History UsefulNotes / TheNineties

23rd Oct '17 8:28:39 AM LentilSandEater
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** Not all fathers. If you were 2-S (In college; abolished in 1971), in any necessary industry/profession, a conscientious objector (1-O was against ALL service; other objectors could still be assigned to non-combat roles), disabled, or married (Later changed so you had to also have a child) during 'Nam, you couldn't be drafted. If you had a sibling or a parent who died or was captured in service (4-G), they couldn't draft you, either.

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** %%** Not all fathers. If you were 2-S (In college; abolished in 1971), in any necessary industry/profession, a conscientious objector (1-O was against ALL service; other objectors could still be assigned to non-combat roles), disabled, or married (Later changed so you had to also have a child) during 'Nam, you couldn't be drafted. If you had a sibling or a parent who died or was captured in service (4-G), they couldn't draft you, either.
9th Sep '17 4:32:10 PM nombretomado
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* This was a tough decade for musical theater. With the "megamusical" trend AndrewLloydWebber spearheaded in TheEighties quietly fading away, the only stage musicals that attracted mainstream media attention were ''Theatre/{{RENT}}'' and two shows adapted from then-recent Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon successes (''Beauty and the Beast'' and ''The Lion King'').

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* This was a tough decade for musical theater. With the "megamusical" trend AndrewLloydWebber Creator/AndrewLloydWebber spearheaded in TheEighties quietly fading away, the only stage musicals that attracted mainstream media attention were ''Theatre/{{RENT}}'' and two shows adapted from then-recent Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon successes (''Beauty and the Beast'' and ''The Lion King'').
5th Sep '17 2:53:04 PM KizunaTallis
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* UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} changed the game at school, if only for a brief time. Towards the end of the '90s, most schools started really ramping-up security measures in fears that they would be the next target of a shooting. There would also usually be a seminar about being tolerant of other viewpoints and so on. But, for some reason, no one thought to tackle bullying, it would be about another decade before that became a hot-button issue.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} changed the game at school, if only for a brief time. Towards the end of the '90s, most schools started really ramping-up security measures in fears that they would be the next target of a shooting. There would also usually be a seminar about being tolerant of other viewpoints and so on. But, for some reason, no one thought to tackle bullying, bullying; it would be about another decade before that became a hot-button issue.




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* The death of Diana Spencer, former Princess of Wales, on August 31 1997, dominated headlines for several weeks. A fashion icon and beloved celebrity known as "The People's Princess" due to her down-to-earth personality and extensive charity work, her accidental death via car crash brought an unprecedented spasm of grief and mourning not just in the United Kingdom, but the world over. Numerous [[ConspiracyTheory conspiracy theories]] would arise over the nature of her demise.



** Tejano music was popular among Mexican Americans in the United States mainly from Texas in the early '90s. Music/{{Selena}} was the most popular Tejano singer in the country and gained media attention when she was murdered by her manager in 1995. Although Tejano still continues to played by a few Mexican American in the state, it has never been able to recapture it's popularity following Selena's death.
** In 1999, the US experienced the "Latino Explosion" where Latin artists such as Ricky Martin, Jennifer Lopez, and Enrique Iglesias became popular with the mainstream media. Needless to say, some Latin music purists criticized the music they played [[ItsPopularNowItSucks as watered-down and unauthentic]].
* The mid-1990s also heralded the "rebirth" of Rhythm & Blues, though the result was much mellower and slower than the R&B of TheSixties and TheSeventies with artists like Babyface, R. Kelly, Gerald Levert, Boys II Men and En Vogue.

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** Tejano music was popular among Mexican Americans in the United States mainly from Texas in the early '90s. Music/{{Selena}} was the most popular Tejano singer in the country and gained media attention when she was murdered by her manager in 1995. Although Tejano still continues to played by a few Mexican American artists in the state, it has never been able to recapture it's reach the popularity following Selena's death.
** In 1999, the US experienced the "Latino Explosion" where Latin artists such as Ricky Martin, Jennifer Lopez, Music/RickyMartin, Music/JenniferLopez, and Enrique Iglesias Music/EnriqueIglesias became popular with the mainstream media. Needless to say, some Latin music purists criticized the music they played [[ItsPopularNowItSucks as watered-down and unauthentic]].
* The mid-1990s also heralded the "rebirth" of Rhythm & Blues, though the result was much mellower and slower than the R&B of TheSixties and TheSeventies with artists like Babyface, R. Kelly, Music/Babyface, Music/RKelly, Gerald Levert, Boys II Men Music/BoysIIMen and En Vogue.



* The "'90s singer-songwriter" was practically a trope in and of itself. Mention the names Music/LizPhair, Music/AlanisMorissette, Music/{{Jewel}}, Sheryl Crow or Music/SarahMcLachlan to any woman in her late 20s/early 30s, and she will most likely regale you with tales of the great music festival that was Lilith Fair (whether or not she actually went there; there's a good chance she got her stories from people who did). The '90s were the first decade in which women in general (not just individual musicians or bands) were taken seriously as rockers, and the female rock stars produced by the decade became known for their [[TrueArtIsAngsty raw, angsty lyrics]] (in true '90s grunge fashion). At the same time, the {{riot grrrl}}s, while never enjoying the mainstream success of their male counterparts, also left their mark on the underground with their staunchly feminist brand of PunkRock.
* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose TV show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are the exception (Music/BritneySpears and Music/ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).
* Music/PattiSmith, the archetypal punk rock goddess, took a nice comeback in the late 1990s after the death of her husband [[Music/{{MC5}} Fred "Sonic" Smith]].

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* The "'90s singer-songwriter" was practically a trope in and of itself. Mention the names Music/LizPhair, Music/AlanisMorissette, Music/{{Jewel}}, Sheryl Crow Music/SherylCrow or Music/SarahMcLachlan to any woman in her late 20s/early 30s, and she will most likely regale you with tales of the great music festival that was Lilith Fair (whether or not she actually went there; there's a good chance she got her stories from people who did). The '90s were the first decade in which women in general (not just individual musicians or bands) were taken seriously as rockers, and the female rock stars produced by the decade became known for their [[TrueArtIsAngsty raw, angsty lyrics]] (in true '90s grunge fashion). At the same time, the {{riot grrrl}}s, while never enjoying the mainstream success of their male counterparts, also left their mark on the underground with their staunchly feminist brand of PunkRock.
* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{TLC}}, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose TV show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are were the exception (Music/BritneySpears and Music/ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).
* Music/PattiSmith, the archetypal punk rock goddess, took made a nice comeback in the late 1990s after the death of her husband [[Music/{{MC5}} Fred "Sonic" Smith]].



* For a small, brief moment, sometime around 1990-93, groups looking for a looser, more organic break from TheEighties who did not want to join {{Grunge}}mania donned bellbottoms, lacy (or striped) shirts, [[NiceHat Dr. Seuss hats]], platform shoes and vintage music gear (Wurlitzer electric pianos to the fore!), played [[TheSeventies 1970's -inspired rock, Power Pop and funk]] and formed the "retro" movement. Lenny Kravitz, Spin Doctors, Music/{{Jellyfish}}, Blind Melon and {{The Black Crowes}} were the most famous artists from this movement, although it also provided its share of OneHitWonder alternative radio-to-pop radio crossover bands like 4 Non Blondes and School of Fish.

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* For a small, brief moment, sometime around 1990-93, groups looking for a looser, more organic break from TheEighties who did not want to join {{Grunge}}mania donned bellbottoms, lacy (or striped) shirts, [[NiceHat Dr. Seuss hats]], platform shoes and vintage music gear (Wurlitzer electric pianos to the fore!), played [[TheSeventies 1970's -inspired 1970's-inspired rock, Power Pop and funk]] and formed the "retro" movement. Lenny Kravitz, Music/LennyKravitz, Spin Doctors, Music/{{Jellyfish}}, Blind Melon and {{The Music/{{The Black Crowes}} were the most famous artists from this movement, although it also provided its share of OneHitWonder alternative radio-to-pop radio crossover bands like 4 Non Blondes and School of Fish.



** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurodance Eurodance]] was extremely popular throughout TheNineties and [[TurnOfTheMillennium the early oughts]] in much of the whole western world [[AmericansHateTingle except the United States]]. Some of the most recognized bands of the genre include artists such as the Dutch-Belgian/Dutch group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Unlimited 2 Unlimited]], Italian group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiffel_65 Eiffel 65]], Danish group Music/{{Aqua}} (best known in the States for their OneHitWonder "Barbie Girl") and group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modjo Modjo]].

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** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurodance Eurodance]] was extremely popular throughout TheNineties and [[TurnOfTheMillennium the early oughts]] in much of the whole western world [[AmericansHateTingle except the United States]]. Some of the most recognized bands of the genre include artists such as the Dutch-Belgian/Dutch group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Unlimited 2 Unlimited]], Italian group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiffel_65 Eiffel 65]], 65]] (best known in the States for their OneHitWonder "I'm Blue (Da Ba Dee)"), Danish group Music/{{Aqua}} (best known in the States for their OneHitWonder "Barbie Girl") and group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modjo Modjo]].



** The 90s also saw the development and refinement of {{IDM}} (Intelligent Dance Music), which borrowed from forms such as techno, {{drum and bass}}, and acid house music and introduced more abstract elements, including heavy use of digital signal processing. One of, if not ''the'' most well known producer in this genre is Richard James, aka Music/AphexTwin.
** While electronic music was massively popular in Europe and was growing fanbases all over the globe, especially in Australia and parts of Asia and South America, the US music market was [[AmericansHateTingle a much tougher nut to crack]]. Dubbed as "electronica", the music felt perpetually on the cusp of breaking through to the pop mainstream, but despite high hopes from fans, dread from conservative music listeners, and a lot of hype in the press, electronic music remained a largely niche phenomenon in the US.

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** The 90s also saw the development and refinement of {{IDM}} (Intelligent IDM ({{Intelligent Dance Music), Music}}), which borrowed from forms such as techno, {{drum and bass}}, and acid house music and introduced more abstract elements, including heavy use of digital signal processing. One of, if not ''the'' most well known producer in this genre is Richard James, aka Music/AphexTwin.
** While electronic music was massively popular in Europe and was growing fanbases all over the globe, especially in Australia and parts of Asia and South America, the US music market was [[AmericansHateTingle a much tougher nut to crack]]. Dubbed as "electronica", the music felt perpetually on the cusp of breaking through to the pop mainstream, but despite high hopes from fans, dread from conservative music listeners, and a lot of hype in the press, electronic music remained a largely niche phenomenon in the US. It wouldn't be until TheNewTens that it would finally make a big splash.
2nd Sep '17 11:27:31 AM KizunaTallis
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* The biggest one-hit wonder of the '90s was "The Macarena" by Los Del Rio. It stayed atop the charts for 60 whole weeks, which was a record at the time, and might still be. That song popularized, or at least revived the trend of a song coming with its own dance -- while everyone in the '90s strongly denied knowing how to do [[DanceCraze the Macarena]], they were probably lying.

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* The biggest one-hit wonder of the '90s was "The Macarena" by Los Del Rio. It stayed atop the charts for 60 whole weeks, which was a record at the time, and might still be. That song popularized, or at least revived the trend of a song coming with its own dance -- while everyone in the '90s strongly denied knowing how to do [[DanceCraze [[DanceSensation the Macarena]], they were probably lying.
2nd Sep '17 10:57:42 AM KizunaTallis
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* The '90s were the decade in which HipHop and RapMusic first began to receive widespread attention from white listeners, and began to expand beyond its [[BigApplesauce New York]] base. The Music/BeastieBoys, Music/RunDMC, Music/MCHammer, Music/CypressHill, Music/HouseOfPain and Music/VanillaIce helped bring it to mainstream attention early in the decade (and late in [[TheEighties the preceding one]]), but the defining trend in '90s rap music was undoubtedly GangstaRap. The influence of gangsta rap was such that, to this day, many people (particularly those who didn't grow up with hip-hop) [[SmallReferencePools associate all rap music]] with the thug life stories popularized by Music/{{NWA}}, Music/SnoopDogg, [[Music/TupacShakur 2pac]] and [[Music/TheNotoriousBIG Biggie]]. These thug life stories were also the cause of a another major moral panic, with [[MoralGuardians cultural critics]] on both sides deriding the music for its perceived violence, obscenity, misogyny, homophobia and black militancy. Gangsta rap peaked in the mid-'90s with the East Coast/West Coast rap rivalry, and while it declined in influence from there, it had given rap music enough cultural clout to survive on its own. For much of the '90s, [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy white kids who listened to rap music]] were considered AcceptableTargets, and were frequently hit with TotallyRadical jokes.

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* The '90s were the decade in which HipHop and RapMusic rap music first began to receive widespread attention from white listeners, and began to expand beyond its [[BigApplesauce New York]] base. The Music/BeastieBoys, Music/RunDMC, Music/MCHammer, Music/CypressHill, Music/HouseOfPain and Music/VanillaIce helped bring it to mainstream attention early in the decade (and late in [[TheEighties the preceding one]]), but the defining trend in '90s rap music was undoubtedly GangstaRap. The influence of gangsta rap was such that, to this day, many people (particularly those who didn't grow up with hip-hop) [[SmallReferencePools associate all rap music]] with the thug life stories popularized by Music/{{NWA}}, Music/SnoopDogg, [[Music/TupacShakur 2pac]] and [[Music/TheNotoriousBIG Biggie]]. These thug life stories were also the cause of a another major moral panic, with [[MoralGuardians cultural critics]] on both sides deriding the music for its perceived violence, obscenity, misogyny, homophobia and black militancy. Gangsta rap peaked in the mid-'90s with the East Coast/West Coast rap rivalry, and while it declined in influence from there, it had given rap music enough cultural clout to survive on its own. For much of the '90s, [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy white kids who listened to rap music]] were considered AcceptableTargets, and were frequently hit with TotallyRadical jokes.
2nd Sep '17 10:54:33 AM KizunaTallis
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* UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} became a major cultural center for the country during the early '90s, as the home of {{grunge}}, ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' and {{Microsoft}}.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} became a major cultural center for the country during the early '90s, as the home of {{grunge}}, ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' and {{Microsoft}}.UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows.



* Also in the late '90s, America was shocked as a young beauty pageant performer named [=JonBenet=] Ramsey was killed. News coverage of the search for her killer(s) dominated the airwaves for quite a while -- to this day, it remains unsolved. It also had the effect of changing the opinion of child beauty pageants and the StageMom, since both were intensely dissected in the aftermath. Opinion changed from "Oh, she's ''adorable!''" to "This is a little creepy."

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* Also in the late '90s, America was shocked as when a young beauty pageant performer named [=JonBenet=] Ramsey was killed.killed in her home. News coverage of the search for her killer(s) dominated the airwaves for quite a while -- to this day, it remains unsolved. It also had the effect of changing the opinion of child beauty pageants and the StageMom, since both were intensely dissected in the aftermath. Opinion changed from "Oh, she's ''adorable!''" to "This is a little creepy."



* Violence in the media was another hot-button issue. In the early '90s, ''Series/MightMorphinPowerRangers'' had the MoralGuardians having panic-induced heart attacks at the thought of young children imitating their martial-arts style violence. As has been repeatedly stated before, ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was the next big whipping boy, entering the public consciousness after the Columbine massacre, as was ProfessionalWrestling.

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* Violence in the media was another hot-button issue. In the early '90s, ''Series/MightMorphinPowerRangers'' ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' had the MoralGuardians having panic-induced heart attacks at the thought of young children imitating their martial-arts style violence. As has been repeatedly stated before, ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was the next big whipping boy, entering the public consciousness after the Columbine massacre, as was ProfessionalWrestling.
2nd Sep '17 10:50:33 AM KizunaTallis
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** In the UK, anime fandom to some extent mirrored the US, though perhaps due to some terrestrial broadcasters' continuing public-service commitments leading them to show "niche" content, some anime being shown on Creator/Channel4 in late-night slots and even [[Creator/TheBBC BBC2]] apparently showing ''Anime/RoyalSpaceForceTheWingsOfHonneamise'' and possibly even ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. (This has rarely been repeated since outside of Film4's occasional showing of Creator/StudioGhibli films and one or two others.) However, anime's reputation in the country did suffer from the fact that most anime releases did tend to suffer from AllAnimeIsNaughtyTentacles syndrome, being violent, horrific or sexual. Then as now, there's also been a lot of NoExportForYou.

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** In the UK, anime fandom to some extent mirrored the US, though perhaps due to some terrestrial broadcasters' continuing public-service commitments leading them to show "niche" content, some anime being shown on Creator/Channel4 in late-night slots and even [[Creator/TheBBC BBC2]] apparently showing ''Anime/RoyalSpaceForceTheWingsOfHonneamise'' and possibly even ''Manga/{{Akira}}''. (This has rarely been repeated since outside of Film4's [=Film4=]'s occasional showing of Creator/StudioGhibli films and one or two others.) However, anime's reputation in the country did suffer from the fact that most anime releases did tend to suffer from AllAnimeIsNaughtyTentacles syndrome, being violent, horrific or sexual. Then as now, there's also been a lot of NoExportForYou.



* Kids book series really began to turn themselves into franchises- mainly thanks to their publisher, Scholastic. ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' was an anthology of horror books by R.L. Stine which had kids confronting lots of creepy stuff- it spawned a [[Series/{{Goosebumps}} TV show]] on Creator/FoxKids. ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' revolved around a group of kids forced to save the Earth from an invasion of [[PuppeteerParasite Puppeteer Parasites]] with the power to change into different animals- and the horrors of war were taking their toll on the group. It also spawned a [[Series/{{Animorphs}} TV show]] on Nickelodeon, albeit a mediocre one. On the educational side of things, ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicSchoolBus'' took off on PBS (although the books began first), and was so popular it even aired on Fox Kids alongside ''Goosebumps'' (though it aired on weekday afternoons)! And ''Literature/HarryPotter'' also arrived on the scene, but didn't really take off until the next decade. ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' also appeared late in the decade, challenging adults who thought the series "vulgar" and helping kids to get into reading. It hasn't really spawned much, although a film is slated to come out soon.

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* Kids book series really began to turn themselves into franchises- franchises, mainly thanks to their shared publisher, Scholastic. ''Literature/{{Goosebumps}}'' was an anthology of horror books by R.L. Stine which had kids confronting lots of creepy stuff- stuff - it spawned a [[Series/{{Goosebumps}} TV show]] on Creator/FoxKids. ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' revolved around a group of kids forced to save the Earth from an invasion of [[PuppeteerParasite Puppeteer Parasites]] with the power to change into different animals- animals, and the horrors of war were taking their toll on the group. It also spawned a [[Series/{{Animorphs}} TV show]] on Nickelodeon, albeit a mediocre one. On the educational side of things, ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicSchoolBus'' took off on PBS (although the books began first), and was so popular it even aired on Fox Kids alongside ''Goosebumps'' (though it aired on weekday afternoons)! And ''Literature/HarryPotter'' also arrived on the scene, but didn't really take off until the next decade. ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' also appeared late in the decade, challenging adults who thought the series "vulgar" and helping kids to get into reading. It hasn't really spawned much, although a film is slated to come out soon.



* As a result of rapidly development in computers, music technology and consequent reduction in the cost of equipment early in the decade, it became possible for a wider number of musicians to produce ElectronicMusic. Even though initially most of the electronic music was dance music, the genre developed more in the decade as musicians started producing music which was not necessarily designed for the dance floor but rather for home listening (later on referred to as "Electronica") and slower paced music which was played throughout chillout rooms, the relaxation sections of the clubs (later on referred to as "downtempo", "chill-out music" and "ambient music").

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* As a result of rapidly rapid development in computers, music technology and consequent reduction in the cost of equipment early in the decade, it became possible for a wider number of musicians to produce ElectronicMusic. Even though initially most of the electronic music was dance music, the genre developed more in the decade as musicians started producing music which was not necessarily designed for the dance floor but rather for home listening (later on referred to as "Electronica") and slower paced music which was played throughout chillout rooms, the relaxation sections of the clubs (later on referred to as "downtempo", "chill-out music" and "ambient music").



** In the early years of the decade, a genre called {{Trance}} was being developed in Germany and the surrounding countries. The early tracks were a combination of HouseMusic and {{techno}} melodies with the stylistic elements of {{ambient}}, marked by slow build-ups, long extended breakdowns, and regular [[CommonTime 4/4 time]]. Two tracks in particular, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnR_A_zQ3bU "We Came in Peace" by Dance 2 Trance]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30eXKMfrVcw The Age of Love's self-titled song]], stood out as the groundwork for the dance genre, which would go on to split into several different subgenres from different points around the world. Many producers and [=DJs=] in the genre such as Music/ArminVanBuuren, Music/MarkusSchulz, Paul Van Dyk, Paul Oakenfold, and others would begin their careers in this decade and [[LongRunners still maintain successful careers and dedicated fanbases to this day]].

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** In the early years of the decade, a genre called {{Trance}} was being developed in Germany and the surrounding countries. The early tracks were a combination of HouseMusic and {{techno}} melodies with the stylistic elements of {{ambient}}, marked by slow build-ups, long extended breakdowns, and focus on regular [[CommonTime 4/4 time]]. Two tracks in particular, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnR_A_zQ3bU "We Came in Peace" by Dance 2 Trance]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30eXKMfrVcw The Age of Love's self-titled song]], stood out as the groundwork for the dance genre, which would go on to split into several different subgenres from different points around the world. Many producers and [=DJs=] in the genre such as Music/ArminVanBuuren, Music/MarkusSchulz, Paul Van Dyk, Paul Oakenfold, and others would begin their careers in this decade and [[LongRunners still maintain successful careers and dedicated fanbases to this day]].



** The 90s also saw the development and refinement of {{IDM}} (Intelligent Dance Music), which borrowed from forms such as techno, {{drum and bass}}, and acid house music and introduced more abstract elements, including heavy use of digital signal processing. One of, if not ''the'' most well known producer is Richard James, aka Music/AphexTwin.

to:

** The 90s also saw the development and refinement of {{IDM}} (Intelligent Dance Music), which borrowed from forms such as techno, {{drum and bass}}, and acid house music and introduced more abstract elements, including heavy use of digital signal processing. One of, if not ''the'' most well known producer in this genre is Richard James, aka Music/AphexTwin.



* Music/TheBeatles saw a nice revival in popularity, beginning in the mid '90s with ''Anthology'' and spilling over into the early oughts with the release of ''Beatles 1'', as a new generation discovered the band (and the original fans introduced the music to their children).

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* Music/TheBeatles saw a nice revival in popularity, beginning in the mid '90s with ''Anthology'' and spilling over into the early oughts 2000s with the release of ''Beatles 1'', ''[[GreatestHitsAlbum Beatles 1]]'', as a new generation discovered the band (and the original fans introduced the music to their children).



* The Nineties was also a decade in which CountryMusic rode a new wave of popularity outside its rural demographic, fueled by superstar "hat acts" and crossover performers like Music/GarthBrooks, Music/RebaMcEntire, Travis Tritt, Music/AlanJackson, Clint Black, Music/VinceGill, Music/ShaniaTwain, Music/FaithHill (and her future husband, Music/TimMcGraw) and Billy Ray Cyrus (yes, [[Music/MileyCyrus Miley's]] father), along with country groups like Lonestar, The Mavericks and BrooksAndDunn who found a way to market the style to modern, baby-boomer rock audiences while retaining a country/rural image and style. Albums like Garth's ''Ropin' The Wind'' and ''No Fences'' and Billy Ray's ''Some Gave All'' competed mightily with {{Music/Nirvana}} and Music/MichaelJackson on the Billboard album charts, and line dancing was a widespread trend. It helped that Wal*Mart's Soundscan system reinvented how music sales were being counted, revealing a huge interest in crossover country with Wal*Mart shoppers.

