History UsefulNotes / TheSolarSystem

29th Oct '17 2:40:20 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* Last but not least, in January 2016 a group of astronomers have suggested that the eccentric orbits of several large Kuiper Belt Objects (see the Detached Object category of small solar system bodies listed further down) could be explained by the presence of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet_Nine a ninth planet]] (so-called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Planet Nine]]), that would be a bit smaller in mass than Neptune or Uranus, two to four times larger than Earth, and that would orbit the Sun in a highly eccentric and inclined orbit that would take many thousands of years to complete never approaching at less than around seven times the Sun-Neptune distance[[note]]At its farthest, Neptune is 30-something AU away from the sun; Planet's Nine's nearest distance to the sun is predicted to be about ''200 AU''[[/note]]. Please note, however, that despite the claims of "a new planet discovered" there's at best just indirect proof of its existence and it's an entirely hypothetical object until it's finally imaged[[note]]Not something that will be easy, mind you, with ''millions'' of stars and galaxies of similar brightness to that planet if it existed at all[[/note]]. Yet other astronomers [[https://newatlas.com/warped-kuiper-belt-planet-ten/50173/ have suggested]] the existence of yet another planet in those cold outer reaches of the Solar System, a body as massive as Mars that would orbit at twice Neptune's distance to the Sun in an inclined orbit, and whose detection if it was real would be as challenging as for the former.

to:

* Last but not least, in January 2016 a group of astronomers have suggested that the eccentric orbits of several large Kuiper Belt Objects (see the Detached Object category of small solar system bodies listed further down) could be explained by the presence of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet_Nine a ninth planet]] (so-called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Planet Nine]]), that would be a bit smaller in mass than Neptune or Uranus, two to four times larger than Earth, and that would orbit the Sun in a highly eccentric and inclined orbit that would take many thousands of years to complete never approaching at less than around seven times the Sun-Neptune distance[[note]]At its farthest, Neptune is 30-something AU away from the sun; Planet's Nine's nearest distance to the sun is predicted to be about ''200 AU''[[/note]]. Please note, however, that despite the claims of "a new planet discovered" there's at best just indirect proof of its existence and it's an entirely hypothetical object until it's finally imaged[[note]]Not something that will be easy, mind you, with ''millions'' of stars and galaxies of similar brightness to that planet if it existed at all[[/note]]. Yet other astronomers [[https://newatlas.com/warped-kuiper-belt-planet-ten/50173/ have suggested]] the existence of yet another planet in those cold outer reaches of the Solar System, a body as massive as Mars that would orbit at twice Neptune's distance to the Sun in an inclined orbit, and whose detection if it was real would be as challenging as for the former.



* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scattered_disc The Scattered Disc]]

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scattered_disc The Scattered Disc]]Disc]]. Could be the home of yet another [[https://newatlas.com/warped-kuiper-belt-planet-ten/50173/ hypothetical planet]], a body as massive as Mars that would orbit at twice Neptune's distance to the Sun in an inclined orbit, and whose detection if it was real at all would be as challenging as Planet IX's one.
29th Oct '17 2:33:29 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* Last but not least, in January 2016 a group of astronomers have suggested that the eccentric orbits of several large Kuiper Belt Objects (see the Detached Object category of small solar system bodies listed further down) could be explained by the presence of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet_Nine a ninth planet]] (so-called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Planet Nine]]), that would be a bit smaller in mass than Neptune or Uranus, two to four times larger than Earth, and that would orbit the Sun in a highly eccentric and inclined orbit that would take many thousands of years to complete never approaching at less than around seven times the Sun-Neptune distance[[note]]At its farthest, Neptune is 30-something AU away from the sun; Planet's Nine's nearest distance to the sun is predicted to be about ''200 AU''[[/note]]. Please note, however, that despite the claims of "a new planet discovered" there's at best just indirect proof of its existence and it's an entirely hypothetical object until it's finally imaged[[note]]Not something that will be easy, mind you, with ''millions'' of stars and galaxies of similar brightness to that planet if it existed at all[[/note]].

to:

