History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs

1st May '16 3:21:57 AM schoi30
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''Glyptodon'' is the most well-known glyptodont, but it's also worth of mention ''Doedicurus'': with its mace-like tail, it was the most ankylosaur-like of them all. These were among the biggest glyptodonts, and thus [[RuleOfCool the most depicted]]. Talking about glyptodonts' armor, it was the most powerful among every land vertebrate (tortoises excluded). It was made by a ''single piece'' made by several scutes fused together, smooth and usually round-shaped, unlike ankylosaurs whose armor was more flexible and spiky. With their compact frame and rigid armor, Glyptodonts were probably slower-moving than ankylosaurs, but still faster than a Galapagos' tortoise. Despite these differences, the glyptodont's armor was astonishingly similar to an ankylosaur's; only the upper parts of the body were covered, the underbelly was unarmored like ankylosaurs and hairy like modern armadillos; the head had a "shield" again like ankylosaurs, and their tail was also covered by bone.

to:

''Glyptodon'' is the most well-known glyptodont, but it's also worth of mention ''Doedicurus'': with its mace-like tail, it was the most ankylosaur-like of them all. These were among the biggest glyptodonts, and thus [[RuleOfCool the most depicted]].

Talking about glyptodonts' armor, it was the most powerful among every land vertebrate (tortoises excluded). It was made by a ''single piece'' made by several scutes fused together, smooth and usually round-shaped, unlike ankylosaurs whose armor was more flexible and spiky. With their compact frame and rigid armor, Glyptodonts were probably slower-moving than ankylosaurs, but still faster than a Galapagos' tortoise. Despite these differences, the glyptodont's armor was astonishingly similar to an ankylosaur's; only the upper parts of the body were covered, the underbelly was unarmored like ankylosaurs and hairy like modern armadillos; the head had a "shield" again like ankylosaurs, and their tail was also covered by bone.
1st May '16 3:04:44 AM schoi30
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!!Big Badass Armadillos: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon Glyptodon]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doedicurus Doedicurus]]'' *

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!!Big Badass Armadillos: badass armadillos: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon Glyptodon]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doedicurus Doedicurus]]'' *
1st May '16 3:01:30 AM schoi30
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After ankylosaurs went extinct, evolution decided to create their mammalian equivalents: the glyptodonts. They were xenarthrans as well, but related to armadillos rather than to sloths. Lived in South America for dozen million years, before going extinct only few thousands years ago: in short, they had the same identical history of their cousins, the giant sloths. Both groups were herbivores (despite giant sloths might be at least partially scavengers), and when adult, they feared no predators except humans. There is a secret behind giant sloths' and glyptodonts' success: their backbone. It was far, far stronger that every other mammal, permitting them to carry such heavy bodies around without suffering back pain. ''Glyptodon'' is the most well-known glyptodont, but it's also worth of mention ''Doedicurus'': with its mace-like tail, it was the most ankylosaur-like of them all. These were among the biggest glyptodonts, and thus [[RuleOfCool the most depicted]]. Talking about glyptodonts' armor, it was the most powerful among every land vertebrate (tortoises excluded). It was made by a ''single piece'' made by several scutes fused together, smooth and usually round-shaped, unlike ankylosaurs whose armor was more flexible and spiky. With their compact frame and rigid armor, Glyptodonts were probably slower-moving than ankylosaurs, but still faster than a Galapagos' tortoise. Despite these differences, the glyptodont's armor was astonishingly similar to an ankylosaur's; only the upper parts of the body were covered, the underbelly was unarmored like ankylosaurs and hairy like modern armadillos; the head had a "shield" again like ankylosaurs, and their tail was also covered by bone. Like ''Megatherium'', also ''Glyptodon'' was known by ancient humans; we now know human hunting wiped out these species, as the species on islands were the last to go, and as there is evidence of human hunting and habitat change in their habitat. Now, only far smaller xenarthrans survive; armadillos, tree sloths and true anteaters (sadly, the natural history of anteaters is poorly-understood).

to:

After ankylosaurs went extinct, evolution decided to create their mammalian equivalents: the glyptodonts. They were xenarthrans as well, but related to armadillos rather than to sloths.

Lived in South America for dozen million years, before going extinct only few thousands years ago: in short, they had the same identical history of their cousins, the giant sloths. Both groups were herbivores (despite giant sloths might be at least partially scavengers), and when adult, they feared no predators except humans. There is a secret behind giant sloths' and glyptodonts' success: their backbone. It was far, far stronger that every other mammal, permitting them to carry such heavy bodies around without suffering back pain.

''Glyptodon'' is the most well-known glyptodont, but it's also worth of mention ''Doedicurus'': with its mace-like tail, it was the most ankylosaur-like of them all. These were among the biggest glyptodonts, and thus [[RuleOfCool the most depicted]]. Talking about glyptodonts' armor, it was the most powerful among every land vertebrate (tortoises excluded). It was made by a ''single piece'' made by several scutes fused together, smooth and usually round-shaped, unlike ankylosaurs whose armor was more flexible and spiky. With their compact frame and rigid armor, Glyptodonts were probably slower-moving than ankylosaurs, but still faster than a Galapagos' tortoise. Despite these differences, the glyptodont's armor was astonishingly similar to an ankylosaur's; only the upper parts of the body were covered, the underbelly was unarmored like ankylosaurs and hairy like modern armadillos; the head had a "shield" again like ankylosaurs, and their tail was also covered by bone.

Like ''Megatherium'', also ''Glyptodon'' was known by ancient humans; we now know human hunting wiped out these species, as the species on islands were the last to go, and as there is evidence of human hunting and habitat change in their habitat. Now, only far smaller xenarthrans survive; armadillos, tree sloths and true anteaters (sadly, the natural history of anteaters is poorly-understood).
1st May '16 2:59:39 AM schoi30
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!!Big Badass Armadillos: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon Glyptodon]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doedicurus Doedicurus]]''

to:

!!Big Badass Armadillos: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon Glyptodon]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doedicurus Doedicurus]]''
Doedicurus]]'' *
1st May '16 2:59:26 AM schoi30
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Added DiffLines:

!!Big Badass Armadillos: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyptodon Glyptodon]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doedicurus Doedicurus]]''

After ankylosaurs went extinct, evolution decided to create their mammalian equivalents: the glyptodonts. They were xenarthrans as well, but related to armadillos rather than to sloths. Lived in South America for dozen million years, before going extinct only few thousands years ago: in short, they had the same identical history of their cousins, the giant sloths. Both groups were herbivores (despite giant sloths might be at least partially scavengers), and when adult, they feared no predators except humans. There is a secret behind giant sloths' and glyptodonts' success: their backbone. It was far, far stronger that every other mammal, permitting them to carry such heavy bodies around without suffering back pain. ''Glyptodon'' is the most well-known glyptodont, but it's also worth of mention ''Doedicurus'': with its mace-like tail, it was the most ankylosaur-like of them all. These were among the biggest glyptodonts, and thus [[RuleOfCool the most depicted]]. Talking about glyptodonts' armor, it was the most powerful among every land vertebrate (tortoises excluded). It was made by a ''single piece'' made by several scutes fused together, smooth and usually round-shaped, unlike ankylosaurs whose armor was more flexible and spiky. With their compact frame and rigid armor, Glyptodonts were probably slower-moving than ankylosaurs, but still faster than a Galapagos' tortoise. Despite these differences, the glyptodont's armor was astonishingly similar to an ankylosaur's; only the upper parts of the body were covered, the underbelly was unarmored like ankylosaurs and hairy like modern armadillos; the head had a "shield" again like ankylosaurs, and their tail was also covered by bone. Like ''Megatherium'', also ''Glyptodon'' was known by ancient humans; we now know human hunting wiped out these species, as the species on islands were the last to go, and as there is evidence of human hunting and habitat change in their habitat. Now, only far smaller xenarthrans survive; armadillos, tree sloths and true anteaters (sadly, the natural history of anteaters is poorly-understood).
1st May '16 2:36:19 AM schoi30
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!!Extinct rhinos: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_rhinoceros Woolly Rhino]], and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasmotherium Elasmotherium]]'' *

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!!Extinct rhinos: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_rhinoceros Woolly Rhino]], Rhinoceros]], and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasmotherium Elasmotherium]]'' *



Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Mammuthus columbi'', ''Mammuthus imperator'', ''Mammuthus sungari'', ''Mammuthus trogontherii'', Dwarf elephants, ''Titanohyrax'', ''Machairodus'', ''Homotherium'', ''Megantereon'', ''Dinofelis'', ''Ursus spelaeus'', ''Arctodus'', ''Miacis'', ''Brontotherium'', ''Embolotherium'', ''Paraceratherium'', ''Megaloceros giganteus'', ''Bison priscus'', ''Bison antiquus'', ''Andrewsarchus'', ''Livyatan'', ''Mylodon'', ''Castoroides'', Ceratogaulids, ''Phoberomys'', ''Palaeochiropteryx'', ''Planetetherium'', ''Diprotodon'', ''Thylacosmilus'', ''Thylacoleo'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals here.]]

to:

Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Mammuthus columbi'', ''Mammuthus imperator'', ''Mammuthus sungari'', ''Mammuthus trogontherii'', Dwarf elephants, ''Titanohyrax'', ''Machairodus'', ''Homotherium'', ''Megantereon'', ''Dinofelis'', ''Ursus spelaeus'', ''Arctodus'', ''Miacis'', ''Brontotherium'', ''Embolotherium'', ''Paraceratherium'', ''Megaloceros giganteus'', ''Bison priscus'', ''Bison antiquus'', ''Andrewsarchus'', ''Livyatan'', ''Mylodon'', ''Castoroides'', Ceratogaulids, ''Phoberomys'', ''Palaeochiropteryx'', ''Planetetherium'', ''Diprotodon'', ''Thylacosmilus'', ''Thylacoleo'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals here.]]
27th Apr '16 12:03:51 AM MrMediaGuy2
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Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for Crocodylomorphs, ''Protosuchus'', ''Hallopus'', ''Pristichampsus'', Mekosuchines, ''Bavarisaurus'', Megalania, ''Postosuchus'', ''Rutiodon'', ''Euparkeria'', ''Erythrosuchus'', ''Kuehneosaurus'', ''Sharovipteryx'', ''Longisquama'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Procolophon'', ''Eudibamus'', ''Triadobatrachus'', ''Karaurus'', ''Eocaecilia'', ''Eryops'', ''Cacops'', ''Platyhystrix'', ''Ichthyostega'', ''Tiktaalik'', Coelacanths, ''Eusthenopteron'', Lungfish, Acanthodes, ''Palaeoniscus'', ''Cheirolepis'', ''Megalodon'', ''Haikouichthys'', Trilobites, ''Pterygotus'', Ammonites, ''Orthoceras'', Rudists, ''Lingula'', Graptolites, ''Cothurnocystis'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirds here]], [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]] or [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherExtinctCreatures here]].

to:

Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for Crocodylomorphs, ''Protosuchus'', ''Hallopus'', ''Pristichampsus'', Mekosuchines, ''Bavarisaurus'', Megalania, ''Postosuchus'', ''Rutiodon'', ''Euparkeria'', ''Erythrosuchus'', ''Kuehneosaurus'', ''Sharovipteryx'', ''Longisquama'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Procolophon'', ''Eudibamus'', ''Triadobatrachus'', ''Karaurus'', ''Eocaecilia'', ''Eryops'', ''Cacops'', ''Platyhystrix'', ''Ichthyostega'', ''Tiktaalik'', Coelacanths, ''Eusthenopteron'', Lungfish, Acanthodes, ''Palaeoniscus'', ''Cheirolepis'', ''Megalodon'', ''Haikouichthys'', Trilobites, ''Pterygotus'', Ammonites, ''Orthoceras'', Rudists, ''Lingula'', Graptolites, ''Cothurnocystis'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirds here]], [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]] or [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherExtinctCreatures here]].
27th Apr '16 12:00:05 AM MrMediaGuy2
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Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Aurornis'', Enantiorns, Neorns, ''Teratornis'', Crocodylomorphs, ''Protosuchus'', ''Hallopus'', ''Pristichampsus'', Mekosuchines, ''Bavarisaurus'', Megalania, ''Postosuchus'', ''Rutiodon'', ''Euparkeria'', ''Erythrosuchus'', ''Kuehneosaurus'', ''Sharovipteryx'', ''Longisquama'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Procolophon'', ''Eudibamus'', ''Triadobatrachus'', ''Karaurus'', ''Eocaecilia'', ''Eryops'', ''Cacops'', ''Platyhystrix'', ''Ichthyostega'', ''Tiktaalik'', Coelacanths, ''Eusthenopteron'', Lungfish, Acanthodes, ''Palaeoniscus'', ''Cheirolepis'', ''Megalodon'', ''Haikouichthys'', Trilobites, ''Pterygotus'', Ammonites, ''Orthoceras'', Rudists, ''Lingula'', Graptolites, ''Cothurnocystis'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirds here]], [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]] or [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherExtinctCreatures here]].

to:

Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Aurornis'', Enantiorns, Neorns, ''Teratornis'', Crocodylomorphs, ''Protosuchus'', ''Hallopus'', ''Pristichampsus'', Mekosuchines, ''Bavarisaurus'', Megalania, ''Postosuchus'', ''Rutiodon'', ''Euparkeria'', ''Erythrosuchus'', ''Kuehneosaurus'', ''Sharovipteryx'', ''Longisquama'', ''Scutosaurus'', ''Procolophon'', ''Eudibamus'', ''Triadobatrachus'', ''Karaurus'', ''Eocaecilia'', ''Eryops'', ''Cacops'', ''Platyhystrix'', ''Ichthyostega'', ''Tiktaalik'', Coelacanths, ''Eusthenopteron'', Lungfish, Acanthodes, ''Palaeoniscus'', ''Cheirolepis'', ''Megalodon'', ''Haikouichthys'', Trilobites, ''Pterygotus'', Ammonites, ''Orthoceras'', Rudists, ''Lingula'', Graptolites, ''Cothurnocystis'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeBirds here]], [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]] or [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeOtherExtinctCreatures here]].
26th Apr '16 11:18:51 PM MrMediaGuy2
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!!Extinct rhinos: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_rhinoceros Woolly Rhino]], and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasmotherium Elasmotherium]]'' *

Mammoths weren't the only “woolly” creatures that lived in the ice age. Special mention should be given to the slightly less famous but still notable woolly rhinos.

''Elasmotherium'', also known as the Unicorn rhino, is often confused with the Woolly (''Coelodonta antiquitatis'') because of their similar appearance: however, the latter was no larger than modern white rhinos and had ''two'' horns as well; ''Elasmotherium'' was much larger (5 tons, like a modern bush elephant) and with one single horn... perhaps as long as a grown man, and put on the front rather than upon the nose: hence [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin unicorn rhinoceros]].

Both lived in the Ice Age in cold climates, alongside mammoths in northern Asia, but the elasmothere had a more southerly range than the woolly rhino, and while both lived east of the Urals, only the woolly rhino was found in Europe[[note]]Possibly. There's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elasmotherium#Western_Eurasia one cave painting]] that might stretch ''Elasmotherium'''s range as far as France[[/note]]; the latter lived alongside the other, more popular woolly, ([[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder guess what]]).

Interestingly, both woollies have left soft parts of their bodies other than bones, hair included. The "unicorn rhinoceros" is often said to have been the inspiration of the {{Unicorn}} myths found all over Eurasia in one form or another when still alive, but this is probably a legend. Possibly. There's a chance the unicorn rhino might have lived into historic times, but the anecdotes and depictions of these creatures might just as well refer to one-horned bulls or animals frozen in the permafrost like mammoths are known to have been. Once again, it appears humans did these things in just as things were getting better.

!!Big badass sloth: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatherium Megatherium]]'' *

One of the largest land mammals that ever lived, ''Megatherium'' had the same size of an elephant or a ''T. rex'': reached 5m when fully erect, and its name means...well... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin big beast]].

Lived just few thousands years ago in South America, and ancient humans knew it, to the point that they actually might have used it and other relatives as a... living pantry! Megathere's remains have been discovered in ancient caves, and it is said that some human hunters enclosed some of these animals in those caves.

In old portraits, ''Megatherium'' was classically shown with a horse-like head and sometimes a giraffe-like tongue to reach foliage on the tree-tops; the horse head and giraffe-tongue are probably mere fantasies, but the high-browsing habits aren't; indeed, the robustness of its body allowed it to stay only on its hind feet (which, curiously, had only one claw each), while the three-clawed forefeet were used to pull down branches. Actually, our "big beast" was neither a horse nor a giraffe relative... was a ''sloth''. More precisely, the stock animal within the group called giant ground sloths, which are not only related to modern sloths, but also to anteaters and armadillos, not to ungulates.

An extremely controversial idea is the possibility that ground sloths might have supplemented their diet with meat that they scavenged from predators such as sabre-tooths by chasing them away from their kill. There isn't much to support this theory other than RuleOfCool, though.[[note]]It is entirely possible they may have eaten ''some'' meat, since modern herbivores like deer have been known to do so for protein and because it's easier to digest. However, this would not be a natural part of their diet, and they would more likely prefer plants.[[/note]] This did not stop ''Walking With Beasts'' from depicting ''Megatherium'' chasing some ''Smilodon'' away from their kill and eating it, and since then, it has been forever cemented as an omnivore in video games such as ''VideoGame/ZooTycoon'' and ''VideoGame/ArkSurvivalEvolved''. Some portrayals take this depiction UpToEleven by having it be an ''active hunter'', knocking over animals like glyptodonts to tear open their soft belly.

''Megatherium'' is the most well-known species, due to being the largest. It's commonly depicted alongside the aforementioned mammoths, despite being strictly South American. ''Megalonyx'' was the sloth species that was common in North America, but it was about half the size of its more famous cousin.

The most famous ground sloth in fiction is Sid from the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, who is only about the size of a human, and resembles ''no'' ground sloth in fiction, much less ''Megatherium''. He resembles more of a modern tree sloth, which the animators did indeed model him off of. The most bizarre portrayal would have to be in the 1948 B-movie ''Film/UnknownIsland'', where a ground sloth was depicted as a strange, roaring predator that resembles a cross between a gorilla and a bear.

!!Ancient bear: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_bear Cave Bear]] *

The most famous extinct bear is the cave bear (''Ursus spelaeus''), whose remains are extremely abundant in European caves. Quite similar to a modern kodiak in shape and size, but with a bigger hump on its shoulder and a more prominent skull, the cave bear is often portrayed as [[BearsAreBadNews the archenemy of Neanderthals]], because both lived in the same places (Pleistocene Europe) and were forced to share the same caves to repair themselves from the rigid Ice Age winters. But it's more probable that Neanderthals (and humans) were actually the worst enemies of cave bears, and some think they could even have contributed to cave bears' extinction.

!!Big Badass Wolf: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dire_wolf Dire Wolf]] *

The dire wolf (''Canis dirus'') was a sort of wolf bigger than ours, possibly a hunter of giant bison in competition with lions. It has been often found in the same tar pits in which ''Smilodon'' remains have been discovered, along with several other American mammals (elephant relatives, ground sloths, but modern-living mammals as well); the most famous is ''Rancho la Brea'', in Los Angeles.

In real life, the dire wolf wasn't much larger than the modern grey wolf, and probably not too different in appearance. However, it had a much more powerful bite, well over twice that of its relative. This would allow it to be a fair competition with other predators at the time. It ranged from as far north as Canada to as far south as South America (though only in the northern and western areas).

The dire wolf's most famous appearance in fiction is in the ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' novel series by Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and the ''Series/GameOfThrones'' TV adaptation of it.

!!Bigfoot?: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigantopithecus Gigantopithecus]]'' *

''Gigantopithecus'' was a relative of the orangutan that also exhibited gorilla-like characters. Found in Southern Asia from China to India, its name means "giant ape", and with reason. It measured up to 10 feet when standing upright, ''two times'' bigger than a modern silverback gorilla: a sort of middle-way between a RealLife gorilla and Film/KingKong.

Sadly, the only certain thing we know about it is just a lower fossil jaw; the shape of the teeth show us it was a plant-eater, possibly specialized to a bamboo-based diet, to the point that some experts think competition with ''the giant panda'' actually drove it to extinction.

At least part of the reason the ape has entered stock territory is due to some scientists speculating that it might have been the inspiration for the mythical yeti (especially since it was discovered in the Himalayas). Some cryptozoologists have taken these theories UpToEleven speculating that not only did it survive to modern times, but at least one lineage migrated to North America and evolved into Bigfoot. Thanks to this radical theory, ''Gigantopithecus'' has been mentioned in virtually every Bigfoot documentary.

There are quite a few problems with this theory. First of all, there is absolutely zero fossil evidence that it survived that long, much less that it made it to North America. Secondly, it's quite unlikely that such a large creature could go unnoticed for so long without leaving ''some'' sort of proof of its existence. Also, since the creature was specialized for eating mostly bamboo, it's doubtful it would survive in a temperate environment without its preferred food, much less spread throughout North America.

Despite this, the “Gigantopithecus = Bigfoot” theory is so persuasive that the ape is often depicted in models and illustrations in an upright stance like a man, just to fit into this theory. Since all we have are its jaw and teeth, its hard to be sure, but judging by its relationship with other apes, it most likely walked on its knuckles like they did. Since primates standing upright requires a specialized foot structure ''extremely'' different from that of other apes, ''Gigantopithecus'' evolving a similar foot structure to that of humans would be a radical case of convergent evolution.

In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''Film/TheJungleBook2016'', a remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a quite [[NightmareFuel/TheJungleBook2016 intense]] and memorable sequence.



Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Mammuthus columbi'', ''Mammuthus imperator'', ''Mammuthus sungari'', ''Mammuthus trogontherii'', Dwarf elephants, ''Titanohyrax'', ''Machairodus'', ''Homotherium'', ''Megantereon'', ''Dinofelis'', ''Ursus spelaeus'', ''Arctodus'', ''Miacis'', ''Brontotherium'', ''Embolotherium'', ''Paraceratherium'', ''Megaloceros giganteus'', ''Bison priscus'', ''Bison antiquus'', ''Andrewsarchus'', ''Livyatan'', ''Megatherium'', ''Mylodon'', ''Castoroides'', Ceratogaulids, ''Phoberomys'', ''Palaeochiropteryx'', ''Planetetherium'', ''Diprotodon'', ''Thylacosmilus'', ''Thylacoleo'', ''Gigantopithecus'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals here.]]

to:

Sorry, these aren't here. If you're looking for ''Mammuthus columbi'', ''Mammuthus imperator'', ''Mammuthus sungari'', ''Mammuthus trogontherii'', Dwarf elephants, ''Titanohyrax'', ''Machairodus'', ''Homotherium'', ''Megantereon'', ''Dinofelis'', ''Ursus spelaeus'', ''Arctodus'', ''Miacis'', ''Brontotherium'', ''Embolotherium'', ''Paraceratherium'', ''Megaloceros giganteus'', ''Bison priscus'', ''Bison antiquus'', ''Andrewsarchus'', ''Livyatan'', ''Megatherium'', ''Mylodon'', ''Castoroides'', Ceratogaulids, ''Phoberomys'', ''Palaeochiropteryx'', ''Planetetherium'', ''Diprotodon'', ''Thylacosmilus'', ''Thylacoleo'', ''Gigantopithecus'', and others, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals here.]]
27th Dec '15 3:05:39 PM Willbyr
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----



In RealLife, pterosaurs were the main flying beings in the Age of Dinosaurs, coexisted with their land-living relatives for 160 million years and eventually went extinct together with the last dinosaurs. Like about dinosaurs, there are several issues about ptero-portrayals in media. They go far further than simple AnachronismStew and MisplacedWildlife, they regard ''every'' pterosaurian biological feature. Here were fall in the CriticalResearchFailure field,and it’s easy to imagine [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology ptero-scientists cry]] [[DarthWiki/WallBanger more than every other colleague]].

to:

In RealLife, pterosaurs were the main flying beings in the Age of Dinosaurs, coexisted with their land-living relatives for 160 million years and eventually went extinct together with the last dinosaurs. Like about dinosaurs, there are several issues about ptero-portrayals in media. They go far further than simple AnachronismStew and MisplacedWildlife, they regard ''every'' pterosaurian biological feature. Here were we fall in the CriticalResearchFailure field,and field, and it’s easy to imagine [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology ptero-scientists cry]] [[DarthWiki/WallBanger crying more than every other colleague]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 80. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs