History UsefulNotes / TheNineties

18th Oct '16 7:35:02 PM nombretomado
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* [[EightiesHair Frizzy and/or voluminous hair]] also briefly remained as an '80s holdover, although flatter hair pushed it out early in the decade. The women's hairstyle most associated with the decade is the "Rachel" cut, worn by Creator/JenniferAniston in the early seasons of ''{{Friends}}'' -- flat, straight, and square layered. Large, chunky blonde highlights, also known as "streaking" (no, not [[NakedPeopleAreFunny that kind]]), became popular around the same time as the "Rachel" cut, also popularized by Jennifer Aniston. Men's hairstyles, meanwhile, changed drastically throughout the decade, from shaggy in 1994, to a parted bowl-cut in 1997, to [[TheSimpsons Bart Simpson spikes]] in 1999. Younger men and teenagers with brown hair cut into the bowl-cut sometimes bleached the longer hair of the "bowl" blonde and, if it was long enough, tied it in a ponytail.

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* [[EightiesHair Frizzy and/or voluminous hair]] also briefly remained as an '80s holdover, although flatter hair pushed it out early in the decade. The women's hairstyle most associated with the decade is the "Rachel" cut, worn by Creator/JenniferAniston in the early seasons of ''{{Friends}}'' ''Series/{{Friends}}'' -- flat, straight, and square layered. Large, chunky blonde highlights, also known as "streaking" (no, not [[NakedPeopleAreFunny that kind]]), became popular around the same time as the "Rachel" cut, also popularized by Jennifer Aniston. Men's hairstyles, meanwhile, changed drastically throughout the decade, from shaggy in 1994, to a parted bowl-cut in 1997, to [[TheSimpsons [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Bart Simpson spikes]] in 1999. Younger men and teenagers with brown hair cut into the bowl-cut sometimes bleached the longer hair of the "bowl" blonde and, if it was long enough, tied it in a ponytail.
18th Oct '16 1:56:54 PM AgProv
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* For the first time in U.S. history, more Americans lived in affluent suburban neighborhoods rather than in cities or towns or on farms. Fueled by this millions-strong middle class, the American "consumer culture" that had been burgeoning since TheFifties reached its apotheosis. There were more creature comforts and general amusements than ever before (including some that were relatively new for the decade, such as cellular phones and hand-held videogame consoles), as well as more people to enjoy them and more dollars with which to buy them. The factor most responsible for setting the stage for this fabulous prosperity remains controversial among social scientists and political pundits, but the general consensus is that the country was reaping a generation's worth of benefits from a dramatic economic shift (dubbed the "New Economy") that had phased out the old industrial labor market (which, frankly speaking, had subordinated the material interests of laborers to those of management) and reoriented American workers toward businesses that capitalized more on individual ingenuity and creativity (such as computer technology).

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* For the first time in U.S. history, more Americans lived in affluent suburban neighborhoods rather than in cities or towns or on farms. Fueled by this millions-strong middle class, the American "consumer culture" that had been burgeoning since TheFifties reached its apotheosis. There were more creature comforts and general amusements than ever before (including some that were relatively new for the decade, such as cellular phones and hand-held videogame consoles), as well as more people to enjoy them and more dollars with which to buy them. The factor most responsible for setting the stage for this fabulous prosperity remains controversial among social scientists and political pundits, but the general consensus is that the country was reaping a generation's worth of benefits from a dramatic economic shift (dubbed the "New Economy") that had phased out the old industrial labor market (which, frankly speaking, had allegedly subordinated the material interests of laborers to those of management) and reoriented American workers toward businesses that capitalized more on individual ingenuity and creativity (such as computer technology).
13th Oct '16 1:37:56 PM hordak27
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* On the subject of the National Curriculum, this was the decade the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Curriculum_assessment National Curriculum assessments, colloquially known as "SATs"]] were brought in, designed to test kids in English, Maths and Science at the end of ever "Key Stage" (typically at the end of Years 2, 6 and 9). These have attracted a lot of criticism (including from teachers' unions) over the stress they were supposedly putting kids under, teaching to the tests, their use as part of school league tables etc.

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* On the subject of the National Curriculum, this was the decade the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Curriculum_assessment National Curriculum assessments, colloquially known as "SATs"]] were brought in, designed to test kids in English, Maths and Science at the end of ever every "Key Stage" (typically at the end of Years 2, 6 and 9). These have attracted a lot of criticism (including from teachers' unions) over the stress they were supposedly putting kids under, teaching to the tests, their use as part of school league tables etc.
7th Oct '16 8:07:19 PM Hugpocalypse
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* What was rock music like in the '90s? Well, HairMetal hung on for the first couple of years in bold defiance of good taste, but was soon acid-washed [[DeaderThanDisco from history]] by {{grunge}}. Grunge, in turn, suffered a backlash as Music/KurtCobain [[DrivenToSuicide killed himself]] and increasingly derivative bands partook in a lyrical style that Creator/NathanRabin dubbed "Hunger-Dunger-Dang." However, even though grunge itself was out, the musical style influenced many bands in what is now known as "{{post-grunge}}", which became prevalent late in the decade and remains to this day. NuMetal arose and peaked around the same time as post-grunge, and Music/{{emo}} was first starting to get mainstream attention thanks to Music/{{Weezer}}.

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* What was rock music like in the '90s? Well, HairMetal hung on for the first couple of years in bold defiance of good taste, but was soon acid-washed [[DeaderThanDisco from history]] by {{grunge}}. Grunge, in turn, suffered a backlash as Music/KurtCobain [[DrivenToSuicide killed himself]] and increasingly derivative bands partook in a lyrical style that Creator/NathanRabin dubbed "Hunger-Dunger-Dang." However, even though grunge itself was out, the musical style influenced many bands in what is now known as "{{post-grunge}}", which became prevalent late in the decade and remains to this day.remained so until UsefulNotes/TheNewTens. NuMetal arose and peaked around the same time as post-grunge, and Music/{{emo}} was first starting to get mainstream attention thanks to Music/{{Weezer}}.
24th Sep '16 2:12:19 PM nombretomado
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* In the UK, it was the decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "merging" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/{{Channel4}} stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).

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* In the UK, it was the decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "merging" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/{{Channel4}} Creator/Channel4 stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).



** In the UK, anime fandom to some extent mirrored the US, though perhaps due to some terrestrial broadcasters' continuing public-service commitments leading them to show "niche" content, some anime being shown on Channel4 in late-night slots and even [[Creator/TheBBC BBC2]] apparently showing ''Anime/RoyalSpaceForceTheWingsOfHonneamise'' and possibly even ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. (This has rarely been repeated since outside of Film4's occasional showing of Creator/StudioGhibli films and one or two others.) However, anime's reputation in the country did suffer from the fact that most anime releases did tend to suffer from AllAnimeIsNaughtyTentacles syndrome, being violent, horrific or sexual. Then as now, there's also been a lot of NoExportForYou.

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** In the UK, anime fandom to some extent mirrored the US, though perhaps due to some terrestrial broadcasters' continuing public-service commitments leading them to show "niche" content, some anime being shown on Channel4 Creator/Channel4 in late-night slots and even [[Creator/TheBBC BBC2]] apparently showing ''Anime/RoyalSpaceForceTheWingsOfHonneamise'' and possibly even ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. (This has rarely been repeated since outside of Film4's occasional showing of Creator/StudioGhibli films and one or two others.) However, anime's reputation in the country did suffer from the fact that most anime releases did tend to suffer from AllAnimeIsNaughtyTentacles syndrome, being violent, horrific or sexual. Then as now, there's also been a lot of NoExportForYou.
23rd Sep '16 10:24:43 PM nombretomado
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* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose tv show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are the exception (BritneySpears and ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).

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* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose tv show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are the exception (BritneySpears (Music/BritneySpears and ChristinaAguilera Music/ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).
21st Sep '16 9:05:02 AM DavidDelony
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* The GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended, with Lifetime, USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family having eliminated their games, while Nickelodeon began focusing on other programming; and the GSN originals of the time (especially the infamous ''[[Series/TheGongShow Extreme Gong]]'') weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.

to:

* The GameShow genre hit it's its lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended, with Lifetime, USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family having eliminated their games, while Nickelodeon began focusing on other programming; and the GSN originals of the time (especially the infamous ''[[Series/TheGongShow Extreme Gong]]'') weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.
20th Sep '16 6:07:21 PM themisterfree
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* The GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended; Lifetime USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family had cleared their remaining games too; and the GSN originals of the time weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.

to:

* The GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended; Lifetime ended, with Lifetime, USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family had cleared having eliminated their remaining games too; games, while Nickelodeon began focusing on other programming; and the GSN originals of the time (especially the infamous ''[[Series/TheGongShow Extreme Gong]]'') weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.
20th Sep '16 6:04:56 PM themisterfree
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* The GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the 'Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended; Lifetime USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family had cleared their remaining games too; and the GSN originals of the time weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.

to:

* The GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the 'Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended; Lifetime USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family had cleared their remaining games too; and the GSN originals of the time weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.
20th Sep '16 5:11:43 PM themisterfree
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* The game show genre hit it's lowest point during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season. However, cable networks began to take over- the USA Network had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the cable games had ended, GSN originals weren't very good, and things were downhill. But when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]].

to:

* The game show GameShow genre hit it's lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season. season- primarily because of the 'Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over- over instead- the USA Network Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended, ended; Lifetime USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family had cleared their remaining games too; and the GSN originals of the time weren't very good, and things were downhill. good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]].clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheNineties