History VideoGame / FallOut

29th Sep '17 3:35:54 PM Samothrace42
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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: The most blatant is [[TheEmpire Caesar's Legion]], which was modeled in-universe on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire and [[ShownTheirWork is sometimes hard to tell apart from the real thing]]. It also has some clear elements gleaned from ancient Sparta. The [[TheFederation New California Republic]] is very much like the Pre-War United States mixed in with both the Roman Republic and the U.S. during the Wild West. The Shi Empire is pretty much ImperialChina reborn. The Great Khans intentionally base themselves after the Mongolian Empire (which gets downplayed by the fact that horses have yet to be seen in this series), and can even be encouraged in ''New Vegas'' to take this more to heart in one of their endings. While probably not deliberate, [[TheOrder Lyons' Brotherhood of Steel]] has a lot in common with early UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}. Similarly, [[RisingEmpire Arthur Maxson's Brotherhood]] is equal parts medieval Europe and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, while the Institute are loosely inspired by both the Illuminati and Renaissance-era Italy. Also, the Commonwealth Minutemen are based on both Revolutionary America and the Iroquois Confederacy, and the Church of the Children of Atom are now essentially the Crusader States.

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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: The most blatant is [[TheEmpire Caesar's Legion]], which was modeled in-universe on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire - and [[ShownTheirWork is sometimes hard to tell apart from the real thing]]. It also has some clear elements gleaned from ancient Sparta. The [[TheFederation New California Republic]] is very much like the Pre-War United States mixed in with both the Roman Republic and the U.S. during the Wild West. The Shi Empire is pretty much ImperialChina reborn. The Great Khans intentionally base themselves after the Mongolian Empire (which gets downplayed by the fact that horses have yet to be seen in this series), and can even be encouraged in ''New Vegas'' to take this more to heart in one of their endings. While probably not deliberate, [[TheOrder Lyons' Brotherhood of Steel]] has a lot in common with early UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}. Similarly, [[RisingEmpire Arthur Maxson's Brotherhood]] is equal parts medieval Europe and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, while the Institute are loosely inspired by both the Illuminati and Renaissance-era Italy. Also, the Commonwealth Minutemen are based on both Revolutionary America and the Iroquois Confederacy, and the Church of the Children of Atom are now essentially the Crusader States.



** '''V'''ault-tec '''A'''ssisted '''T'''argeting '''S'''ystem.

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** '''V'''ault-tec '''V'''ault-Tec '''A'''ssisted '''T'''argeting '''S'''ystem.



** The Courier is unaware until ''Lonesome Road'' that they already ''were'' this to the people of the Divide, [[spoiler:and not [[MikeNelsonDestroyerOfWorlds in a good way]]]].

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** The Courier is unaware until ''Lonesome Road'' that they already ''were'' this to the people of the Divide, [[spoiler:and not ''not'' [[MikeNelsonDestroyerOfWorlds in a good way]]]].



* MedievalStasis: From 1843 to 1960, there was a world of difference, from technology to culture to politics in the span of 127 years. From 1960 to 2077? Not so much. Still holds true for after the Great War, with over 200 years having passed and very little actual rebuilding being witnessed in places. Subverted with The Institute since they have been able to make great advances in technology, something which has earned them a LOT of enemies.
** However, this applies primarily to fashions and society: [[RedHerring Communism]] was still the great menace, women were still [[StayInTheKitchen chained to the stove]](at least until the Resource Wars, when they couldn't afford to waste resources anymore), and cars were still curvy and chromed. Bomb-shelter architecture, particle physics, and weaponized viruses (not to mention propaganda-as-mind-control) all made great strides under the PowersThatBe of pre-war America.

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* MedievalStasis: From 1843 to 1960, there was a world of difference, from technology to culture to politics in the span of 127 years. From 1960 to 2077? Not so much. Still holds true for after the Great War, with over 200 years having passed and very little actual rebuilding being witnessed in places. Subverted with The Institute the Institute, though, since they have been able to make great advances in technology, technology - something which has earned them a LOT ''lot'' of enemies.
** However, this applies primarily to fashions and society: [[RedHerring Communism]] was still the great menace, women were still [[StayInTheKitchen chained to the stove]](at least until the Resource Wars, when they couldn't afford to waste resources valuable workers anymore), and cars were still curvy and chromed. Bomb-shelter architecture, particle physics, and weaponized viruses (not to mention propaganda-as-mind-control) all made great strides under the PowersThatBe of pre-war America.



* MohsScaleOfScienceFiction: It'd be easier to list Sci Fi elements that [[SciFiKitchenSink haven't been included in the series]], most of which would be totally impossible with real science. It ranks as a 2 since the series is largely void of supernatural elements and Phlebtonium is consistent.

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* MohsScaleOfScienceFiction: MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness: It'd be easier to list Sci Fi [=sci-fi=] elements that [[SciFiKitchenSink haven't ''[[SciFiKitchenSink haven't]]'' [[TropeOverdosed been included in the series]], most of which would be totally impossible with real science. It Still, it ranks as a 2 since the series is largely ([[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane largely]]) void of supernatural elements and Phlebtonium is consistent.



* MythologyGag: In ''Fallout'', recruitable NPC Tycho mentions he's a Desert Ranger. The Desert Rangers were the protagonists of ''Wasteland'', the game to which ''Fallout'' is a SpiritualSuccessor. The BigBad of ''Fallout Tactics'' also seems to be a subtle ShoutOut to the BigBad of ''Wasteland''. As per WordOfGod, Tycho's outfit became the basis of the Desert Ranger Combat Armor, which in itself inspired the IconicOutfit of the NCR Veteran Rangers.

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* MythologyGag: In ''Fallout'', the recruitable NPC Tycho mentions he's a Desert Ranger. The Desert Rangers were the protagonists of ''Wasteland'', the game to which ''Fallout'' is a SpiritualSuccessor. The BigBad of ''Fallout Tactics'' also seems to be a subtle ShoutOut to the BigBad of ''Wasteland''. As per WordOfGod, Tycho's outfit became the basis of the Desert Ranger Combat Armor, which in itself inspired the IconicOutfit of the NCR Veteran Rangers. And in ''Fallout 4'', the [[WeHelpTheHelpless Commonwealth Minutemen's]] relationship with the [[DeterminedHomesteader Settlers]] under their protection is based after that of ''Wasteland's'' Desert Rangers.


Added DiffLines:

** ''Fallout 4'' also has heavy Wild-West undertones - the [[WeHelpTheHelpless Commonwealth Minutemen]] are pretty much an entire knightly [[TheOrder order]] of CowboyCops - but adds in influences from Colonial and Civil War-era Americana.
25th Sep '17 3:54:11 AM DRCEQ
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* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth. One ride in Nuka World mentions that Nuka Cola started producing their in root beer to compete with sunset. Cow tipping is also a recurring joke across all the games. And after Bethesda Game Studios took over the series, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] references [[AuthorAppeal are often found throughout the Wasteland]].

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* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth. One ride in Nuka World mentions that Nuka Cola started producing their in own root beer to compete with sunset.Sunset. Cow tipping is also a recurring joke across all the games. And after Bethesda Game Studios took over the series, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] references [[AuthorAppeal are often found throughout the Wasteland]].
25th Sep '17 12:34:43 AM Skagit
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* MedievalStasis: From 1843 to 1960, there was a world of difference, from technology to culture to politics in the span of 127 years. From 1960 to 2077? Not so much. Still holds true for after the Great War, with over 200 years having passed and very little actual rebuilding being witnessed in places.

to:

* MedievalStasis: From 1843 to 1960, there was a world of difference, from technology to culture to politics in the span of 127 years. From 1960 to 2077? Not so much. Still holds true for after the Great War, with over 200 years having passed and very little actual rebuilding being witnessed in places. Subverted with The Institute since they have been able to make great advances in technology, something which has earned them a LOT of enemies.



* MohsScaleOfScienceFiction: It'd be easier to list Sci Fi elements that [[SciFiKitchenSink haven't been included in the series]], most of which would be totally impossible with real science. It ranks as a 2 since the series is largely void of supernatural elements and Phlebtonium is consistent.



* RadiationImmuneMutants: Ghouls, who can even ''heal'' from radiation.

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* RadiationImmuneMutants: Ghouls, who can even ''heal'' from radiation. Super Mutants are also immune, though they aren't healed by it.



* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth. Cow tipping is also a recurring joke across all the games. And after Bethesda Game Studios took over the series, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] references [[AuthorAppeal are often found throughout the Wasteland]].

to:

* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth. One ride in Nuka World mentions that Nuka Cola started producing their in root beer to compete with sunset. Cow tipping is also a recurring joke across all the games. And after Bethesda Game Studios took over the series, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] references [[AuthorAppeal are often found throughout the Wasteland]].
20th Sep '17 6:32:09 PM Dirtyblue929
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* '''''All Roads''' (2010)'': A tie-in GraphicNovel for ''Fallout: New Vegas'', written by Chris Avellone and created in conjunction with Creator/DarkHorseComics. It details the events leading up to the opening of the game, and provides background on one of the game's antagonists. Originally included in the collector's edition of the game, it was released digitally in 2011. With the exception of a single panel[[note]]A flashback depicts NCR Cavalry riding horses, which are canonically extinct. The inclusion was apparently due to a miscommunication with the artists.[[/note]], it aligns almost completely with canon and is regarded as such.

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* '''''All Roads''' (2010)'': A tie-in GraphicNovel for ''Fallout: New Vegas'', written by Chris Avellone and created in conjunction with Creator/DarkHorseComics. It details the events leading up to the opening of the game, and provides background on one of the game's antagonists. Originally included in the collector's edition of the game, it was released digitally in 2011. With the exception of a single panel[[note]]A flashback depicts panel[[note]]An NCR Cavalry riding horses, which cavalry unit rides horses (which are canonically extinct. The inclusion was apparently extinct) due to a miscommunication with the artists.[[/note]], artists; the writers meant ''armored'' cavalry, as in [=APCs=][[/note]], it aligns almost completely with canon and is regarded as such.
11th Sep '17 2:37:05 PM Samothrace42
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** Postwar societies tend to borrow from ancient cultures as well, though often warped interpretations of them. Romans in Vegas, Old West towns, Mongol-ish nomads, American Revolutionaries...

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** Postwar Post-War societies tend to borrow from ancient cultures as well, though often warped interpretations of them. Romans in Vegas, Old West towns, Mongol-ish nomads, American Revolutionaries...