* Last but not least, in January 2016 a group of astronomers have suggested that the eccentric orbits of several large Kuiper Belt Objects (see the Detached Object category of small solar system bodies listed further down) could be explained by the presence of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet_Nine a ninth planet]] (so-called [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Planet Nine]]), that would be a bit smaller in mass than Neptune or Uranus, two to four times larger than Earth, and that would orbit the Sun in a highly eccentric and inclined orbit that would take many thousands of years to complete never approaching at less than around seven times the Sun-Neptune distance[[note]]At its farthest, Neptune is 30-something AU away from the sun; Planet's Nine's nearest distance to the sun is predicted to be about ''200 AU''[[/note]]. Please note, however, that despite the claims of "a new planet discovered" there's at best just indirect proof of its existence and it's an entirely hypothetical object until it's finally imaged[[note]]Not something that will be easy, mind you, with ''millions'' of stars and galaxies of similar brightness to that planet if it existed at all[[/note]]. Yet other astronomers [[https://newatlas.com/warped-kuiper-belt-planet-ten/50173/ have suggested]] the existence of yet another planet in those cold outer reaches of the Solar System, a body as massive as Mars that would orbit at twice Neptune's distance to the Sun in an inclined orbit, and whose detection if it was real would be as challenging as for the former.
11th Sep '17 1:06:13 AM PaulA
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All these are dark and freezing cold, absolutely no life (except for, probably, [[Creator/HPLovecraft Mi-go]]) could exist or survive here.

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All these are dark and freezing cold, absolutely no life (except for, probably, [[Creator/HPLovecraft [[Literature/TheWhispererInDarkness Mi-go]]) could exist or survive here.
28th Jul '17 10:05:14 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eris_(dwarf_planet) Eris]][[note]](it is accompanied by a single known moon, Dysnomia)[[/note]][[note]]When first discovered, it was nicknamed [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]]. No, Dysnomia was never referred to in any official context as "[[{{Sidekick}} Gabrielle]]".]][[/note]]

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eris_(dwarf_planet) Eris]][[note]](it is accompanied by a single known moon, Dysnomia)[[/note]][[note]]When first discovered, it was nicknamed [[Series/XenaWarriorPrincess Xena]]. No, Dysnomia was never referred to in any official context as "[[{{Sidekick}} Gabrielle]]".]][[/note]]
[[/note]]
13th Mar '17 11:09:20 AM unokkun
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As for the future, things will not change very much for the Solar System ''as a whole'' during the next five billion years[[note]]Some calculations simulations give a very small probability within that timeframe of either Mercury going haywire and being ejected of the Solar Sytem if it does not crash before into either Venus or Earth, or Mars colliding with Earth. Sleep well, it will ''not'' happen tomorrow. [[ParanoiaFuel We think]][[/note]]. Sure, the orbits of some moons such as Mars' Phobos or Neptune's Triton will decay and the latter will produce both a ''hell'' of a meteor shower and a splendid ring system around its planet, there will continue being the occasional asteroid/impact here and there, the occasional star passing too close and shaking the Oort Cloud sending comets to the inner Solar System, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and the Earth becoming unhabitable]] because of a Sun that is brightening with time as described above but if we could see the Solar System by then it is expected we'd see something very similar to the current one[[note]]OK, the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to [[FusionDance merge]] around those ages and the Sun will end up on the outskirts of the newly-formed galaxy, if not thrown out to intergalactic space (it will come back much later, though), but unless we've ''very'' bad luck the collision will not affect us[[/note]].

to:

As for the future, things will not change very much for the Solar System ''as a whole'' during the next five billion years[[note]]Some calculations simulations give a very small probability within that timeframe of either Mercury going haywire and being ejected of the Solar Sytem if it does not crash before into either Venus or Earth, or Mars colliding with Earth. Sleep well, it will ''not'' happen tomorrow. [[ParanoiaFuel We think]][[/note]]. Sure, the orbits of some moons such as Mars' Phobos or Neptune's Triton will decay and the latter will produce both a ''hell'' of a meteor shower and a splendid ring system around its planet, there will continue being the occasional asteroid/impact here and there, the occasional star passing too close and shaking the Oort Cloud sending comets to the inner Solar System, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and the Earth becoming unhabitable]] because of a Sun that is brightening with time as described above but if we could see the Solar System by then it is expected we'd see something very similar to the current one[[note]]OK, the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to [[FusionDance merge]] around those ages and the Sun will end up on the outskirts of the newly-formed galaxy, if not thrown out to intergalactic space (it will come back much later, though), but unless we've ''very'' bad luck the collision will not affect us[[/note]].
11th Mar '17 3:35:00 PM Pokefan
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To be completely fair, Pluto is still a "planet" and the arguing over that point is really amounts to more of a FandomRivalry than any serious bickering. Pluto is a '''dwarf ''planet''''' - the word "planet" is right there in the name. Some people exclude it from lists of planets, while others hold onto it as a "Traditional" planet (We did call it a planet for 70 years, after all). Yes, the definitions were in dire need of an overhaul, but everyone still agrees that it's a body in our solar system worthy of study. The fact that all the astronomers responsible for its "demotion" were all eagerly watching the imagery coming in from the New Horizons probe in 2015 is proof of this - absolutely ''none'' of those them was thinking "Well, Pluto's not really a planet, so this whole mission is a pointless wash." So when you hear people arguing over planet/not planet just take it on the same level as "Franchise/StarTrek vs Franchise/StarWars", or "[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 Joel vs Mike]]". Some just call it a "world", a nice neutral term for large bodies.
20th Feb '17 4:28:00 PM ScorpiusOB1
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[[TakingYouWithMe The revenge of those protoplanets and other debris]] came four billion years ago in the form of a large number of them ending up in the inner Solar System, where they [[ColonyDrop pummeled to death]] the more or less formed terrestrial planets, scarring them with countless craters and causing quite a lot of damage to them[[note]]In the case of Earth, the heaviest impacts would have been enough to vaporize the oceans and even melt the crust in [[TabletopGame/Warhammer40000 Exterminatus]] fashion, wrapping the planet in an atmosphere of molten rock and water vapor for some time. It's not know if life had formed by then but if had it existed it would have been destroyed in the most violent collisions. Perhaps life formed several times, just to being destroyed again when a large impactor came crashing again, or it survived sheltered deep into Earth's crust or in the very deepest oceans. On a more positive note, it's thought those impacts brought still more water to Earth[[/note]]. This hellish rain may have lasted a few hundred million years, and was the last event of significance in the Solar System[[note]]On a more domestic scale, the remaining asteroids [[AsteroidMonster pummeled among themselves]] in the belt further reducing the population of large bodies and producing many smaller ones, and giant planets would have captured some of those floating rocks as moons (one of them ''very'' large -ask Neptune's Triton-). Venus, that could have been an Earth-like planet became the [[DeathWorld hellish world]] that is now because of its closeness to the Sun, and Mars being too small perhaps thanks to Jupiter's journey, lost its protecting magnetic field and with it most of its atmosphere and the liquid water it's now it had in those epochs[[/note]]. From there until now, little has happened in the Solar System in a global scale besides the occasional impact here and there of a stray asteroid or comet, the star passing across the Oort cloud[[note]]Ask [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 Gliese 710]][[/note]] sending a shower of comets to the inner Solar System, and a Sun that as it ages becomes more luminous[[note]]As it fuses the hydrogen on its core, the latter contracts increasing its temperature causing an increase of the fusion rate and thus of the released energy and so on. As there's no convection in the inner regions of the Sun, just the outermost ones, our star cannot use all of its nuclear fuel.[[/note]]


to:

[[TakingYouWithMe The revenge of those protoplanets and other debris]] came four billion years ago in the form of a large number of them ending up in the inner Solar System, where they [[ColonyDrop pummeled to death]] the more or less formed terrestrial planets, scarring them with countless craters and causing quite a lot of damage to them[[note]]In the case of Earth, the heaviest impacts would have been enough to vaporize the oceans and even melt the crust in [[TabletopGame/Warhammer40000 Exterminatus]] fashion, wrapping the planet in an atmosphere of molten rock and water vapor for some time. It's not know if life had formed by then but if had it existed it would have been destroyed in the most violent collisions. Perhaps life formed several times, just to being destroyed again when a large impactor came crashing again, or it survived sheltered deep into Earth's crust or in the very deepest oceans. On a more positive note, it's thought those impacts brought still more water to Earth[[/note]]. This hellish rain may have lasted a few hundred million years, and was the last event of significance in the Solar System[[note]]On a more domestic scale, the remaining asteroids [[AsteroidMonster [[AsteroidsMonster pummeled among themselves]] in the belt further reducing the population of large bodies and producing many smaller ones, and giant planets would have captured some of those floating rocks as moons (one of them ''very'' large -ask Neptune's Triton-). Venus, that could have been an Earth-like planet became the [[DeathWorld hellish world]] that is now because of its closeness to the Sun, and Mars being too small perhaps thanks to Jupiter's journey, lost its protecting magnetic field and with it most of its atmosphere and the liquid water it's now it known to have had in those epochs[[/note]]. From there until now, little has happened in the Solar System in a global scale besides the occasional impact here and there of a stray asteroid or comet, the star passing across the Oort cloud[[note]]Ask [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_710 Gliese 710]][[/note]] sending a shower of comets to the inner Solar System, and a Sun that as it ages becomes more luminous[[note]]As it fuses the hydrogen on its core, the latter contracts increasing its temperature causing an increase of the fusion rate and thus of the released energy and so on. As there's no convection in the inner regions of the Sun, just the outermost ones, our star cannot use all of its nuclear fuel.[[/note]]

16th Feb '17 8:38:25 PM dogman15
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Turning to nomenclature on a smaller scale, the New Horizons probe will reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015, giving cartographers at least two whole new worlds worth of craters, mountains, and other points of interest to name. Current plans are to name features after various underworld locations and their denizens, spacecraft and space scientists, explorers and their vessels (real and fictional), and artists and authors whose works have depicted exploration. [[http://www.ourpluto.org/ A page has been set up]] to allow people to vote for names to be submitted to the IAU for official use, so cast your vote for a real-life [[Series/{{Firefly}} Vallis Serenity]], [[Literature/WatershipDown Colles Watership]], and [[Series/BabylonFive Regio Z'ha'dum]]! [[note]]sorry, [[Franchise/StarTrek Trekkers]], but [[http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Feature/15133?__fsk=1962724877 there's already an Enterprise Rupes]] on Mercury.[[/note]][[note]]Sorry, voting was closed back on 24 April 2015[[/note]]

to:

Turning to nomenclature on a smaller scale, the New Horizons probe will reach reached Pluto and Charon in July 2015, giving cartographers at least two whole new worlds worth of craters, mountains, and other points of interest to name. Current plans are to name features after various underworld locations and their denizens, spacecraft and space scientists, explorers and their vessels (real and fictional), and artists and authors whose works have depicted exploration. [[http://www.ourpluto.org/ A page has been set up]] to allow people to vote for names to be submitted to the IAU for official use, so cast your vote for a real-life [[Series/{{Firefly}} Vallis Serenity]], [[Literature/WatershipDown Colles Watership]], and [[Series/BabylonFive Regio Z'ha'dum]]! [[note]]sorry, [[Franchise/StarTrek Trekkers]], but [[http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Feature/15133?__fsk=1962724877 there's already an Enterprise Rupes]] on Mercury.[[/note]][[note]]Sorry, voting was closed back on 24 April 2015[[/note]]
13th Feb '17 7:22:40 AM ScorpiusOB1
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As for the future, things will not change very much for the Solar System ''as a whole'' during the next five billion years[[note]]Some calculations simulations give a very small probability within that timeframe of either Mercury going haywire and being ejected of the Solar Sytem if it does not crash before into either Venus or Earth, or Mars colliding with Earth. Sleep well, it will ''not'' happen tomorrow. [[ParanoiaFuel We think]][[/note]]. Sure, the orbits of some moons such as Mars' Phobos or Neptune's Triton will decay and the latter will produce both a ''hell'' of a meteor shower and a splendid ring system around its planet, there will continue being the occasional asteroid/impact here and there, the occasional star passing too close and shaking the Oort Cloud sending comets to the inner Solar System, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and the Earth becoming unhabitable]] because of a Sun that is brightening with time as described above but if we could see the Solar System by then it is expected we'd see something very similar to the current one[[note]OK, the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to [[FusionDance merge]] around those ages and the Sun will end up on the outskirts of the newly-formed galaxy, if not thrown out to intergalactic space (it will come back much later, though), but unless we've ''very'' bad luck the collision will not affect us[[/note]].

to:

As for the future, things will not change very much for the Solar System ''as a whole'' during the next five billion years[[note]]Some calculations simulations give a very small probability within that timeframe of either Mercury going haywire and being ejected of the Solar Sytem if it does not crash before into either Venus or Earth, or Mars colliding with Earth. Sleep well, it will ''not'' happen tomorrow. [[ParanoiaFuel We think]][[/note]]. Sure, the orbits of some moons such as Mars' Phobos or Neptune's Triton will decay and the latter will produce both a ''hell'' of a meteor shower and a splendid ring system around its planet, there will continue being the occasional asteroid/impact here and there, the occasional star passing too close and shaking the Oort Cloud sending comets to the inner Solar System, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and the Earth becoming unhabitable]] because of a Sun that is brightening with time as described above but if we could see the Solar System by then it is expected we'd see something very similar to the current one[[note]OK, one[[note]]OK, the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way are expected to [[FusionDance merge]] around those ages and the Sun will end up on the outskirts of the newly-formed galaxy, if not thrown out to intergalactic space (it will come back much later, though), but unless we've ''very'' bad luck the collision will not affect us[[/note]].
13th Feb '17 7:19:20 AM ScorpiusOB1
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The Solar System was born more or less four thousand and a half billion years ago from the collapse of a large gas cloud, that as typical per the process of star formation fragmented into many smaller ones[[note]]There's strong evidence that one or several supernovae, the deaths of massive star, may have triggered this proces. It, as well as others, show that our Sun was born in a large star-forming region of the style of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Nebula Orion nebula]], forming part of a large star cluster (imagine the [[AlienSky star-studded sky in that epoch]]. Its brothers and sisters are somewhere in the Milky Way, perhaps even with planets where life has developed too[[/note]]. One of said fragments, as it collapsed, began spin faster flattening and taking a flying saucer-like shape. Its center, as it collapsed, became hotter and denser until hydrogen fusion began at its very center. The Sun was born[[note]]Our daystar was during those early epochs a very different one: larger, cooler, and more luminous during its contraction, covered by sunspots, and more active with strong flare activity. When hydrogen ignited, while less luminous than now, it kept said activity with sunspots and flares galore and a ''very'' powerful solar wind until a few million years later it calmed somewhat, especially said wind.

to:

The Solar System was born more or less four thousand and a half billion years ago from the collapse of a large gas cloud, that as typical per the process of star formation fragmented into many smaller ones[[note]]There's strong evidence that one or several supernovae, the deaths of massive star, may have triggered this proces. It, as well as others, show that our Sun was born in a large star-forming region of the style of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Nebula Orion nebula]], forming part of a large star cluster (imagine the [[AlienSky star-studded sky in that epoch]]. Its brothers and sisters are somewhere in the Milky Way, perhaps even with planets where life has developed too[[/note]]. One of said fragments, as it collapsed, began spin faster flattening and taking a flying saucer-like shape. Its center, as it collapsed, became hotter and denser until hydrogen fusion began at its very center. The Sun was born[[note]]Our daystar was during those early epochs a very different one: larger, cooler, and more luminous during its contraction, covered by sunspots, and more active with strong flare activity. When hydrogen ignited, while less luminous than now, it kept said activity with sunspots and flares galore and a ''very'' powerful solar wind until a few million years later it calmed somewhat, especially said wind.
wind.[[/note]]
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