History VideoGame / PapersPlease

7th Feb '16 7:59:12 PM Deathhacker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Both the "perfect" endings pretty much requires you to look something up, as they require you to either do almost all of the [=EZIC=] jobs or none at all. Doing anything in between will result in a worse ending where whichever side survives berates you before either casting you out or flat out murdering your ass. [[spoiler: In addition, even the [=EZIC=] ending requires you to spare the man in red, which is not apparent when they give you the assignment since they've been otherwise able to help you out of tough binds up until that point.]]
4th Feb '16 9:03:55 PM Deathhacker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Jorji's first passport states that it's issued by "Cobrastan". Either you can helpfully point out the lie, or the citation will point it out for you, to you.
4th Feb '16 8:59:03 PM Deathhacker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** To fulfill the first and to avoid the second, you must carefully balance your books. If you can't make enough, you inevitably have to decide who gets medicine, food and heat, and who to simply let die. And these are your family members.
4th Feb '16 1:58:03 AM Blacksun388
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* FriendInTheBlackMarket: Potentially Jorji, whose certainly in the right business to be smuggling drugs and other things. [[spoiler: Such as forged paperwork and smuggling people, if needed to other countries.]]
to:
* FriendInTheBlackMarket: Potentially Jorji, whose certainly in the right business to be smuggling drugs and other things. [[spoiler: Such as forged paperwork and smuggling people, if needed needed, to other countries.]]
31st Jan '16 2:15:19 AM samrules4
Is there an issue? Send a Message
--->''"A few minutes."''
to:
--->''"A few --->''"[[BlatantLies A few]] [[TvTropesWillRuinYourLife minutes."'' ]]"''
24th Jan '16 6:42:23 PM FungusFromYuggoth
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or let them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
to:
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or let lets them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
24th Jan '16 6:31:43 PM FungusFromYuggoth
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or consider it a satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
to:
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want''you'' want ''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or let them consider it a typical Western satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
24th Jan '16 6:29:10 PM FungusFromYuggoth
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all it's abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as immerse you in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or consider it a satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
to:
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all it's its abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as immerse you quite an authentic immersion in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or consider it a satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
24th Jan '16 6:28:00 PM FungusFromYuggoth
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ShownTheirWork: Boy howdy. As mentioned under AdultFear, this game ''will'' trigger an emotional response if you are old enough to have experienced life in an Eastern Bloc state, preferably before Perestroika, or if you have relatives who did. It is, for all it's abstraction and the fictional setting, an eerily accurate portrayal of both the actual mechanisms of a totalitarian state as well as immerse you in the mood of a typical inhabitant. On the one hand, you have a vast, sprawling bureaucracy with a rigid, codified set of laws and instructions, [[{{InsaneTrollLogic}} some of which are mutually exclusive or contradictory]] and liable to change frequently (although the game ramps up the frequency in comparison to RealLife), and which are enforced by [[{{StateSec}} a pervasive and paranoid surveillance and security apparatus]], which ''will'' set its sights on you even for small offenses, because in the totalitarian mindset, this is indicative of a potential for treason in more serious situations (particularly for functionaries of the state) - which was very much TruthInTelevision in the Brezhnev-era USSR, for instance. On the other hand, the same bureaucracy is thoroughly corrupt and the very people who want''you'' to perform unerringly like an automaton are not above ignoring rules and instructions they draw up themselves if it serves their needs [[labelnote: note]] and while one might say that corruption is a problem of all societies, including Western liberal democratic ones, it does not reflect the almost absurd level to which it was present in the USSR, being known and exploited across all social strata [[/labelnote]]...which was just as true. The logical processes in a totalitarian state ''do'' differ from those in modern Western societies, which makes it hard for young Western first-time players of the game to understand what is going on or consider it a satirical exaggeration, while somebody with an Eastern Bloc background will remember/recognize that the game actually does not exaggerate all that much, and will probably intuitively understand better what the pitfalls in play might be. After a bit of practice and exposure to the game, the player will get a sense of the mood of the typical Soviet citizen of the late 70s: the feeling of being a small cog in a vast, inefficient and malfunctioning machine (although you can bet that it will function perfectly the moment it is ''not'' it your interests for it to do so), leading to a JustFollowingOrders mentality and outward conformity to the system while trying to game it for one's own personal aims, which sometimes does work, sometimes not.
24th Jan '16 5:55:01 PM FungusFromYuggoth
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** A second offense of having non-approved decorations on the wall of your booth is enough to get you sentenced to forced labor.
to:
** A second offense of having non-approved decorations on the wall of your booth is enough to get you sentenced to forced labor. Although once you realize that the game portrays the frequently absurd internal logic systems of totalitarian governments [[{{ShownTheirWork}} ''quite'' authentically]] [[labelnote:note]]if you are old enough to have spent at least a few conscious years, say the late childhood, in the Eastern Bloc, for instance. preferably before the Perestroika, or if you happen to have older relatives who did[[/labelnote]] and if you [[{{FridgeLogic}} try to follow that logic]], it makes sense: the serious offense is not so much the trivial matter of non-approved decoration (unless it were subversive, that'd be serious by itself), but the fact that you defied a direct order, ''any'' order - totalitarian governments are big on absolutes. If you defy a trivial order like this, chances are you'll defy another order in a more serious situation, and that is a quality intolerable in a state employee and thus a part of the system.
This list shows the last 10 events of 460. Show all.