History UsefulNotes / TheNineties

23rd Feb '17 9:21:53 PM SpukiKitty
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Added DiffLines:

*** It also helped the MoralGuardians that the details were so sensational. Not only were [[EnfantTerrible two little boys]] the culprits and the victim a toddler but the [[ColdBloodedTorture murder itself]] was absolutely [[NightmareFuel the stuff of nightmares]].
20th Feb '17 5:34:29 PM nombretomado
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* Gender politics began to seriously change throughout the decade in ways that suggested the feminist movement of the late 1960's had been ahead of its time. Social attitudes and patterns of thought that had previously been acceptible were challenged and opposed as more women got into postiions of power and influence, especially in TV and the media. There were some notable hangovers of "male chauvanist" hegemony: the PageThreeStunna in BritishNewspapers, for instance, and the emergence of "lads' mags" as a sort of backlash against against the new reality, such as the controversial ''Magazine/{{Loaded}}'' and its wave of imitators such as ''GQ'' and ''Maxim''. But in the main comedy had to move on from sexist cheap laughs and jokes at the expense of women, minorites and gays. ValuesDissonance became obvious when considering older TV and radio comedy thought [[OnceAcceptableTargets perfectly acceptable]].

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* Gender politics began to seriously change throughout the decade in ways that suggested the feminist movement of the late 1960's had been ahead of its time. Social attitudes and patterns of thought that had previously been acceptible were challenged and opposed as more women got into postiions of power and influence, especially in TV and the media. There were some notable hangovers of "male chauvanist" hegemony: the PageThreeStunna in BritishNewspapers, UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers, for instance, and the emergence of "lads' mags" as a sort of backlash against against the new reality, such as the controversial ''Magazine/{{Loaded}}'' and its wave of imitators such as ''GQ'' and ''Maxim''. But in the main comedy had to move on from sexist cheap laughs and jokes at the expense of women, minorites and gays. ValuesDissonance became obvious when considering older TV and radio comedy thought [[OnceAcceptableTargets perfectly acceptable]].
17th Feb '17 8:24:52 PM Doug86
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** Across ThePond, by contrast, this is the decade where ''Franchise/DoctorWho'' was mainly conspicuous by its ''absence'' from TV screens, having been cancelled by Creator/TheBBC in 1989. The one HopeSpot was the [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie starring Paul McGann]], designed to try and finally crack the US market for the show it never took off into a new series, which would have to wait until 2005. [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse A loyal fanbase meant the franchise, along with various spinoffs and tributes, continued in other media, though.]]

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** Across ThePond, by contrast, this is the decade where ''Franchise/DoctorWho'' ''Series/DoctorWho'' was mainly conspicuous by its ''absence'' from TV screens, having been cancelled by Creator/TheBBC in 1989. The one HopeSpot was the [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie starring Paul McGann]], designed to try and finally crack the US market for the show it never took off into a new series, which would have to wait until 2005. [[Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse A loyal fanbase meant the franchise, along with various spinoffs and tributes, continued in other media, though.]]
5th Feb '17 6:52:03 PM ethansloan
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* For a small, brief moment, sometime around 1990-93, groups looking for a looser, more organic break from TheEighties who did not want to join {{Grunge}}mania donned bellbottoms, lacy (or striped) shirts, [[NiceHat Dr. Seuss hats]], platform shoes and vintage music gear (Wurlitzer electric pianos to the fore!), played [[TheSeventies 1970's -inspired rock, Power Pop and funk]] and formed the "retro" movement. Lenny Kravitz, Spin Doctors, Music/{{Jellyfish}}, Blind Melon and The Black Crowes were the most famous artists from this movement, although it also provided its share of OneHitWonder alternative radio-to-pop radio crossover bands like 4 Non Blondes and School of Fish.