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* The Nineties was also a decade in which CountryMusic rode a new wave of popularity outside its rural demographic, fueled by superstar "hat acts" and crossover performers like Music/GarthBrooks, Music/RebaMcEntire, Travis Tritt, Music/AlanJackson, Clint Black, Music/VinceGill, Music/ShaniaTwain, Music/FaithHill (and her future husband, Music/TimMcGraw) and Billy Ray Cyrus (yes, [[Music/MileyCyrus Miley's]] father), along with country groups like Lonestar, The Mavericks Music/{{Lonestar}}, Music/TheMavericks and BrooksAndDunn Music/BrooksAndDunn who found a way to market the style to modern, baby-boomer rock audiences while retaining a country/rural image and style. Albums like Garth's ''Ropin' The Wind'' and ''No Fences'' and Billy Ray's ''Some Gave All'' competed mightily with {{Music/Nirvana}} and Music/MichaelJackson on the Billboard album charts, and line dancing was a widespread trend. It helped that Wal*Mart's Walmart's Soundscan system reinvented how music sales were being counted, revealing a huge interest in crossover country with Wal*Mart Walmart shoppers.



* If you ask South Americans, they will tell you thar this the decade of the Rock En Español. Many Argentinian, Chilean and Mexican rock bands became well known in the mainstreal, although, in the case of Soda Stereo, it was basically becoming continentally famous just in time to dissolve.


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* If you ask South Americans, they will tell you thar that this was the decade of the Rock En Español. Many Argentinian, Chilean and Mexican rock bands became well known in the mainstreal, mainstream, although, in the case of Soda Stereo, it was basically becoming continentally famous over the continent just in time to dissolve.




* The first big controversy was centered around ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', which was never a favorite of those who made the rules. A young boy supposedly lit his trailer home on fire because he wanted to imitate the main characters' pyromaniacal tendencies. The resulting outcry led Creator/{{MTV}} to move the show to a later timeslot, causing a decrease in ratings. Oh, and that boy who lit his trailer home on fire? They didn't have cable.
* Violence in the media was another hot-button issue. In the early '90s, ''PowerRangers'' had the MoralGuardians having panic-induced heart attacks at the thought of young children imitating their martial-arts style violence. As has been repeatedly stated before, ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was the next big whipping boy, entering the public consciousness after the Columbine massacre, as was ProfessionalWrestling.
* Sexuality in the media was another big sticking point. ''NYPDBlue'' had an episode where Dennis Franz' naked ass was shown, creating a great deal of controversy. It also became something of a NeverLiveItDown moment for Franz.
** In the UK it was 1994 before a Lesbian Kiss could be shown in a primetime, non-titillating, sympathetic, manner. It would be another four years before a transsexual woman could be shown in the same way.

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* The first big controversy was centered around ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', which was never a favorite of those who made the rules. A young boy supposedly lit his trailer home on fire because he wanted to imitate the main characters' pyromaniacal pyromaniac tendencies. The resulting outcry led Creator/{{MTV}} to move the show to a later timeslot, causing a decrease in ratings. Oh, and that boy who lit his trailer home on fire? They didn't have cable.
* Violence in the media was another hot-button issue. In the early '90s, ''PowerRangers'' ''Series/MightMorphinPowerRangers'' had the MoralGuardians having panic-induced heart attacks at the thought of young children imitating their martial-arts style violence. As has been repeatedly stated before, ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was the next big whipping boy, entering the public consciousness after the Columbine massacre, as was ProfessionalWrestling.
* Sexuality in the media was another big sticking point. ''NYPDBlue'' ''Series/NYPDBlue'' had an episode where Dennis Franz' Franz's naked ass was shown, creating a great deal of controversy. It also became something of a NeverLiveItDown moment for Franz.
** In the UK UK, it was 1994 before a Lesbian Kiss could be shown in a primetime, non-titillating, non-titillating and sympathetic, manner. It would be another four years before a transsexual woman could be shown in the same way.



** Pedro Zamora, an [[EnsembleDarkhorse audience favorite character]] in ''Series/TheRealWorld: UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco'', died of AIDS just after that season had aired. Pedro's sympathetic portrayal helped change people's minds about what gay and HIV+ people were like.

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** Pedro Zamora, an a [[EnsembleDarkhorse audience fan favorite character]] in participant]] on ''Series/TheRealWorld: UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco'', died of AIDS just after that season had aired. Pedro's sympathetic portrayal helped change people's minds about what gay and HIV+ people were like.



* One of the key figures of '90s controversy was Joycelyn Elders, the Surgeon General under Bill Clinton. Pretty much everything out of her mouth pissed off her opponents: from the suggestion that schools distribute contraceptives and teach a more comprehensive sexual education program to the idea that drugs should be legalized. However, the one concept that will always follow her around was the suggestion that young people should [[ADateWithRosiePalms masturbate]] instead of engaging in potentially risky sexual activity. This was the final nail in her coffin, and she was out after that.

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* One of the key figures of '90s controversy was Joycelyn Elders, the Surgeon General under Bill Clinton. Pretty much everything Everything that came out of her mouth pissed off her opponents: from the suggestion that schools distribute contraceptives and teach a more comprehensive sexual education program to the idea that drugs should be legalized. However, the one concept that will always follow her around was the suggestion that young people should [[ADateWithRosiePalms masturbate]] instead of engaging in potentially risky sexual activity. This was the final nail in her coffin, and she was out after that.



** Or anorexia. Towards the late 90s, there was a big focus on shutting down pro-ana websites, and for a little while it seemed like the obesity rhetoric was toned down in favor or preventing eating disorders.

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** Or anorexia. Towards the late 90s, there was a big focus on shutting down pro-ana "pro-ana" websites, and for a little while it seemed like the obesity rhetoric was toned down in favor or preventing eating disorders.



* Gender politics began to seriously change throughout the decade in ways that suggested the feminist movement of the late 1960's had been ahead of its time. Social attitudes and patterns of thought that had previously been acceptible were challenged and opposed as more women got into postiions of power and influence, especially in TV and the media. There were some notable hangovers of "male chauvanist" hegemony: the PageThreeStunna in UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers, for instance, and the emergence of "lads' mags" as a sort of backlash against against the new reality, such as the controversial ''Magazine/{{Loaded}}'' and its wave of imitators such as ''GQ'' and ''Maxim''. But in the main comedy had to move on from sexist cheap laughs and jokes at the expense of women, minorites and gays. ValuesDissonance became obvious when considering older TV and radio comedy thought [[OnceAcceptableTargets perfectly acceptable]].

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* Gender politics began to seriously change throughout the decade in ways that suggested the feminist movement of the late 1960's had been ahead of its time. Social attitudes and patterns of thought that had previously been acceptible acceptable were challenged and opposed as more women got into postiions positions of power and influence, especially in TV and the media. There were some notable hangovers of "male chauvanist" chauvinist" hegemony: the PageThreeStunna in UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers, for instance, and the emergence of "lads' mags" as a sort of backlash against against the new reality, such as the controversial ''Magazine/{{Loaded}}'' and its wave of imitators such as ''GQ'' and ''Maxim''. But And in the main mainstream, comedy had to move on from sexist cheap laughs and jokes at the expense of women, minorites minorities and gays. ValuesDissonance became obvious when considering older TV and radio comedy thought these groups were [[OnceAcceptableTargets perfectly acceptable]].acceptable joke fodder]].



** In the early 1990s, "Save the Rain Forest" was a particularly popular type of environmentalism, especially among young people. This resulted in films like ''WesternAnimation/FernGullyTheLastRainforest'' and at one point [=McDonald's=] even had rain forest-themed Happy Meal toys.

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** In the early 1990s, "Save the Rain Forest" was a particularly popular type of environmentalism, especially among young people. This resulted in films like ''WesternAnimation/FernGullyTheLastRainforest'' and at one point [=McDonald's=] even had rain forest-themed rainforest-themed Happy Meal toys.



* The Toronto Blue Jays became the first non-American team to win the World Series in 1992 and 1993. The 1994-1995 Major League Baseball players' strike was a major turning point in the history of the sport. This was also the height of the Steroid Era, although the full extent of steroid use was not known yet. The second half of the decade saw the New York Yankees return to prominence after over a decade and a half of mediocrity. 1998 saw professional baseball get a big boost in popularity thanks to Mark [=McGwire=] and Sammy Sosa's chase of the single season home-run record[[note]]Roger Maris, with 61[[/note]]. Both men ended up breaking it[[note]] Mcgwire had 70 to Sosa's 66[[/note]], but the accomplishment would be tarnished by their later accusations of using performance-enhancing drugs. In addition, new teams were established in Colorado, Miami, Arizona, and Tampa.

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* The Toronto Blue Jays became the first non-American team to win the World Series in 1992 and 1993. The 1994-1995 Major League Baseball players' strike was a major turning point in the history of the sport. This was also the height of the Steroid Era, although the full extent of steroid use was not known yet. The second half of the decade saw the New York Yankees return to prominence after over a decade and a half of mediocrity. 1998 saw professional baseball get a big boost in popularity thanks to Mark [=McGwire=] and Sammy Sosa's chase of the single season home-run record[[note]]Roger Maris, with 61[[/note]]. Both men ended up breaking it[[note]] Mcgwire it[[note]][=McGwire=] had 70 to Sosa's 66[[/note]], but the accomplishment would be tarnished by their later accusations of using performance-enhancing drugs. In addition, new teams were established in Colorado, Miami, Arizona, and Tampa.



* This was the decade when personal computers really transitioned from the hi-tech novelty of TheEighties to being an essential part of everyday life, in the home as well as workplaces and schools. Improving technology expanded the scope of what computers were for- multimedia, desktop publishing, and of course the internet- making them worthwhile for more people to get, whilst the rise of graphical user interfaces that had began in the mid-'80s made them more user-friendly than the old text-based/command line driven systems impenetrable to non-specialists and "whizz-kids".
** Nevertheless, computers tended to be much more expensive and a comparative luxury by modern standards. Like televisions in the '50s, most homes had only one computer for the whole family to use (if they had one at all), and in the early part of the decade, it might not have been the latest and greatest model (indeed, a small number of 8-bit machines like the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} and the UsefulNotes/AppleII were still being made in the very early '90s). It would have almost certainly been a desktop- laptops were bulky, expensive and underpowered compared to similarly-priced desktops, and didn't have the advantage of then non-existent wi-fi. Laptops were like cell phones in the early '90s: a status symbol for high-powered executives. For many young people, the only time when they had access to a reasonably modern computer was in school, and then, it was usually only in the computer lab (if the school even had one). And even then, the odd old machine might be still lingering around for certain specific applications. As the decade wore on, [=PCs=] eventually declined in price, and it became a running joke that if you bought a new PC, chances are it would be out of date within 6 months!

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* This was the decade when personal computers really transitioned from the hi-tech novelty of TheEighties to being an essential part of everyday life, in the home as well as workplaces and schools. Improving technology expanded the scope of what computers were for- for - multimedia, desktop publishing, and of course the internet- internet - making them worthwhile for more people to get, whilst the rise of graphical user interfaces that had began in the mid-'80s made them more user-friendly than the old text-based/command line driven systems impenetrable to non-specialists and "whizz-kids".
"whiz-kids".
** Nevertheless, computers tended to be much more expensive and a comparative luxury by modern standards. Like televisions in the '50s, most homes had only one computer for the whole family to use (if they had one at all), and in the early part of the decade, it might not have been the latest and greatest model (indeed, a small number of 8-bit machines like the UsefulNotes/{{Commodore 64}} and the UsefulNotes/AppleII were still being made in the very early '90s). It would have almost certainly been a desktop- desktop, as laptops were bulky, expensive and underpowered compared to similarly-priced desktops, and didn't have the advantage of then non-existent wi-fi. Laptops were like cell phones in the early '90s: a status symbol for high-powered executives. For many young people, the only time when they had access to a reasonably modern computer was in school, and even then, it was usually only in the computer lab (if the school even had one). And even then, the odd old machine might be still lingering around for certain specific applications. As the decade wore on, [=PCs=] eventually declined in price, and it became a running joke that if you bought a new PC, chances are it would be out of date within 6 months!



* Printers were largely of the dot-matrix variety to begin with, before being gradually superseded by the usually superior (and much quieter!) inkjets as the decade progressed; we also saw the beginning of affordable colour printing. Laser printers existed but were usually bulky, expensive, and monochrome, so were only really favoured by large offices.

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* Printers were largely of the dot-matrix variety to begin with, before being gradually superseded by the usually superior (and much quieter!) inkjets as the decade progressed; we also saw the beginning of affordable colour color printing. Laser printers existed but were usually bulky, expensive, and monochrome, so were only really favoured favored by large offices.



* It was also the decade of the CD-ROM, which as the acronym [[note]]Compact Disc-Read Only Memory[[/note]] implied, was only meant for distributing software too big to fit on dozens of floppy discs. Before the internet was really well-established, we also had the phenomenon of the multimedia CD-ROM, an ideal format for educational and reference materials to replace old, musty, boring books and probably an ideal way to get parents to buy their kids a computer as they wouldn't be just using it for nasty things like playing ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''. This also had the upshot of meaning computers and games consoles, like the original Playstation, could play audio [=CDs=] as well.

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* It was also the decade of the CD-ROM, which as the acronym [[note]]Compact acronym[[note]]Compact Disc-Read Only Memory[[/note]] implied, was only meant for distributing software too big to fit on dozens of floppy discs. Before the internet was really well-established, we also had the phenomenon of the multimedia CD-ROM, an ideal format for educational and reference materials to replace old, musty, boring books and probably an ideal way to get parents to buy their kids a computer as they wouldn't be just using it for nasty things like playing ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}''. This also had the upshot of meaning computers and games consoles, like the original Playstation, could play audio [=CDs=] as well.



* The late '90s saw the growth of the "dot-com" bubble, which is when everybody and their dog decided that they were an "e-ntrepreneur" and started up a website offering them some kind of service in the "new economy" that would be created by the internet. As it turned out, claims about the "new economy" were about [[WebTwoPointOh ten years premature]] -- the spectacular burst of the dot-com bubble put a lot of people out of work, killed most of the start-ups that proliferated, and hammered the economy of Silicon Valley. Still, the dot-com bubble was, in hindsight, the clearest turning point in public acceptance of the internet as a necessity of everyday life, as proven by the fact that its bust had such a large impact on the economy. Afterwards, the "old internet" (or "web 1.0"), reserved primarily for computer geeks and first adopters, was replaced with the multi-billion-dollar networks we have today.
* Cell phones were in the transition period between the giant bricks of the '80s and the smaller, sleeker, multimedia-enabled devices of today. While prices were coming down, they were still most definitely a luxury item, even more so than a home computer, and were predominantly the domain of businessmen and people who worked on the go. For the rest of us, there were pagers. (Remember Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}} saying "If the Apocalypse comes, beep me"? That's a pager she's talking about.) Cell phones started becoming smaller, cheaper and more common late in the decade, but even then, anything beyond the basics (sending and receiving calls and text messages) was reserved only for the most high-end models. Service was found only in more urban areas, and was still rather spotty. Text messaging was a lot more expensive than it is today, and was practically unheard of. It wasn't for nothing that most people still relied on land lines during this period, and things like pay phones and the Yellow Pages (massive {{doorstopper}} books that listed all phone numbers in a given area, which still exist today, but are notorious for being immediately thrown out due to their uselessness) were commonplace. The mobile phone boom only really took off at the ''very'' end of the decade, when all of a sudden every man and his dog suddenly seemed to have one- even (gasp!) ''kids!'' \\

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* The late '90s saw the growth of the "dot-com" bubble, which is when everybody and their dog decided that they were an "e-ntrepreneur" and started up a website offering them some kind of service in the "new economy" that would be created by the internet. As it turned out, claims about the "new economy" were about [[WebTwoPointOh ten years premature]] -- the spectacular burst of the dot-com bubble early into the 2000s put a lot of people out of work, killed most of the start-ups that proliferated, and hammered the economy of Silicon Valley. Still, the dot-com bubble was, in hindsight, the clearest turning point in public acceptance of the internet as a necessity of everyday life, as proven by the fact that its bust had such a large impact on the economy. Afterwards, the "old internet" (or "web 1.0"), reserved primarily for computer geeks and first adopters, was replaced with the multi-billion-dollar networks we have today.
* Cell phones were in the transition period between the giant bricks of the '80s and the smaller, sleeker, multimedia-enabled devices of today. While prices were coming down, they were still most definitely a luxury item, even more so than a home computer, and were predominantly the domain of businessmen and people who worked on the go. For the rest of us, there were pagers. (Remember Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}} saying "If the Apocalypse comes, beep me"? That's a pager she's talking about.) Cell phones started becoming smaller, cheaper and more common late in the decade, but even then, anything beyond the basics (sending and receiving calls and text messages) was reserved only for the most high-end models. Service was found only in more urban areas, and was still rather spotty. Text messaging was a lot more expensive than it is today, and was practically unheard of. It wasn't for nothing that most people still relied on land lines during this period, and things like pay phones and the Yellow Pages (massive {{doorstopper}} books that listed all phone numbers in a given area, which still exist today, but are notorious for being immediately thrown out due to their uselessness) were commonplace. The mobile phone boom only really took off at the ''very'' end of the decade, when all of a sudden every man and his dog suddenly seemed to have one- one - even (gasp!) ''kids!'' \\



Due to this transition period, the 90s also saw some now nearly forgotten phone technologies, and strange juxtapositions. Rotary phones (the kind with an analog dial) were still a common sight when cell phones came into the market, so a single household might be using both early 20th century and cutting edge phone technology. There were also "car phones" which could not be used effectively outside the vehicle and were of questionable use inside the vehicle. At home, caller ID was first introduced, creating a minor revolution in how people used the phone, since calls could be screened without resorting to the hassle of an answering machine.\\

* Video gaming really started taking off amongst kids. The early '90s saw the SuperNintendo and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (a.k.a Mega Drive outside of North America), which is seen by some as the first great UsefulNotes/{{console war|s}} -- to this day, it's truly difficult to tell who was the clear-cut winner. Gaming started improving from a technolgical standpoint, and by the late '90s we had both a 64-bit system and the birth of the compact disc as a gaming medium. Creator/{{Nintendo}} briefly owned the market again after Sega started imploding thanks to [[RightHandVersusLeftHand infighting between the American and Japanese divisions]] and [[ExecutiveMeddling general mismanagement]], but [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation Sony]] would take over with the Playstation (one) starting in 1995, and held a choke-hold until the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} came along in the mid '00s. With video games going 3D, side-scrolling platformers became DeaderThanDisco (until nostalgia revived them in the next decade), and by 1997 you could expect to be ostracized for still having a 16-bit system. Ironically, 16-bit platformers have aged much better than most early 3D efforts.\\

to:

Due to this transition period, the 90s also saw some now nearly forgotten phone technologies, and strange juxtapositions. Rotary phones (the kind with an analog dial) were still a common sight when cell phones came into the market, so a single household might be using both early 20th century and cutting edge phone technology. There were also "car phones" which could not be used effectively outside the vehicle and were of questionable use inside the vehicle. At home, caller ID was first introduced, creating a minor revolution in how people used the phone, since calls could be screened without resorting to the hassle of an answering machine.\\

machine.
* Video gaming really started taking off amongst with kids. The early '90s saw the SuperNintendo UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem and the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis (a.k.a Mega Drive outside of North America), which is seen by some as the first great UsefulNotes/{{console war|s}} -- to this day, it's truly difficult to tell who was the clear-cut winner. Gaming started improving from a technolgical technological standpoint, and by the late '90s we had both a 64-bit system and the birth of the compact disc as a gaming medium. Creator/{{Nintendo}} briefly owned the market again after Sega started imploding thanks to [[RightHandVersusLeftHand infighting between the American and Japanese divisions]] and [[ExecutiveMeddling general mismanagement]], but [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation Sony]] would take over with the Playstation (one) starting in 1995, and held a choke-hold until the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} came along in the mid '00s. With video games going 3D, side-scrolling platformers became DeaderThanDisco (until nostalgia revived them in the next decade), and by 1997 you could expect to be ostracized for still having a 16-bit system. Ironically, 16-bit platformers have aged much better than most early 3D efforts.\\



A number of noteworthy trends took place in early-mid '90s gaming. Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' pioneered the MascotWithAttitude in 1991, bringing a TotallyRadical flair into gaming and spawning a legion of [[FollowTheLeader copycats]] who would often take digs at {{Mario}} and [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]]. This trend went out of fashion in the end of the decade, as the Sonic franchise went through its [[UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn Saturn]]-era DorkAge and many of its copycats ran head-first into the PolygonCeiling, with 2001's ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'', a ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''-esque parody of the genre, providing the denouement. FullMotionVideo and virtual reality were also hyped up, with many people predicting that the future of gaming was in interactive movies and the ability to actually be ''in'' the game, man. After a few years of grainy, sub-VHS-quality video with [[DullSurprise production]] [[SpecialEffectFailure values]] [[NoBudget to match]], [[SensoryAbuse eye strain]], and bombs like the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and ''VideoGame/NightTrap'', gamers realized that, no, [[DeaderThanDisco this was not the future]].\\\

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A number of noteworthy trends took place in early-mid '90s gaming. Creator/{{Sega}}'s ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' pioneered the MascotWithAttitude in 1991, bringing a TotallyRadical flair into gaming and spawning a legion of [[FollowTheLeader copycats]] who would often take digs at {{Mario}} Franchise/{{Mario}} and [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]]. This trend went out of fashion in by the end of the decade, as the Sonic franchise went through its [[UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn Saturn]]-era DorkAge and many of its copycats ran head-first into the PolygonCeiling, with 2001's ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'', a ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''-esque parody of the genre, providing the denouement. FullMotionVideo and virtual reality were also hyped up, with many people predicting that the future of gaming was in interactive movies and the ability to actually be ''in'' the game, man. After a few years of grainy, sub-VHS-quality video with [[DullSurprise production]] [[SpecialEffectFailure values]] [[NoBudget to match]], [[SensoryAbuse eye strain]], and bombs like the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy and ''VideoGame/NightTrap'', gamers realized that, no, [[DeaderThanDisco this was not the future]].\\\



Of course, accompanying the growth of gaming was the genesis of the anti-gaming movement, which managed to bring about a Senate hearing over the violence in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' and ''VideoGame/NightTrap''. This prompted the creation of [[MediaWatchdog the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB)]] to pre-empt government censorship. Near the end of the decade, UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} managed to cause a second moral panic over [[MurderSimulators video game violence]], this time targeted at the burgeoning FirstPersonShooter genre. Video games were still viewed very much as a children's activity, and anybody over the age of 16 who still played games was viewed as either a shut-in nerd or an Eric Harris-in-waiting.\\\

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Of course, accompanying the growth of gaming was the genesis of the anti-gaming movement, which managed to bring about a Senate hearing over the violence in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' and ''VideoGame/NightTrap''. This prompted the creation of [[MediaWatchdog the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB)]] to pre-empt preempt government censorship. Near the end of the decade, UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} managed to cause a second moral panic over [[MurderSimulators video game violence]], this time targeted at the burgeoning FirstPersonShooter genre. Video games were still viewed very much as a children's activity, and anybody over the age of 16 who still played games was viewed as either a shut-in nerd or an Eric Harris-in-waiting.\\\



* The DVD first came into the United States in 1997, with ''Film/{{Twister}}'' and ''Film/BladeRunner : The Director's Cut'' the first two movies to be released on the new format. However, it wouldn't be until the following decade that the DVD really shone in popularity and sales figures. Until then, we were stuck with the poorer-quality, and much bulkier, VHS.

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* The DVD first came into the United States in 1997, with ''Film/{{Twister}}'' and ''Film/BladeRunner : ''Film/BladeRunner: The Director's Cut'' the first two movies to be released on the new format. However, it wouldn't be until the following decade that the DVD really shone in popularity and sales figures. Until then, we were stuck with the poorer-quality, and much bulkier, VHS.



* Banking was changed forever by digital technology. In 1990 [=ATMs=] were rare [[note]]and virtually always attached to, if not ''inside'', a bank[[/note]], by 1999, they were on every street corner. Ditto for in store debit, and the number of places that took credit cards. TheNineties became the decade where the only reason to actually talk to someone who worked at the bank was to get a loan or open an account. Until the very late 1990's it was unheard of to pay for fast food with a card.

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* Banking was changed forever by digital technology. In 1990 1990, [=ATMs=] were rare [[note]]and virtually always attached to, if not ''inside'', a bank[[/note]], by 1999, they were on every street corner. Ditto for in store debit, and the number of places that took credit cards. TheNineties became the decade where the only reason to actually talk to someone who worked at the bank was to get a loan or open an account. Until the very late 1990's it was unheard of to pay for fast food with a card.
2nd Sep '17 3:10:36 AM KizunaTallis
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* For the first time in U.S. history, more Americans lived in affluent suburban neighborhoods rather than in cities or towns or on farms. Fueled by this millions-strong middle class, the American "consumer culture" that had been burgeoning since TheFifties reached its apotheosis. There were more creature comforts and general amusements than ever before (including some that were relatively new for the decade, such as cellular phones and hand-held videogame consoles), as well as more people to enjoy them and more dollars with which to buy them. The factor most responsible for setting the stage for this fabulous prosperity remains controversial among social scientists and political pundits, but the general consensus is that the country was reaping a generation's worth of benefits from a dramatic economic shift (dubbed the "New Economy") that had phased out the old industrial labor market (which, had allegedly subordinated the material interests of laborers to those of management) and reoriented American workers toward businesses that capitalized more on individual ingenuity and creativity (such as computer technology).
* The 1990s were the point at which [[DrugsAreBad drug awareness]] reached the point of {{Narm}}. Anti-drug commercials were sprinkled in between shows aimed at eight-year-olds, most of whom [[MisaimedMarketing weren't exactly being offered to begin with]]. [[note]]Though the young actresses involved helped usher millions of boys into adolescence.[[/note]] Programs like DARE were at their most aggressive (and least effective), and Creator/RachaelLeighCook was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwu7L38glcQ tearing up her kitchen for unclear reasons]]. Amongst adults, employee drug tests were ubiquitous no matter your line of work.

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* For the first time in U.S. history, more Americans lived in affluent suburban neighborhoods rather than in cities or towns or on farms. Fueled by this millions-strong middle class, the American "consumer culture" that had been burgeoning since TheFifties reached its apotheosis. [[ConspicuousConsumption apotheosis]]. There were more creature comforts and general amusements than ever before (including some that were relatively new for the decade, such as cellular phones and hand-held videogame video game consoles), as well as more people to enjoy them and more dollars with which to buy them. The factor most responsible for setting the stage for this fabulous prosperity remains controversial among social scientists and political pundits, but the general consensus is that the country was reaping a generation's worth of benefits from a dramatic economic shift (dubbed the "New Economy") that had phased out the old industrial labor market (which, had allegedly subordinated the material interests of laborers to those of management) and reoriented American workers toward businesses that capitalized more on individual ingenuity and creativity (such as computer technology).
* The 1990s were the point at which [[DrugsAreBad drug awareness]] reached the point of {{Narm}}. Anti-drug commercials public service announcements were sprinkled in between shows aimed at eight-year-olds, most of whom [[MisaimedMarketing weren't exactly being offered to begin with]]. [[note]]Though the young actresses involved helped usher millions of boys into adolescence.[[/note]] Programs like DARE were at their most aggressive (and least effective), and Creator/RachaelLeighCook was [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwu7L38glcQ tearing up her kitchen for unclear reasons]]. Amongst adults, employee drug tests were ubiquitous no matter your line of work.



** In the UK, there was a fair bit of controversy surrounding the James Bulger case of 1993, infamously involving two ''ten-year-old boys'' murdering the much younger Bulger, and it had been rumoured they were trying to imitate horror movies such as ''Film/ChildsPlay3''. Naturally prompting a moral panic over the effects of violent media on children...
*** It also helped the MoralGuardians that the details were so sensational. Not only were [[EnfantTerrible two little boys]] the culprits and the victim a toddler but the [[ColdBloodedTorture murder itself]] was absolutely [[NightmareFuel the stuff of nightmares]].

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** In the UK, there was a fair bit of controversy surrounding the James Bulger case of 1993, infamously involving two ''ten-year-old boys'' murdering the much younger Bulger, and it had been rumoured rumored they were trying to imitate horror movies such as ''Film/ChildsPlay3''. Naturally ''Film/ChildsPlay3'', naturally prompting a moral panic over the effects of violent media on children...
children.
*** It also helped the MoralGuardians that the details were so very sensational. Not only were [[EnfantTerrible two little boys]] the culprits and the victim a toddler toddler, but the [[ColdBloodedTorture murder itself]] was absolutely [[NightmareFuel the stuff of nightmares]].



** Pretty much anything attempting to market to Gen-Xers became [[TotallyRadical in your face and EXTREME!!!]] It usually came in one of two flavors: "Don't Just (verb), (verb) [[NoIndoorVoice TO THE EXTREME!!!]]" or "[[NotYourDaddysX This isn't your grandma's (noun)]]."

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** Pretty much anything attempting to market Anything being marketed to Gen-Xers became [[TotallyRadical in your face and EXTREME!!!]] It usually came in one of two flavors: "Don't Just (verb), (verb) [[NoIndoorVoice TO THE EXTREME!!!]]" or "[[NotYourDaddysX This isn't your grandma's (noun)]]."



** The '90s was also the decade in which advertisers sought to drive a wedge in between parents and kids. There is no shortage of ads that appeal to kids by outright excluding adults from the activities they enjoy, or in a more subtle form, creating "kids clubs" so that kids can enjoy Burger King without the interference of the buzzkill parents that actually purchased the meal.

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** The '90s was also the decade in which advertisers sought to drive a wedge in between parents and kids. There is was no shortage of ads that appeal appealed to kids by outright excluding adults from the activities they enjoy, or in a more subtle form, creating "kids "kids' clubs" so that kids can enjoy Burger King without the interference of the buzzkill parents that actually purchased the meal.



* Though they'd made an attempt on the World Trade Center in 1993 and were certainly on the public's radar, radical Muslim terrorists weren't the [[YouCanPanicNow hot-button terrorist threat]] ''du jour''. In the US at least, that was mostly homegrown [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic militia groups]], religious {{cult}}s, and other nutballs. The Unabomber, Oklahoma City, and the UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} UsefulNotes/OlympicGames are the most famous, but there were many others, including a pair of high-profile abortion clinic bombings, and many feared an attack where they lived. Though domestic terrorism certainly didn't ''end'', the media focus turned to Islamic extremism late in the decade.

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* Though they'd made an attempt on the World Trade Center in 1993 and were certainly on the public's radar, radical Muslim terrorists weren't the [[YouCanPanicNow hot-button terrorist threat]] ''du jour''. In the US at least, that was mostly homegrown [[RightWingMilitiaFanatic militia groups]], religious {{cult}}s, and other nutballs. The Unabomber, Oklahoma City, and the UsefulNotes/{{Atlanta}} UsefulNotes/OlympicGames are the most famous, famous incidents, but there were many others, including a pair of high-profile abortion clinic bombings, and many feared an attack where they lived. Though domestic terrorism certainly didn't ''end'', the media focus turned to Islamic extremism late in the decade.



* Starting in the '90s, a lot of the stigma surrounding such things as cohabitation and single-parent homes started to slowly fade away. (''Series/MurphyBrown'''s single motherhood -- a fact of life that seems ridiculously banal today -- was actually an issue in [[UsefulNotes/DanQuayle the 1992 Presidential election]].) As opposed to the earlier decades when people kept problems to themselves, the mental focus of the '90s was all about being open with one's life issues. Gay rights were just starting to be a topic of conversation, though cultural mores generally kept gay relationships in subtext rather than text.

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* Starting in the '90s, a lot of the stigma surrounding such things as cohabitation and single-parent homes started to slowly fade away. (''Series/MurphyBrown'''s single motherhood -- a fact of life that seems ridiculously banal today -- was actually an issue in [[UsefulNotes/DanQuayle the 1992 Presidential election]].) As opposed to the earlier decades when people kept problems to themselves, the mental focus of the '90s was all about being open with one's life issues. Gay rights were just starting to be become a topic of conversation, though cultural mores generally kept gay relationships in subtext rather than text.



* As for the US {{networks}}, Creator/{{NBC}} was pretty much king of the roost thanks to its lineup of {{sitcom}}s, Creator/{{Fox}} had ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''Series/TheXFiles'', and its massive sports contracts to fall back on, and Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{ABC}} were pretty much neck-and-neck at the bottom. ABC did have a success story with TGIF, though. 1995 saw the birth of Creator/TheWB and Creator/{{UPN}}, and while neither would reach the mass appeal of the Big Four, they would ultimately be successful within their own niches (teenagers and young adults for the WB, and African-Americans for UPN).
* Cable (and, in the US, it was just cable; satellite TV didn't become a thing until very late in the decade like it did in the UK) was still largely a wasteland of reruns, UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, cooking shows, infomercials, movies, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and]] [[PoorMansPorn scrambled softcore porn]]. The common joke about cable, as told in a famous Music/BruceSpringsteen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAlDbP4tdqc song]], was that it was "57 channels and nothin' on." Creator/USANetwork, for instance, was mainly known in those days for their game show reruns and the ''USA Cartoon Express''. The few channels that did become popular did so by carving out their own niches instead of trying to compete with broadcast television; Creator/{{MTV}} targeted teenaged and young adult music fans, Creator/{{ESPN}} targeted sports fans, Creator/{{HBO}} targeted movie buffs, Creator/CartoonNetwork and Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} dueled for children's viewership, and the Creator/DiscoveryChannel, Creator/TheHistoryChannel, and Creator/{{TLC}} competed for people who wanted to feel smart. It was only at the end of the decade when HBO started debuting shows like ''Series/TheSopranos'' and ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' and proving that cable was a viable outlet for popular original programming; before then, the Big Four networks stood dominant.
* In the UK, it was the decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "[[Main/InNameOnly merging]]" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/Channel4 stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).
* The '90s was more or less the decade of the {{sitcom}}. ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'', and ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' led the way, followed by ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' and ''Series/{{Friends}}''. The two most popular setups for sitcoms in the era seemed to be either a) {{dysfunctional famil|y}}ies (taking after ''Married...'', ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''), or b) "hip" singles in the city, often [[FriendsRentControl living together]] (taking after ''Frasier'' and ''Friends''). SturgeonsLaw, of course, was in full effect, and since the aforementioned shows were so popular, the 90% of crap was that much bigger from all the copycats. The worst sitcoms today would seem positively mediocre compared to some of the things that aired back then, like ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJXB_6bKa2g&feature=related Charlie Hoover]]''.

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* As for the US {{networks}}, Creator/{{NBC}} was pretty much the king of the roost thanks to its lineup of {{sitcom}}s, {{sitcom}}s. Creator/{{Fox}} had ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', ''Series/TheXFiles'', and its massive sports contracts to fall back on, and Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{ABC}} were pretty much neck-and-neck at the bottom. ABC did have a success story with TGIF, though. 1995 saw the birth of Creator/TheWB and Creator/{{UPN}}, and while neither would reach the mass appeal of the Big Four, they would ultimately be successful within their own niches (teenagers and young adults for the WB, and African-Americans for UPN).
* Cable (and, in the US, it was just cable; satellite TV didn't become a thing until very late in the decade like it did in the UK) was still largely a wasteland of reruns, UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, [[UsefulNotes/{{Syndication}} syndicated shows]], cooking shows, infomercials, movies, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and]] [[PoorMansPorn scrambled softcore porn]]. The common joke about cable, as told in a famous Music/BruceSpringsteen [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAlDbP4tdqc song]], was that it was "57 channels and nothin' on." Creator/USANetwork, for instance, was mainly known in those days for their game show reruns and the ''USA Cartoon Express''. The few channels that did become popular did so by carving out their own niches instead of trying to compete with broadcast television; Creator/{{MTV}} targeted teenaged teenage and young adult music fans, Creator/{{ESPN}} targeted sports fans, Creator/{{HBO}} targeted movie buffs, Creator/CartoonNetwork and Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} dueled for children's viewership, and the Creator/DiscoveryChannel, Creator/TheHistoryChannel, and Creator/{{TLC}} competed for people who wanted to feel smart. It was only at the end of the decade when HBO started debuting shows like ''Series/TheSopranos'' and ''Series/SexAndTheCity'' and proving proved that cable was a viable outlet for popular original programming; before then, the Big Four networks stood dominant.
* In the UK, it was the this decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "[[Main/InNameOnly merging]]" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/Channel4 stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) videos) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).
* The '90s was more or less the decade of the {{sitcom}}. ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'', and ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' led the way, followed by ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' and ''Series/{{Friends}}''. The two most popular setups for sitcoms in the era seemed to be either a) {{dysfunctional famil|y}}ies (taking after ''Married...'', ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'', and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''), or b) "hip" singles in the city, often [[FriendsRentControl living together]] (taking after ''Frasier'' and ''Friends''). SturgeonsLaw, of course, was in full effect, and since the aforementioned shows were so popular, a deluge of uninspired copycats trying to cash in on the 90% of crap was that much bigger from all the copycats.trend. The worst sitcoms today would seem positively mediocre compared to some of the things that aired back then, like ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJXB_6bKa2g&feature=related Charlie Hoover]]''.



** Creator/FoxKids and Creator/KidsWB started in this decade, challenging the Big 3 with innovative programming (excepting NBC, which quit early in the decade to focus on ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' and its' ilk).
** After decades in the AnimationAgeGhetto, animated series began to appear that were aimed at adults as well as children -- and sometimes [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids not even particularly at children]]. ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' was the show that started this boom, acting as an edgy pop culture touchstone for much of the decade, its characters' {{catch phrase}}s entering the "hip" lexicon. Following in its wake, ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', and most notoriously, ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' (among other [[Series/{{Dinosaurs}} less than]] [[WesternAnimation/FishPolice successful]] attempts) really started to push the envelope as to what stories could be told via animation, often with fantastic results. Even children's shows like ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'', ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpy'', and ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' played a giant game of "[[GettingCrapPastTheRadar let's see what we can slip past the censors]]," and often won.
** Action cartoons also began to try and break out of the ghetto with Creator/HannaBarbera's ''WesternAnimation/SwatKats'', ABC's ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatAm'' (based off the mega-popular [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog video game]]), and Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''WesternAnimation/{{Exosquad}}'' having lots of rather violent action and dark plots for kids cartoons; ultimately this, along with a bunch of other factors (''What-A-Cartoon'' (see below) causing ''SWAT Kats'' to be canceled, Disney acquired ABC and remade it's Saturday AM lineup, resulting in ''Sonic'' getting the boot; ''Exosquad'', being syndicated, was placed in crappy timeslots) caused them to end before they should've. All three series still retain an immense following (with ''Sonic'' continuing in a way via the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie Comics series]], and the creators of ''SWAT Kats'' recently creating a Kickstarter for a rebooted series).

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** Creator/FoxKids and Creator/KidsWB started in this decade, challenging the Big 3 with innovative programming (excepting NBC, which quit early in the decade to focus on ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' and its' its ilk).
** After decades in the AnimationAgeGhetto, animated series began to appear that were aimed at adults as well as children -- and sometimes [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids not even particularly at children]]. ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' was the show that started this boom, acting as an edgy pop culture touchstone for much of the decade, its characters' {{catch phrase}}s entering the "hip" lexicon. Following in its wake, ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheAnimatedSeries'', and most notoriously, ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' (among other [[Series/{{Dinosaurs}} less than]] [[WesternAnimation/FishPolice successful]] attempts) really started to push the envelope as to what stories could be told via animation, often with fantastic results. Even children's shows like ''WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife'', ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpy'', and ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' played a giant game of "[[GettingCrapPastTheRadar let's see what we can slip past the censors]]," censors]]" and often won.
** Action cartoons also began to try and break out of the ghetto with Creator/HannaBarbera's ''WesternAnimation/SwatKats'', ABC's ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatAm'' (based off the mega-popular [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog video game]]), and Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''WesternAnimation/{{Exosquad}}'' having lots of rather violent action and dark plots for kids kids' cartoons; ultimately this, along with a bunch of other factors (''What-A-Cartoon'' (see below) causing ''SWAT Kats'' to be canceled, Disney acquired ABC and remade it's Saturday AM lineup, resulting in ''Sonic'' getting the boot; ''Exosquad'', being syndicated, was placed in crappy timeslots) caused them to end before they should've. All three series still retain an immense following (with ''Sonic'' continuing in a way via the [[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Archie Comics series]], and the creators of ''SWAT Kats'' recently creating a Kickstarter in 2015 for a rebooted series).



** Creator/CartoonNetwork began in 1992, initially airing reruns of older cartoons, before producing ''What A Cartoon!'' and ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' in the middle part of the decade.

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** Creator/CartoonNetwork began in 1992, initially airing reruns of older cartoons, before producing ''What A Cartoon!'' ''WesternAnimation/WhatACartoonShow'' and ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'' in the middle part of the decade.decade and continued to grow with the creation of the Creator/CartoonCartoons block showcasing original programming.



* The [[TwentyFourHourNewsNetworks 24-hour cable news machine]] really got its motor running in the '90s, starting with Creator/{{CNN}}'s famous coverage of the UsefulNotes/GulfWar. With national stories coming to a head (UsefulNotes/BillClinton's [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown involvement with Monica Lewinsky]]; [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome JonBenet Ramsey]]; UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}}; [[IfItBleedsItLeads OJ Simpson]]), a combination of the networks and the Internet made reporting what it is today (same info repeated ad nauseum, new info as needed). Sadly, this also started the trend of news networks latching onto and subsequently overreporting whatever they deemed to be the "next big thing".
* The GameShow genre hit its lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended, with Lifetime, USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family having eliminated their games, while Nickelodeon began focusing on other programming; and the GSN originals of the time (especially the infamous ''[[Series/TheGongShow Extreme Gong]]'') weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.

to:

* The [[TwentyFourHourNewsNetworks 24-hour cable news machine]] really got its motor running in the '90s, starting with Creator/{{CNN}}'s famous coverage of the UsefulNotes/GulfWar. With national stories coming to a head (UsefulNotes/BillClinton's [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown involvement with Monica Lewinsky]]; [[MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome JonBenet Ramsey]]; UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}}; [[IfItBleedsItLeads OJ Simpson]]), a combination of the networks and the Internet made reporting what it is today (same info repeated ad nauseum, new info as needed). Sadly, this also started the trend of news networks latching onto and subsequently overreporting over-reporting on whatever they deemed to be the "next big thing".
* The GameShow genre hit its lowest point since the quiz-show scandals during the decade, as show after show got cancelled. Of the shows that debuted in syndication for the 1990-91 season (reboots of ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''Series/TheJokersWild'', ''Quiz Kids Challenge'', ''Trump Card'' and ''Series/TheChallengers''), none survived into the next season- season, primarily because of the ''Series/WheelOfFortune''/''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' ''Series/WheelOfFortune''[=/=]''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'' combo snagging the good timeslots and destroying any other games put against it. The networks, especially NBC and ABC, had completely cleared their schedules of games by 1995, and CBS merely had ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' by that time. However, cable networks began to take over instead- the Creator/USANetwork had both originals and plenty of reruns, and what was then [[Creator/ABCFamily The Family Channel]] took a similar approach. Nickelodeon had their own shows, as did Creator/{{Lifetime}}. Creator/{{GSN}} launched in 1994, to the delight of fans of the classics. But by the end of the decade, nearly all of the original cable games had ended, with Lifetime, USA and the newly-renamed Fox Family having eliminated their games, while Nickelodeon began focusing on other programming; and the GSN originals of the time (especially the infamous ''[[Series/TheGongShow Extreme Gong]]'') weren't very good. But at the tail-end of the decade, when ABC decided to import a show from Britain called ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'', the genre was given new life, with new prime-time games popping up overnight- even if half the new shows were [[WhoWantsToBeWhoWantsToBeAMillionaire Millionaire clones]]. This carried over into the next decade, with mixed results.



* Viewership of a show lived and died on the TV ratings. If, say, the network scheduled your favorite show out of order or preempted it with sports, the best you could hope for was to write a letter and hope they read it. There were no [=DVDs=] for repeated watching of a show, and whilst some shows might have got a [=VHS=] release (which was often impractical due to the bulky tapes taking up vast amounts of shelf space), KeepCirculatingTheTapes applied in a lot more cases. Online communities (to get the word out about the mistreatment of a show) were still embryonic -- it was only late in the decade that networks began caring (slightly) about a show's online "buzz", as this meant that the show was reaching a wealthy and educated audience. (''Series/TheXFiles'' was one of the first shows to really see growth in popularity connected to its internet fandom.)

to:

* Viewership of a show lived and died on the TV ratings. If, say, the network scheduled your favorite show out of order or preempted it with sports, the best you could hope for was to write a letter and hope they read it. There were no [=DVDs=] for repeated watching of a show, and whilst some shows might have got a [=VHS=] VHS release (which was often impractical due to the bulky tapes taking up vast amounts of shelf space), KeepCirculatingTheTapes applied in a lot more cases. Online communities (to get the word out about the mistreatment of a show) were still embryonic -- it was only late in the decade that networks began caring (slightly) about a show's online "buzz", as this meant that the show was reaching a wealthy and educated audience. (''Series/TheXFiles'' was one of the first shows to really see growth in popularity connected to its internet fandom.)



* The drink synonymous with the '90s was coffee. Whereas in the past, coffee was what mom and dad drank in the mornings while reading the newspaper, in the '90s coffee became a trendy, must-have beverage, often ordered with a ton of modifiers (tall half-caf, no sugar, whipped cream, two shots of espresso, et cetera). This was the point where Starbucks began (and continues) to pick up in popularity. The fact that coffee was associated with the "hip" cultural center of UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} was probably not a coincidence.

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* The drink most synonymous with the '90s was coffee. [[MustHaveCaffeine coffee]]. Whereas in the past, coffee was what mom and dad drank in the mornings while reading the newspaper, in the '90s coffee became a trendy, must-have beverage, often ordered with a ton of modifiers (tall half-caf, no sugar, whipped cream, two shots of espresso, et cetera). flavored syrup, etc). This was the point where Starbucks began (and continues) to pick up in popularity.popularity and the franchise is still going strong. The fact that coffee was associated with the "hip" cultural center of UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} was probably not a coincidence.



* Towards the end of the decade, some food products aimed at kids would advertise how EXTREME!! they were by coming in different colors. Green ketchup and blue french fries showed up on shelves, and a lot of kids food changed color when it was being prepared. The products didn't taste any different, but they did stain your clothes a lot more than the normal stuff, and the trend of colored food died out pretty quickly.

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* Towards the end of the decade, some food products aimed at kids would advertise how EXTREME!! "EXTREME!!" they were by coming in different colors. Green ketchup and blue french fries showed up on shelves, and a lot of kids food changed color when it was being prepared. The products didn't taste any different, but they did stain your clothes a lot more than the normal stuff, and the trend novelty of colored food died out pretty quickly.



