History UsefulNotes / TeaAndTeaCulture

17th Sep '17 11:28:47 AM nombretomado
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* Tea is popularly made with electric kettles rather than stovetops or microwaves. Such electric kettles are that much more popular in Britain than in the U.S. (where it didn't catch on outside college students making [[RamenAsDehydratedNoodles instant ramen]]).

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* Tea is popularly made with electric kettles rather than stovetops or microwaves. Such electric kettles are that much more popular in Britain than in the U.S. (where it didn't catch on outside college students making [[RamenAsDehydratedNoodles [[UsefulNotes/RamenAsDehydratedNoodles instant ramen]]).
1st Sep '17 4:59:45 PM aristos_achaion
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* Southern-style sweet tea is very much an acquired taste, largely because it's ''very'' sweet. It's made by brewing the tea with sugar added to the pot, resulting in a concoction that can have twice as much sugar as Coca-Cola. Lemon is commonly added as well. Iced tea is common elsewhere in the country (and was invented in St. Louis, Missouri, for the 1904 World's Fair, which also gave us the ice-cream cone), but it's nowhere near as sweet as the Southern variety. Within the South, there's some debate as to whether you add the sugar when the tea is cold or hot (the latter slightly caramelizes the sugar for flavor). Despite being in the South itself, New Orleans (borrowing from Cajun culture) drinks its tea like the North, much to the consternation of other Southerners passing through town. ([[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]], who is from Georgia, was truly stunned when he found this out firsthand in his ''Feasting on Asphalt'' series.)

to:

* Southern-style sweet tea is very much an acquired taste, largely because it's ''very'' sweet. It's made by brewing the tea with sugar added to the pot, resulting in a concoction that can have twice as much sugar as Coca-Cola[[note]]A common ratio is 1 cup of sugar per quart of tea, which results in about 75g of sugar for a 12oz serving, as opposed to 39g for a 12oz can of Coca-Cola.[[/note]]. Lemon is commonly added as well. Iced tea is common elsewhere in the country (and was invented in St. Louis, Missouri, for the 1904 World's Fair, which also gave us the ice-cream cone), but it's nowhere near as sweet as the Southern variety. Within the South, there's some debate as to whether you add the sugar when the tea is cold or hot (the latter slightly caramelizes the sugar for flavor). Despite being in the South itself, New Orleans (borrowing from Cajun culture) drinks its tea like the North, much to the consternation of other Southerners passing through town. ([[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]], who is from Georgia, was truly stunned when he found this out firsthand in his ''Feasting on Asphalt'' series.)
2nd Aug '17 6:22:50 PM DavidDelony
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Starting in TheNineties, tea culture finally started to take off in the States. Loose-leaf tea started to appear, albeit mostly limited to specialty stores, tea shops, and mail order but you're also now seeing experimental brands of premium tea, like Tazo. (You can find British and Irish brands, but they tend to be significantly marked up.) You're even starting to see more electric kettles like in Britain. Asian tea varieties are also making an appearance, meaning that for British visitors, their best bet at finding tea they'd actually be impressed with would be in a Chinese or Japanese restaurant.

to:

Starting in TheNineties, tea culture finally started to take off in the States.States [[PopularityPolynomial (again)]], possibly due to the growth of anglophilia. Loose-leaf tea started to appear, albeit mostly limited to specialty stores, tea shops, and mail order but you're also now seeing experimental brands of premium tea, like Tazo. (You can find British and Irish brands, but they tend to be significantly marked up.) You're even starting to see more electric kettles like in Britain. Asian tea varieties are also making an appearance, meaning that for British visitors, their best bet at finding tea they'd actually be impressed with would be in a Chinese or Japanese restaurant.
9th Jul '17 9:08:21 AM nombretomado
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** During the occupation after WorldWarTwo, the district of East Frisia had its own unique food rationing cards. The main difference was that tea was treated as one of the basic necessities like bread and potatoes, instead of a luxury good like coffee.

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** During the occupation after WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the district of East Frisia had its own unique food rationing cards. The main difference was that tea was treated as one of the basic necessities like bread and potatoes, instead of a luxury good like coffee.
17th Jun '17 10:45:40 PM karstovich2
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** Morocco even has a tea ceremony, albeit not as elaborate as Japan's. When tea is being served to an honored guest, the host makes a big show of bringing in all the trays, tasting the tea halfway through boiling, and pouring it at least a meter high (to obtain the optimal mixture and aeration). Because Moroccan tea is very sweet (a joking saying in Morocco is "Moroccans don't drink tea, they drink honey), they have special sugar "cubes"--really bricks about 10 cm long by 1.5 cm wide and 1 cm deep--to provide the massive sweetness the ceremonial pot of tea requires. Moroccans will also insist on the highest-quality water so as not to detract from the flavor. In southern parts of the country (which are mostly desert), the tea preparation process can take as long as an hour and a half -- for just tea!

to:

** Morocco even has a tea ceremony, albeit not as elaborate as Japan's. When tea is being served to an honored guest, the host makes a big show of bringing in all the trays, tasting the tea halfway through boiling, and pouring it at least a meter high (to obtain the optimal mixture and aeration). Because Moroccan tea is very sweet (a joking saying in Morocco is "Moroccans don't drink tea, they drink honey), honey"), they have special sugar "cubes"--really bricks about 10 cm long by 1.5 cm wide and 1 cm deep--to provide the massive sweetness the ceremonial pot of tea requires. Moroccans will also insist on the highest-quality water so as not to detract from the flavor. In southern parts of the country (which are mostly desert), the tea preparation process can take as long as an hour and a half -- for just tea!
17th Jun '17 10:44:59 PM karstovich2
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** Morocco even has a tea ceremony, albeit not as elaborate as Japan's. When tea is being served to an honored guest, the host makes a big show of bringing in all the trays, tasting the tea halfway through boiling, and pouring it at least a meter high (to obtain the optimal mixture and aeration). Moroccans will also insist on the highest-quality water so as not to detract from the flavor. In southern parts of the country (which are mostly desert), the tea preparation process can take as long as an hour and a half -- for just tea!

to:

** Morocco even has a tea ceremony, albeit not as elaborate as Japan's. When tea is being served to an honored guest, the host makes a big show of bringing in all the trays, tasting the tea halfway through boiling, and pouring it at least a meter high (to obtain the optimal mixture and aeration). Because Moroccan tea is very sweet (a joking saying in Morocco is "Moroccans don't drink tea, they drink honey), they have special sugar "cubes"--really bricks about 10 cm long by 1.5 cm wide and 1 cm deep--to provide the massive sweetness the ceremonial pot of tea requires. Moroccans will also insist on the highest-quality water so as not to detract from the flavor. In southern parts of the country (which are mostly desert), the tea preparation process can take as long as an hour and a half -- for just tea!
17th Jun '17 10:26:59 PM karstovich2
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* Southern-style sweet tea is very much an acquired taste, largely because it's ''very'' sweet. It's made by brewing the tea with sugar added to the pot, resulting in a concoction that can have twice as much sugar as Coca-Cola. Lemon is commonly added as well. Iced tea is common elsewhere in the country (and was invented in St. Louis, Missouri, for the 1904 World's Fair, which also gave us the ice-cream cone), but it's nowhere near as sweet as the Southern variety. Within the South, there's some debate as to whether you add the sugar when the tea is cold or hot (the latter slightly caramelizes the sugar for flavor). Despite being in the South itself, New Orleans (borrowing from Cajun culture) drinks its tea like the North, much to the consternation of other Southerners passing through town. (Southerner [[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]] was truly stunned when he found this out firsthand in his ''Feasting on Asphalt'' series.)

to:

* Southern-style sweet tea is very much an acquired taste, largely because it's ''very'' sweet. It's made by brewing the tea with sugar added to the pot, resulting in a concoction that can have twice as much sugar as Coca-Cola. Lemon is commonly added as well. Iced tea is common elsewhere in the country (and was invented in St. Louis, Missouri, for the 1904 World's Fair, which also gave us the ice-cream cone), but it's nowhere near as sweet as the Southern variety. Within the South, there's some debate as to whether you add the sugar when the tea is cold or hot (the latter slightly caramelizes the sugar for flavor). Despite being in the South itself, New Orleans (borrowing from Cajun culture) drinks its tea like the North, much to the consternation of other Southerners passing through town. (Southerner [[Series/GoodEats ([[Series/GoodEats Alton Brown]] Brown]], who is from Georgia, was truly stunned when he found this out firsthand in his ''Feasting on Asphalt'' series.)
17th Jun '17 10:18:10 PM karstovich2
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** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, the largest centre of the tea trading business[[note]]I.e. that was where nearly all the firms and brokerages had their headquarters, and so that was where they kept all the records on who owned how much tea, and what kind of tea, and where it all was; the warehouses where the physical tea was actually stored were in a number of locations across the country[[/note]] in the British Empire. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]]. [[NotHyperbole That is not an exaggeration;]] the British government bought every ounce of 1943's global tea crop that was available to them at wholesale. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.

to:

** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, the largest centre of the tea trading business[[note]]I.e. business[[note]]That is, that was where nearly all the firms and brokerages had their headquarters, and so that was where they kept all the records on who owned how much tea, and what kind of tea, and where it all was; the their documents. The warehouses where the physical tea was actually stored were in a number of locations across the country[[/note]] country. The bombing did not destroy all that much tea; the street is so short that it couldn't hold a single warehouse. However, the bombing did obliterate all the records of where the tea was, how much was in each place, and who owned it all.[[/note]] in the British Empire. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]]. [[NotHyperbole That is not an exaggeration;]] the British government bought every ounce of 1943's global tea crop that was available to them at wholesale. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.
17th Jun '17 10:11:34 PM karstovich2
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As a relative latecomer to the transcontinental trade, the East India Company had to make do with the proverbial scraps left over from the Portuguese, and then the Dutch (the world's great merchant-shipping power in the 17th century). However, Dutch supremacy could not last forever, and it was in the field of textiles and tea in particular that their early advantage counted against them. The Dutch had moved, ruthlessly, to monopolise the supply and transportation of spices, which were quite easily the most valuable goods to be found in the East. However, the demand for spices proved limited; people can only eat so much of them, and their value eventually went down as the European market became saturated. On the other hand the British had almost completely borrowed the Dutch financial system, added small but significant improvements (particularly the invention of modern shipping insurance), more or less gotten over their [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar political troubles]], and [[Series/{{Connections}} invited a Dutchman over to... kind of... be King]] in 1688. With this, Britain managed to get enough money to exploit an unnoticed niche in the market: they would realise and capitalise upon the price elasticity of demand[[note]]The basic economic measure of how much demand for a product changes with its price. For relatively "inelastic" goods, even if the price changes a lot, the demand for it won't change that much -- think medication, for instance, which you're always going to need. For "elastic" goods, if the price falls a little, many more people will demand it, and if it rises a little, many more people will give up and just not demand it anymore. What this means is that for an inelastic good, raising prices typically increases profits because the amount lost from the people no longer demanding the good is easily made up for by the increase in price, while for elastic goods, profits usually go up when prices go down, because the amount lost from the fact that buyers are paying the seller less is more than made up for by the number of people who can buy it at the new low price but couldn't at the old higher one.[[/note]] for cotton and silk clothing (leading directly to the catastrophic collapse of the British wool-textile industry).

to:

As a relative latecomer to the transcontinental trade, the East India Company had to make do with the proverbial scraps left over from the Portuguese, and then the Dutch (the world's great merchant-shipping power in the 17th century). However, Dutch supremacy could not last forever, and it was in the field of textiles and tea in particular that their early advantage counted against them. The Dutch had moved, ruthlessly, to monopolise the supply and transportation of spices, which were quite easily the most valuable goods to be found in the East. However, the demand for spices proved limited; people can only eat so much of them, and their value eventually went down as the European market became saturated. On the other hand the British had almost completely borrowed the Dutch financial system, added small but significant improvements (particularly the invention of modern shipping insurance), more or less gotten over their [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar political troubles]], and [[Series/{{Connections}} invited a Dutchman over to... kind of... be King]] in 1688. With this, Britain managed to get enough money to exploit an unnoticed niche in the market: they would realise and capitalise upon the price elasticity of demand[[note]]The basic economic measure of how much demand for a product changes with its price. For relatively "inelastic" goods, even if the price changes a lot, the demand for it won't change that much -- think medication, for instance, which you're always going to need. For "elastic" goods, if the price falls a little, many more people will demand it, and if it rises a little, many more people will give up and just not demand it anymore. What this means is that for an inelastic good, raising prices typically increases profits because the amount lost from the people no longer demanding the good is easily made up for by the increase in price, while for elastic goods, profits usually go up when prices go down, because the amount lost from the fact that buyers are paying the seller less is more than made up for by the number of people who can buy it at the new low price but couldn't at the old higher one. In general, necessities, like medicine and basic foodstuffs, are more inelastic, while luxuries like, well, tea, are highly elastic.[[/note]] for cotton and silk clothing (leading directly to the catastrophic collapse of the British wool-textile industry).
17th Jun '17 10:07:58 PM karstovich2
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* '''Oolong tea''', spelled ''wūlóng'' in Pinyin (literally meaning "black dragon tea"), is more oxidized than green tea but less than black; it can occupy any point in that spectrum. It remains the most popular drinking tea in Taiwan and China. A shipment of it was [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution dumped into Boston Harbour in a(n in)famous incident]] and was the type most-consumed in Britain before the proliferation of Indian tea plantations in the late 19th century.
* '''Post-fermented tea''', such as pu-erh tea, is made from green or oolong tea leaves aged to allow fermentation and additional oxidation, producing a dark brown tea. ''This'' is what is called "black tea" in China, though "dark tea" is an equally valid translation. It is usually sold in compressed form as bricks, discs, or even more distinctive shapes like bowls and mushrooms. The ideal duration of the aging process is widely disputed.

to:

* '''Oolong tea''', spelled ''wūlóng'' in Pinyin (literally meaning "black dragon tea"), is more oxidized than green tea but less than black; it can occupy any point in that spectrum. It remains the most popular drinking tea in Taiwan and China.China, and is one of two traditional types of tea for yum cha/dim sum in Guangdong. A shipment of it was [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution dumped into Boston Harbour in a(n in)famous incident]] and was the type most-consumed in Britain before the proliferation of Indian tea plantations in the late 19th century.
* '''Post-fermented tea''', such as pu-erh tea, is made from green or oolong tea leaves aged to allow fermentation and additional oxidation, producing a dark brown tea. ''This'' is what is called "black tea" in China, though "dark tea" is an equally valid translation. It is usually sold in compressed form as bricks, discs, or even more distinctive shapes like bowls and mushrooms. The ideal duration of the aging process is widely disputed. Pu-erh is the other traditional type of tea for yum cha/dim sum in Guangdong.
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