History VideoGame / PapersPlease

27th May '16 5:17:43 PM nombretomado
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After a shortened version of the game served as a beta for several months, the full game was released worldwide on 8 August 2013. A port for the PlaystationVita was formally announced in August 2014, while an iPad port was released on December 14, 2014. However, a misunderstanding with Apple caused a censored version to be uploaded to the app store; the game was reuploaded uncensored a day later.

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After a shortened version of the game served as a beta for several months, the full game was released worldwide on 8 August 2013. A port for the PlaystationVita UsefulNotes/PlaystationVita was formally announced in August 2014, while an iPad port was released on December 14, 2014. However, a misunderstanding with Apple caused a censored version to be uploaded to the app store; the game was reuploaded uncensored a day later.
26th May '16 8:09:40 PM Gorank
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* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[InsaneTrollLogic some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/note]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or lets them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[InsaneTrollLogic some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[note]] and [[note]]and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/note]]...strata[[/note]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or lets them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
25th May '16 7:55:48 AM jnv11
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Added DiffLines:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: When terrorists strike when there is an entrant in the booth, that entrant is locked in the booth during the emergency. You never get to finish processing the entrant or let the entrant leave. The entrant disappears before the start of the next day.
24th May '16 6:03:29 PM Austin
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Added DiffLines:

* WakeUpCallBoss: Jorji's first appearance can actually trip up a new player, since everyone before him has been forthright in giving you their papers. Jorji... [[TooDumbToLive doesn't give you anything]], and the game does not give you inline directions that the proper way to deal with a lack of paperwork is to cross-reference the actual rule in the manual with the empty desk. However, the daily bulletin that you get at the beginning of each day that you are supposed to read before starting a day will teach you this if you read it. You could spend precious in-game hours knowing that you're ''supposed'' to deny him, but not knowing ''how'' to [[FailedASpotCheck if you fail to read the daily bulletin]].


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* ZeroEffortBoss: The EZIC attack on the final day is ridiculously easy to thwart with a couple of easy shots because the terrorists are very slow.
22nd May '16 9:12:44 PM IronicMouse
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* TheWarJustBefore: The story is set in a border checkpoint between the fictional countries of Arstotsla and Kolechia, which recently fought the Six Year War.
22nd May '16 1:57:29 PM jnv11
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* YouNoTakeCandle: Many characters speak in very stilted English. Likely a sign of them not quite grasping the language of Arstotzka fully. Though on the other hand, the player character sometimes speaks this way himself ("Where is passport?"), so who knows. One possible interpretation is that the text is being translated directly from the faux-Russian language into English, leading to the usual grammatical issues.

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* YouNoTakeCandle: Many characters speak in very stilted English. Likely a sign of them not quite grasping the language of Arstotzka fully. Though on the other hand, the player character sometimes speaks WordOfGod states that this way himself ("Where is passport?"), so who knows. One possible interpretation is that the text is being translated directly from the faux-Russian language into English, leading intentional to the usual grammatical issues.give this an Eastern European feel.
21st May '16 9:32:55 PM jnv11
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* RedshirtArmy: The Arstotzkan guards. Almost all of the time, they have terrible aim, and the week cannot go by without at least one of them dying. Once you have access to a rifle, you can potentially save two of them when an attack happens (though saving Sergiu is the only one that matters). Somehow, an Arstotzkan border inspector has better aim than the men who are trained to shoot on sight. Sergiu will even lampshade his bad aim if you save him once.

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* RedshirtArmy: The Arstotzkan guards. Almost all of the time, they have terrible aim, and the week cannot go by without at least one of them dying. Once you have access to a rifle, you can potentially save two of them when an attack happens (though saving Sergiu is the only one that matters).matters to the in-game story). Somehow, an Arstotzkan border inspector has better aim than the men who are trained to shoot on sight. Sergiu will even lampshade his bad aim if you save him once.
21st May '16 9:00:02 PM MissMokushiroku
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* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial[=/=]TemptingFate:

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* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial[=/=]TemptingFate:SuspiciouslySpecificDenial:



* TakingYouWithMe: A scripted event is for [[spoiler:a Kolechian with impeccable entry papers]] to self-destruct, killing three guards at the entry border. [[spoiler:This will happen twice, and both times, you will NOT be able to stop them because their papers are perfect.]]
** If you decide to deny them and receive a citation, the next person(s) in the line will do the same thing, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption even if it's already past 6 PM]].

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* TakingYouWithMe: A scripted event is for [[spoiler:a Kolechian with impeccable entry papers]] to self-destruct, killing three guards at the entry border. [[spoiler:This will happen twice, and both times, you will NOT be able to stop them because their papers are perfect.]]
**
]] If you decide to deny them and receive a citation, the next person(s) in the line will do the same thing, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption even if it's already past 6 PM]].PM]].
* TemptingFate: "For sure, I am not in criminal bulletin or anything!" [[spoiler:Unfortunately, Jorji is...]]



* VerbalBackspace: A surprising number of immigrants get their length of stay ''completely'' wrong. Not simply off by a short measure of time, but ''way'' off. When you confront them about the discrepancy, they universally have an "Oh, right, that" reaction.

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* VerbalBackspace: VerbalBackspace:
**
A surprising number of immigrants get their length of stay ''completely'' wrong. Not simply off by a short measure of time, but ''way'' off. When you confront them about the discrepancy, they universally have an "Oh, right, that" reaction. Even more amusing is that the system sees this as clearing the discrepancy.



