History VideoGame / GuiltyGear

31st Jan '18 11:47:56 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* JapaneseSpirit: A key factor behind the power and value of the Japanese people. [[GenreSavvy Three guesses why the Gears marked them for extinction first.]]

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* JapaneseSpirit: A key factor behind the power and value of the Japanese people. [[GenreSavvy Three guesses why the Gears marked them for extinction first.]]
26th Jan '18 1:26:49 PM BronsonRay
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->''Heaven or Hell?''

to:

->''Heaven or Hell?''
->''Are you ready? It's cool! Let's enjoy a great show time!! [[labelnote:*]]good luck[[/labelnote]]''



!!Duel 1! Let's ROCK!

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!!Duel !!Heaven or Hell? Duel 1! Let's ROCK!
11th Dec '17 9:22:23 PM Malady
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* OohMeAccentsSlipping: In ''Guilty Gear Xrd''. LiamOBrien has many talents but a convincing (and consistent) English accent is not one of them. In his defence, [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch the dialogue he has to say]] may be a factor.

to:

* OohMeAccentsSlipping: In ''Guilty Gear Xrd''. LiamOBrien Creator/LiamOBrien has many talents but a convincing (and consistent) English accent is not one of them. In his defence, [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch the dialogue he has to say]] may be a factor.
25th Nov '17 11:46:23 AM Superjustinbros
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* LastLousyPoint: Digital Figure Mode in ''Xrd'' has a ''lot'' of unlockable character poses, expressions, and palette swaps for each character, which can only be unlocked randomly via fishing and are mixed in with other unlocks such as palette swaps for use in regular matches, name plates, avatar parts, and guild icons for online profile customization. ''-REV 2-'' expanded the selection with even more poses and expressions for the playable cast along with an assortment of extra characters. Needless to say unless you spend hours grinding for W$ in Episode or online matches once you run out of chances for quick and easy money from Tutorial, Story, Combo, and Mission, you'll be fishing ''a lot'' just to unlock everything.

to:

* LastLousyPoint: Digital Figure Mode in ''Xrd'' has a ''lot'' of unlockable character poses, expressions, and palette swaps for each character, which can only be unlocked randomly via fishing and are mixed in with other unlocks such as palette swaps for use in regular matches, name plates, avatar parts, and guild icons for online profile customization. ''-REV 2-'' expanded the selection with even more poses and expressions for the playable cast along with an assortment of extra characters. Needless to say unless you spend hours grinding for W$ in Episode or online matches once you run out of chances for quick and easy money from Tutorial, Story, Combo, and Mission, you'll be fishing ''a lot'' just to unlock everything. The daily chests added to a later update in''-REV 2-'' help getting unlocks slightly easier, as it gives one free random drop of items per day.



** All of the Valentines in ''Xrd'' have some kind of unique mechanic based on another genre of gaming. Ramlethal has canned combos similar to other fighting games like MortalKombat, Elphelt primarily [[ThirdPersonShooter uses guns]], and from ''Revelator'' Jack'O takes advantage of [[MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena Servants.]]

to:

** All of the Valentines in ''Xrd'' have some kind of unique mechanic based on another genre of gaming. Ramlethal has canned combos similar to other fighting games like MortalKombat, Elphelt primarily [[ThirdPersonShooter uses guns]], and from ''Revelator'' Jack'O takes advantage of her [[MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena Servants.]]Servants]].



** Still no mention of Johnny? The guy is basically the definition of this. His particular style of patient, precise [[IaijutsuPractitioner iaido swordsmanship]] is nearly as out-of-place as Elphelt's guns, and that's not even the unusual part. He has to manage a truly limited resource, his coins. If a coin toss hits, it will power up the next use of his signature Mist Finer, giving the move incredible range and power. But with only five coins per round (unless he successfully uses the Treasure Hunt super), he has to toss them carefully.

to:

** Still no mention of Johnny? The guy is basically the definition of this. His particular style of patient, precise [[IaijutsuPractitioner iaido swordsmanship]] is nearly as out-of-place as Elphelt's guns, and that's not even the unusual part. He has to manage a truly limited resource, his coins. If a coin toss hits, it will power up the next use of his signature Mist Finer, giving the move incredible range and power. But with only five coins per round (unless he successfully uses the Treasure Hunt super), super and restocks his stash), he has to toss them carefully.


Added DiffLines:

* PlayEveryDay: In ''-REV 2-'', the first time you visit a multiplayer lobby in a single day, a chest is located somewhere which automatically unlocks a random assortment of items in the same fashion of fishing when opened.
19th Oct '17 8:57:45 AM X2X
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** The other facet of this system, though, is how the combos work: the attacks, particularly what would be the first four face buttons on a console controller, ascend in order of strength for a reason: they combo together in what's called the Gatling Combo system. Unlike many competing fighters, ''especially'' those present at the time of ''[=GG1=]'' and ''GGX''[='s=] releases, combos are actually easier to accomplish because the fundamentals work the same across most the cast -- neutral P will animation-cancel combo into K, K into S, and S into HS. Furthermore, you can often "jump" a single level and it will still be a combo -- P-S-HS, for example. While specific directional-input-plus-attack-type combos, as well as what specials can finish combos, vary for each character (and is where a lot of the depth comes in) the essential concept holds true for every single character in the game, meaning you'll at least have ''something'' to start from when playing a new character (or gives you at least some knowledge against characters you don't yet have good match-up knowledge against - ultimately, they have to obey this same rule everyone else follows, and their combos will ''have'' to end on either HS or a special, and this is where you can go on the attack).
* Finally, there's the idea of "Roman Cancels" -- in short, pressing a certain button combination (or, on pretty much any modern console controller or fightstick, a single button) will allow your character to, in a single frame, [[LagCancel go back to a "neutral" state from deep within a combo]] at the cost of tension meter. In short, you could, for example, do P-K-S-HS, Roman Cancel, take a step forward to get back in range, and P-K-S-HS ''again'', and it would all count as one combo that the enemy can't just interrupt via guarding. Roman Cancels, along with Dust attacks, are what lead to the huge, stylish combos that ''Guilty Gear'' is so famous for -- you can do a ground combo, Roman Cancel into a Dust attack, perform your Dust combo, Roman Cancel ''again'' if you have meter, and do a second air combo. That's an extreme example, but does reflect what having the ability to hard cancel a combo into a new combo allows for.

to:

** The other facet of this system, though, is how the combos work: the attacks, particularly what would be the first four face buttons on a console controller, ascend in order of strength for a reason: they combo together in what's called the Gatling Combo system. Unlike many competing fighters, ''especially'' those present at the time of ''[=GG1=]'' and ''GGX''[='s=] releases, combos are actually easier to accomplish because the fundamentals work the same across most the cast -- neutral P will animation-cancel combo into K, K into S, and S into HS. Furthermore, you can often "jump" a single level and it will still be a combo -- P-S-HS, for example. While specific directional-input-plus-attack-type combos, as well as what specials can finish combos, vary for each character (and is where a lot of the depth comes in) the essential concept holds true for every single character in the game, meaning you'll at least have ''something'' to start from when playing a new character (or gives you at least some knowledge against when facing characters you don't yet have good match-up knowledge against - -- ultimately, they have to obey this same rule everyone else follows, and their combos will ''have'' to end on either HS or a special, and this is where you can go on the attack).
attack). There are a few exceptions to the rule, however. Slayer, introduced in ''GGXX'', has little in the way of gatlings compared to the rest of the cast, instead having to rely on links [[note]]performing a move with quick startup immediately after a move with quick recovery has connected, all while the opponent is still in hit stun, thus "linking" together the attacks into a single combo; in Slayer's case, a common link would be close standing S > far standing S > close standing S > far standing S, then followed by a standing kick (5K) and canceled into a special move (usually his [[DashAttack Mappa Hunch]])[[/note]] and frame traps [[note]]moves that appear unsafe at first glance but are actually advantageous on block, used to bait the opponent into retaliating only to be punished in return; the aforementioned c.S > f.S link is one such example[[/note]] to continue pressuring the opponent.
* Finally, there's the idea of "Roman Cancels" -- in short, pressing a certain button combination (or, on pretty much any modern console controller or fightstick, a single button) will allow your character to, in a single frame, [[LagCancel go back to a "neutral" state from deep within a combo]] at the cost of tension meter. meter, signified by a red flash of energy briefly enveloping the user and, prior to [[VideoGame3DLeap the switch to 3D]], [[CallingYourAttacks the announcer calling out "Romantic!"]] In short, you could, for example, do P-K-S-HS, Roman Cancel, take a step forward to get back in range, and P-K-S-HS ''again'', and it would all count as one combo that the enemy can't just interrupt via guarding. Roman Cancels, along with Dust attacks, are what lead to the huge, stylish combos that ''Guilty Gear'' is so famous for -- you can do a ground combo, Roman Cancel into a Dust attack, perform your Dust combo, Roman Cancel ''again'' if you have meter, and do a second air combo. That's an extreme example, but does reflect what having the ability to hard cancel a combo into a new combo allows for.for.
** The ''XX'' series would expand upon this system by adding in [=FRCs=] (Force/False Roman Cancels), Roman Cancels [[SomeDexterityRequired that could only be used during specific frames for specific moves that varied by character]] but only cost 25% of the tension meter as opposed to 50% and [[ColourCodedForYourConvenience were instead colored blue]]. ''Xrd'' would change how Roman Cancels work by [[http://www.dustloop.com/wiki/index.php?title=GGXRD/Movement#Roman_Cancel providing players more freedom in when they could use RCs]] as well as giving [=RCs=] the ability to [[BulletTime briefly slow down time]].