* EasterEgg: Most of the 'special encounters' in ''1'', ''2'', and ''Tactics''. Some are just there to be goofy, while some (while still pretty goofy) offer some awesome weapons and equipment.



* RadiationImmuneMutants: Ghouls, who even heal from radiation.
* RagnarokProofing: Averted in the first two games, which pretty much assume complete destruction of every identifiable landmark that hasn't been constantly maintained (one location, appropriately called Junktown, is apparently constructed entirely out of scrap wood, stone, and metal). Played strongly in the third, where (despite atomic onslaught and 200 years without maintenance) you can still generally get lights and running water wherever you go. While in ''New Vegas,'' it's justified thanks to Mr. House's long-term plans sparing Vegas and the Mojave (and even more so, Hoover Dam) from the worst of the Great War. ''4'' also plays this trope relatively straight, but is partly justified due to that the nuclear bomb headed for Boston ''missed'', sparing the city from atomic annihilation.

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* RadiationImmuneMutants: Ghouls, who can even heal ''heal'' from radiation.
* RagnarokProofing: Averted in the first two games, which pretty much assume complete destruction of every identifiable landmark that hasn't been constantly maintained (one location, appropriately called Junktown, is apparently constructed entirely out of scrap wood, stone, and metal). Played strongly in the third, where (despite atomic onslaught and 200 years without maintenance) you can still generally get lights and running water wherever you go. While in ''New Vegas,'' it's justified thanks to Mr. House's long-term plans sparing Vegas and the Mojave (and even more so, Hoover Dam) from the worst of the Great War. ''4'' also plays this trope relatively straight, but is partly justified due to the fact that the nuclear bomb headed for Boston ''missed'', sparing the city from atomic annihilation.



** In the First Battle of Hoover Dam, Caesar's Legion learned a '''brutal''' lesson on how their tactics and general M.O., which has allowed them to absorb and steamroll the tribals that had been their enemies for so long, matter little in the face of an organized country's firepower, as the NCR demonstrated.
** For all their benevolent intentions, the [[WeHelpTheHelpless Commonwealth Minutemen's]] [[ObstructiveBureaucracy absurdly weak command structure]] led to over-extension and a truly ''[[HumiliationConga humiliating]]'' decline in regional power & influence, to the point that there's literally ''[[LastOfHisKind one]]'' Minutemen left in the entire Commonwealth at the start of the story.

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** In the First Battle of Hoover Dam, Caesar's Legion learned a '''brutal''' lesson on how their tactics and general M.O., which has allowed them to absorb and steamroll the tribals that had been their enemies for so long, matter mattered little in the face of an organized country's firepower, as the NCR demonstrated.
** For all their benevolent intentions, the [[WeHelpTheHelpless Commonwealth Minutemen's]] [[ObstructiveBureaucracy absurdly weak command structure]] led to over-extension and a truly ''[[HumiliationConga humiliating]]'' decline in regional power & influence, to the point that there's literally ''[[LastOfHisKind one]]'' Minutemen Minuteman left in the entire Commonwealth at the start of the story.



** Each of the games (''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' especially) put tons of work into making their in-game settings be as accurate to their real-world counterparts (within reason, of course).
** In ''New Vegas'', Caesar's Legion are heavily based after the Roman Empire {{In-Universe}} - and it can actually be pretty hard at times to tell them apart from the real things.
** While not nearly to the Legion's extent, the Commonwealth Minutemen in ''4'' are based after the real-world colonial militias on not just an aesthetic level. Similarly, most of the espionage tactics used by the Railroad (i.e., dead drops) are based on actual methods used by the CIA during the Cold War.

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** Each of the games (''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' especially) put tons of work into making their in-game settings be as accurate to their real-world counterparts as possible (within reason, of course).
** In ''New Vegas'', Caesar's Legion are heavily based after the Roman Empire {{In-Universe}} - and it can actually be pretty hard at times to tell them apart from the real things.
thing.
** While not nearly to the Legion's extent, the Commonwealth Minutemen in ''4'' are based after the real-world colonial militias that fought in the American Revolution on not just an aesthetic level. Similarly, most of the espionage tactics used by the Railroad (i.e., dead drops) are based on actual methods used by the CIA during the Cold War.



* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Amazingly, the series ''is'' idealistic. Yes, the world has burned in nuclear fire and is host to all manner of unsavory characters and vicious animals who will kill you or worse. But civilization has endured, is rebuilding, and there is still goodness and virtue in the hearts of many. And if you play a good character, the good will eventually overcome the evil. There's a reason why tropes like EarnYourHappyEnding exist.

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* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Amazingly, the series ''is'' is idealistic. Yes, the world has burned in nuclear fire and is host to all manner of unsavory characters and vicious animals who will kill you or worse. But civilization has endured, is rebuilding, and there is still goodness and virtue in the hearts of many. And if you play a good character, the good will eventually overcome the evil. There's a ''Fallout's'' part of the reason why tropes like EarnYourHappyEnding exist.



* TroubleFromThePast: Half of the problems in the entire series are leftovers from the past, either in the form of radiation, old world machines, or other leftover messes.

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* TroubleFromThePast: Half of the problems in the entire series are leftovers from the past, either in the form of radiation, old world Old World machines, or other leftover messes.



** ''Fallout 4'': If you were disgusted by them, you and your army storm The Institute and blow it up with its own reactor. If you decide to side with them, then you fight the Brotherhood of Steel at [[spoiler:their airbase and hijack Liberty Prime to see their airbase as a giant Communist vehicle]]. "Boom".

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** ''Fallout 4'': If [[spoiler:If you were disgusted by them, you and your army storm The Institute and blow it up with its own reactor. If you decide to side with them, then you fight the Brotherhood of Steel at [[spoiler:their their airbase and hijack Liberty Prime to see their airbase as a giant Communist vehicle]].vehicle. "Boom".]]



*** However, what most consider to be quite possibly ''the'' most horrifically evil act you can accomplish in ''Fallout 3'' is going to Rivet City and convincing the mentally unstable Mr. Lopez to commit suicide. It's notable that while people will happily upload videos of nuking Megaton, [[EvenEvilHasStandards virtually no one has really posted videos of this online]].

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*** However, what most consider to be quite possibly ''the'' most horrifically evil reprehensible act you can accomplish in ''Fallout 3'' is going to Rivet City and convincing the mentally unstable Mr. Lopez to commit suicide. It's notable that while people will happily upload videos of nuking Megaton, [[EvenEvilHasStandards virtually no one has really posted videos of this online]].



* VillainousLegacy: Non-character example. The BigBad of the first game, TheMaster, was using the Forced Evolutionary Virus to mutate humans. The villains of the second game excavated the ruins of his lair to retrieve the FEV for their own uses, and the villains of the third synthesized their own version for their plan as well. [[spoiler:And while it's not an essential part of the game's plot, the firth game (Fallout 4) reveals that the Institute ''also'' had samples of FEV, which they used to help experiment with the creation of synthetic tissue - which inadvertently created the Commonwealth's breed of Super Mutants.]]

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* VillainousLegacy: Non-character example. The BigBad of the first game, TheMaster, was using the Forced Evolutionary Virus to mutate humans. The villains of the second game excavated the ruins of his lair to retrieve the FEV for their own uses, and the villains of the third synthesized their own version for their plan as well. [[spoiler:And while it's not an essential part of the game's plot, the firth fifth game (Fallout 4) reveals that the Institute ''also'' had samples of FEV, which they used to help experiment with the creation of synthetic tissue - which inadvertently created the Commonwealth's breed of Super Mutants.]]



* WeCanRuleTogether: The Master, President Eden, and Caesar all make similar offers to the player character. The Master is actually good for it, while Eden's plan will get you killed (although in his defense, he was genuine about his wanting you to join him, [[spoiler:your inferior Wastelander biology just served as a SpannerInTheWorks]]), and Caesar doesn't exactly have the best track record of keeping his promises (especially if you're playing a female character, given Caesar's view on the place of women in society). The Institute under Father/[[spoiler:Shaun]] also make this offer to you - and, like the Master, they're actually pretty good for the offer.

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* WeCanRuleTogether: The Master, President Eden, and Caesar all make similar offers to the player character. The Master is actually good for it, while Eden's plan will get you killed (although in his defense, he was ''was'' genuine about his wanting you to join him, [[spoiler:your inferior Wastelander biology just served as a SpannerInTheWorks]]), and Caesar doesn't exactly have the best track record of keeping his promises (especially if you're playing a female character, given Caesar's view on the place of women in society). The Institute under Father/[[spoiler:Shaun]] also make this offer to you - and, like the Master, they're actually pretty good for the offer.



** The Institute also has this advantage. On the one hand, their vast [[MechaMook Gen 1 & 2 Synth]] armies are individually weaker than humans and have weaker laser weapons than those from the Pre-War days. However, that doesn't matter. Why? Because not only are the Institute TheConspiracy, but they can produce Gen 1 & 2 Synths by the veritable ''millions''.

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** The Institute also has this advantage. On the one hand, their vast [[MechaMook Gen 1 & 2 Synth]] armies are individually weaker than humans and have weaker laser weapons than even those from the Pre-War days. However, that doesn't matter. Why? Because not only are the Institute TheConspiracy, but they can produce Gen 1 & 2 Synths by the veritable ''millions''.



** While [[MadScientist the Institute]] are [[ALighterShadeOfBlack considerably grayer on the morality spectrum]] than both the Legion and Enclave, they also are examples of this. They justify their brutal conspiracy over New England by explaining that they plan on eventually supplying their advanced technology to the surface so as to create a utopia - but will only do this with a society they find worthy enough, so as to prevent the Great War from happening all over again.

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** While [[MadScientist the Institute]] are [[ALighterShadeOfBlack considerably grayer on the morality spectrum]] than both the Legion and Enclave, they also are examples of this. They justify their brutal conspiracy over New England by explaining that they plan on eventually supplying their advanced technology to the surface so as to create a utopia - [[OnlyTheChosenMayWield but will only do this with a society they find worthy enough, enough for their tech]], so as to prevent the Great War from happening all over again.again. Any society they find "inferior" or not meeting their standards? They'll happily smother it in the cradle.
10th Sep '17 1:05:54 PM Samothrace42
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** The ghouls may make third degree burn victims look pretty, but they are immune to radiation, can't apparently [[TheAgeless die from old age]], and do not seem to require [[TheNeedless even food, water, or possibly even air]] (the canon suggests that they can go into a sort of hibernation where they don't need any of that, but need to eat, drink, and breathe to be able to do anything). In fact, if they were able to breed they might be considered an improvement over humanity. Sadly, some ghouls seem prone to eventually degenerate into a 'feral' condition that reduces them to a (hostile) ape-like level of intelligence. In Fallout 2, you can stumble across a ghoul who was BuriedAlive in the cemetery outside New Reno. He complains that it took you long enough. In New Vegas, you encounter a group of ghouls who plan on leaving for their lethally-radioactive "promised land" to escape persecution from humans. In Fallout 4, you can discover Billy, a ghoul boy who has been trapped in a fridge for 200 years (he used it as a way to take shelter from the bombs, but got stuck).
** Super Mutants (the name stuck before their true origins were learned) were specifically ''designed'' to be superior to humans in coping with the harsh Wasteland: they're radiation-proof, staggeringly strong and shrug off bullets... but their gifts came at the cost of them being sterile and not very bright (with a few exceptions).

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** The ghouls Ghouls may make third degree burn victims look pretty, but they are immune to radiation, can't apparently [[TheAgeless die from old age]], and do not seem to require [[TheNeedless even food, water, or possibly even air]] (the canon suggests that they can go into a sort of hibernation where they don't need any of that, but need to eat, drink, and breathe to be able to do anything). In fact, if they were able to breed they might be considered an improvement over humanity. Sadly, some ghouls seem prone to eventually degenerate into a 'feral' condition that reduces them to a (hostile) ape-like level of intelligence. In Fallout 2, you can stumble across a ghoul who was BuriedAlive in the cemetery outside New Reno. He complains that it took you long enough. In New Vegas, you encounter a group of ghouls who plan on leaving for their lethally-radioactive "promised land" to escape persecution from humans. In Fallout 4, you can discover Billy, a ghoul Ghoul boy who has been trapped in a fridge for 200 years (he used it as a way to take shelter from the bombs, but got stuck).
** Super Mutants (the name stuck before their true origins were learned) were specifically ''designed'' to be superior to humans in coping with the harsh Wasteland: they're radiation-proof, staggeringly strong and shrug off bullets... but their gifts came at the cost of them being sterile and not very bright (with a few exceptions). In fact, the vast majority of Super Mutants found on the East Coast are AlwaysChaoticEvil (although this is justified by them both being created by inferior [=FEV=] strains and being largely culled from Wastelander stock - who are already usually dumb to a fault anyway).



** The PreWar world struggled with resource shortages, oppressive governments, and brutal warfare for twenty-five years before it all ended in a blaze of nuclear fire.
* TheDragon: Lieutenant to the Master in ''1'', Horrigan to Richardson in ''2'', and Colonel Autumn to Eden in ''3''. In ''Vegas'', Caesar's right hand is Legate Lanius, while President Kimball's number two is General Lee Oliver. [[spoiler:Benny]] was this to Mr. House (and you can take his place), and [[spoiler:Yes Man is this to you, if you choose the Independent path]].

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** The PreWar Pre-War world struggled with resource shortages, oppressive governments, and brutal warfare for twenty-five years before it all ended in a blaze of nuclear fire.
* TheDragon: The Lieutenant to the Master in ''1'', Frank Horrigan to Richardson in ''2'', and Colonel Autumn to Eden in ''3''. In ''Vegas'', Caesar's right hand is Legate Lanius, while President Kimball's number two is General Lee Oliver. [[spoiler:Benny]] was this to Mr. House (and you can take his place), and [[spoiler:Yes Man is this to you, if you choose the Independent path]]. In ''4'', Lancer-Captain Kells is this to Elder Maxson, [[AvertedTrope but there is no real character that fits this role]] for Father.



* EagleLand: The prewar United States depicted itself as Type 1 but in fact was heavily into Type 2. ''Fallout'' is one of the very few cases in Western media in which the USA is actually depicted as being outright villainous; the prewar government was an Orwellian nightmare that makes the real-world Soviet Union look positively warm and fuzzy in comparison, and their successors, the Enclave, are ''even worse''. Most frightening of all; given the nightmare the world was becoming on the eve of the Great War, it's not much of a stretch to think the United States became the way it was out of the need to survive the Resource Wars. When nations are annihilating each other over what few resources still exist on a global scale, looking out for your own country and people at the expense of all others becomes a grim necessity.
* EarnYourHappyEnding: ''Fallout 2'' and ''New Vegas'', especially.
* EasterEgg: Most of the 'special encounters' in 1, 2, and Tactics. Some are just there to be goofy, while some (while still pretty goofy) offer some awesome weapons and equipment.
* ElaborateUndergroundBase: The Vaults as well as ''Fallout 3's'' Raven Rock. Both [[JustifiedTrope justified]], as some of the Vaults are supposed to hold hundreds, and in a few cases thousands, of people, and Raven Rock is based on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raven_Rock_Mountain_Complex actual Raven Rock government complex]].

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* EagleLand: The prewar Pre-War United States depicted itself as Type 1 but in fact was heavily into Type 2. ''Fallout'' is one of the very few cases in Western media in which the USA is actually depicted as being outright villainous; the prewar Pre-War government was an Orwellian nightmare that makes the real-world Soviet Union look positively warm and fuzzy in comparison, and their successors, the Enclave, are ''even worse''. Most frightening of all; given the nightmare the world was becoming on the eve of the Great War, it's not much of a stretch to think the United States became the way it was out of the need to survive the Resource Wars. When nations are annihilating each other over what few resources still exist on a global scale, looking out for your own country and people at the expense of all others becomes a grim necessity.
* EarnYourHappyEnding: ''Fallout 2'' and 2'', ''New Vegas'', especially.
* EasterEgg: Most of the 'special encounters' in 1, 2,
and Tactics. Some are just there to be goofy, while some (while still pretty goofy) offer some awesome weapons and equipment.
''4'' all count for this several times over.
* ElaborateUndergroundBase: The Vaults as well as ''Fallout 3's'' Raven Rock. Both [[JustifiedTrope justified]], as some of the Vaults are supposed to hold hundreds, and in a few cases thousands, of people, and Raven Rock is based on the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raven_Rock_Mountain_Complex actual Raven Rock government complex]]. The Institute also counts as this, [[spoiler:being located far below the C.I.T. ruins.]]



** There's also a number of {{Cryptic Background Reference}}s, most but not all involving [[Creator/HPLovecraft Dunwich]] [[Literature/TheDunwichHorror Borers]] LLC, that suggest [[spoiler:several ''truly'' Lovecraftian abominations exist in the world. Not mutant results of the Great War, but the real deal: vile, possibly [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane genuinely magical]] entities pre-dating human civilization itself]].

to:

** There's also a number of {{Cryptic Background Reference}}s, most but (but not all all) involving [[Creator/HPLovecraft Dunwich]] [[Literature/TheDunwichHorror Borers]] LLC, that suggest [[spoiler:several ''truly'' Lovecraftian abominations exist in the world. Not mutant results of the Great War, but the real deal: vile, possibly [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane genuinely magical]] entities pre-dating human civilization itself]].



*** More specifically for the game's factions, the East Coast Brotherhood has their {{Power Armor}}-clad Paladins and Knights, the Institute has their Coursers, and even the Railroad has their Heavies. Only the Commonwealth Minutemen lack their own {{Elite Mook}}.



* FantasyCounterpartCulture: The most blatant is [[TheEmpire Caesar's Legion]], which was modeled in-universe on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire and [[ShownTheirWork is sometimes hard to tell apart from the real thing]]. The [[TheFederation New California Republic]] is very much like the pre-war United States. The Shi Empire is pretty much ImperialChina reborn. And while probably not deliberate, [[TheOrder Lyons' Brotherhood of Steel]] has a lot in common with early UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}.
** Most can be justified at least marginally considering that the universe of Fallout is not based on some other world, but a divergence of our own world, so cultures would have tried to base themselves off of some kind of history in many cases. An inversion of sorts in some of the cultural inclusions as they end up based not on real world historical cultures, but fantasy sources, such as books or movies that were popular in or around the 1950's.

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* FantasyCounterpartCulture: The most blatant is [[TheEmpire Caesar's Legion]], which was modeled in-universe on UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire and [[ShownTheirWork is sometimes hard to tell apart from the real thing]]. It also has some clear elements gleaned from ancient Sparta. The [[TheFederation New California Republic]] is very much like the pre-war Pre-War United States.States mixed in with both the Roman Republic and the U.S. during the Wild West. The Shi Empire is pretty much ImperialChina reborn. And while The Great Khans intentionally base themselves after the Mongolian Empire (which gets downplayed by the fact that horses have yet to be seen in this series), and can even be encouraged in ''New Vegas'' to take this more to heart in one of their endings. While probably not deliberate, [[TheOrder Lyons' Brotherhood of Steel]] has a lot in common with early UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}.
UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}. Similarly, [[RisingEmpire Arthur Maxson's Brotherhood]] is equal parts medieval Europe and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, while the Institute are loosely inspired by both the Illuminati and Renaissance-era Italy. Also, the Commonwealth Minutemen are based on both Revolutionary America and the Iroquois Confederacy, and the Church of the Children of Atom are now essentially the Crusader States.
** Most can be justified at least marginally considering that the universe of Fallout ''Fallout'' is not based on some other world, but a divergence of our own world, so cultures would have tried to base themselves off of some kind of history in many cases. An inversion of sorts in some of the cultural inclusions as they end up based not on real world historical cultures, but fantasy sources, such as books or movies that were popular in or around the 1950's.



** The feral ghouls. Especially how they're portrayed in ''Fallout 3'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas''. They're ghouls rendered [[AxCrazy completely insane]] and hardly sentient anymore. You'll get positive karma by [[MercyKill killing them]]. Fallout 4 makes so they can survive having multiple limbs blown off, doubling the amount of potential body horror.
** Robobrains. Those human brains used as central processors were ''not'' volunteers, they're enemy [=POWs=], political prisoners, conscientious objectors, executed criminals (both sane & insane), and deserters whose brains were forcibly extracted ''while they were still alive'', shoved into a robot body while perfectly conscious and aware, and left stuck in a never-ending nightmare, kept constantly awake and alert by the machines they're wired into and completely incapable of doing anything at all they aren't specifically programmed to do.