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* For a small, brief moment, sometime around 1990-93, groups looking for a looser, more organic break from TheEighties who did not want to join {{Grunge}}mania donned bellbottoms, lacy (or striped) shirts, [[NiceHat Dr. Seuss hats]], platform shoes and vintage music gear (Wurlitzer electric pianos to the fore!), played [[TheSeventies 1970's -inspired rock, Power Pop and funk]] and formed the "retro" movement. Lenny Kravitz, Spin Doctors, Music/{{Jellyfish}}, Blind Melon and The {{The Black Crowes Crowes}} were the most famous artists from this movement, although it also provided its share of OneHitWonder alternative radio-to-pop radio crossover bands like 4 Non Blondes and School of Fish.
24th Jan '17 11:16:20 AM ZombieAladdin
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* No one saw it coming, but the 1990's were the last decade of the record[=/=]CD[=/=]cassette store. Some malls would even have two or three of them. There would be music playing on the sound system - and some stores even had several CD players with headphones so you could sample a CD before you bought it. Stores would sell T-shirts and other merchandise, too. Working in a music store was some good cred for a young adult, and definitely brag-worthy. The door was slammed shut on them in 2000 practically on the nose with the rise of Napster. You can still buy music on CD in a store now, but nothing like back in the 1990's. What few stores remain today adapted by expanding to selling movies and sometimes video games along with music, or with places like Amoeba Music in Hollywood, live off of their reputations and the musicians themselves coming in to visit.

to:

* No one saw it coming, but the 1990's were the last decade of the record[=/=]CD[=/=]cassette store. Some malls would even have two or three of them. There would be music playing on the sound system - and some stores even had several CD players with headphones so you could sample a CD before you bought it. Stores would sell T-shirts and other merchandise, too. Working in a music store was some good cred for a young adult, and definitely brag-worthy. The door was slammed shut on them in 2000 practically on the nose with the rise of Napster. You can still buy music on CD in a store now, but nothing like back in the 1990's. What few stores remain today adapted by expanding to selling movies and sometimes video games along with music, or with places like Amoeba Music in Hollywood, geographically close to performers and record labels, live off of their reputations and the musicians themselves coming in to visit.
24th Jan '17 11:13:35 AM ZombieAladdin
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* No one saw it coming, but the 1990's were the last decade of the record[=/=]CD[=/=]cassette store. Some malls would even have two or three of them. There would be music playing on the sound system - and some stores even had several CD players with headphones so you could sample a CD before you bought it. Stores would sell T-shirts and other merchandise, too. Working in a music store was some good cred for a young adult, and definitely brag-worthy. The door was slammed shut on them in 2000 practically on the nose with the rise of Napster. You can still buy music on CD in a store now, but nothing like back in the 1990's. What few stores remain today adapted by expanding to selling movies and sometimes video games along with music.

to:

* No one saw it coming, but the 1990's were the last decade of the record[=/=]CD[=/=]cassette store. Some malls would even have two or three of them. There would be music playing on the sound system - and some stores even had several CD players with headphones so you could sample a CD before you bought it. Stores would sell T-shirts and other merchandise, too. Working in a music store was some good cred for a young adult, and definitely brag-worthy. The door was slammed shut on them in 2000 practically on the nose with the rise of Napster. You can still buy music on CD in a store now, but nothing like back in the 1990's. What few stores remain today adapted by expanding to selling movies and sometimes video games along with music.music, or with places like Amoeba Music in Hollywood, live off of their reputations and the musicians themselves coming in to visit.
19th Jan '17 4:50:43 PM Xtifr
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** Running alongside this trend (and indeed pre-dating it by several years) was Music/{{Phish}}, a Vermont alternative rock band that became a touring juggernaut completely under the nose of mainstream music outlets. Just like their primary influence the GratefulDead did in the late 60's and early 70's.

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** Running alongside this trend (and indeed pre-dating it by several years) was Music/{{Phish}}, a Vermont alternative rock band that became a touring juggernaut completely under the nose of mainstream music outlets. Just like their primary influence the GratefulDead Music/TheGratefulDead did in the late 60's and early 70's.
10th Jan '17 4:37:37 PM ZombieAladdin
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* In 1993, ''MagicTheGathering'' became the first successful collectable card game (at least in the United States). It would be followed by several other competing [=CCGs=]. None would succeed at surpassing ''Magic's'' popularity, at least until {{Pokemon}} came along...

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* In 1993, ''MagicTheGathering'' became the first successful collectable card game (at least in the United States). It would be followed by several other competing [=CCGs=]. None would succeed at surpassing ''Magic's'' popularity, at least until {{Pokemon}} TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} came along...Even then though, most people with Pokémon cards simply collected them with no other motivation. It took until the following decade, when ''Manga/YuGiOh'' took the world by storm, for most of the kids with Pokémon cards to realize there was a game attached to it. Hence, ''Magic: The Gathering'' remained the only truly popular collectible card game people actually ''played''.



Outside the PC and console arenas, arcades were still popular in the first half of the '90s. Many big restaurants and other establishments had at least one or two machines, and many department stores of the day had a section (usually at the entrance) where the arcade games could be found. At the start of the decade, these machines only needed one quarter to play, just like in the '80s. Then ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' and other games came out which needed two quarters to play, and the prices would only go up from there. Around the mid '90s, arcades began a long decline in popularity, as home consoles started catching up to what the dedicated hardware of an arcade cabinet was capable of. While they were still somewhat popular by 2000, by then the writing was on the wall.

to:

Outside the PC and console arenas, arcades were still popular in the first half of the '90s. Many big restaurants and other establishments had at least one or two machines, and many department stores of the day had a section (usually at the entrance) where the arcade games could be found. At the start of the decade, these machines only needed one quarter to play, just like in the '80s. Then ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' and other games came out which needed two quarters to play, and the prices would only go up from there. Around the mid '90s, arcades began a long decline in popularity, as home consoles started catching up to what the dedicated hardware of an arcade cabinet was capable of. While they were still somewhat popular by 2000, by then the writing was on the wall. Averted in Japan, however: In Japan, arcades are viewed as social hang-out spots for children and teenagers, particularly in urban areas. Any noticeable decline in arcade density in Japan would not occur until around 2014, and for entirely different reasons than in the west.\\\
Speaking of arcades, {{pinball}} would see its highest ever heights and its rock-bottom within this decade. Beginning on a high note with 1990's ''Pinball/FunHouse'', in 1992, [[Creator/MidwayGames Bally]] would release ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'', the top-selling pinball machine of all time and arguably the only pinball machine that went mainstream. Due to ''The Addams Family'', every arcade had a few pinball games somewhere. However, by 1999, pinball would become so obscure and unpopular that every company that made them either went out of business or moved to more profitable industries, rendering pinball a dead industry for the decade's last few months.
4th Jan '17 6:33:53 PM GranadalandDreamer
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* In the UK, it was the decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "merging" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/Channel4 stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).

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* In the UK, it was the decade that pretty much finished Creator/TheBBC and [[Creator/{{ITV}} ITV]] duopoly once and for all, thanks in part to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcasting_Act_1990 the deregulation of the Thatcher government]] and the emergence of satellite TV (and to a lesser extent cable). In terms of satellite TV, there was a short-lived rivalry between the government-backed British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB), offering a 5-channel lineup of varied, mostly British-oriented fare, and UsefulNotes/RupertMurdoch's Creator/{{Sky}}, broadcasting on the pan-European Astra satellite along with a number of other early satellite/cable ventures, and relying much more on entertainment and US imports. This ended with the two services eventually "merging" "[[Main/InNameOnly merging]]" (read: BSB was taken over by Sky) in late 1990. On the terrestrial front, Creator/Channel4 stopped being funded by ITV, and took a more commercial direction with sometimes raunchy live entertainment shows, as opposed to the more dry, intellectual fare it presented in TheEighties; whilst the launch of Creator/ChannelFive (with accompanying Music/SpiceGirls video!) promised a new, fresh approach to over-the-air broadcasting (but ultimately being notorious for its mildly sordid late night fare).
1st Jan '17 4:12:18 PM Xtifr
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** Meanwhile, the liberation of air broadcasting in several Latin American countries in the early-mid '90s led to the need to fill endless hours of broadcast time in the early morning and late afternoon/early evening. With what they filled it, you ask? With several hundred hours of dubbed anime (mostly licensed {{Toei}} fare), that's what. The anime boom came to Latin America a decade before it landed in the US, with series like ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', ''Manga/SaintSeiya'', ''Manga/DragonBall'' (the full series, not just ''Anime/DragonBallZ''), ''Manga/SlamDunk'' and ''Manga/CaptainTsubasa'', among dozens of others, becoming household names on par with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' south of the border.

to:

** Meanwhile, the liberation of air broadcasting in several Latin American countries in the early-mid '90s led to the need to fill endless hours of broadcast time in the early morning and late afternoon/early evening. With what they filled it, you ask? With several hundred hours of dubbed anime (mostly licensed {{Toei}} Creator/ToeiAnimation fare), that's what. The anime boom came to Latin America a decade before it landed in the US, with series like ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', ''Manga/SaintSeiya'', ''Manga/DragonBall'' (the full series, not just ''Anime/DragonBallZ''), ''Manga/SlamDunk'' and ''Manga/CaptainTsubasa'', among dozens of others, becoming household names on par with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' south of the border.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheNineties