History UsefulNotes / TeaAndTeaCulture

30th Jan '17 2:51:30 PM margdean56
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** Iran popularized drinking unsweetened tea while biting on sugar or candy. Iran has had can sugar for longer than anyone other than India, so it's likely that the custom originated there. It's a distinct experience, to say the least. Russia borrowed the tradition from there, and in turn it left a variant of the ''samovar'' tradition.

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** Iran popularized drinking unsweetened tea while biting on sugar or candy. Iran has had can cane sugar for longer than anyone other than India, so it's likely that the custom originated there. It's a distinct experience, to say the least. Russia borrowed the tradition from there, and in turn it left a variant of the ''samovar'' tradition.
30th Jan '17 2:36:08 PM margdean56
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The craze also spilled over into Ireland, which mostly mimics British tea consumption patters. if anything, they're even ''more'' tea-crazy than the British; by weight, they consume more tea per capita. Australia is similar, but they're much closer to Asia and tend to be quicker to adopt modern Asian tea crazes, like Taiwanese bubble tea.

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The craze also spilled over into Ireland, which mostly mimics British tea consumption patters. if patterns. If anything, they're even ''more'' tea-crazy than the British; by weight, they consume more tea per capita. Australia is similar, but they're much closer to Asia and tend to be quicker to adopt modern Asian tea crazes, like Taiwanese bubble tea.
23rd Dec '16 2:45:19 PM DavidDelony
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* In the German-speaking Alpine regions -- Austria, parts of Switzerland, and parts of southern Germany -- Jäger-Tee (lit. hunter tea) is a popular beverage among hunters, skiers and other outdoorsy types, praised for it's ability to restore warmth to the body after a day out in the cold and wet. Jäger-Tee is a grog consisting of hot, black tea with a tot of rum, just big enough to add some sweetness and a bit of "zip".

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* In the German-speaking Alpine regions -- Austria, parts of Switzerland, and parts of southern Germany -- Jäger-Tee (lit. hunter tea) is a popular beverage among hunters, skiers and other outdoorsy types, praised for it's its ability to restore warmth to the body after a day out in the cold and wet. Jäger-Tee is a grog consisting of hot, black tea with a tot of rum, just big enough to add some sweetness and a bit of "zip".
23rd Dec '16 2:43:17 PM DavidDelony
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* Green tea is largely seen as a "hipster" drink, with sencha in particular being the "authentic" high-quality Asian tea. Not being all ''that'' concerned with authenticity, you'll also see green tea lattes in coffee shops. Green tea is also becoming popular as a health food.

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* Green tea is largely seen as a "hipster" drink, with sencha matcha in particular being the "authentic" high-quality Asian tea. Not being all ''that'' concerned with authenticity, you'll also see green tea lattes in coffee shops. Green tea is also becoming popular as a health food.
15th Dec '16 9:17:27 AM HazelMcCallister
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* '''Chai''' is simply the Hindi word for tea. '''Masala chai''' is the proper name for the popular tea drink flavored with spices (and, conversely, '''chai masala''' is the blend of spices used to make it).

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* '''Chai''' is simply the Hindi word for tea.tea, and in fact ''tea'' and ''chai'' come from different Chinese dialectical pronunciations of the same word (''te'' in the Amoy dialect, ''cha'' in Mandarin and Cantonese, among other variations). '''Masala chai''' is the proper name for the popular tea drink flavored with spices (and, conversely, '''chai masala''' is the blend of spices used to make it). However, outside of India (and particularly in the U.S.) masala chai has sometimes been marketed as '''[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment chai tea]]''' or simply '''chai'''.



* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varieties it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concocted as a scam--the flavourings were added to cheap teas to pass them off as the more expensive Fo Shou or Keemun, teas which naturally tasted of bergamot; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.

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* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varieties it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concocted as a scam--the flavourings were added to cheap teas to pass them off as the more expensive Fo Shou or Keemun, teas which naturally tasted of bergamot; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) not have) received a shipment of it as a gift.
12th Dec '16 4:44:06 PM DavidDelony
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* '''Tea bags''' are an affront to most serious tea drinkers. The tea is lower-quality, it's processed smaller leading to more air exposure (and flavor deterioration), and it's crammed into a space too small for the water to diffuse through properly. But in several parts of the world, including the U.K. and the U.S., tea bags are much more popular than "loose leaf" tea. Tea aficionados in America consider them a necessary evil, as loose-leaf tea can't really be found outside specialty stores. The technology is improving, though, and larger "pyramid bags" and "tea sachets" are modest improvements as well.

to:

* '''Tea bags''' are an affront to most serious tea drinkers. The tea is lower-quality, it's processed smaller leading to more air exposure (and flavor deterioration), and it's crammed into a space too small for the water to diffuse through properly. But in several parts of the world, including the U.K. and the U.S., tea bags are much more popular than "loose leaf" tea. Even places with advanced tea cultures can't resist the sheer convenience of tea bags. Tea aficionados in America consider them a necessary evil, as loose-leaf tea can't really be found outside specialty stores. The technology is improving, though, and larger "pyramid bags" and "tea sachets" are modest improvements as well.
30th Nov '16 9:13:31 PM gemmabeta2
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* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varieties it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concoted as a scam--the flavourings added to cheap teas to pass them off as the more expensive Fo Shou or Keemun, teas which naturally tasted of bergamot; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.

to:

* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varieties it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concoted concocted as a scam--the flavourings were added to cheap teas to pass them off as the more expensive Fo Shou or Keemun, teas which naturally tasted of bergamot; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.
30th Nov '16 9:12:16 PM gemmabeta2
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30th Nov '16 9:11:55 PM gemmabeta2
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* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varietes it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concoted as a scam--the bergamot was used to allow cheaper teas to be passed off as more expensive Chinese teas; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.

to:

* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varietes varieties it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concoted as a scam--the bergamot was used flavourings added to allow cheaper cheap teas to be passed pass them off as the more expensive Chinese teas; Fo Shou or Keemun, teas which naturally tasted of bergamot; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.
30th Nov '16 9:07:24 PM gemmabeta2
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* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey, invented in China, is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varietes it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who received a shipment of it as a gift.

to:

* Flavors are numerous, but Earl Grey, invented in China, Grey is one of the most common. It's flavoured with oil of bergamot, a bitter citrus fruit, and in some varietes it might also have orange or lemon peel, or flowers like lavender, verbena, or rose petals. The blend was originally concoted as a scam--the bergamot was used to allow cheaper teas to be passed off as more expensive Chinese teas; but nevertheless, the Britons developed a taste for it. It's [[CaptainObvious named after the Earl Grey]], who (may or may not) received a shipment of it as a gift.
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