!Main games [[labelnote:*]]''The Midnight Carnival'' and ''Accent Core Plus R'' were ported to Steam much later in life and they were ''all'' found in arcades, aside from, curiously, the original ''Guilty Gear''.[[/labelnote]]

to:

!Main games [[labelnote:*]]''The Midnight Carnival'' and ''Accent Core Plus R'' were ported to Steam UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} much later in life and they were ''all'' found in arcades, aside from, curiously, the original ''Guilty Gear''.[[/labelnote]]



* ''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'' (2007, Xbox 360/Steam) [[labelnote:*]]Notably, despite the name, it is ''[[OddballInTheSeries not]]'' a traditional fighting game and is more like an odd FG-[[RealTimeStrategy RTS]] [[GenreBusting hybrid]], which resulted in it being ''intensely'' unpopular. Despite this, it is treated as the "true" sequel to ''[=GG1=]'' (''X'' and the ''XX'', while canon, are officially {{Gaiden Game}}s, and quite a few plot elements from ''[=GG2=]'' were incorporated into its sequel(s), ''Guilty Gear Xrd''.[[/labelnote]]

to:

* ''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'' (2007, Xbox 360/Steam) [[labelnote:*]]Notably, despite the name, it is ''[[OddballInTheSeries not]]'' a traditional fighting game and is more like an odd FG-[[RealTimeStrategy RTS]] [[GenreBusting hybrid]], which resulted in it being ''intensely'' unpopular. Despite this, it is treated as the "true" sequel to ''[=GG1=]'' (''X'' and the ''XX'', ''XX'' installments, while canon, are officially {{Gaiden Game}}s, Game}}s), and quite a few plot elements from ''[=GG2=]'' were incorporated into its sequel(s), ''Guilty Gear Xrd''.[[/labelnote]]



See also ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'', a SpiritualSuccessor created during ''Guilty Gear'''s hiatus.

to:

See also ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'', ''Franchise/BlazBlue'', a SpiritualSuccessor created during ''Guilty Gear'''s hiatus.



