grow into the hero he NEEDS to be. It was all for Neville as for as the RoR was concerned.

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Never once did the RoR [=RoR=] reveal itself to Harry and the crew in all the capers they got into. Once Neville wanted to get involved the room reveals itself to him so that HE can train. Which is why the climactic moment in the training montage is when Neville finally learns how to stun someone. Once Neville joins Dumbeldore's Army the room now acts as their HQ, secret hiding place and hiding place of a Horcrux because by helping Harry succeed the room helps Dumbeldore's Army succeed so that Neville can have his dramatic moment and grow into the hero he NEEDS to be. It was all for Neville as for as the RoR [=RoR=] was concerned.



* [[AndNowIMustScream Holy shit...]]

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* [[AndNowIMustScream [[AndIMustScream Holy shit...]]



The few objects we see in the department are notable in two ways. First is that they are poorly understood, second is that they are dangerous. Brains that can do horrible things to people, time machines, a portal to the dead, and a room filled with the [[ArsonMurderJaywalking power of love]]. Leave these things for the general public is only begging for trouble, and worse if these things get loose to an unprepared one. They are not just studying the gate of death, they are making sure nothing comes out.

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The few objects we see in the department are notable in two ways. First is that they are poorly understood, second is that they are dangerous. Brains that can do horrible things to people, time machines, a portal to the dead, and a room filled with the [[ArsonMurderJaywalking [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking power of love]]. Leave these things for the general public is only begging for trouble, and worse if these things get loose to an unprepared one. They are not just studying the gate of death, they are making sure nothing comes out.



The hat probably did the same thing with the Marauders. Sirius, the first one to be sorted, was brave, but his braveness comes out of loyalty, since he would die rather than betray his friends. Sirius is so loyal that his animagus is a dog. However, he wanted to be on Gryffindor to annoy his mother, and this was the only thought in his mind at the moment of the sorting. This was brave enough, in the hat's opinion, to be a Gryffindor. Lupin was next. He was intelligent and studious enough to be a Ravenclaw, but he needed to accept himself which he would learn to do in Gryffindor, with a friend like Black. The Hat had already seen Sirius' mind and knew they would be good friends. Then came Peter, very ambitious, but he was the kind of guy who would become the mook of future Death Eaters. So it send him to Gryffindor to encourage him to become a better person (this went [[GoneHorriblyWrong Horribly Wrong). And lastly, James, very brave, he would die to protect his family. So he was a Gryffindor.

to:

The hat probably did the same thing with the Marauders. Sirius, the first one to be sorted, was brave, but his braveness comes out of loyalty, since he would die rather than betray his friends. Sirius is so loyal that his animagus is a dog. However, he wanted to be on Gryffindor to annoy his mother, and this was the only thought in his mind at the moment of the sorting. This was brave enough, in the hat's opinion, to be a Gryffindor. Lupin was next. He was intelligent and studious enough to be a Ravenclaw, but he needed to accept himself which he would learn to do in Gryffindor, with a friend like Black. The Hat had already seen Sirius' mind and knew they would be good friends. Then came Peter, very ambitious, but he was the kind of guy who would become the mook of future Death Eaters. So it send him to Gryffindor to encourage him to become a better person (this went [[GoneHorriblyWrong Horribly Wrong).Wrong]]). And lastly, James, very brave, he would die to protect his family. So he was a Gryffindor.



* Isn't this canon?

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* Isn't this canon?canon?

[[WMG:Galleons represent the actual amount of quantified magic in the world.]]
* Galleons are not created per se. The Goblins were able to cast a spell that created 1 galleon per calorie of magical energy in the world. Galleons can probably be physically counterfeited, however a casual magical scan would reveal that counterfeit was not an original. No new galleons can be created because there is only so much magic in the world. Now, having a galleon doesn't control any magic in the world, but the fact that the total galleons equals to the total magic in the world is why they are used as currency for purchasing magical items.However much magical energy was used that is how many galleons the thing costs...or at least that is the theory, of course black market trades are made all the time where the magical value of items is inflated or deflated for one reason or another.
* I always figured that there is a small circle of goblins who run Gringotts who each cast a spell that makes galleons. You can make a physical counterfeit galleon but no one wants to because doing so would get you cursed by the Goblins.
26th Feb '18 5:02:49 PM nombretomado
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As we have so far seen, the likelihood of technology malfunctioning in the presence of magic has a direct correlation between the power and complexity of the magic and technology (respectively) and the probability of both a malfunction in general and how catastrophic said malfunction will be. My guess is that the inverse applies: If extremely powerful technology is "practiced" around sufficiently complex magic, that probability that said magic will fail tends toward 1. Magic, warping reality at a level similar to [[SchrodingersCat the absurdity experiments used to describe the hypothetically stupid effects of quantum physics at a macroscopic level]], is automatically much, ''much'' stronger than any technology available today, but also amazingly more complex in its spells' inner workings.\\

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As we have so far seen, the likelihood of technology malfunctioning in the presence of magic has a direct correlation between the power and complexity of the magic and technology (respectively) and the probability of both a malfunction in general and how catastrophic said malfunction will be. My guess is that the inverse applies: If extremely powerful technology is "practiced" around sufficiently complex magic, that probability that said magic will fail tends toward 1. Magic, warping reality at a level similar to [[SchrodingersCat [[UsefulNotes/SchrodingersCat the absurdity experiments used to describe the hypothetically stupid effects of quantum physics at a macroscopic level]], is automatically much, ''much'' stronger than any technology available today, but also amazingly more complex in its spells' inner workings.\\
16th Jul '17 9:50:39 AM nombretomado
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Dippet may have been, like many wizards, something of an isolationist. Brought up in the wizard world and dealing with wizard world issues, the problem of a muggle World War being right on Britain's doorstep might not have occurred to him. Harry Potter proved that one could spend his early childhood in an environment that was not very nurturing and recover from it if good family figures (in his cases, people like Sirius and the Weasleys) were put around him. There may have been several teenagers brought up in similar environments - wizards raised by muggles that may or may not have been killed during World War Two. Naturally, most of these children would end up in British muggle orphanages, exposing them further to the horrors of the war, but also cutting them off from nurturing contact from other, older wizards. And it's possible that it was this group of children that became the original Death Eaters. WordOfGod says that Voldemort was brought into the world in a one-sided act of passion (his father was under the effects of a Love Potion, which, despite its name, only causes strong infatuation - as mentioned by Slughorn in HBP) and raised in an environment where people felt obligated to take care of him...and that he would have turned differently if brought up in a loving environment. It seems strange that there were no families that would want to take in a seemingly bright, talented, and upstanding young man like Tom Riddle - or that there was nowhere in wizarding Britain where orphaned young wizards could live during the summer holidays. Dippet's and the Ministry's failure to make provision for these children, especially during WW2, might have had a hand in creating the monster that was Voldemort (and by extension, the Death Eaters.)

to:

Dippet may have been, like many wizards, something of an isolationist. Brought up in the wizard world and dealing with wizard world issues, the problem of a muggle World War being right on Britain's doorstep might not have occurred to him. Harry Potter proved that one could spend his early childhood in an environment that was not very nurturing and recover from it if good family figures (in his cases, people like Sirius and the Weasleys) were put around him. There may have been several teenagers brought up in similar environments - wizards raised by muggles that may or may not have been killed during World War Two. Naturally, most of these children would end up in British muggle orphanages, exposing them further to the horrors of the war, but also cutting them off from nurturing contact from other, older wizards. And it's possible that it was this group of children that became the original Death Eaters. WordOfGod says that Voldemort was brought into the world in a one-sided act of passion (his father was under the effects of a Love Potion, which, despite its name, only causes strong infatuation - as mentioned by Slughorn in HBP) and raised in an environment where people felt obligated to take care of him...and that he would have turned differently if brought up in a loving environment. It seems strange that there were no families that would want to take in a seemingly bright, talented, and upstanding young man like Tom Riddle - or that there was nowhere in wizarding Britain where orphaned young wizards could live during the summer holidays. Dippet's and the Ministry's failure to make provision for these children, especially during WW2, [=WW2=], might have had a hand in creating the monster that was Voldemort (and by extension, the Death Eaters.)
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