** Even more amusing is that the system sees this as clearing the discrepancy.
** If you get some artwork from your child and hang it up at your work station, one scripted entrant will insult it. If you deny or detain them for any reasons, they think it's [[BullyingADragon because they offended you]] and [[AintTooProudToBeg proclaim that such art should be in a museum]].

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** Even more amusing is that the system sees this as clearing the discrepancy.
** If you get some artwork from your child and hang it up at your work station, one scripted entrant will insult it. If you deny or detain them for any reasons, reason, they think it's [[BullyingADragon because they offended you]] and [[AintTooProudToBeg proclaim that such art should be in a museum]].



* [[YetAnotherStupidDeath Yet Another Stupid Citation]]: After getting further into the game and becoming more proficient, you will likely resolve to never allow something as easy and frequent as an expired passport or invalid issuing city to go past your eyes unnoticed. You will just as likely do it again at some point, after checking almost everything else.

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* [[YetAnotherStupidDeath Yet Another Stupid Citation]]: YetAnotherStupidDeath: After getting further into the game and becoming more proficient, you will likely resolve to never allow something as easy and frequent as an expired passport or invalid issuing city to go past your eyes unnoticed. You will just as likely do it again at some point, after checking almost everything else.



* YouNoTakeCandle: Many characters speak in very stilted English. Likely a sign of them not quite grasping the language of Arstotzka fully. Though on the other hand, the player character sometimes speaks this way himself ("Where is passport?"), so who knows.
** One possible interpretation is that the text is being translated directly from the faux-Russian language into English, leading to the usual grammatical issues.

to:

* YouNoTakeCandle: Many characters speak in very stilted English. Likely a sign of them not quite grasping the language of Arstotzka fully. Though on the other hand, the player character sometimes speaks this way himself ("Where is passport?"), so who knows.
**
knows. One possible interpretation is that the text is being translated directly from the faux-Russian language into English, leading to the usual grammatical issues.
20th May '16 11:05:09 PM Gadjiltron
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* BodyguardingABadass: After the player gets access to the tranquillizer gun, the guards, particularly Sergiu, will start relying on the inspector to keep them safe, despite their superior armament and Sergiu's promise to protect him. Saving Sergiu in the first attack causes him to admit to being part of a RedshirtArmy afterwards. This trope is also played if the inspector fails to destroy the motorcycle that a terrorist is [[CarFu trying to crash into the inspector's booth]] on day 28 because one of the guards will shoot and destroy the motorcycle before it can hit the booth.

to:

* BodyguardingABadass: After the player gets access to the tranquillizer tranquilizer gun, the guards, particularly Sergiu, will start relying on the inspector to keep them safe, despite their superior armament and Sergiu's promise to protect him. Saving Sergiu in the first attack causes him to admit to being part of a RedshirtArmy afterwards. This trope is also played with if the inspector fails to destroy the motorcycle that a terrorist is [[CarFu trying to crash into the inspector's booth]] on day 28 because one of the guards will shoot and destroy the motorcycle before it can hit the booth.



** When the option of [[spoiler:fleeing to Obristan using forged passports]] comes into play, [[spoiler:Jorgi forces you to confiscate his passport; you cannot prevent this, nor can you return it to him after the fact.]] Unlike the above example, you ''still'' get a citation for this.

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** When the option of [[spoiler:fleeing to Obristan using forged passports]] comes into play, [[spoiler:Jorgi [[spoiler:Jorji forces you to confiscate his passport; you cannot prevent this, nor can you return it to him after the fact.]] Unlike the above example, you ''still'' get a citation for this.



** In day 20 you are given an envelope containing a deadly poison with 'don't touch powder' written on it. If you touch the powder, you will collapse and die, causing the game to return to the title screen.



* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[InsaneTrollLogic some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or lets them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[InsaneTrollLogic some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] [[note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...[[/note]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or lets them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.



* StupidityIsTheOnlyOption: Want to unlock all the ending tokens? You'll have to do some dumb things, assuming you didn't accidentally get those anyways. Four of them involve shooting either bystanders or border guards with weapons, which is hard to do accidentally with decent aim.

to:

* StupidityIsTheOnlyOption: Want to unlock all the ending tokens? endings? You'll have to do some dumb things, assuming you didn't accidentally get those anyways. Four of them involve shooting either bystanders or border guards with weapons, which is hard to do accidentally with decent aim.



* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial:

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* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial:SuspiciouslySpecificDenial[=/=]TemptingFate:



* TemptingFate: "For sure, I am not in criminal bulletin or anything" [[spoiler:Unfortunately, Jorji is...]]



** After Arstotzka becomes known as a haven for international criminals (which you helped create if you previously failed to arrest Vince Lestrade), you are handed a wanted posted with the world's three most wanted criminals on it and are required to detain them upon sight.

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** After Arstotzka becomes known as a haven for international criminals (which you helped create if you previously failed to arrest Vince Lestrade), you are handed a wanted posted poster with the world's three most wanted criminals on it and are required to detain them upon sight.


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** Near the end of the game, Jorji eventually offers the player an option of [[spoiler:escaping the audit by moving to Obristan]], and if the player lets him in, he'll force his passport onto the player before proceeding. The player can opt to confiscate his passport before approval, and Jorji calls the player out on it for a bit.
20th May '16 10:11:53 PM Gadjiltron
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Added DiffLines:

* InstructiveLevelDesign: Each time you get introduced to a new rule, document, or type of discrepancy, it's almost guaranteed the first entrant that day will show a correct example of the new document or let you exercise the new rule. The game's habits about this is {{Lampshaded}} in day 14, just as you detain your first wanted criminal.
-->'''Inspector''': Funny to see you here. Just when starting to look for criminals.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.PapersPlease