* DifficultButAwesome: The Force Roman Cancel (FRC) in the ''XX'' series. Only applicable to specific moves, an FRC uses less Tension meter than a regular Roman Cancel and can also work even if the move doesn't connect (whereas regular [=RCs=] must actually make contact, meaning you can make non-safe attacks safe by expending 25% of your Tension gauge). However the frame window to perform these is very small and if you miss it, you'll just get a regular RC and burn more meter (or in the case of whiffed attacks, nothing at all, meaning your attack is now unsafe).

to:

* DifficultButAwesome: The Force Roman Cancel (FRC) in the ''XX'' series. Only applicable to specific moves, an FRC uses less Tension meter than a regular Roman Cancel and can also work even if the move doesn't connect (whereas regular [=RCs=] must actually make contact, meaning you can make non-safe attacks safe by expending 25% of your Tension gauge). However the frame window to perform these [[SomeDexterityRequired is very small small]] and if you miss it, you'll just get a regular RC and burn more meter (or in the case of whiffed attacks, nothing at all, meaning your attack is now unsafe).



** Printed on the characters' clothing in ''Xrd'' are a variety of different phrases- these are easier to notice in closeups and Digital Figure.

to:

** Printed on the characters' clothing in ''Xrd'' are a variety of different phrases- phrases -- these are easier to notice in closeups and Digital Figure.
19th Oct '17 8:24:52 AM X2X
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* The first is that air-dashing and air mobility is fundamental to the game. While ''GG'' was not the first game to feature improved air mobility or dashing in the air, starting with ''GGX'' in particular it's considered the first game to get it ''right'' and to control well. It features a huge number of air control options, all of which are variously good for offense, defense, etc., and various characters have different air performance envelopes, and one of the purposes of the game is to better simulate the crazy shonen anime air battles seen in works like Manga/DragonBall. Even moreso than a game like, say, ''Franchise/StreetFighter'', air offense is a vital part of a match.
* And on that note, the Dust attack. The "fifth" attack button is, when pressed neutral, basically a universal sky-launching "uppercut" for all characters. Connect this and follow immediately with a jump, and you then get to do the really big air combos the series is so famous for (as "Dust combos", especially under the right conditions, can be significantly longer than standard combos). Non-neutral Dust attacks tend to vary a good deal more between characters, but neutral Dust tends to be pretty much the same mechanically, even if the animation is different. The button is called "Dust", by the way, because the animations usually kicked up a lot of dust as a visual tell that this sort of launch was happening.
* For that matter, the button layout and the Gatling Combo system. ''GG'' is a 5-button setup, as opposed to the 6 of ''Street Fighter'' or the 4 favored by so many ''SNK'' titles - the buttons are Punch, Kick, Slash, Heavy Slash, and Dust. The first thing to note is Slash and Heavy Slash - while Punch and Kick tend to have fairly similar performance envelopes across characters, Slash attacks are where their unique mechanics often start to come into play alongside any special attacks. While it's called "Slash" because that's what series leads Sol and Ky do (slash with their swords), ''GG'' characters can use some ''weird'' weapons and Slashes tend to be wildly different from character to character.
** The other facet of this system, though, is how the combos work: the attacks, particularly what would be the first four face buttons on a console controller, ascend in order of strength for a reason: they combo together in what's called the Gatling Combo system. Unlike a lot of the competition, ''especially'' at the time of [=GG1=]'s or GGX's release, combos are actually easier to accomplish because the fundamentals work the same across all characters - neutral P will animation-cancel combo into K, K into S, and S into HS. Furthermore, you can often "jump" a single level and it will still be a combo - P-S-HS, for example. While specific directional-input-plus-attack-type combos, as well as what specials can finish combos, vary for each character (and is where a lot of the depth comes in) the essential concept holds true for every single character in the game, meaning you'll at least have ''something'' to start from when playing a new character (or gives you at least some knowledge against characters you don't yet have good matchup knowledge against - ultimately, they have to obey this same rule everyone else follows, and their combos will ''have'' to end on either HS or a special, and this is where you can go on the attack).
* Finally, there's the idea of "Roman Cancels" - basically, press a certain button combination (or, on pretty much any modern console controller or fightstick, a single button) and your character will, in a single frame, go back to a "neutral" state from deep within a combo at the cost of tension meter. In short, you could, for example, do P-K-S-HS, Roman Cancel, take a step forward to get back in range, and P-K-S-HS ''again'', and it would all count as one combo that the enemy can't just interrupt via guarding. Roman Cancels, along with Dust attacks, are what lead to the huge stylish combos that ''GG'' is so famous for - you can do a ground combo, Roman Cancel into a Dust knockup, do your Dust combo, Roman Cancel ''again'' if you have meter, and do a second air combo. That's an extreme example but does reflect what having the ability to hard cancel a combo into a new combo allows for.

to:

* The first and most notable aspect of ''Guilty Gear'' is that air-dashing [[VideoGameDashing air dashing]] and [[DoubleJump air mobility is mobility]] are fundamental to the game. series. While ''GG'' ''Guilty Gear'' was not the first game to feature improved air mobility or dashing in the air, starting with ''GGX'' in particular it's considered the first fighting game series [[TropeCodifier to get it ''right'' it]] ''[[TropeCodifier right]]'' [[TropeCodifier and to control well. It well]], particularly starting with ''Guilty Gear X''. The series features a huge number of air control options, all of which are variously good for offense, defense, etc., and various characters have different air performance envelopes, and as one of the purposes of the game series is to better simulate the crazy shonen anime air battles seen in works like Manga/DragonBall. ''Manga/DragonBall''. Even moreso more so than a game like, say, ''Franchise/StreetFighter'', air offense is a vital part of a match.
match, to the point that ''Guilty Gear'' and other games with a similarly large number of air mobility options (''VideoGame/MeltyBlood'', ''Franchise/BlazBlue'', etc.) are said to have "air footsies" [[note]]"footsies" being a term used in the UsefulNotes/FightingGameCommunity to refer to the ground-based aspect of fighters, both players out of mid-range and trying to strategically control the flow of battle by committing to their longest-ranged, generally safest moves (known as pokes) and reacting accordingly[[/note]].
* And on that note, the Dust attack. The "fifth" attack button is, when pressed in neutral, basically [[LauncherMove a universal sky-launching "uppercut" for all characters. characters]]. Connect this and follow immediately with a jump, and you then get to do the really big air combos the series is so famous for (as "Dust combos", combos," especially under the right conditions, can be significantly longer than standard combos). Non-neutral Dust attacks tend to vary a good deal more between characters, but neutral Dust tends to be pretty much the same mechanically, even if the animation is different. The button is called "Dust", "Dust," by the way, because the animations usually kicked kick up a lot of dust as a visual tell that this sort of launch was happening.
* For that matter, the button layout and the Gatling Combo system. ''GG'' ''Guilty Gear'' is a 5-button setup, as opposed to the 6 6-button layout of ''Street Fighter'' or the 4 4-button layout favored by so many ''SNK'' titles - Creator/{{SNK}} titles: the buttons are Punch, Kick, Slash, Heavy Slash, and Dust. The first thing to note is Slash and Heavy Slash - -- while Punch and Kick tend to have fairly similar performance envelopes across characters, Slash attacks are where their unique mechanics often start to come into play alongside any special attacks. While it's called "Slash" because that's what series leads Sol and Ky do (slash with their swords), ''GG'' characters can use some ''weird'' weapons and Slashes tend to be wildly different from character to character.
** The other facet of this system, though, is how the combos work: the attacks, particularly what would be the first four face buttons on a console controller, ascend in order of strength for a reason: they combo together in what's called the Gatling Combo system. Unlike a lot of the competition, many competing fighters, ''especially'' those present at the time of [=GG1=]'s or GGX's release, ''[=GG1=]'' and ''GGX''[='s=] releases, combos are actually easier to accomplish because the fundamentals work the same across all characters - most the cast -- neutral P will animation-cancel combo into K, K into S, and S into HS. Furthermore, you can often "jump" a single level and it will still be a combo - -- P-S-HS, for example. While specific directional-input-plus-attack-type combos, as well as what specials can finish combos, vary for each character (and is where a lot of the depth comes in) the essential concept holds true for every single character in the game, meaning you'll at least have ''something'' to start from when playing a new character (or gives you at least some knowledge against characters you don't yet have good matchup match-up knowledge against - ultimately, they have to obey this same rule everyone else follows, and their combos will ''have'' to end on either HS or a special, and this is where you can go on the attack).
* Finally, there's the idea of "Roman Cancels" - basically, press -- in short, pressing a certain button combination (or, on pretty much any modern console controller or fightstick, a single button) and will allow your character will, to, in a single frame, [[LagCancel go back to a "neutral" state from deep within a combo combo]] at the cost of tension meter. In short, you could, for example, do P-K-S-HS, Roman Cancel, take a step forward to get back in range, and P-K-S-HS ''again'', and it would all count as one combo that the enemy can't just interrupt via guarding. Roman Cancels, along with Dust attacks, are what lead to the huge huge, stylish combos that ''GG'' ''Guilty Gear'' is so famous for - -- you can do a ground combo, Roman Cancel into a Dust knockup, do attack, perform your Dust combo, Roman Cancel ''again'' if you have meter, and do a second air combo. That's an extreme example example, but does reflect what having the ability to hard cancel a combo into a new combo allows for.



