History ValuesDissonance / Literature

7th Dec '17 9:37:33 AM nightkiller
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** ''Literature/LiveAndLetDie'' is over-the-top with crazy racism. Hilariously, James Bond's Texan sidekick Felix Leiter tries to educate him about black culture in America. Also, Bond is surprised to see a "Negress" driving a car in New York.

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** ''Literature/LiveAndLetDie'' is over-the-top with crazy racism. Hilariously, James Bond's Texan sidekick Felix Leiter tries to educate him about black culture in America. [[note]] 'Fortunately,' continued Leiter, 'I like the negroes and they know it somehow.[[/note]] Also, Bond is surprised to see a "Negress" driving a car in New York.
7th Dec '17 9:33:38 AM nightkiller
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Added DiffLines:

**** That's an interesting interpretation. The actual passage reads: "I come from the South. You know the definition of a virgin down there? Well, it's a girl who can run faster than her brother. In my case I couldn't run as fast as my uncle. I was twelve."
3rd Dec '17 10:07:32 AM thatsnumberwang
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* ''Literature/TheSheik'', a 1919 novel, is practically the epitome of this trope. Young, independent heroine who has no use for traditional feminine values takes a trip into the desert and is kidnapped by a cringeworthy-stereotype of an Arab Sheik. Said Sheik proceeds to rape her more or less daily, giving her what is actually a fairly accurately written case of severe PTSD. The dissonance sets in when, halfway through the novel, she realizes she's in love with him because he's 'mastered' her, made her realize she's a woman and weak and needs a man, and proceeds to give up her personality and do whatever he wants to make him happy. While he eventually falls in love with her, too, he feels so terrible about what he did that he wants to send her away so he ''won't hurt her anymore'', and only agrees to let her stay because she tries to ''shoot herself in the head''. And even today, a lot of [[FanDumb people consider this romantic]]. (The heroine's abrupt change of heart could easily be read as StockholmSyndrome, but nobody knew what that was in 1919 and that clearly wasn't the author's intent.)

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* ''Literature/TheSheik'', a 1919 novel, is practically the epitome of this trope. Young, independent heroine who has no use for traditional feminine values takes a trip into the desert and is kidnapped by a cringeworthy-stereotype of an Arab Sheik. Said Sheik proceeds to rape her more or less daily, giving her what is actually a fairly accurately written case of severe PTSD. The dissonance sets in when, halfway through the novel, she realizes she's in love with him because he's 'mastered' her, made her realize she's a woman and weak and needs a man, and proceeds to give up her personality and do whatever he wants to make him happy. While he eventually falls in love with her, too, he feels so terrible about what he did that he wants to send her away so he ''won't hurt her anymore'', and only agrees to let her stay because she tries to ''shoot herself in the head''. And even today, a lot of [[FanDumb people consider this romantic]].romantic. (The heroine's abrupt change of heart could easily be read as StockholmSyndrome, but nobody knew what that was in 1919 and that clearly wasn't the author's intent.)
22nd Nov '17 8:23:48 AM Malady
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* ''[[https://mommylolo.com/2015/08/03/what-girls-can-be/ What Girls Can Be,]]'' a picture book released by Hallmark in the 1960s that comes off as downright depressing today. The book was for showing little girls the career choices they had to pick from, which ranged from schoolteacher to typist. Hallmark also put out a ''What Boys Can Be'' equivalent, which ended with the boy in that book becoming President.

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* ''[[https://mommylolo.com/2015/08/03/what-girls-can-be/ What Girls Can Be,]]'' a picture book released by Hallmark in the 1960s that comes off as downright depressing today. The book was for showing little girls the career choices they had to pick from, which ranged from from. Some choices were schoolteacher to typist.and typist, and ended with ''housewife''. Hallmark also put out a ''What Boys Can Be'' equivalent, which ended with the boy in that book becoming President.
21st Nov '17 9:25:05 AM Argon2
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* ''[[https://mommylolo.com/2015/08/03/what-girls-can-be/ What Girls Can Be,]]'' a picture book released by Hallmark in the 1960s that comes off as downright depressing today. The book was for showing little girls the career choices they had to pick from, which ranged from schoolteacher to typist. The book ends with "housewife." Hallmark also put out a ''What Boys Can Be'' equivalent, which ended with the boy in that book becoming President.

to:

* ''[[https://mommylolo.com/2015/08/03/what-girls-can-be/ What Girls Can Be,]]'' a picture book released by Hallmark in the 1960s that comes off as downright depressing today. The book was for showing little girls the career choices they had to pick from, which ranged from schoolteacher to typist. The book ends with "housewife." Hallmark also put out a ''What Boys Can Be'' equivalent, which ended with the boy in that book becoming President.
18th Nov '17 12:25:05 PM Fangusu
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* ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Violet and Mike were considered "bad" in 1964 and 1971 because of their interests in gum and television, respectively. These characteristics, although worrisome when exaggerated in real life, would not be seen as repulsive enough to warrant scary punishments in the early 21st century. This is why most post-1971 takes on the story not only give Mike Teavee ''unsavory'' tendencies, but also downplay Violet Beauregarde's gum-chewing in favor of an unhealthy motive, whether it is to lose weight, to be a constant winner or to promote gum-chewing as a "talent".

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* ''Literature/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'': Violet and Mike were considered "bad" in 1964 and 1971 because of their interests in gum and television, respectively. These characteristics, although worrisome when exaggerated in real life, would not be seen as repulsive enough to warrant scary punishments in the early 21st century. This is why most the majority of post-1971 takes on the story not only give Mike Teavee ''unsavory'' tendencies, but also downplay Violet Beauregarde's gum-chewing in favor of an unhealthy motive, whether it is to lose weight, to be a constant winner or to promote gum-chewing as a "talent".
17th Nov '17 12:55:25 PM Fangusu
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* ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'':
** This is the primary reason that nearly all attempts to revive the franchise for 21st-century readers have failed. When the books were first written and published, it was acceptable for preteens to work as baby-sitters; these days, one would have to wait until at least their late teens to take on this responsibility.
** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. For one thing, Susan displays every single autistic symptom known to medicine, which is actually impossible in real life (since the official name of the neurological condition is Autism ''Spectrum'' Disorder and everyone who has it is affected differently). Secondly, Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped by Kristy (who is never called out on this), and the kid is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy also tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school and have her do the special needs program in the local school, despite the fact that the boarding school is actually ''much'' better suited for Susan's needs. Then at a school assembly, Kristy sits behind the special needs class and treats them as if they were zoo exhibits. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.

to:

* ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'':
**
''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'': This is the primary reason that nearly all attempts to revive the franchise for 21st-century readers have failed. When the books were first written and published, it was acceptable for preteens to work as baby-sitters; these days, one would have to wait until at least their late teens to take on this responsibility. \n** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. For one thing, Susan displays every single autistic symptom known to medicine, which is actually impossible in real life (since the official name of the neurological condition is Autism ''Spectrum'' Disorder and everyone who has it is affected differently). Secondly, Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped by Kristy (who is never called out on this), and the kid is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy also tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school and have her do the special needs program in the local school, despite the fact that the boarding school is actually ''much'' better suited for Susan's needs. Then at a school assembly, Kristy sits behind the special needs class and treats them as if they were zoo exhibits. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.
15th Nov '17 12:53:31 PM JJHIL325
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** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. For one thing, Susan displays every single autistic symptom known to medicine, which is actually impossible in real life (since the official name is Autism ''Spectrum'' Disorder). Secondly, Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped by Kristy (who is never called out on this), and she is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school. Then at a school assembly, Kristy sits behind the special needs class and views them as they were zoo exhibits. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.

to:

** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. For one thing, Susan displays every single autistic symptom known to medicine, which is actually impossible in real life (since the official name of the neurological condition is Autism ''Spectrum'' Disorder). Disorder and everyone who has it is affected differently). Secondly, Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped by Kristy (who is never called out on this), and she the kid is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy also tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school. school and have her do the special needs program in the local school, despite the fact that the boarding school is actually ''much'' better suited for Susan's needs. Then at a school assembly, Kristy sits behind the special needs class and views treats them as if they were zoo exhibits. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.
15th Nov '17 7:31:59 AM Pichu-kun
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* Victor Hugo's ''Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame''. Frollo's obsession with Esmeralda is regarded as twisted and inappropriate because he's a priest, and supposed to be celibate. It's highly questionable because he's of (minor) nobility, and she's a Gypsy, the lowest social class in Paris. But there's no hesitation over the fact that ''[[MayDecemberRomance he's thirty-six years old and she's barely sixteen]]''.

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* Victor Hugo's ''Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame''. ''Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'':
**
Frollo's obsession with Esmeralda is regarded as twisted and inappropriate because he's a priest, and supposed to be celibate. It's highly questionable because he's of (minor) nobility, and she's a Gypsy, the lowest social class in Paris. But there's no hesitation over the fact that ''[[MayDecemberRomance ''[[AgeGapRomance he's thirty-six years old and she's barely sixteen]]''.



* For societies which value the concept of romantic love, folk tales (even from previous periods in the people's own history) where the heroine's reward after her ordeal is essentially to bag a man of wealth can be a bit jarring.
** [[RescueSex Likewise where the hero's reward after completing a quest is boning the king's hot daughter.]]

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* For societies which value the concept of romantic love, folk tales (even from previous periods in the people's own history) where the heroine's reward after her ordeal is essentially to bag a man of wealth can be a bit jarring.
**
jarring. [[RescueSex Likewise where the hero's reward after completing a quest is boning the king's hot daughter.]]



* ''Literature/ALittlePrincess'' ends with Sara being restored to her wealth and position and her friend Becky ends up as Sara's personal attendant. Modern audiences may find this a little shocking but in the context of when the novel is set, it's a fitting happy ending. Considering that Becky would have risen into a very powerful position and gained security as well as a kind and friendly mistress it's a very happy ending indeed. This trope is likely the reason the film adaptation has Becky being adopted by Sara's father at the end.

to:

* ''Literature/ALittlePrincess'' ''Literature/ALittlePrincess'':
** ''A Little Princess'
ends with Sara being restored to her wealth and position and her friend Becky ends up as Sara's personal attendant. Modern audiences may find this a little shocking but in the context of when the novel is set, it's a fitting happy ending. Considering that Becky would have risen into a very powerful position and gained security as well as a kind and friendly mistress it's a very happy ending indeed. This trope is likely the reason the film adaptation has Becky being adopted by Sara's father at the end.



* The ''Literature/LandOfOz'' series has a few of this. One of the major ones is in the second book, where young boy Tip learns that he is the lost Princess of Oz and is transformed into his "[[FirstLawOfGenderBending true form]]". After he does so, he changes from his previous personality into an out-and-out girly girl who does little to no adventuring. A few other bits of dissonance show up as well, such as in the first book when the Tin Man, who can't bear to see any other creature die at the hand of another... kills a wildcat that was chasing a small mouse by chopping off its head with his ax.
** On the other hand, the book series is actually quite FairForItsDay regarding topics such as feminism. The Land of Oz is ruled by four women and a man in the first book, and the women are portrayed as equally likely to be Wicked as they are to be Good. Female characters that appear later on range from good to bad on the morality spectrum, and each and every one of the characters, female or not, are different and varied characters. Same goes for the male characters; they are all equally as likely to be good characters as they are to be bad characters, and just as varied as the females.
*** That's more while Ozma was treated more as a girly-girl who wasn't good with adventures, Dorothy Gale (who was popular enough that a massive letter-writing campaign forced Baum to write her back into the books) was a tough and self-reliant farmgirl who could be trusted to get herself out of trouble. It was to the point that her portrayal in the film is something of an AdaptationalWimp.
** The reckless use of magic in the latter books would likely raise many eyebrows if used in modern fantasy. It's disturbingly easy to deconstruct the Ozma-Glinda regime as 1984 with wizards and talking animals (all but three people in the kingdom are banned from using magic, Ozma has a magical mirror to [[BigBrotherIsWatchingYou spy on her citizens]], dissenters are memory-wiped, etc.) Deconstructing Ozma's gender identity is also popular among fanfic writers, in particular the idea that she still sees herself as the boy Tip and the pretty princess thing is merely an act.
*** The last book written by Baum himself has a former wizard who believes the magic ban to be a childish action, and fully expects it to be lifted someday. It is possible Baum himself didn't like the implications too much.

to:

* ''Literature/LandOfOz'':
**
The ''Literature/LandOfOz'' ''Oz'' series has a few of this. One of the major ones is in the second book, where young boy Tip learns that he is the lost Princess of Oz and is transformed into his "[[FirstLawOfGenderBending true form]]". After he does so, he changes from his previous personality into an out-and-out girly girl who does little to no adventuring. A few other bits of dissonance show up as well, such as in the first book when the Tin Man, who can't bear to see any other creature die at the hand of another... kills a wildcat that was chasing a small mouse by chopping off its head with his ax.
** On the other hand, the book series is actually quite FairForItsDay regarding topics such as feminism. The Land of Oz is ruled by four women and a man in the first book, and the women are portrayed as equally likely to be Wicked as they are to be Good. Female characters that appear later on range from good to bad on the morality spectrum, and each and every one of the characters, female or not, are different and varied characters. Same goes for the male characters; they are all equally as likely to be good characters as they are to be bad characters, and just as varied as the females.
***
females. That's more while Ozma was treated more as a girly-girl who wasn't good with adventures, Dorothy Gale (who was popular enough that a massive letter-writing campaign forced Baum to write her back into the books) was a tough and self-reliant farmgirl who could be trusted to get herself out of trouble. It was to the point that her portrayal in the film is something of an AdaptationalWimp.
** The reckless use of magic in the latter books would likely raise many eyebrows if used in modern fantasy. It's disturbingly easy to deconstruct the Ozma-Glinda regime as 1984 ''1984'' with wizards and talking animals (all but three people in the kingdom are banned from using magic, Ozma has a magical mirror to [[BigBrotherIsWatchingYou spy on her citizens]], dissenters are memory-wiped, etc.) Deconstructing Ozma's gender identity is also popular among fanfic writers, in particular the idea that she still sees herself as the boy Tip and the pretty princess thing is merely an act.
***
act. The last book written by Baum himself has a former wizard who believes the magic ban to be a childish action, and fully expects it to be lifted someday. It is possible Baum himself didn't like the implications too much.much.
** Ozma and Dorothy's relationship raises eyebrows more than it was intended to. Their declarations of love and frequent kissing were meant to be seen as [[RomanticTwoGirlFriendship innocent, childish gestures]]. They instead come off as outright romantic.



* Explored in ''Obasan'', by Joy Kogawa. The family is Japanese, and the protagonist's brother is a fan of Captain America comic books. During WWII, Captain America's archenemy was the worst kind of Japanese stereotype. The family in the book goes to a Japanese interment camp. Yet the brother remains a fan of the comics.

to:

* Explored in ''Obasan'', by Joy Kogawa. The family is Japanese, and the protagonist's brother is a fan of Captain America ''Captain America'' comic books. During WWII, Captain America's archenemy was the worst kind of Japanese stereotype. The family in the book goes to a Japanese interment camp. Yet the brother remains a fan of the comics.



* This is the primary reason that nearly all attempts to revive ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'' for 21st-century readers have failed. When the books were first written and published, it was acceptable for preteens to work as baby-sitters; these days, one would have to wait until at least their late teens to take on this responsibility.

to:

* ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'':
**
This is the primary reason that nearly all attempts to revive ''Literature/TheBabysittersClub'' the franchise for 21st-century readers have failed. When the books were first written and published, it was acceptable for preteens to work as baby-sitters; these days, one would have to wait until at least their late teens to take on this responsibility.



* ''[[{{Literature/Typhoon}} Typhoon]]'' by Joseph Conrad uses the term ''Coolie'' to describe the chinese slaves who are taken on a steamer, on top of having some stereotypical traits related to chinese culture. Nowadays, this term is frowned up

to:

* ''[[{{Literature/Typhoon}} Typhoon]]'' by Joseph Conrad uses the term ''Coolie'' to describe the chinese Chinese slaves who are taken on a steamer, on top of having some stereotypical traits related to chinese Chinese culture. Nowadays, this term is frowned upup.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'', the titular Snow White is seen as tremendously beautiful from the day of her birth due to her [[RavenHairIvorySkin incredibly pale skin]] and blood red lips. That image often brings to mind [[EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette illness]] more than it did at the time of release. This is one reason why {{Grimmification}} and FracturedFairytale takes on the story tend to make Snow White a creepier character, even some making her an outright vampire.
14th Nov '17 10:31:59 AM JJHIL325
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** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped, and she is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.

to:

** ''Kristy and the Secret of Susan'''s, (which was published in 1990) overall attitude towards Autism has ''not'' aged well. For one thing, Susan displays every single autistic symptom known to medicine, which is actually impossible in real life (since the official name is Autism ''Spectrum'' Disorder). Secondly, Susan's boundaries are completely overstepped, overstepped by Kristy (who is never called out on this), and she is consistently viewed in a relatively negative light. Kristy introduces Susan to the neighborhood children (who treat Susan like an outcast) in order to force her to make friends, which is very difficult even for people with milder cases of autism. Kristy tries to guilt-trip Susan's parents out of sending her to a boarding school. Then at a school assembly, Kristy sits behind the special needs class and views them as they were zoo exhibits. Worst of all, the story ends with Susan's mother hoping that her yet-to-arrive second child will be "normal", implying that she considers Susan "broken" and wants to replace her; they even plan to name the baby "Hope" as an indicator of this exact mindset.
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