History UsefulNotes / TeaAndTeaCulture

1st Apr '17 6:44:20 PM DavidDelony
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Starting in TheNineties, tea culture finally started to take off in the States. Loose-leaf tea started to appear, albeit mostly limited to specialty stores and tea shops, but you're also now seeing experimental brands of premium tea, like Tazo. (You can find British and Irish brands, but they tend to be significantly marked up.) You're even starting to see more electric kettles like in Britain. Asian tea varieties are also making an appearance, meaning that for British visitors, their best bet at finding tea they'd actually be impressed with would be in a Chinese or Japanese restaurant.

to:

Starting in TheNineties, tea culture finally started to take off in the States. Loose-leaf tea started to appear, albeit mostly limited to specialty stores and stores, tea shops, and mail order but you're also now seeing experimental brands of premium tea, like Tazo. (You can find British and Irish brands, but they tend to be significantly marked up.) You're even starting to see more electric kettles like in Britain. Asian tea varieties are also making an appearance, meaning that for British visitors, their best bet at finding tea they'd actually be impressed with would be in a Chinese or Japanese restaurant.
26th Mar '17 11:54:35 AM SgtFrog1
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** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, the largest centre of the tea trading business[[note]]I.e. that was where nearly all the firms and brokerages had their headquarters, and so that was where they kept all the records on who owned how much tea, and what kind of tea, and where it all was; the warehouses where the physical tea was actually stored were in a number of locations across the country[[/note]] in the British Empire. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]]. That is not an exaggeration; the British government bought every ounce of 1943's global tea crop that was available to them at wholesale. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.

to:

** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, the largest centre of the tea trading business[[note]]I.e. that was where nearly all the firms and brokerages had their headquarters, and so that was where they kept all the records on who owned how much tea, and what kind of tea, and where it all was; the warehouses where the physical tea was actually stored were in a number of locations across the country[[/note]] in the British Empire. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]]. [[NotHyperbole That is not an exaggeration; exaggeration;]] the British government bought every ounce of 1943's global tea crop that was available to them at wholesale. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.
5th Mar '17 4:25:59 PM karstovich2
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* The '''Southern camp''' includes Upper (''i.e.'' southern) Egypt, Sudan, and Yemen. Tea here is also black, but instead of pouring boiling water over tea leaves, large quantities of leaves and larger quantities of sugar are put into the pot together, and the mixture is boiled over a strong flame for at least five minutes. This makes it a sort of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decoction decoction]] rather than an infusion; even the Iranian and Turkish practice of leaving the tea heated doesn't do that. It's so strong as to be called [[KlatchianCoffee "suicide tea"]]. Even the locals have to commonly add milk to dilute it. This recipe is best known for being drunk in Upper Egypt, where it's called "Saidi tea", but the original recipe was probably Bedouin; it's also found in Bedouin-influenced parts of the Maghreb.

to:

* The '''Southern camp''' includes Upper (''i.e.'' southern) Egypt, Sudan, and Yemen. Tea here is also black, but instead of pouring boiling water over tea leaves, large quantities of leaves and larger quantities of sugar are put into the pot together, and the mixture is boiled over a strong flame for at least five minutes. This makes it a sort of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decoction decoction]] rather than an infusion; even the Iranian and Turkish practice of leaving the tea heated doesn't do that. It's so strong as that it can perceptibly increase your heart rate, leading some Westerners who tried it to be called dub it [[KlatchianCoffee "suicide tea"]]. Even the locals have to commonly add milk to dilute it. This recipe is best known for being drunk in Upper Egypt, where it's called "Saidi tea", but the original recipe was probably Bedouin; it's also found in Bedouin-influenced parts of the Maghreb.
5th Mar '17 4:15:18 PM karstovich2
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Tea is grown in parts of Africa such as Kenya, but it's mostly a cash crop for export; locals will drink a few cheaper blends, but it's not very culturally important. But tea matters intensely in the Islamic world, where it's as popular as coffee -- and where consuming alcohol is very strongly socially discouraged, and in fact [[AgainstMyReligion totally prohibited]] in UsefulNotes/{{Islam}}.

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Tea is grown in parts of Africa such as Kenya, but it's mostly a cash crop for export; locals will drink a few cheaper blends, but it's not very culturally important. But tea matters intensely in the Islamic world, where it's as popular as coffee -- and where consuming alcohol is very strongly socially discouraged, and in fact [[AgainstMyReligion totally prohibited]] in UsefulNotes/{{Islam}}.
UsefulNotes/{{Islam}} (not that the prohibition is law outside a few countries, but the religious ban creates a social stigma, although how much of one has varied greatly over time).
5th Mar '17 4:04:35 PM karstovich2
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As a relative latecomer to the transcontinental trade, the East India Company had to make do with the proverbial scraps left over from the Portuguese, and then the Dutch (the world's great merchant-shipping power in the 17th century). However, Dutch supremacy could not last forever, and it was in the field of textiles and tea in particular that their early advantage counted against them. The Dutch had moved, ruthlessly, to monopolise the supply and transportation of spices, which were quite easily the most valuable goods to be found in the East. However, the demand for spices proved limited; people can only eat so much of them, and their value eventually went down as the European market became saturated. On the other hand the British had almost completely borrowed the Dutch financial system, added small but significant improvements (particularly the invention of modern shipping insurance), more or less gotten over their [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar political troubles]], and [[Series/{{Connections}} invited a Dutchman over to... kind of... be King]] in 1688. With this, Britain managed to get enough money to exploit an unnoticed niche in the market: they would realise and capitalise upon the elasticity of demand[[note]]The basic economic measure of how much demand for a product changes with its price. For relatively "inelastic" goods, even if the price changes a lot, the demand for it won't change that much -- think medication, for instance, which you're always going to need. For "elastic" goods, if the price falls a little, many more people will demand it, and if it rises a little, many more people will give up and just not demand it anymore.[[/note]] for cotton and silk clothing (leading directly to the catastrophic collapse of the British wool-textile industry).

to:

As a relative latecomer to the transcontinental trade, the East India Company had to make do with the proverbial scraps left over from the Portuguese, and then the Dutch (the world's great merchant-shipping power in the 17th century). However, Dutch supremacy could not last forever, and it was in the field of textiles and tea in particular that their early advantage counted against them. The Dutch had moved, ruthlessly, to monopolise the supply and transportation of spices, which were quite easily the most valuable goods to be found in the East. However, the demand for spices proved limited; people can only eat so much of them, and their value eventually went down as the European market became saturated. On the other hand the British had almost completely borrowed the Dutch financial system, added small but significant improvements (particularly the invention of modern shipping insurance), more or less gotten over their [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar political troubles]], and [[Series/{{Connections}} invited a Dutchman over to... kind of... be King]] in 1688. With this, Britain managed to get enough money to exploit an unnoticed niche in the market: they would realise and capitalise upon the price elasticity of demand[[note]]The basic economic measure of how much demand for a product changes with its price. For relatively "inelastic" goods, even if the price changes a lot, the demand for it won't change that much -- think medication, for instance, which you're always going to need. For "elastic" goods, if the price falls a little, many more people will demand it, and if it rises a little, many more people will give up and just not demand it anymore. What this means is that for an inelastic good, raising prices typically increases profits because the amount lost from the people no longer demanding the good is easily made up for by the increase in price, while for elastic goods, profits usually go up when prices go down, because the amount lost from the fact that buyers are paying the seller less is more than made up for by the number of people who can buy it at the new low price but couldn't at the old higher one.[[/note]] for cotton and silk clothing (leading directly to the catastrophic collapse of the British wool-textile industry).
5th Mar '17 3:42:25 PM karstovich2
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** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, Britain's biggest tea trade centre. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]], buying practically anything they could get their hands on. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.

to:

** Tea distribution within the country during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII was a big deal, for morale if nothing else. One of the Luftwaffe's biggest blows to British morale was a 1942 bombing attack on Mincing Lane, Britain's biggest the largest centre of the tea trade centre. trading business[[note]]I.e. that was where nearly all the firms and brokerages had their headquarters, and so that was where they kept all the records on who owned how much tea, and what kind of tea, and where it all was; the warehouses where the physical tea was actually stored were in a number of locations across the country[[/note]] in the British Empire. In response to shortage fears, the British government decided to buy [[AllOfThem all the tea]], buying practically anything they could get their hands on.tea]]. That is not an exaggeration; the British government bought every ounce of 1943's global tea crop that was available to them at wholesale. They sent more tea to British troops, by weight, than anything save ''bullets'' -- even more than ''artillery shells''. They also assigned civil servants to coordinate the dispersal and movement of tea stockpiles throughout the country, a job Creator/ArthurCClarke describes having done in his autobiography.
30th Jan '17 2:51:30 PM margdean56
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** Iran popularized drinking unsweetened tea while biting on sugar or candy. Iran has had can sugar for longer than anyone other than India, so it's likely that the custom originated there. It's a distinct experience, to say the least. Russia borrowed the tradition from there, and in turn it left a variant of the ''samovar'' tradition.

to:

** Iran popularized drinking unsweetened tea while biting on sugar or candy. Iran has had can cane sugar for longer than anyone other than India, so it's likely that the custom originated there. It's a distinct experience, to say the least. Russia borrowed the tradition from there, and in turn it left a variant of the ''samovar'' tradition.
30th Jan '17 2:36:08 PM margdean56
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The craze also spilled over into Ireland, which mostly mimics British tea consumption patters. if anything, they're even ''more'' tea-crazy than the British; by weight, they consume more tea per capita. Australia is similar, but they're much closer to Asia and tend to be quicker to adopt modern Asian tea crazes, like Taiwanese bubble tea.

to:

The craze also spilled over into Ireland, which mostly mimics British tea consumption patters. if patterns. If anything, they're even ''more'' tea-crazy than the British; by weight, they consume more tea per capita. Australia is similar, but they're much closer to Asia and tend to be quicker to adopt modern Asian tea crazes, like Taiwanese bubble tea.
23rd Dec '16 2:45:19 PM DavidDelony
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* In the German-speaking Alpine regions -- Austria, parts of Switzerland, and parts of southern Germany -- Jäger-Tee (lit. hunter tea) is a popular beverage among hunters, skiers and other outdoorsy types, praised for it's ability to restore warmth to the body after a day out in the cold and wet. Jäger-Tee is a grog consisting of hot, black tea with a tot of rum, just big enough to add some sweetness and a bit of "zip".

to:

* In the German-speaking Alpine regions -- Austria, parts of Switzerland, and parts of southern Germany -- Jäger-Tee (lit. hunter tea) is a popular beverage among hunters, skiers and other outdoorsy types, praised for it's its ability to restore warmth to the body after a day out in the cold and wet. Jäger-Tee is a grog consisting of hot, black tea with a tot of rum, just big enough to add some sweetness and a bit of "zip".
23rd Dec '16 2:43:17 PM DavidDelony
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* Green tea is largely seen as a "hipster" drink, with sencha in particular being the "authentic" high-quality Asian tea. Not being all ''that'' concerned with authenticity, you'll also see green tea lattes in coffee shops. Green tea is also becoming popular as a health food.

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* Green tea is largely seen as a "hipster" drink, with sencha matcha in particular being the "authentic" high-quality Asian tea. Not being all ''that'' concerned with authenticity, you'll also see green tea lattes in coffee shops. Green tea is also becoming popular as a health food.
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