!Main games [[labelnote:*]]''Midnight Carnival'' & ''Accent Core Plus R'' got ports to Steam much later in life and they were ''all'' found in arcades, aside from, curiously, the original ''Missing Link''.[[/labelnote]]
* ''Guilty Gear: The Missing Link'' (1998, PSX)
* ''Guilty Gear X: By Your Side'' (2000, Dreamcast[=/=]PS2)
* ''Guilty Gear XX: The Midnight Carnival'' (2002, PS2)
** ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (2003, PS2/Xbox)
** ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (2005, PS2)
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'' (2006, PS2/Wii)
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus'' (2009, PS2/Wii/PSP)
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R'' (2012, Xbox 360 XBLA[=/=]PS3 PSN)
* ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' (2014, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)
** ''Guilty Gear Xrd -REVELATOR-'' (2015, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)
** ''Guilty Gear Xrd REV 2'' (2017, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)

to:

!Main games [[labelnote:*]]''Midnight [[labelnote:*]]''The Midnight Carnival'' & and ''Accent Core Plus R'' got ports were ported to Steam much later in life and they were ''all'' found in arcades, aside from, curiously, the original ''Missing Link''.''Guilty Gear''.[[/labelnote]]
* ''Guilty Gear: The Missing Link'' (1998, PSX)
[[UsefulNotes/PlayStation PSX]])
* ''Guilty Gear X: By Your Side'' (2000, Dreamcast[=/=]PS2)
[[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]][=/=][[UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 PS2]])
* ''Guilty Gear XX: The Midnight Carnival'' (2002, PS2)
[=PS2=])
** ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (2003, PS2/Xbox)
[=PS2=]/UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}})
** ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (2005, PS2)
[=PS2=])
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'' (2006, PS2/Wii)
[=PS2=]/UsefulNotes/{{Wii}})
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus'' (2009, PS2/Wii/PSP)
[=PS2=]/Wii/[[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable PSP]])
** ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R'' (2012, Xbox 360 XBLA[=/=]PS3 PSN)
UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}} [[UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade XBLA]][=/=][[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]] [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork PSN]])
* ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' (2014, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)
[=PS3=][=/=][[UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 PS4]][=/=]UsefulNotes/{{Steam}})
** ''Guilty Gear Xrd -REVELATOR-'' (2015, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)
[=PS3=]/[=PS4=]/Steam)
** ''Guilty Gear Xrd REV 2'' (2017, PS3[=/=]PS4[=/=]Steam PC)
[=PS3=]/[=PS4=]/Steam)



* ''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'' (2007, Xbox 360/Steam)[[labelnote:*]]Notably, despite the name it is ''not'' a traditional fighting game and is more like an odd FG/MOBA hybrid, which resulted in it being ''intensely'' unpopular. Despite this, quite a few plot elements from it were incorporated into ''[=Xrd=]''.[[/labelnote]]
* ''Guilty Gear Petit'' (2001, Wonderswan)
** ''Guilty Gear Petit 2'' (2002, Wonderswan)
* ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (2004, Arcade[=/=]PS2[=/=]Xbox)
* ''Guilty Gear Dust Strikers'' (2006, Nintendo DS)

to:

