History VideoGame / Skullmonkeys

28th May '16 8:23:09 PM nombretomado
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''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the foe apes more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.

to:

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the foe apes more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.
16th Dec '15 2:32:15 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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* AscendedExtra: The Skullmonkeys were first mentioned in ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'''s lengthy Hall of Records before showing up here in the clay.
31st Oct '14 3:51:03 PM spirasen
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The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation. Until, that is, the announcement of its' SpiritualSuccessor: ''Armikrog''.

to:

The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation. Until, that is, the announcement of its' its SpiritualSuccessor: ''Armikrog''.
31st Oct '14 3:47:45 PM spirasen
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''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the foe apes more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.

to:

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the foe apes more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' its pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.
26th Oct '14 1:40:49 PM spaceace72
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Added DiffLines:

** [[spoiler: ReallyDeadMontage]]: a [[BlackComedy humorous take on it]].
26th Feb '14 10:58:15 AM LanceOmikron
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The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation, not at least until the announcement of its' SpiritualSuccessor, ''Armikrog''.

to:

The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation, not at least until stagnation. Until, that is, the announcement of its' SpiritualSuccessor, SpiritualSuccessor: ''Armikrog''.
26th Feb '14 9:29:22 AM LanceOmikron
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The aforementioned villain returns as Kloggmonkey, the self-proclaimed ruler of all Skullmonkeys on planet IDZNAK, [[PaperThinDisguise wearing merely a skull and a monkey skin]] and wearing out [[ThePlan a pretty simple plan]] to bring revenge to The Neverhood: force his newly-acquired minions to build the so-called Evil Engine Number Nine. One of the Skullmonkeys, Jerry'O, however, being much more intelligent than the rest of his kind, becomes the evidence of how Klogg actually become the king, and, in a desperate hope to save his world, uses a flying bird machine to summon Klaymen...

Who doesn't even know what's going on here.

to:

The aforementioned villain returns as Kloggmonkey, the self-proclaimed and proclaims himself ruler of all Skullmonkeys on planet IDZNAK, IDZNAK [[PaperThinDisguise simply by wearing merely a skull and a monkey skin]] and wearing out skin]]. He then forms [[ThePlan a pretty simple plan]] to bring take revenge to The Neverhood: force his newly-acquired minions to build the so-called Evil Engine Number Nine. One of the Skullmonkeys, Jerry'O, however, being much more intelligent than the rest of his kind, becomes the evidence of how Klogg actually become the king, and, in is unswayed by Klogg's lies. In a desperate hope bid to save his world, Jerry'O uses a flying bird machine to summon Klaymen...

Klaymen...

...
Who doesn't even know has no idea what's going on here.
27th Jun '13 6:24:54 AM UnstoppableAvengers
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''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the enemy Skullmonkeys more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.

to:

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the enemy Skullmonkeys foe apes more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.
27th Jun '13 6:24:00 AM UnstoppableAvengers
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''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for UnexpectedGameplayChanges too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the enemy Skullmonkeys more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.

The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation, not at least until the announcement of its' SpiritualSuccesor, ''Armikrog''.

to:

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for UnexpectedGameplayChanges {{Unexpected Gameplay Change}}s too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the enemy Skullmonkeys more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the player to get on with.

The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation, not at least until the announcement of its' SpiritualSuccesor, SpiritualSuccessor, ''Armikrog''.
27th Jun '13 6:23:20 AM UnstoppableAvengers
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[[caption-width-right:320:A ''baaad'' man, fell from the sky...]]

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. Unlike its predecessor ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'', ''Skullmonkeys'' is a PlatformGame in the goofy style of DougTenNapel's earlier ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim''.

to:

[[caption-width-right:320:A
--> A
''baaad'' man, fell from the sky...]]

sky...
----> '''Jerry'O'''

Remember Klogg being thrown into space after the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheNeverhood Neverhood]]''? You think he'd be lost forever, floating around the orbits of unknown planets and not harming anyone?

You've almost got it right. ''Almost.''

The aforementioned villain returns as Kloggmonkey, the self-proclaimed ruler of all Skullmonkeys on planet IDZNAK, [[PaperThinDisguise wearing merely a skull and a monkey skin]] and wearing out [[ThePlan a pretty simple plan]] to bring revenge to The Neverhood: force his newly-acquired minions to build the so-called Evil Engine Number Nine. One of the Skullmonkeys, Jerry'O, however, being much more intelligent than the rest of his kind, becomes the evidence of how Klogg actually become the king, and, in a desperate hope to save his world, uses a flying bird machine to summon Klaymen...

Who doesn't even know what's going on here.

''Skullmonkeys'' is The Neverhood's claymation sequel to their eponymous game, released by Electronic Arts exclusively for the PlayStation in 1998. Unlike its predecessor ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'', It's not an AdventureGame anymore, though: now it's being a PlatformGame done in aesthetics and wackiness closer to the original ''VideoGame/TheNeverhood'' and slightly to ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim'', only with [[NintendoHard buffed-up difficulty]], more areas to explore and less gameplay differences between each level (which also counts for UnexpectedGameplayChanges too): the whole thing relies on platforming, running and stomping the enemy Skullmonkeys more than it does on shooting and carrying/escorting stuff from one point to another. It doesn't include a huge variety of powerups or stage hazards other than enemies and spikes, though, so what really makes ''Skullmonkeys'' challenging is a PlatformGame in its' pretty ''hellish'' level design, which requires medium to little reaction time from the goofy style player to get on with.

The game itself turned out to be the last Neverhood installment to be officially released by TenNapel and his crew, bringing the entire series into stagnation, not at least until the announcement
of DougTenNapel's earlier ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim''.its' SpiritualSuccesor, ''Armikrog''.



* BeautifulVoid: If you forget about a bunch of floating platforms, Klaymen and Monkey Mage, the post-Castle-de-Los-Muertos boss battle is wholehandedly this. [[spoiler:1970]] may also be one, blended with HallOfMirrors.

to:

* BeautifulVoid: If you forget about a bunch of floating platforms, Klaymen and Monkey Mage, the post-Castle-de-Los-Muertos boss battle is wholehandedly this. this.
**
[[spoiler:1970]] may also be one, blended with HallOfMirrors.HallOfMirrors. Which perfectly fits, considering the psychedelia representing the same time period. Oh, and the entire world ends with [[spoiler:a boa platform with extra lives floating above, all that on the background of '''a freakin' disco dancer's chest.''']]



* DifficultyByRegion: The Japanese version of the game features a few more cheats to run around with. In particular, the stage selection screen.



* EyeScream: The boss Joe Head Joe has a very...disgusting attack: He pops out his lower eyeballs (I say "lower" because this boss has two heads), which roll at you, possibly in an attempt to flatten you, all the while [[NauseaFuel making slimy sounds]] until they fall off the platform.

to:

* EyeScream: The boss Joe Head Joe has a very... disgusting attack: He pops out his lower eyeballs (I say "lower" because this boss has two heads), which roll at you, possibly in an attempt to flatten you, all the while [[NauseaFuel making slimy sounds]] until they fall off the platform.
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