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** The feral ghouls.Feral Ghouls. Especially how they're portrayed in ''Fallout 3'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas''. They're ghouls rendered [[AxCrazy completely insane]] and hardly sentient anymore. You'll get positive karma by [[MercyKill killing them]]. Fallout 4 makes so they can survive having multiple limbs blown off, doubling the amount of potential body horror.
** Robobrains. Those human brains used as central processors were ''not'' volunteers, they're enemy [=POWs=], political prisoners, conscientious objectors, executed criminals (both sane & insane), and deserters whose brains were forcibly extracted ''while they were still alive'', shoved into a robot body while perfectly conscious and aware, and left stuck in a never-ending nightmare, kept constantly awake and alert by the machines they're wired into and completely incapable of doing anything at all they aren't specifically programmed to do. [[spoiler:The countless testing logs found scattered throughout the testing facility in ''Fallout 4: Automatron'' is a perfect example of how unbearably horrific the process was.]]



** And of course because this is ''Fallout'', the prewar governments love of genetic engineering, though great, doesn't hold a candle to the prewar love of nukes.

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** And of course because this is ''Fallout'', the prewar governments Pre-War government's love of genetic engineering, though great, doesn't hold a candle to the prewar Pre-War love of nukes.



* GoodIsNotSoft: A universal truth in the main four games. You can play an AllLovingHero who upholds morality and protects the innocent, but there's a lot of nasty people out there looking to ruin your hard work, and they are not going to survive the attempt.

to:

* GoodIsNotSoft: A universal truth in the main four five games. You can play an AllLovingHero who upholds morality and protects the innocent, but there's a lot of nasty people out there looking to ruin your hard work, and they are not going to survive the attempt.



** ''Fallout 3'''s ''Broken Steel'' DLC had the East Coast Brotherhood of Steel's war against the Enclave, in which the Lone Wanderer gets involved only at the tail end of said war. While ''New Vegas'' has a number of events mentioned, like the First Battle of Hoover Dam as well as the crushing defeat of both the West Coast Brotherhood and Enclave at the hands of the NCR. All of which have lasting repercussions by the time the Courier enters the picture.

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** ''Fallout 3'''s ''Broken Steel'' DLC had the East Coast Brotherhood of Steel's war against the Enclave, in which the Lone Wanderer gets involved only at the tail end of said war. While
**
''New Vegas'' has a number of events mentioned, like the First Battle of Hoover Dam as well as the crushing defeat of both the West Coast Brotherhood and Enclave at the hands of the NCR. All of which have lasting repercussions by the time the Courier enters the picture.picture.
** ''Fallout 4'' has not only the espionage war still being waged between the Railroad and Institute (of which the [[SpannerInTheWorks Sole Survivor's]] timely intervention will ''permanently'' decide the conflict's resolution), but the fall of the Commonwealth Minutemen in the game's backstory.



** Though given some of the things you read about the pre-war United States, the conflict probably counts more as EvilVersusEvil. China was a brutal dictatorship which conquered and subjugated her neighbours with armies of {{Sociopathic Soldier}}s in a vain attempt to alleviate crippling economic problems. America was the exact same except with the added caveat that it was run by the Nazi Illuminati behind a puppet government and it also shamelessly poured resources into a number of horrific science projects (the Robobrains, the Deathclaws, various bioweapons like the FEV, etc.) and often using incarcerated Chinese-American citizens as guinea pigs.

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** Though given some of the things you read about the pre-war Pre-War United States, the conflict probably counts more as EvilVersusEvil. China was a brutal dictatorship which conquered and subjugated her neighbours neighbors with armies of {{Sociopathic Soldier}}s in a vain attempt to alleviate crippling economic problems. America was the exact same except with the added caveat that it was run by the Nazi Illuminati behind a puppet government and it also shamelessly poured resources into a number of horrific science projects (the Robobrains, the Deathclaws, various bioweapons like the FEV, etc.) and often using incarcerated Chinese-American citizens as guinea pigs.pigs.
** The series as a whole generally likes this trope, although it typically leans more on {{Black and Grey Morality}}. ''New Vegas'' and ''4'' probably play this trope the straightest with their central conflicts.



** In New Vegas all of the [=DLCs=] have a character who is this to some extent, and nearly all of them are (or at least presented as) antagonists at some point. In ''Dead Money'' and ''Lonesome Road'' Father Elijah and Ulysses respectively went on long incredible journeys involving post-war organizations, settlements, and tribes otherwise unmentioned in the series. In ''Honest Hearts'' there is Joshua Graham, who was formally both a Mormon missionary and the legate for Cesar's Legion. Dr. Mobius of ''Old World Blues'' was a prewar scientist and BrainInAJar who eventually used SCIENCE! to [[spoiler:prevent his former colleagues from ravaging the post apocalyptic world.]]

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** In New Vegas ''New Vegas,'' all of the [=DLCs=] have a character who is this to some extent, and nearly all of them are (or at least presented as) antagonists at some point. In ''Dead Money'' and ''Lonesome Road'' Father Elijah and Ulysses respectively went on long incredible journeys involving post-war organizations, settlements, and tribes otherwise unmentioned in the series. In ''Honest Hearts'' there is Joshua Graham, who was formally both a Mormon missionary and the legate for Cesar's Legion. Dr. Mobius of ''Old World Blues'' was a prewar scientist and BrainInAJar who eventually used SCIENCE! to [[spoiler:prevent his former colleagues from ravaging the post apocalyptic post-apocalyptic world.]]]]
** ''4'' gives not only [[MonsterSobStory the backstory]] of [[spoiler:Conrad Kellogg]], but also has several {{Apocalyptic Logs}} detailing [[TraumaCongaLine the exploits]] of Paladin Brandis and Recon Squad Artemis. There's also the exploits of the Quincy refugees - Preston Garvey, Sturges, Mama Murphy, and Jun & Marcy Long - found in the Museum of Freedom at Concord near the beginning of the game. Terminals found scattered across the Commonwealth tell more of their struggles to survive after the Quincy Massacre.



* HumanoidAbomination: Frank Horrigan, the genetically engineered synthetic cyborg homocidal maniac specially created by the Enclave, who is forever sealed in a suit of power armor that continually pumps him with life support. ''Dead Money'', the ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' DLC, has the Ghost people. The Cloud apparently changed normal human beings into feral, nocturnal, gas proof, limb-regenerating, and [[MadeOfIron hard to kill]] abominations sealed in hazmat suits, with their only purpose now being to stab, throw spears, and chuck bombs.

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* HumanoidAbomination: Frank Horrigan, the genetically engineered synthetic cyborg homocidal maniac specially created by the Enclave, who is forever sealed in a suit of power armor that continually pumps him with life support. ''Dead Money'', the ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' DLC, has the Ghost people.People. The Cloud apparently changed normal human beings into feral, nocturnal, gas proof, limb-regenerating, and [[MadeOfIron hard to kill]] abominations sealed in hazmat suits, with their only purpose now being to stab, throw spears, and chuck bombs. [[ChurchMilitant The Church of the Children of Atom]] also seem to be this, as they look like completely ordinary humans but can survive ungodly amounts of radiation.



** Fallout 4 has the T-60 Power Armor.

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** Fallout 4 has the T-60 Power Armor. The Silver Shroud costume also counts as this, albeit from an {{In-Universe}} perspective.



* LivingRelic: Despite the nuclear annihilation and the 200+ years that have passed since then, there are still several characters that serve as living remnants of pre-war America. There are a significant number of pre-War ghouls (most prominently Desmond Lockhart from ''Point Lookout'', Raul Tejada from ''New Vegas'', Dean Domino from ''Dead Money'', The Vault Tech Representative from 4), a handful of sentient computers ([=ZAX=], [=SKYNET=], Button Gwinnett (possibly), and [[spoiler:President Eden]]), a few [[BrainInAJar Brains In A Jar]] (Professor Calvert, the Think Tank), and a few pre-war individuals who were preserved in suspended animation (Mr. House, the Tranquility Lane inhabitants, the prisoners aboard Mothership Zeta, and the main character in the fourth game). Of them all, most have either adapted to the new world (in the case of the Ghouls), or are cripplingly insane (in the case of Calvert and the Think Tank), with only Mr. House and [[spoiler:President Eden]] really holding onto the vision of pre-war America and trying to restore it in the Wasteland in their own way.

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* LivingRelic: Despite the nuclear annihilation and the 200+ 210+ years that have passed since then, there are still several characters that serve as living remnants of pre-war Pre-War America. There are a significant number of pre-War Pre-War ghouls (most prominently Desmond Lockhart from ''Point Lookout'', Raul Tejada from ''New Vegas'', Dean Domino from ''Dead Money'', The Vault Tech [=Vault-Tec=] Representative from 4), a handful of sentient computers ([=ZAX=], [=SKYNET=], Button Gwinnett (possibly), and [[spoiler:President John Henry Eden]]), a few [[BrainInAJar Brains In A Jar]] (Professor Calvert, the Think Tank), Tank, and Jezebel), and a few pre-war [=Pre-War=] individuals who were preserved in suspended animation (Mr. House, the Tranquility Lane inhabitants, the prisoners aboard Mothership Zeta, ''Mothership Zeta'', and the main character [[PlayerCharacter Sole Survivor]] in the fourth game). Of them all, most have either adapted to the new world (in the case of the Ghouls), or are cripplingly insane (in the case of Calvert and the Think Tank), with only Mr. House and [[spoiler:President Eden]] really holding onto the vision of pre-war [=Pre-War=] America and trying to restore it in the Wasteland in their own way.



** New Vegas is much more prominent in this. Revolvers and dusters and other parts of cowboy culture are given great focus, and several towns (like Goodsprings in the beginning of the game) heavily resemble the Old West.
* {{Nerf}}: Power Armor got this treatment immediately after the second game, and [[UniquenessDecay seems to get more plentiful across the wasteland with each Fallout installment]]. At first, it was [[ArmorOfInvincibility nearly]] [[PurposelyOverpowered impenetrable]] and could only be gotten through a [[ThatOneSidequest particularly difficult sidequest]] for the [[TheOrder Brotherhood Of Steel]]. By Fallout 4, even the ''raiders'' have it, and the player can get any armor by simply [[FakeUltimateMook killing the wearer and walking away with their suit.]]

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** New Vegas ''New Vegas'' is much more prominent in this. Revolvers and dusters and other parts of cowboy culture are given great focus, and several towns (like Goodsprings in the beginning of the game) heavily resemble the Old West.
* {{Nerf}}: Power Armor got this treatment immediately after the second game, and [[UniquenessDecay seems to get more plentiful across the wasteland with each Fallout installment]]. At first, it was [[ArmorOfInvincibility nearly]] [[PurposelyOverpowered impenetrable]] and could only be gotten through a [[ThatOneSidequest particularly difficult sidequest]] for the [[TheOrder Brotherhood Of Steel]]. By Fallout 4, ''Fallout 4'', even the ''raiders'' ''Raiders'' have it, and the player can get any armor by simply [[FakeUltimateMook killing the wearer and walking away with their suit.]]



** Averted somewhat in the later games (especially New Vegas), where the Science skill also allows building and repairing of high-tech items, and grants access to science-specific perks.

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** Averted somewhat in the later games (especially New Vegas), ''New Vegas'' and ''4''), where the Science skill also allows building and repairing of high-tech items, and grants access to science-specific perks.



* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: Player characters across the series. Games occasionally include the option for you to mention your name in dialogue, but in the Bethesda-era entries, for obvious reasons (ie, all [=NPCs=] are voiced) no one will ever refer to you by name. The first game never gave you a name or nickname, but games since have dubbed the player character of the first game is "The Vault Dweller". The second game, you're "TheChosenOne", but no one outside your tribe refers to you this way and will be amused if you say that it's your title. In ''[[Videogame/FalloutTactics Tactics]]'', you're only known as "The Warrior". In ([[CanonDiscontinuity the mercifully forgotten]]) ''Brotherhood of Steel'', you're the Initiate[[note]]Though in that game you choose between three pre-made characters named Nadia, Cain and Cyrus[[/note]]. ''Fallout 3'', Three Dog dubs you "The Lone Wanderer" but no one else uses the term. ''New Vegas'' flips this, you're "The Courier" to everyone ''except'' Mr. New Vegas, who just refers to you as an anonymous civilian contractor or courier. Fallout 4 is an interesting case, you're given the option to actually name your character, but only one NPC in the entire game actually refers to you with it, and to everyone else you're the "Sole Survivor," or "[[AffectionateNickname Blue]]."
* OppressiveStatesOfAmerica: The pre-War United States of America was not pretty. The infrastructure of America had collapsed due to the resource shortages (food, fuel, and material) while unemployment was skyrocketing. The government responded by becoming a police state and by trying to scapegoat their problems on Communists, then brutally cracking down on anyone who spoke out against their regime. Arrests, "re-education," and in some cases outright murder followed as the government tried to keep the population in line. At the same time, the New Plague (suspected to be a bio-weapon unleashed by one of America's enemies) began to spread, leading to nationwide quarantines. Before long the government had given up trying to cure it and decided to use the paranoia created by its spread as a cover in order to break up assemblies and register people. Eventually, civil liberties became virtually non-existent. In one example the commanding Officer of the Hopeville missile base, Commander Devlin, had a protest group arrested and sent off for human experimentation, claiming it would give them "the white-hot rage of capitalist justice." These tactics made things worse, and by the end of 2077 the United States was on the verge of a massive civil uprising.

to:

* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: Player characters across the series. Games occasionally include the option for you to mention your name in dialogue, but in the Bethesda-era entries, for obvious reasons (ie, all [=NPCs=] are voiced) no one will ever refer to you by name. The first game never gave you a name or nickname, but games since have dubbed the player character of the first game is "The Vault Dweller". The second game, you're "TheChosenOne", but no one outside your tribe refers to you this way and will be amused if you say that it's your title. In ''[[Videogame/FalloutTactics Tactics]]'', you're only known as "The Warrior". In ([[CanonDiscontinuity the mercifully forgotten]]) ''Brotherhood of Steel'', you're the Initiate[[note]]Though in that game you choose between three pre-made characters named Nadia, Cain and Cyrus[[/note]]. ''Fallout 3'', Three Dog dubs you "The Lone Wanderer" but no one else uses the term. ''New Vegas'' flips this, as you're "The Courier" to everyone ''except'' Mr. New Vegas, who just refers to you as an anonymous civilian contractor or courier. Fallout 4 ''Fallout 4'' is an interesting case, case; you're given the option to actually name your character, but only one NPC [=NPC=] in the entire game ''entire game'' actually refers to you with it, and to everyone else you're the "Sole Survivor," [[CallBack "the Vault Dweller,"]] or "[[AffectionateNickname Blue]]."
* OppressiveStatesOfAmerica: The pre-War Pre-War United States of America was not pretty. The infrastructure of America had collapsed due to the resource shortages (food, fuel, and material) while unemployment was skyrocketing. The government responded by becoming a police state and by trying to scapegoat their problems on Communists, then brutally cracking down on anyone who spoke out against their regime. Arrests, "re-education," and in some cases outright murder followed as the government tried to keep the population in line. At the same time, the New Plague (suspected to be a bio-weapon unleashed by one of America's enemies) began to spread, leading to nationwide quarantines. Before long the government had given up trying to cure it and decided to use the paranoia created by its spread as a cover in order to break up assemblies and register people. Eventually, civil liberties became virtually non-existent. In one example the commanding Officer of the Hopeville missile base, Commander Devlin, had a protest group arrested and sent off for human experimentation, claiming it would give them "the white-hot rage of capitalist justice." These tactics made things worse, and by the end of 2077 the United States was on the verge of a massive civil uprising.



** Except for 4, where a zero ''recorded'' kill run is possible, but extremely difficult and requires abusing certain perks to get enemies to kill each other, making it more of a TechnicalPacifist run.

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** Except for 4, ''4'', where a zero ''recorded'' kill run is ''is'' possible, but [[NintendoHard extremely difficult difficult]] and requires abusing certain perks to get enemies to kill each other, making it more of a TechnicalPacifist run.



* PuttingOnTheReich: The Enclave are very similar to Nazis, goals and method-wise. [[spoiler:And the entire pre-war American government too, straight down to using Chinese-Americans as guinea pigs for mad science experiments... if not outright exterminating them in death camps.]]

to:

* PuttingOnTheReich: The Enclave are very similar to Nazis, goals and method-wise. [[spoiler:And the entire pre-war Pre-War American government too, straight down to using Chinese-Americans as guinea pigs for mad science experiments... if not outright exterminating them in death camps.]]



* RagnarokProofing: Averted in the first two games, which pretty much assume complete destruction of every identifiable landmark that hasn't been constantly maintained (one location, appropriately called Junktown, is apparently constructed entirely out of scrap wood, stone, and metal). Played strongly in the third, where (despite atomic onslaught and 200 years without maintenance) you can still generally get lights and running water wherever you go. While in ''New Vegas,'' it's justified thanks to Mr. House's long-term plans sparing Vegas and the Mojave (and even more so, Hoover Dam) from the worst of the Great War.

to:

* RagnarokProofing: Averted in the first two games, which pretty much assume complete destruction of every identifiable landmark that hasn't been constantly maintained (one location, appropriately called Junktown, is apparently constructed entirely out of scrap wood, stone, and metal). Played strongly in the third, where (despite atomic onslaught and 200 years without maintenance) you can still generally get lights and running water wherever you go. While in ''New Vegas,'' it's justified thanks to Mr. House's long-term plans sparing Vegas and the Mojave (and even more so, Hoover Dam) from the worst of the Great War. ''4'' also plays this trope relatively straight, but is partly justified due to that the nuclear bomb headed for Boston ''missed'', sparing the city from atomic annihilation.



** As early as ''Fallout 1'', letting others know of Vault 13 is a good way to get the Master's attention much earlier, as news of a still-active Vault does spread relatively quick in the wasteland.
** The Brotherhood of Steel in the West Coast for the longest time held to the belief that their power armor, high tech arsenal and increasingly dogmatic adherence to the Codex would be enough, despite their small numbers and dwindling tech advantage. Until being defeated by an ever more powerful (and numerically superior) NCR, though the West Coast Brotherhood can still refuse to see the painful truth.
** In the First Battle of Hoover Dam, Caesar's Legion learns a brutal lesson on how their tactics and general MO, which has allowed them to absorb and steamroll the tribals that had been their enemies for so long, matter little in the face of an organized country's firepower, as the NCR demonstrated.
* RealityIsUnrealistic: Radiation poisoning is the one condition in the series which must be treated, since it doesn't go away on its own. In real life radiation sickness is like the common cold: the body heals itself. There are some treatments of minor value, such as the use of steroids to boost the healing process, but assuming you survive the original exposure, radiation sickness eventually goes away on its own.

to:

** As early as ''Fallout 1'', letting others know of Vault 13 is a good way to get the Master's attention much earlier, as news of a still-active Vault does spread relatively quick in the wasteland.
Wasteland.
*** Similarly, Settlers are notified by Radio Beacons in order to join Minutemen settlements in ''4''. However, this also means that the knowledge of new & relatively rich towns now open for plundering will spread like wildfire, so the settlements should be prepared to fight off attacks from Super Mutants, Raiders, and Gunners.
** The Brotherhood of Steel in the West Coast for the longest time held to the belief that their power armor, high tech arsenal and increasingly dogmatic adherence to the Codex would be enough, despite their small numbers and dwindling tech advantage. Until being they were defeated by an ever more powerful (and numerically superior) NCR, though the West Coast Brotherhood can still ''still'' refuse to see the painful truth.
** In the First Battle of Hoover Dam, Caesar's Legion learns learned a brutal '''brutal''' lesson on how their tactics and general MO, M.O., which has allowed them to absorb and steamroll the tribals that had been their enemies for so long, matter little in the face of an organized country's firepower, as the NCR demonstrated.
** For all their benevolent intentions, the [[WeHelpTheHelpless Commonwealth Minutemen's]] [[ObstructiveBureaucracy absurdly weak command structure]] led to over-extension and a truly ''[[HumiliationConga humiliating]]'' decline in regional power & influence, to the point that there's literally ''[[LastOfHisKind one]]'' Minutemen left in the entire Commonwealth at the start of the story.
* RealityIsUnrealistic: Radiation poisoning is the one condition in the series which must be treated, since it doesn't go away on its own. In real life life, radiation sickness is like the common cold: the body heals itself. There are some treatments of minor value, such as the use of steroids to boost the healing process, but assuming you survive the original exposure, radiation sickness eventually goes away on its own.



* RecycledInSpace: The Enclave are essentially ''Nazis... in America.'' Caesar's Legion are ''Imperial Romans... in America.''
* TheRemnant: Where to start? You've got the remnants of the Master's Army and the Enclave (the remnants of the éminence grise of the US government) in ''Fallout 2'' and ''Fallout 3'', as well as the game's ghoulified Chinese soldiers on U.S. soil, still holding their positions and waiting for word from a headquarters that was (presumably) vaporized long ago.

to:

** You will always have a CanineCompanion, and will ''never'' be without your Pip-Boy.
* RecycledInSpace: The Enclave are essentially ''Nazis... in America.'' Caesar's Legion are ''Imperial Romans... in America.'' And the Institute are (more or less) ''The Illuminati... [[RuleOfThree in America]].''
* TheRemnant: Where to start? You've got the remnants of the Master's Army and the Enclave (the remnants of the éminence grise of the US government) in ''Fallout 2'' and ''Fallout 3'', as well as the game's ghoulified Ghoulified Chinese soldiers on U.S. soil, still holding their positions and waiting for word from a headquarters that was (presumably) vaporized long ago.



* RetroUniverse: Fallout America is an amalgam of all the decades of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, as well as the SciFi Produced during those decades. TheForties give the setting its wartime propaganda, urging you to buy Victory Bonds. TheFifties give it their Pre-War fashions and car designs; Fifties SciFi gives it ''nuclear cars'' and the styling of its robots. TheSixties give it the use of the word "hippies" (in Fallout 3) and anti-war graffiti (all over Hidden Valley in New Vegas). TheSeventies give it the punk fashion of the raiders and the oil crisis. TheEighties give it the drug crisis and emerging biological warfare. The post-war civilizations also show elements of TheGreatDepression and TheWildWest.

to:

** ''4'' has the shipwrecked & Ghoulified remnants of a Norwegian freighter, who have since then degenerated into Raiders [[TragicMonster in order to survive]].
* RetroUniverse: Fallout Fallout's America is an amalgam of all the decades of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, as well as the SciFi Produced produced during those decades. TheForties give the setting its wartime propaganda, urging you to buy Victory Bonds. TheFifties give it their Pre-War fashions and car designs; Fifties SciFi gives it ''nuclear cars'' and the styling of its robots. TheSixties give it the use of the word "hippies" (in Fallout 3) ''Fallout 3'') and anti-war graffiti (all over Hidden Valley in New Vegas). ''New Vegas''). TheSeventies give it the punk fashion of the raiders and Raiders, the oil crisis.crisis, [[spoiler:and the Institute's general design aesthetic]]. TheEighties give it the drug crisis and emerging biological warfare. The post-war Post-War civilizations also show elements of TheGreatDepression and TheWildWest.



* RidiculousFutureInflation: The Prewar World had a seriously insane case of this. ''Fallout Tactics'' has a gas station where the price of regular gasoline is somewhere in the $4500 range. Premium fuel was $8000.99 per gallon. (Then again, this may have been more due to the lack of oil. The shock of the price is still jarring to those who do not know about the oil shortage of the past). The intro also shows an ad for a car advertised as being fully analog, with no computers, and costing "just" $199,999.99. The newspapers from the 2050s and 2070s shown in the ''Fallout 3'' loading screens cost $56 each. In ''Fallout 4,'' as evidenced by a terminal in Gwinnett Brewery, a pint of beer cost $39 in 2077, the year the Great War started. A six-pack cost $200, and a donut is proudly advertised for the low low price of $30.
* RobotBuddy: Skynet and K-9 in Fallout 2, RL-3 in Fallout 3, ED-E and Rex (technically, it's a [[BrainInAJar cyborg dog]], but still...) in New Vegas, Codsworth and X6-88 in ''4''.

to:

* RidiculousFutureInflation: The Prewar Pre-War World had a seriously insane case of this. ''Fallout Tactics'' has a gas station where the price of regular gasoline is somewhere in the $4500 range. Premium fuel was $8000.99 per gallon. (Then again, this may have been more due to the lack of oil. The shock of the price is still jarring to those who do not know about the oil shortage of the past). The intro also shows an ad for a car advertised as being fully analog, with no computers, and costing "just" $199,999.99. The newspapers from the 2050s and 2070s shown in the ''Fallout 3'' loading screens cost $56 each. In ''Fallout 4,'' as evidenced by a terminal in Gwinnett Brewery, a pint of beer cost $39 in 2077, the year the Great War started. A six-pack cost $200, and a donut is proudly advertised for the low low, low price of $30.
* RobotBuddy: Skynet and K-9 in Fallout 2, RL-3 in Fallout 3, ED-E and Rex (technically, it's a [[BrainInAJar cyborg dog]], but still...) in New Vegas, and Codsworth and X6-88 & Curie ([[spoiler:the latter only initially, [[BrainUploading at the very least]]]]) in ''4''.4.



* RomanceSidequest: Averted prior to ''Fallout 4''. In ''Fallout 2'' you could get married, but it was a ShotgunWedding with a one-night stand treated mostly as a joke, and you couldn't have any meaningful interactions with your spouse after the marriage anyway. An optional romance subplot was planned for ''New Vegas'' but it was ultimately scrapped (as many of Obsidian's creative staff are on record as not being fond of typical "video game romance"). ''Fallout 4'' allows all human companions ([[{{Robosexual}} and one robot]]) to be romanced [[EveryoneIsBi regardless of gender]], but you gotta work to earn their affection.
* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth.
* ScavengedPunk: Much of the weapons, equipment, clothing, armor, and at least one entire city are made of Pre-War junk that's distinctly AtomPunk in style.
* ScavengerWorld: It's a post-apocalyptic series, it goes without saying. That said, it's not like scavenging is the only thing people do, and there are several communities dedicated to rebuilding and creating things anew. In ''Fallout 2'' and ''New Vegas'', many parts of the wasteland have become quite civilized again.
* SceneryGorn: Naturally. The series lovingly shows destroyed building and cities.
* SchizoTech: People before the war had robots with AI, computer-assisted driving, pocket computers, satellite-based weapons, and powered armor, but not mobile phones, wireless communications, or even color TV. Justified somewhat in that pre-War society is supposed to represent the RaygunGothic image of the future popular in the 1950s, not necessarily the future of ''our'' world.
** The post-war world - naturally - has even more of this going on. The average wastelander may live in a ramshackle wrought-iron and plywood shack, and work the fields, the brahmin pens, or hunt with a scavenged ancient rifle or revolver that's held together with duct-tape and faith. Tribals may be even more primitive, with loincloths and spears made from sticks with kitchen knives tacked on the end. The NCR is one of the more advanced and stable civilisations out there; some of the bigger and richer cities and towns will have functional electricity and running water, and they have the know-how to build and maintain some fairly advanced tech themselves, but overall nothing we would consider cutting-edge. The Brotherhood of Steel have access to energy weapons, power armour and robots, but they hoard it all and actively seek to confiscate most examples from wastelanders.

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* RomanceSidequest: Averted prior to ''Fallout 4''. In ''Fallout 2'' you could get married, but it was a ShotgunWedding with a one-night stand treated mostly as a joke, and you couldn't have any meaningful interactions with your spouse after the marriage anyway. An optional romance subplot was planned for ''New Vegas'' but it was ultimately scrapped (as many of Obsidian's creative staff are on record as not being fond of typical "video game romance"). ''Fallout 4'' allows all human companions ([[{{Robosexual}} and one robot]]) to be romanced [[EveryoneIsBi regardless of gender]], but you still gotta work to earn their affection.
* RunningGag: In ''New Vegas'', Sunset Sarsaparilla is immensely popular, but was a commercial failure on the east coast (HandWaving why it isn't available in ''3''). In ''Tactics'', the description for Cherry Nuka Cola states that it was met with sub-par sales and generally considered mediocre, but ''4'' establishes that it's really popular in the Commonwealth.
Commonwealth. Cow tipping is also a recurring joke across all the games. And after Bethesda Game Studios took over the series, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]] references [[AuthorAppeal are often found throughout the Wasteland]].
* ScavengedPunk: Much of the weapons, equipment, clothing, armor, and at least one entire city are made of Pre-War junk that's distinctly AtomPunk in style.
style. ''4'' even introduces "pipe guns," ramshackle firearms made out of wood, scrap metal, and prayers that Raiders and Settlers usually use when backed into a corner.
* ScavengerWorld: It's a post-apocalyptic series, it goes without saying. That said, it's not like scavenging is the only '''only''' thing people do, and there are several communities dedicated to rebuilding and creating things anew. In ''Fallout 2'' and 2'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'', many parts of the wasteland Wasteland have actually become quite civilized again.
* SceneryGorn: Naturally. The series lovingly shows countless destroyed building buildings, irradiated deathtraps, and ruined cities.
* SchizoTech: People before the war Great War had robots with AI, computer-assisted driving, pocket computers, satellite-based weapons, and powered armor, but not mobile phones, wireless communications, or even color TV. Justified somewhat in that pre-War Pre-War society is supposed to represent the RaygunGothic image of the future popular in the 1950s, not necessarily the future of ''our'' world.
** The post-war Post-War world - naturally - has even more of this going on. The average wastelander Wastelander may live in a ramshackle wrought-iron and plywood shack, and work the fields, the brahmin Brahmin pens, or hunt with a scavenged ancient rifle or revolver that's held together with duct-tape and faith. Tribals may be even more primitive, with loincloths and spears made from sticks with kitchen knives tacked on the end. The NCR is one of the more advanced and stable civilisations civilizations out there; some of the bigger and richer cities and towns will have functional electricity and running water, and they have the know-how to build and maintain some fairly advanced tech themselves, but overall nothing we would consider cutting-edge. cutting-edge (on average, the NCR's tech level is somewhere between the Wild West and the U.S. circa [=WW1=]). The Commonwealth Minutemen, an organization that can set up peaceful settlements with downed airplane engines serving as ''ersatz'' windmills, utilize any tech they can get their hands on - which manifests in their primary weapons being crank-powered ''laser muskets''. The Brotherhood of Steel have access to energy weapons, power armour Power Armor and robots, but they hoard it all and actively seek to confiscate most examples from wastelanders.Wastelanders.



** ''Fallout 1'' featured a detailed description of cell division, and how a mutagenic artificial virus interfered at the anaphase stage. In many ways, the result of this interference is the single most ''fantastic'' element of the story; everything else follows.

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** ''Fallout 1'' featured a detailed description of cell division, and how a mutagenic artificial virus interfered at the anaphase stage. In many ways, the result of this interference is the single most ''fantastic'' element of the story; everything else follows.follows reality.



** Each of the games (''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' especially) put tons of work into making their in-game settings be as accurate to their real-world counterparts (within reason, of course).
** In ''New Vegas'', Caesar's Legion are heavily based after the Roman Empire {{In-Universe}} - and it can actually be pretty hard at times to tell them apart from the real things.
** While not nearly to the Legion's extent, the Commonwealth Minutemen in ''4'' are based after the real-world colonial militias on not just an aesthetic level. Similarly, most of the espionage tactics used by the Railroad (i.e., dead drops) are based on actual methods used by the CIA during the Cold War.



* SkippableBoss: Thanks to Fallout's commitment to "multiple solutions," there are several. [[spoiler:This includes the Lieutenant and the Master in the first game, General Jing-Wei and Colonel Augustus Autumn in the third, and Legate Lanius, Father Elijah, the Think Tank and Ulysses in New Vegas.]] Subverted now and then: [[spoiler:Frank Horrigan in the second game will only let you get out over his dismembered corpse.]] Check the particular game pages for more details.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Amazingly, the series ''is'' slightly idealistic. Yes, the world has burned in nuclear fire and is host to all manner of unsavory characters and vicious animals who will kill you or worse. But civilization has endured, is rebuilding, and there is still goodness and virtue in the hearts of some. And if you play a good character, the good will eventually overcome the evil. There's a reason why tropes like EarnYourHappyEnding exist.

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* SkippableBoss: Thanks to Fallout's commitment to "multiple solutions," there are several. [[spoiler:This includes the Lieutenant and the Master in the first game, General Jing-Wei Jingwei and Colonel Augustus Autumn in the third, and Legate Lanius, Father Elijah, the Think Tank and Ulysses in New Vegas.Vegas, and Swan and Oswald the Outrageous in the fourth.]] Subverted now and then: [[spoiler:Frank Horrigan in the second game will only let you get out over his dismembered corpse.corpse, and Kellogg even lampshades the series' tendency for this to happen before starting combat.]] Check the particular game pages for more details.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Amazingly, the series ''is'' slightly idealistic. Yes, the world has burned in nuclear fire and is host to all manner of unsavory characters and vicious animals who will kill you or worse. But civilization has endured, is rebuilding, and there is still goodness and virtue in the hearts of some.many. And if you play a good character, the good will eventually overcome the evil. There's a reason why tropes like EarnYourHappyEnding exist.



* SoloCharacterRun: Extremely common throughout the series due to ArtificialStupidity. In VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}, companions [[CantCatchUp did not level up, could not change their starting armor]], and were generally liabilities due to friendly fire and obstructing doors or corridors. This situation has improved as the series progressed.

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* SoloCharacterRun: Extremely common throughout the series due to ArtificialStupidity. In VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}, companions [[CantCatchUp did not level up, could not change their starting armor]], and were generally liabilities due to friendly fire and obstructing doors or corridors. This situation has ''has'' improved as the series progressed.



* SuperSoldier: The original and current point of creating Super Mutants, Deathclaws, and Power Armor. This was the US's hat before the war.

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* SuperSoldier: The original and current point of creating Super Mutants, Deathclaws, and Power Armor. This was the US's hat before the war. The Institute have since taken up that hat with their creation of [[TheDreaded Coursers]].



** In Fallout 4, [[spoiler:the launch trailer's narration is actually one of the ending narrations.]]



* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: The MO of quite a few villains throughout the series.

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* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: The MO M.O. of quite a few villains throughout the series.series. In fact, ''[[WellIntentionedExtremist every]]'' BigBad has had this goal - the Master, Presidents Dick Richardson and John Henry Eden, Caesar/[[spoiler:Edward Sallow]], and Father/[[spoiler:Shaun]].



* VagueAge: Averted with the protagonists of Fallout 1, 2, and 3; the Vault Dweller and Chosen One's ages can be specified in character creation and the Lone Wanderer is stated in-game to be 19 years old when he/she leaves Vault 101. Played straight with New Vegas and 4, where even though character creation allows the Courier and the Sole Survivor to look however he/she wants (even elderly), their ages aren't explicitly stated in-game outside of a few (often vague) hints.

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* VagueAge: Averted with the protagonists of Fallout 1, 2, and 3; the Vault Dweller and Chosen One's ages can be specified in character creation creation, and the Lone Wanderer is stated in-game to be 19 years old when he/she leaves Vault 101. Played straight with New Vegas and 4, where even though character creation allows the Courier and the Sole Survivor to look however he/she wants (even elderly), their ages aren't explicitly stated in-game outside of a few (often vague) hints.



** ''Fallout'': [[spoiler:A big Cathedral in the middle of the ruins of Los Angeles inhabited by strange cultists and a shadowy atmosphere. Below, there is a dark Vault filled with Super Mutant Nightkin elite troopers, mad scientists, mutated aberrations, cultists and crazy FEV-induced psykers. The walls are full of a grotesque biological goo that looks strangely alive. At the end of your way, you have to pass a corridor where your nemesis starts blasting you with his immense psionic powers. At the end, you meet what can be accurately called the strangest being of the wastelands: insane, super-intelligent, grotesquely mutated]]. There's also [[spoiler:an old military laboratory in the remote badlands west of Vault 13, guarded by strong mutant soldiers and robots. The base is brightly-lit, yet the atmosphere is dense and shadowy. In the depths of the base, big vats of bubbling green fluid contains, depending on the point of view, either the key to the evolution of the human race, or its eventual demise.]] The game lets you choose which one you want to destroy first though, and you're not trapped inside them once you enter and are forced to finish them.

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** ''Fallout'': [[spoiler:A big Cathedral in the middle of the ruins of Los Angeles is inhabited by strange cultists and a shadowy atmosphere. Below, there is a dark Vault filled with Super Mutant Nightkin elite troopers, mad scientists, mutated aberrations, cultists and crazy FEV-induced psykers. The walls are full of a grotesque biological goo that looks strangely alive. At the end of your way, you have to pass a corridor where your nemesis starts blasting you with his immense psionic powers. At the end, you meet what can be accurately called the strangest being of the wastelands: insane, super-intelligent, grotesquely mutated]]. There's also [[spoiler:an old military laboratory in the remote badlands west of Vault 13, guarded by strong mutant soldiers and robots. The base is brightly-lit, yet the atmosphere is dense and shadowy. In the depths of the base, big vats of bubbling green fluid contains, depending on the point of view, either the key to the evolution of the human race, or its eventual demise.]] The game lets you choose which one you want to destroy first though, and you're not trapped inside them once you enter and are forced to finish them.



** ''Fallout 4'': If you were disgusted by them, you and your army storm The Institute and blow it up with its own reactor. If you decide to side with them, then you fight the Brotherhood of Steel at [[spoiler:their airbase and hijack Liberty Prime to see their airbase as a giant communist carrier]]. "Boom".

to:

** ''Fallout 4'': If you were disgusted by them, you and your army storm The Institute and blow it up with its own reactor. If you decide to side with them, then you fight the Brotherhood of Steel at [[spoiler:their airbase and hijack Liberty Prime to see their airbase as a giant communist carrier]].Communist vehicle]]. "Boom".



** A minor, but rather poignant, bit of cruelty is convincing Moira to give up on her Wasteland Survival Guide. Not only is this considered evil, but it gives you a perk called Dream Crusher (a perk that prevents enemies from scoring critical hits) and forever dampens her ordinarily cheery attitude. They really went out of their way to make you seem like a bastard for doing it.
** In ''Broken Steel'' [[spoiler:you can wipe the Brotherhood HQ right off the map, kill off any stragglers, and get a special Magnum if you do]].

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** A minor, but rather poignant, bit of cruelty is convincing [[ThePollyanna Moira Brown]] to give up on her Wasteland Survival Guide. Not only is this considered evil, but it gives you a perk called Dream Crusher "Dream Crusher" (a perk that prevents enemies from scoring critical hits) and forever dampens her ordinarily cheery attitude. [[PlayerPunch They really went out of their way to make you you]] [[YouBastard seem like a bastard for doing it.
**
it]].
***
In ''Broken Steel'' [[spoiler:you can wipe the Brotherhood HQ right off the map, kill off any stragglers, and get a special Magnum if you do]].do]].
*** However, what most consider to be quite possibly ''the'' most horrifically evil act you can accomplish in ''Fallout 3'' is going to Rivet City and convincing the mentally unstable Mr. Lopez to commit suicide. It's notable that while people will happily upload videos of nuking Megaton, [[EvenEvilHasStandards virtually no one has really posted videos of this online]].



** ''Fallout 4'' downplays this the most out of the series...and you can '''still''' do some utterly despicable things. For example, you can sell a Ghoul child to some slavers, or if you refuse, give up his entire family to the slavers. In one Diamond City quest, you can ambush a chem deal, and then murder your partners to take all the chems and money for yourself. Also, the vast majority of the populaces of the ''Prydwen'', Institute, and Railroad HQ aren't immortal, meaning you can go on a kill-happy murder spree if you want to.



* AVillainNamedKhan: The game has the Khans as a gang of raiders, later reformed into the Great Khans. The latter particularly take inspiration from Mongolian history, and a possible ending for them in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has them emulate the Mongolians further as a basis to reform their tribe around.
* VillainousLegacy: Non-character example. The BigBad of the first game, TheMaster, was using the Forced Evolutionary Virus to mutate humans. The villains of the second game excavated the ruins of his lair to retrieve the FEV for their own uses, and the villains of the third synthesized their own version for their plan as well.

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** In ''Fallout 4'', due to the new Companion Affinity system (serving as a replacement for Karma), your companions can become so disgusted at your actions that they [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere will leave your services entirely]], [[PermanentlyMissableContent never to be seen again]]. The sole exceptions to this are [[CanineCompanion Dogmeat]] (who, being a dog, doesn't know any better), [[RobotBuddy Ada]] (who, despite being self-aware, still has a sufficiently limited A.I. so that she can't really judge your actions on a moral level), and any other Automatron companions. Even your nominally [[GreyAndGrayMorality "evil"]] [[TokenEvilTeammate companions]] - [[BloodKnight Cait]], [[TheBrute Strong]], and [[ConsummateProfessional X6-88]] - can still leave your services, basing their decisions on either [[PragmaticVillainy pragmatic]] or [[EveryoneHasStandards moral]] grounds.
* AVillainNamedKhan: The game has the Khans as a gang of raiders, Raiders, later reformed into the Great Khans. The latter particularly take inspiration from Mongolian history, and a possible ending for them in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has them emulate the Mongolians further as a basis to reform their tribe around.
* VillainousLegacy: Non-character example. The BigBad of the first game, TheMaster, was using the Forced Evolutionary Virus to mutate humans. The villains of the second game excavated the ruins of his lair to retrieve the FEV for their own uses, and the villains of the third synthesized their own version for their plan as well. [[spoiler:And while it's not an essential part of the game's plot, the firth game (Fallout 4) reveals that the Institute ''also'' had samples of FEV, which they used to help experiment with the creation of synthetic tissue - which inadvertently created the Commonwealth's breed of Super Mutants.]]



* WasOnceAMan: Every ghoul and super mutant you encounter was a human once.
* WastelandElder: A lot of towns have them. This includes [[TeenageWasteland Little Lamplight]], whose "Elder" is about 12.
* WeCanRuleTogether: The Master, President Eden, and Caesar all make similar offers to the player character. The Master is actually good for it, while Eden's plan will get you killed, and Caesar doesn't exactly have the best track record of keeping his promises (especially if you're playing a female character, given Caesar's view on the place of women in society).

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* WasOnceAMan: Every ghoul Ghoul and super mutant Super Mutant you encounter was a human once.
* WastelandElder: A lot of towns have them. This een includes [[TeenageWasteland Little Lamplight]], whose "Elder" is about 12.
* WeCanRuleTogether: The Master, President Eden, and Caesar all make similar offers to the player character. The Master is actually good for it, while Eden's plan will get you killed, killed (although in his defense, he was genuine about his wanting you to join him, [[spoiler:your inferior Wastelander biology just served as a SpannerInTheWorks]]), and Caesar doesn't exactly have the best track record of keeping his promises (especially if you're playing a female character, given Caesar's view on the place of women in society).society). The Institute under Father/[[spoiler:Shaun]] also make this offer to you - and, like the Master, they're actually pretty good for the offer.



** The Institute also has this advantage. On the one hand, their vast [[MechaMook Gen 1 & 2 Synth]] armies are individually weaker than humans and have weaker laser weapons than those from the Pre-War days. However, that doesn't matter. Why? Because not only are the Institute TheConspiracy, but they can produce Gen 1 & 2 Synths by the veritable ''millions''.



** The two main "evil" factions of the canon, [[AncientConspiracy the Enclave]] and [[TheEmpire the Legion]], are stand-out examples. Both are ruthless, mass-murdering organizations, with the former plotting genocide against all wastelanders and the latter [[RapePillageAndBurn raping and pillaging]] across vast swaths of the southwest. However, both point out that the Wasteland is, in most places, a terrifying hellhole teeming with psychotic killers and vicious mutants. The leaders of both groups believe that the end will justify their means, bringing peace and civilization to an otherwise horrific CrapsackWorld.

to:

** The two main most "evil" factions of the canon, [[AncientConspiracy the Enclave]] and [[TheEmpire the Legion]], are stand-out examples. Both are ruthless, mass-murdering organizations, with the former plotting genocide against all wastelanders Wastelanders and the latter [[RapePillageAndBurn raping and pillaging]] across vast swaths of the southwest.American Southwest. However, both point out that the Wasteland is, in most places, a terrifying hellhole teeming with psychotic killers and vicious mutants. The leaders of both groups believe that the end will justify their means, bringing peace and civilization to an otherwise horrific CrapsackWorld.CrapsackWorld.
** While [[MadScientist the Institute]] are [[ALighterShadeOfBlack considerably grayer on the morality spectrum]] than both the Legion and Enclave, they also are examples of this. They justify their brutal conspiracy over New England by explaining that they plan on eventually supplying their advanced technology to the surface so as to create a utopia - but will only do this with a society they find worthy enough, so as to prevent the Great War from happening all over again.



* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Explored throughout the series is treatment of non-human races, such as ghouls and Super Mutants. The fourth game's story centers around this in regards to synths, Institute-made artificial humans created as spies, assassins, and slave labor. Synths are so incredibly life-like in appearance and biology that they are practically indistinguishable from humans, such that there are synths that don't even realize they are synths and think themselves flesh-and-blood humans! Because the Institute likes to switch people in the Commonwealth with synths, there is mass paranoia over them, to the point where family will turn their guns on each other at the mere suspicion that they have been replaced with a synth. The Institute consider synths little more than machines, no more human-like than a Mister Handy robot, and treat them as machines. The Brotherhood of Steel consider synths a danger to humanity and seek their complete eradication. The Railroad, meanwhile, consider synths to be people and seek to liberate them (and even then, that's only taking into account the lifelike Gen 3 synths: there is internal debate over whether earlier and more primitive Gen 1 and Gen 2 synths count as people).

to:

* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Explored throughout the series is treatment of non-human races, such as ghouls Ghouls, robots/A.I.s, and Super Mutants. The fourth game's story centers around this in regards to synths, Institute-made artificial humans created as spies, assassins, and slave labor. Synths are so incredibly life-like in appearance and biology that they are practically indistinguishable from humans, such that there are synths that don't even realize they are synths and think themselves flesh-and-blood humans! Because the Institute likes to switch people in the Commonwealth with synths, there is mass paranoia over them, to the point where family will turn their guns on each other at the mere suspicion that they have been replaced with a synth. The Institute consider synths little more than machines, no more human-like than a Mister Handy robot, and treat them as machines. The Brotherhood of Steel consider synths a danger to humanity and seek their complete eradication. The Railroad, meanwhile, consider synths to be people and seek to liberate them (and even then, that's only taking into account the lifelike Gen 3 synths: there is internal debate over whether earlier and more primitive Gen 1 and Gen 2 synths count as people).
15th Aug '17 10:29:35 AM rmctagg09
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* TheAntiNihilist: The setting of the Fallout universe is that a large percentage of humanity was killed by nuclear fallout, and structures of the old world are either decayed, eroding or destroyed. Anyone who was able to survive has to live in a world where the remaining survivors are converted into homicidal super mutants or turned into ghouls due to the lingering radiation. A large portion of animals have become hostile predators, robots are still following their programs to a murderous degree and multiple factions are further dividing the survivors due to a war to see who should repair civilisation. Vault Tec still have posters and merchandise that promote this trope by telling the occupants to have faith in the government, survivors are trying to be hopeful and upbeat despite the circumstances and finally people are trying find purpose in this apocalyptic world.

to:

* TheAntiNihilist: The setting of the Fallout universe is that a large percentage of humanity was killed by nuclear fallout, and structures of the old world are either decayed, eroding or destroyed. Anyone who was able to survive has to live in a world where the remaining survivors are converted into homicidal super mutants or turned into ghouls due to the lingering radiation. A large portion of animals have become hostile predators, robots are still following their programs to a murderous degree and multiple factions are further dividing the survivors due to a war to see who should repair civilisation. civilization. Vault Tec still have has posters and merchandise that promote this trope by telling the occupants to have faith in the government, survivors are trying to be hopeful and upbeat despite the circumstances circumstances, and finally people are trying find purpose in this apocalyptic world.
15th Aug '17 3:04:19 AM Buck
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Added DiffLines:

* TheAntiNihilist: The setting of the Fallout universe is that a large percentage of humanity was killed by nuclear fallout, and structures of the old world are either decayed, eroding or destroyed. Anyone who was able to survive has to live in a world where the remaining survivors are converted into homicidal super mutants or turned into ghouls due to the lingering radiation. A large portion of animals have become hostile predators, robots are still following their programs to a murderous degree and multiple factions are further dividing the survivors due to a war to see who should repair civilisation. Vault Tec still have posters and merchandise that promote this trope by telling the occupants to have faith in the government, survivors are trying to be hopeful and upbeat despite the circumstances and finally people are trying find purpose in this apocalyptic world.
21st Jul '17 5:37:17 AM razorrozar7
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* LuckStat: Puts the L in SPECIAL. Atypically for RPGs, it's actually a quantification of one's ability to calculate and manipulate probability; Mr. House, who was able to predict the exact day (and, very nearly, the ''exact hour'') of the Great War has 10 Luck. Increases your chances at {{critical hit}}s, positive RandomEncounters and all sorts of other nice things. In ''New Vegas'', one dialogue option for characters with high enough Luck lets you successfully ''guess'' a password off the top of your head. [[ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish And it's not even "swordfish"]]. Another lets you '''perform brain surgery''' with a tiny fraction of the Medicine skill you'd need otherwise. Getting it up to 8 or 9 will allow you to clean house at the Blackjack tables.

to:

* LuckStat: Puts the L in SPECIAL. Atypically for RPGs, [=RPGs=], it's actually a quantification of one's ability to calculate and manipulate probability; Mr. House, who was able to predict the exact day (and, very nearly, the ''exact hour'') of the Great War War, has 10 Luck. Increases your chances at {{critical hit}}s, positive RandomEncounters and all sorts of other nice things. In ''New Vegas'', one dialogue option for characters with high enough Luck lets you successfully ''guess'' a password off the top of your head. [[ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish And it's not even "swordfish"]]. Another lets you '''perform brain surgery''' with a tiny fraction of the Medicine skill you'd need otherwise. Getting it up to 8 or 9 will allow you to clean house at the Blackjack tables.
21st Jul '17 5:36:24 AM razorrozar7
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LuckStat: Puts the L in SPECIAL. Atypically for RPGs, it's actually a quantification of one's ability to calculate and manipulate probability; Mr. House, who was able to predict the exact day (and, very nearly, the ''exact hour'' of the Great War) has 10 Luck. Increases your chances at {{critical hit}}s, positive RandomEncounters and all sorts of other nice things. In ''New Vegas'', one dialogue option for characters with high enough Luck lets you successfully ''guess'' a password off the top of your head. [[ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish And it's not even "swordfish"]]. Another lets you '''perform brain surgery''' with a tiny fraction of the Medicine skill you'd need otherwise. Getting it up to 8 or 9 will allow you to clean house at the Blackjack tables.

to:

* LuckStat: Puts the L in SPECIAL. Atypically for RPGs, it's actually a quantification of one's ability to calculate and manipulate probability; Mr. House, who was able to predict the exact day (and, very nearly, the ''exact hour'' hour'') of the Great War) War has 10 Luck. Increases your chances at {{critical hit}}s, positive RandomEncounters and all sorts of other nice things. In ''New Vegas'', one dialogue option for characters with high enough Luck lets you successfully ''guess'' a password off the top of your head. [[ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish And it's not even "swordfish"]]. Another lets you '''perform brain surgery''' with a tiny fraction of the Medicine skill you'd need otherwise. Getting it up to 8 or 9 will allow you to clean house at the Blackjack tables.
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