* ''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'' (2007, Xbox 360/Steam)[[labelnote:*]]Notably, 360/Steam) [[labelnote:*]]Notably, despite the name name, it is ''not'' ''[[OddballInTheSeries not]]'' a traditional fighting game and is more like an odd FG/MOBA hybrid, FG-[[RealTimeStrategy RTS]] [[GenreBusting hybrid]], which resulted in it being ''intensely'' unpopular. Despite this, it is treated as the "true" sequel to ''[=GG1=]'' (''X'' and the ''XX'', while canon, are officially {{Gaiden Game}}s, and quite a few plot elements from it ''[=GG2=]'' were incorporated into ''[=Xrd=]''.its sequel(s), ''Guilty Gear Xrd''.[[/labelnote]]
* ''Guilty Gear Petit'' (2001, Wonderswan)
UsefulNotes/{{WonderSwan}})
** ''Guilty Gear Petit 2'' (2002, Wonderswan)
[=WonderSwan=])
* ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (2004, Arcade[=/=]PS2[=/=]Xbox)
Arcade/[=PS2=]/Xbox)
* ''Guilty Gear Dust Strikers'' (2006, Nintendo DS)UsefulNotes/NintendoDS)



* ''Pro Jumper! Chimaki's Hot Spring Tour Guilty Gear Tangent!?'' (2010, Nintendo DS DSiWare)

to:

* ''Pro Jumper! Chimaki's Hot Spring Tour Guilty Gear Tangent!?'' (2010, Nintendo DS DSiWare)UsefulNotes/DSiWare)
3rd Oct '17 1:29:01 AM SpaceDrake
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The year is 2180, and there are whispers that the Gears may be revived and resume their genocide of humanity. In the midst of the ensuing turmoil, two opposing rivals clash swords: Sol Badguy, an [[AntiHero amoral]] BountyHunter with a dark secret linking him to the Gears; and Ky Kiske, an [[ThePaladin idealistic young paladin]] of the Second Holy Order.

to:

The As the first game opens, the year is 2180, and there are whispers that the Gears may be revived and resume their genocide of humanity. In the midst of the ensuing turmoil, two opposing rivals clash swords: Sol Badguy, an [[AntiHero amoral]] BountyHunter with a dark secret linking him to the Gears; and Ky Kiske, an [[ThePaladin idealistic young paladin]] of the Second Holy Order.



** Several in ''Xrd'', to the point that its Story Mode ends with a "To Be Continued." Sol, likely along with Sin and [[spoiler: an emotionally-developed Ramlethal]] have to save [[spoiler: Elphelt]] from her captors. Ky has been revealed to be [[spoiler: part-Gear]], and [[spoiler: Dizzy]] has been revived. May's illness has yet to be fully resolved, and Faust's research of her reveals something nasty is going to go down in Japan. Zato-1 has been revived, implying more possibilities for the Assassin's Guild. The fate of That Man after the battle hasn't been revealed yet. Bedman's plan isn't finished, and he is TheDragon to [[spoiler: To Ariels, ruler of the Sanctus Populi]].
** ''Xrd REV 2'''s After Story drops some major hints about a future installment. [[spoiler:Raven]] is looking to challenge [[spoiler:Sol]], who is also being challenged by [[spoiler:That Man]]. [[spoiler:That Man]] is turned over to the authorities. Finally, [[spoiler:another worldwide event known as G4]] will be taking place.
* SequelNumberSnarl: ''[=GG2=]: Overture'' avoided this by merit of regulating the ''X'' series to the status of sidestories to the original game without diminishing their impact on canon. ''Xrd'', which could essentially be considered a sequel to both ''XX'' and ''Overture'', oddly picks up the slack, however, as it more or less continues on from the titling conventions of ''X'' and ''XX'' (''Guilty Gear X3'' would've been an acceptable choice, but ASW certainly couldn't call the game "Guilty Gear [[ExplicitContent XXX]]", [[UnfortunateNames now could they?]]).