* In the UnitedKingdom it was all change for no change as the Right-Wing eighties conservative government hung on, generating sex-scandal, after sex-scandal, after corruption-scandal until 1997 and UsefulNotes/TonyBlair took power. The attempts by the Conservatives to hang onto power is generally considered to have delayed the Northern Ireland peace process for at least 3 years.
** Also in the UK, Glasgow began to throw off its ViolentGlaswegian heritage and modernise the city centre. This had the side effect of causing a musical and artistic explosion in the late '90s that bore serious fruit in the following decade.

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* In the UnitedKingdom UsefulNotes/UnitedKingdom it was all change for no change as the Right-Wing eighties conservative government hung on, generating sex-scandal, after sex-scandal, after corruption-scandal until 1997 and UsefulNotes/TonyBlair took power. The attempts by the Conservatives to hang onto power is generally considered to have delayed the Northern Ireland peace process for at least 3 years.
** Also in the UK, Glasgow began to throw off its ViolentGlaswegian heritage and modernise modernize the city centre.center. This had the side effect of causing a musical and artistic explosion in the late '90s that bore serious fruit in the following decade.



** Against this backdrop two former Soviet republics, Armenia and Azerbaijan, went to war over the Armenian-populated enclave of UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, formerly an autonomous oblast within the Azerbaijani SSR, as soon as the Soviet Union toppled. The war ended in a ceasefire in 1994 that is still ongoing. Nagorno-Karabakh declared independence but has to date not been recognized by any country, at least until some peace deal is brokered.

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** Against this backdrop backdrop, two former Soviet republics, Armenia and Azerbaijan, went to war over the Armenian-populated enclave of UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, formerly an autonomous oblast within the Azerbaijani SSR, as soon as the Soviet Union toppled. The war ended in a ceasefire in 1994 that is still ongoing. Nagorno-Karabakh declared independence but has to date not been recognized by any country, at least until some peace deal is brokered.



* In Canada, the country comes within a hairs breath (Within ''1%'') of the country splitting apart with Quebec voting to separate from that Canada in an provincial referendum. Fortunately, while the Federalists side despaired that all they seemed to do is delay the inevitable, the frustrated separatist Quebec premier inadvertently prevented that when he went into a SoreLoser tirade complaining about he was thwarted by "Money and the ethnic vote." At that rash statement, his comrades gave themselves a massive FacePalm while minorities got a forceful reminder at how brazenly ethnocentric the separatist side was, and thus the "winning conditions" to have a third separation referendum have proved frustratingly out of reach.

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* In Canada, the country comes came within a hairs hair's breath (Within (within ''1%'') of the country splitting apart with Quebec voting to separate from that Canada in an a provincial referendum. Fortunately, while the Federalists side despaired that all they seemed to do is delay the inevitable, the frustrated separatist Quebec premier inadvertently prevented that when he went into a SoreLoser tirade complaining about he was thwarted by "Money and the ethnic vote." At that rash statement, his comrades gave themselves a massive FacePalm while minorities got a forceful reminder at how brazenly ethnocentric the separatist side was, and thus the "winning conditions" to have a third separation referendum have proved frustratingly out of reach.



* What was rock music like in the '90s? Well, HairMetal hung on for the first couple of years in bold defiance of good taste, but was soon acid-washed [[DeaderThanDisco from history]] by {{grunge}}. Grunge, in turn, suffered a backlash as Music/KurtCobain [[DrivenToSuicide killed himself]] and increasingly derivative bands partook in a lyrical style that Creator/NathanRabin dubbed "Hunger-Dunger-Dang." However, even though grunge itself was out, the musical style influenced many bands in what is now known as "PostGrunge", which became prevalent late in the decade and remained so until UsefulNotes/TheNewTens. NuMetal arose and peaked around the same time as post-grunge, and Music/{{emo}} was first starting to get mainstream attention thanks to Music/{{Weezer}}.

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* What was rock music like in the '90s? Well, HairMetal hung on for the first couple of years in bold defiance of good taste, changing tides, but was soon acid-washed [[DeaderThanDisco from history]] by {{grunge}}. Grunge, in turn, suffered a backlash as Music/KurtCobain [[DrivenToSuicide killed himself]] and increasingly derivative bands partook in a lyrical style that Creator/NathanRabin dubbed "Hunger-Dunger-Dang." However, even though grunge itself was out, the musical style influenced many bands in what is now known as "PostGrunge", which became prevalent late in the decade and remained so until UsefulNotes/TheNewTens. NuMetal arose and peaked around the same time as post-grunge, and Music/{{emo}} was first starting to get mainstream attention thanks to Music/{{Weezer}}.



** The 1990s also saw the birth of "Nu Metal", a genre that blended elements of heavy metal, hardcore punk, grunge, and rap. Notable bands from this genre include Korn, Slipknot, Limp Bizkit, and Deftones. Despite the name, however, the genre was (and continues to be) loathed by many traditional heavy metal fans, and many don't even consider it to be a real metal genre.
* The 1990s was the decade in which the popularity of VisualKei in Japan became almost as widespread as it would ever be. The various subgenres formed out of and split off from Visual Shock, several of the original Visual Shock bands were at the apex of their fame for the time being (and some for their entire careers), and the era is considered one of the most creative and innovative within Visual. More can be found on the Useful Notes page for Visual Kei, but the scene and its subgenres that existed at the time were doing ''very'' well for a while. The combined onslaught of the years of the Lost Decade economy finally wearing down economic input and interest in the scene, a series of major disbandments and hiatuses (Music/XJapan, Music/{{Kuroyume}}, Music/MaliceMizer, Music/LunaSea, Music/SEIKIMAII and many others would all be disbanded by 2000, with most reuniting around late in TheNoughties or early in TheNewTens), a series of public scandals and deaths (including that of one of the founders of the scene, hide, and Malice Mizer's drummer, Kami), and general interest in rock and metal dying out for a while made this drop off as the 2000s began, until international interest and renewed interest locally, the advent of YouTube showing off old bands to new fans, and an infusion of new talent in the forms of acts such as Music/{{Miyavi}}, Music/DirEnGrey and the advent of adapted styles such as Oshare Kei and Digital Kei would revive the scene in the late 2000s.
* The '90s were the decade in which [[HipHop hip-hop/rap]] first began to receive widespread attention from white listeners, and began to expand beyond its [[BigApplesauce New York]] base. The Music/BeastieBoys, Music/RunDMC, Music/MCHammer, Music/CypressHill, Music/HouseOfPain and Music/VanillaIce helped bring it to mainstream attention early in the decade (and late in [[TheEighties the preceding one]]), but the defining trend in '90s rap music was undoubtedly GangstaRap. The influence of gangsta rap was such that, to this day, many people (particularly those who didn't grow up with hip-hop) [[SmallReferencePools associate all rap music]] with the thug life stories popularized by Music/{{NWA}}, Music/SnoopDogg, [[Music/TupacShakur 2pac]] and [[Music/TheNotoriousBIG Biggie]]. These thug life stories were also the cause of a another major moral panic, with [[MoralGuardians cultural critics]] on both sides deriding the music for its perceived violence, obscenity, misogyny, homophobia and black militancy. Gangsta rap peaked in the mid-'90s with the East Coast/West Coast rap rivalry, and while it declined in influence from there, it had given rap music enough cultural clout to survive on its own. For much of the '90s, [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy white kids who listened to rap music]] were considered AcceptableTargets, and were frequently hit with TotallyRadical jokes.

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** The 1990s also saw the birth of "Nu Metal", a genre that blended elements of heavy metal, hardcore punk, grunge, and rap. Notable bands from this genre include Korn, Slipknot, Limp Bizkit, Music/{{Korn}}, Music/{{Slipknot}}, Music/LimpBizkit, and Deftones.Music/Deftones. Despite the name, however, the genre was (and continues to be) loathed by many traditional heavy metal fans, and many don't even consider it to be a real metal genre.
* The 1990s was the decade in which the popularity of VisualKei in Japan became almost as widespread as it would ever be. The various subgenres formed out of and split off from Visual Shock, several of the original Visual Shock bands were at the apex of their fame for the time being (and some for their entire careers), and the era is considered one of the most creative and innovative within Visual. More can be found on the Useful Notes page for Visual Kei, but the scene and its subgenres that existed at the time were doing ''very'' well for a while. The combined onslaught of the years of the Lost Decade economy finally wearing down economic input and interest in the scene, a series of major disbandments break-ups and hiatuses (Music/XJapan, Music/{{Kuroyume}}, Music/MaliceMizer, Music/LunaSea, Music/SEIKIMAII and many others would all be disbanded by 2000, with most reuniting around late in TheNoughties or early in TheNewTens), a series of public scandals and deaths (including that of one of the founders of the scene, hide, Hideto "hide" Matsumoto, and Malice Mizer's drummer, Kami), and general interest in rock and metal dying out for a while made this drop off as the 2000s began, until international interest and renewed interest locally, the advent of YouTube showing off old bands to new fans, and an infusion of new talent in the forms of acts such as Music/{{Miyavi}}, Music/DirEnGrey and the advent of adapted styles such as the LighterAndSofter Oshare Kei and Digital Kei would revive the scene in the late 2000s.
* The '90s were the decade in which [[HipHop hip-hop/rap]] HipHop and RapMusic first began to receive widespread attention from white listeners, and began to expand beyond its [[BigApplesauce New York]] base. The Music/BeastieBoys, Music/RunDMC, Music/MCHammer, Music/CypressHill, Music/HouseOfPain and Music/VanillaIce helped bring it to mainstream attention early in the decade (and late in [[TheEighties the preceding one]]), but the defining trend in '90s rap music was undoubtedly GangstaRap. The influence of gangsta rap was such that, to this day, many people (particularly those who didn't grow up with hip-hop) [[SmallReferencePools associate all rap music]] with the thug life stories popularized by Music/{{NWA}}, Music/SnoopDogg, [[Music/TupacShakur 2pac]] and [[Music/TheNotoriousBIG Biggie]]. These thug life stories were also the cause of a another major moral panic, with [[MoralGuardians cultural critics]] on both sides deriding the music for its perceived violence, obscenity, misogyny, homophobia and black militancy. Gangsta rap peaked in the mid-'90s with the East Coast/West Coast rap rivalry, and while it declined in influence from there, it had given rap music enough cultural clout to survive on its own. For much of the '90s, [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy white kids who listened to rap music]] were considered AcceptableTargets, and were frequently hit with TotallyRadical jokes.



** in Latin America there were two main derivative from hip-hop. The first was the technomerengue, a fusion of poppy hip-hop with Dominican merengue, mostly embraced by artists of Caribbean origins like Proyecto Uno, Ilegales, Calle Ciega, Sandy & Papo and El General, among others. The other was the rap-reagee movement in Puerto Rico, specially the artists recorded in the albums series "The Noise", whose musical style eventually progressed into what we now call reggaeton.

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** in In Latin America there were two main derivative from hip-hop. The first was the technomerengue, a fusion of poppy hip-hop with Dominican merengue, mostly embraced by artists of Caribbean origins like Proyecto Uno, Ilegales, Calle Ciega, Sandy & Papo and El General, among others. The other was the rap-reagee rap-reggae movement in Puerto Rico, specially the artists recorded in the albums series "The Noise", whose musical style eventually progressed into what we now call reggaeton.



* The "'90s singer-songwriter" was practically a trope in and of itself. Mention the names Music/LizPhair, Music/AlanisMorissette, Music/{{Jewel}}, Sheryl Crow or Music/SarahMcLachlan to any woman in her 30s or late-20s, and she will most likely regale you with tales of the great music festival that was Lilith Fair (whether or not she actually went there; there's a good chance she got her stories from people who did). The '90s were the first decade in which women in general (not just individual musicians or bands) were taken seriously as rockers, and the female rock stars produced by the decade became known for their [[TrueArtIsAngsty raw, angsty lyrics]] (in true '90s grunge fashion). At the same time, the {{riot grrrl}}s, while never enjoying the mainstream success of their male counterparts, also left their mark on the underground with their staunchly feminist brand of PunkRock.
* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose tv show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are the exception (Music/BritneySpears and Music/ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).

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* The "'90s singer-songwriter" was practically a trope in and of itself. Mention the names Music/LizPhair, Music/AlanisMorissette, Music/{{Jewel}}, Sheryl Crow or Music/SarahMcLachlan to any woman in her 30s or late-20s, late 20s/early 30s, and she will most likely regale you with tales of the great music festival that was Lilith Fair (whether or not she actually went there; there's a good chance she got her stories from people who did). The '90s were the first decade in which women in general (not just individual musicians or bands) were taken seriously as rockers, and the female rock stars produced by the decade became known for their [[TrueArtIsAngsty raw, angsty lyrics]] (in true '90s grunge fashion). At the same time, the {{riot grrrl}}s, while never enjoying the mainstream success of their male counterparts, also left their mark on the underground with their staunchly feminist brand of PunkRock.
* Combining the above two points, the pop princesses of the 90's were mostly R&B artists. Music/MariahCarey, TLC, Music/{{Brandy}} (whose tv TV show ''Series/{{Moesha}}'' was ''the'' show for teen girls), Monica, and so on. The Music/SpiceGirls are the exception (Music/BritneySpears and Music/ChristinaAguilera didn't get big until '99 and are thus better associated with the 2000's).



* The biggest one-hit wonder of the '90s was "The Macarena" by Los Del Rio. It stayed atop the charts for 60 whole weeks, which was a record at the time, and might still be. That song popularized, or at least revived the trend of a song coming with its own dance -- while everyone in the '90s strongly denied knowing how to do the Macarena, they were probably lying.
* With the advent of the internet, some music fans begin to start their own websites devoted to music, and begin the earliest {{blog}}s. Pitchfork Media, begun by a college dropout in 1997, would become a major player in music criticism in the next decade (after years of featuring hammy, poorly written reviews which often gave low scores to beloved records just because).
* The mid-'90s also saw the rebirth of swing music/dance, as well as some clothing styles (mostly bowling shirts) from TheFifties. Within a few years, the fad had faded, but the music, dance, and to a lesser degree the clothing, was at a higher baseline than before the boom. This is probably best showcased in the movie ''Film/{{Swingers}}''.

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* The biggest one-hit wonder of the '90s was "The Macarena" by Los Del Rio. It stayed atop the charts for 60 whole weeks, which was a record at the time, and might still be. That song popularized, or at least revived the trend of a song coming with its own dance -- while everyone in the '90s strongly denied knowing how to do [[DanceCraze the Macarena, Macarena]], they were probably lying.
* With the advent of the internet, TheInternet, some music fans begin to start their own websites devoted to music, and begin the earliest {{blog}}s. Pitchfork Media, begun by a college dropout in 1997, would become a major player in music criticism in the next decade (after years of featuring hammy, poorly written reviews which often gave low scores to beloved records just because).
* The mid-'90s mid '90s also saw the rebirth of swing music/dance, as well as some clothing styles (mostly bowling shirts) from TheFifties. Within a few years, the fad had faded, but the music, dance, and to a lesser degree the clothing, was at a higher baseline than before the boom. This is probably best showcased in the movie ''Film/{{Swingers}}''.



* If you ask an European what music was like in the '90s, chances are he'll talk to you about [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurodance Eurodance]], a genre of electronic dance music that was extremely popular throughout TheNineties and [[TurnOfTheMillennium the early oughts]], in pretty much the whole western world except the United States. Some of the most recognized bands of the genre include artists such as the Dutch-Belgian/Dutch group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Unlimited 2 Unlimited]], Italian group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiffel_65 Eiffel 65]], Danish group Music/{{Aqua}} and group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modjo Modjo]].

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* If you ask an European what As a result of rapidly development in computers, music technology and consequent reduction in the cost of equipment early in the decade, it became possible for a wider number of musicians to produce ElectronicMusic. Even though initially most of the electronic music was like dance music, the genre developed more in the '90s, chances are he'll talk decade as musicians started producing music which was not necessarily designed for the dance floor but rather for home listening (later on referred to you about as "Electronica") and slower paced music which was played throughout chillout rooms, the relaxation sections of the clubs (later on referred to as "downtempo", "chill-out music" and "ambient music").
**
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurodance Eurodance]], a genre of electronic dance music that Eurodance]] was extremely popular throughout TheNineties and [[TurnOfTheMillennium the early oughts]], oughts]] in pretty much of the whole western world [[AmericansHateTingle except the United States.States]]. Some of the most recognized bands of the genre include artists such as the Dutch-Belgian/Dutch group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Unlimited 2 Unlimited]], Italian group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiffel_65 Eiffel 65]], Danish group Music/{{Aqua}} (best known in the States for their OneHitWonder "Barbie Girl") and group [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modjo Modjo]].Modjo]].
** In the early years of the decade, a genre called {{Trance}} was being developed in Germany and the surrounding countries. The early tracks were a combination of HouseMusic and {{techno}} melodies with the stylistic elements of {{ambient}}, marked by slow build-ups, long extended breakdowns, and regular [[CommonTime 4/4 time]]. Two tracks in particular, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnR_A_zQ3bU "We Came in Peace" by Dance 2 Trance]] and [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30eXKMfrVcw The Age of Love's self-titled song]], stood out as the groundwork for the dance genre, which would go on to split into several different subgenres from different points around the world. Many producers and [=DJs=] in the genre such as Music/ArminVanBuuren, Music/MarkusSchulz, Paul Van Dyk, Paul Oakenfold, and others would begin their careers in this decade and [[LongRunners still maintain successful careers and dedicated fanbases to this day]].
** A more raw and harder-edged style of electronic music called big beat, which usually uses heavy breakbeats and synthesizer-generated loops and patterns, gained great popularity in the later parts of the decade. Among the most commercially successful acts in this genre were European acts such as Music/TheProdigy, Music/TheChemicalBrothers, Music/FatboySlim, The Crystal Method, Groove Armada and Basement Jaxx.
** The 90s also saw the development and refinement of {{IDM}} (Intelligent Dance Music), which borrowed from forms such as techno, {{drum and bass}}, and acid house music and introduced more abstract elements, including heavy use of digital signal processing. One of, if not ''the'' most well known producer is Richard James, aka Music/AphexTwin.
** While electronic music was massively popular in Europe and was growing fanbases all over the globe, especially in Australia and parts of Asia and South America, the US music market was [[AmericansHateTingle a much tougher nut to crack]]. Dubbed as "electronica", the music felt perpetually on the cusp of breaking through to the pop mainstream, but despite high hopes from fans, dread from conservative music listeners, and a lot of hype in the press, electronic music remained a largely niche phenomenon in the US.
** Electronic music also wasn't free from the scorn of the moral guardians, becoming something of TheNewRockAndRoll. Electronic music concerts, also known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rave "raves"]], and festivals such as the Love Parade, and nightclubs like Gatecrasher became notorious for their association with different kinds of hard drugs, most especially ecstasy. Laws such as the "RAVE (Reducing Americans' Vulnerability to Ecstasy) Act" were hastily passed in the process.



* The biggest celebrity of TheEighties, Music/MichaelJackson, started the decade off well with the album ''Dangerous''. But in 1993 accusations of child molestation and his choice to settle out of court with the alleged victim's family, as well as with the son of one of his maids over similar claims, soiled his FriendToAllChildren reputation and started a downward trajectory for his career. By decade's end he was better known (particularly in the U.S.) for his tabloid-friendly antics than his music, and this would not change until [[DeadArtistsAreBetter his death in 2009]].

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* The biggest celebrity of TheEighties, Music/MichaelJackson, started the decade off well with the album ''Dangerous''. But in 1993 1993, accusations of child molestation and his choice to settle out of court with the alleged victim's family, as well as with the son of one of his maids over similar claims, soiled his FriendToAllChildren reputation and started a downward trajectory for his career. By decade's end end, he was better known (particularly in the U.S.) for his tabloid-friendly antics than his music, and this would not change until [[DeadArtistsAreBetter his death in 2009]].
1st Sep '17 5:07:03 AM Doug86
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** Also on the 3D animation front, ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' got underway in 1994, as the first CGI-made TV series, and (much like ABC stablemate ''Sonic'') gained renown for it's complex plots. Unfortunately, when Disney took over ABC they banished ''Sonic'' and ''ReBoot'' back to Canada. However, ''ReBoot'' managed to survive in syndication and on Cartoon Network, and also led to ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' being revived with the equally complex ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''.

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** Also on the 3D animation front, ''WesternAnimation/ReBoot'' got underway in 1994, as the first CGI-made TV series, and (much like ABC stablemate ''Sonic'') gained renown for it's complex plots. Unfortunately, when Disney took over ABC they banished ''Sonic'' and ''ReBoot'' ''[=ReBoot=]'' back to Canada. However, ''ReBoot'' ''[=ReBoot=]'' managed to survive in syndication and on Cartoon Network, and also led to ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' being revived with the equally complex ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''.
28th Aug '17 9:20:53 AM SeptimusHeap
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* This is the decade where international interest in ''[[SoapOpera telenovelas]]'' truly exploded, expanding even further that it was in the previous decade. The decade was practically dominated by Mexican shows, with Venezuelan ones following its steps, at least during the first half. Thalia became a household name on three continents, thanks to the three "María" soaps she starred, up to ''Series/MariaLaDelBarrio''. On the latter half, interest for productions from Brazil and Colombia's soaps increased, due to the comparatively "grittier" and "realistic" feeling they had compared with the most classical Mexican exports, without putting the romance on the backseat. Among the Brazilian soaps, series like ''Pantanal'' and ''Xica da Silva'' generated intercontinental interest, while Colombia grabbed some on its own with ''Café con aroma de mujer'', ''Las Aguas Mansas'', and ''YoSoyBettyLaFea''.

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* This is the decade where international interest in ''[[SoapOpera telenovelas]]'' truly exploded, expanding even further that it was in the previous decade. The decade was practically dominated by Mexican shows, with Venezuelan ones following its steps, at least during the first half. Thalia became a household name on three continents, thanks to the three "María" soaps she starred, up to ''Series/MariaLaDelBarrio''. On the latter half, interest for productions from Brazil and Colombia's soaps increased, due to the comparatively "grittier" and "realistic" feeling they had compared with the most classical Mexican exports, without putting the romance on the backseat. Among the Brazilian soaps, series like ''Pantanal'' and ''Xica da Silva'' generated intercontinental interest, while Colombia grabbed some on its own with ''Café con aroma de mujer'', ''Las Aguas Mansas'', and ''YoSoyBettyLaFea''.''Series/YoSoyBettyLaFea''.



* In 1993, ''MagicTheGathering'' became the first successful collectable card game (at least in the United States). It would be followed by several other competing [=CCGs=]. None would succeed at surpassing ''Magic's'' popularity, at least until TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} came along...Even then though, most people with Pokémon cards simply collected them with no other motivation. It took until the following decade, when ''Manga/YuGiOh'' took the world by storm, for most of the kids with Pokémon cards to realize there was a game attached to it. Hence, ''Magic: The Gathering'' remained the only truly popular collectible card game people actually ''played''.

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* In 1993, ''MagicTheGathering'' ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' became the first successful collectable card game (at least in the United States). It would be followed by several other competing [=CCGs=]. None would succeed at surpassing ''Magic's'' popularity, at least until TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} came along...Even then though, most people with Pokémon cards simply collected them with no other motivation. It took until the following decade, when ''Manga/YuGiOh'' took the world by storm, for most of the kids with Pokémon cards to realize there was a game attached to it. Hence, ''Magic: The Gathering'' remained the only truly popular collectible card game people actually ''played''.
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