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** Several in ''Xrd'', to the point that its Story Mode ends with a "To Be Continued." Sol, likely along with Sin and [[spoiler: an emotionally-developed Ramlethal]] have to save [[spoiler: Elphelt]] from her captors. Ky has been revealed to be [[spoiler: part-Gear]], and [[spoiler: Dizzy]] has been revived. May's illness has yet to be fully resolved, and Faust's research of her reveals something nasty is going to go down in Japan. Zato-1 has been revived, implying more possibilities for the Assassin's Guild. The fate of That Man after the battle hasn't been revealed yet. Bedman's plan isn't finished, and he is TheDragon to [[spoiler: To Ariels, ruler of the Sanctus Populi]].
** ''Xrd REV 2'''s After Story drops some major hints about a future installment. [[spoiler:Raven]] is looking to challenge [[spoiler:Sol]], who is also being challenged by [[spoiler:That Man]]. [[spoiler:That Man]] is turned turns ''himself'' over to the authorities. authorities, in an obvious bid to [[spoiler:arrange a fight with Sol]]. Finally, [[spoiler:another worldwide event known as G4]] will be taking place.
place. And of course, [[spoiler:the reconstituted Aria pointedly does ''not'' appear on camera at any point during the After Stories]].
* SequelNumberSnarl: ''[=GG2=]: Overture'' avoided this by merit of regulating relegating the ''X'' series to the status of sidestories to the original game without diminishing their impact on canon. ''Xrd'', which could essentially be considered a sequel to both ''XX'' and ''Overture'', oddly picks up the slack, however, as it more or less continues on from the titling conventions of ''X'' and ''XX'' (''Guilty Gear X3'' would've been an acceptable choice, but ASW certainly couldn't call the game "Guilty Gear [[ExplicitContent XXX]]", [[UnfortunateNames now could they?]]).


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* TimeSkip: ''X'' and ''XX'' take place not very long after ''1'', going no further than 2181. ''2'' jumps all the way to 2185, and ''Xrd'' jumps further forward to late 2187. ''=REVELATOR='' ends right as November 2187 does.
1st Oct '17 6:58:42 PM SpaceDrake
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** The most interesting example is perhaps the intro trailer for ''Guilty Gear X''. Now, the English might sound like a terrible dub job from that period... and that's because it is, as it was ''commissioned by a nascent [=ArcSys=] themselves for the Japanese version''. The English voiceover was used even in the JP versions of the game; the initial narration was sometimes dubbed over in Japanese (on top of the still-audible English), but everything else was in English flat out (except May's orders in her scene, which are in Japanese in all versions). This is why the translation, especially of the narration, is a bit shonky and the acting isn't great - because it's what [=ArcSys=] wrote, sent over and commissioned. Needless to say, renditions of the game in vocal English have improved since then.
28th Sep '17 2:42:21 PM Tractical_Chunder
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** Hilariously enough, when going into his gear form during Dragon Install in ''Xrd'', he ''gains'' the jacket that he wears in story mode but looses the rest of his clothing.
7th Aug '17 11:32:47 PM Superjustinbros
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* LastLousyPoint: Digital Figure Mode in ''Xrd'' has a ''lot'' of unlockable character poses, expressions, and palette swaps for each character, which can only be unlocked randomly via fishing and are mixed in with other unlocks such as palette swaps for use in regular matches, name plates, avatar parts, and guild icons for online profile customization. ''-REV 2-'' expanded the selection with even more poses and expressions for the playable cast along with an assortment of extra characters. Needless to say unless you spend hours grinding for W$ once you run out of chances for quick and easy money from Tutorial, Story, Combo, and Mission, you'll be fishing ''a lot'' just to unlock everything.

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* LastLousyPoint: Digital Figure Mode in ''Xrd'' has a ''lot'' of unlockable character poses, expressions, and palette swaps for each character, which can only be unlocked randomly via fishing and are mixed in with other unlocks such as palette swaps for use in regular matches, name plates, avatar parts, and guild icons for online profile customization. ''-REV 2-'' expanded the selection with even more poses and expressions for the playable cast along with an assortment of extra characters. Needless to say unless you spend hours grinding for W$ in Episode or online matches once you run out of chances for quick and easy money from Tutorial, Story, Combo, and Mission, you'll be fishing ''a lot'' just to unlock everything.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.GuiltyGear