History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs

14th Apr '17 10:58:15 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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Although "saber-tooths" belongs to the cat family Felidae, they are in a separate branch of that clade from modern felines; thus, the popular denomination "saber-toothed tiger" is not correct at all. The "tiger" thing means that ''Smilodon'' is often heard roaring just like an actual tiger or a lion, though only the big cats of the genus ''[[PantheraAwesome Panthera]]'' (that is, lions, tigers, jaguars and leopards) can roar thanks to the structure of their larynxes unique to this group. Even though scientists say the structure of the small bones in the saber-tooth's mouth are set up for making a sort of roar, this roar arguably was''not'' identical to that of modern big cats.

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Although "saber-tooths" belongs to the cat family Felidae, they are in a separate branch of that clade from modern felines; thus, the popular denomination "saber-toothed tiger" is not correct at all. The "tiger" thing means that ''Smilodon'' is often heard roaring just like an actual tiger or a lion, though only the big cats of the genus ''[[PantheraAwesome Panthera]]'' (that is, lions, tigers, jaguars and leopards) can roar thanks to the structure of their larynxes unique to this group. Even though scientists say the structure of the small bones in the saber-tooth's mouth are set up for making a sort of roar, this roar arguably was''not'' was ''not'' identical to that of modern big cats.
30th Mar '17 2:25:07 PM 0000
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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 9m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.

to:

''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 9m 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.
15th Mar '17 11:39:41 AM 0000
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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.

to:

''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m 9m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.
15th Feb '17 9:33:02 PM schoi30
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Expect to see ''Smilodon'' heavily interacting with humans, as our ancestors' main predator: in RealLife other carnivores such as [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife prehistoric lions]] were probably more important predators. And expect to see it ''living alongside woolly mammoths''. Even though they were contemporary, their habitat in RealLife was largely different, with ''Smilodon''s preferring warmer climates. And, naturally, don't exclude seeing saber-toothed cats somehow living alongside dinosaurs, and in the worst scenario, [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot fighting against a ''T. rex'']].

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Expect to see ''Smilodon'' heavily interacting with humans, as our ancestors' main predator: in RealLife other carnivores such as [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife prehistoric lions]] were probably more important predators. And expect to see it ''living alongside woolly mammoths''. Even though they were contemporary, their habitat in RealLife was largely different, with ''Smilodon''s preferring warmer climates.climates[[note]]Though ''S. fatalis'' would have experienced snowy winters considering its region's climate at the time[[/note]]. And, naturally, don't exclude seeing saber-toothed cats somehow living alongside dinosaurs, and in the worst scenario, [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot fighting against a ''T. rex'']].
1st Feb '17 12:35:56 AM PaulA
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Rarely will you see any other pterosaur in fiction, but if you do, it will either be ''Pterodactylus'' or ''Dimorphodon''. In the original novel ''The Lost World'' (1912), the two scientists argue if the pterosaurs they meet are one of the two. Whatever kind they were, they are enormously oversized — [[UpToEleven even bigger than a Pteranodont]]. In RealLife both were not bigger than a large seagull. In recent stories, ''Pterodactylus'' and ''Dimorphodon'' are rarely portrayed, but are common in documentaristic media due to their historical relevance.

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Rarely will you see any other pterosaur in fiction, but if you do, it will either be ''Pterodactylus'' or ''Dimorphodon''. In the original novel ''The ''Literature/{{The Lost World'' World|1912}}'' (1912), the two scientists argue if the pterosaurs they meet are one of the two. Whatever kind they were, they are enormously oversized — [[UpToEleven even bigger than a Pteranodont]]. In RealLife both were not bigger than a large seagull. In recent stories, ''Pterodactylus'' and ''Dimorphodon'' are rarely portrayed, but are common in documentaristic media due to their historical relevance.
relevance.



# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''

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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''
''Literature/{{The Lost World|1912}}''
29th Jan '17 2:02:11 AM Sleeping_Beauty
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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives.

to:

''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives.
relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.
12th Jan '17 1:29:18 PM MrMediaGuy2
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The most famous ground sloth in fiction is Sid from the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, who is only about the size of a human, and resembles ''no'' ground sloth in fiction, much less ''Megatherium''. He resembles more of a modern tree sloth, which the animators did indeed model him off of. In prehistoric terms, though, he seems to be closest to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothrotheriops Nothrotheriops]] at least in terms of appearance. The most bizarre portrayal would have to be in the 1948 B-movie ''Film/UnknownIsland'', where a ground sloth was depicted as a strange, roaring predator that resembles a cross between a gorilla and a bear.

to:

The most famous ground sloth in fiction is Sid from the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, who is only about the size of a human, and resembles ''no'' ground sloth in fiction, real life, much less ''Megatherium''. He resembles looks more of like a modern tree sloth, which the animators did indeed model him off of. In prehistoric terms, though, he seems to be closest to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothrotheriops Nothrotheriops]] at least in terms of appearance. The most bizarre portrayal would have to be in the 1948 B-movie ''Film/UnknownIsland'', where a ground sloth was depicted as a strange, roaring predator that resembles a cross between a gorilla and a bear.



The most famous extinct bear is the cave bear (''Ursus spelaeus''), whose remains are extremely abundant in European caves. Quite similar to a modern Kodiak in shape and size, but with a bigger hump on its shoulder and a more prominent skull, the cave bear is often portrayed as [[BearsAreBadNews the archenemy of Neanderthals]], because both lived in the same places (Pleistocene Europe) and were forced to share the same caves to repair themselves from the frigid Ice Age winters. But it's more probable that Neanderthals (and humans) were actually the worst enemies of cave bears, and some think they could even have contributed to cave bears' extinction.

Studies show the cave bear to have been to an almost pure herbivore, like the living giant panda, living on a strict diet of berries and shrubs. In fact, the inflexibility of its diet may be what contributed to its extinction.

The North American short-faced bear (''Arctodus''), in contrast to its stockier cousin, had long limbs and a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin bulldog-like snout]] and was probably an agile runner and specialized hunter.

Expect the two to be confused in pop culture, despite being quite different in appearance, and the short-faced bear being more related to the South American spectacled bear than the modern grizzly. Also expect the cave bear to be depicted as a hunter of large prey despite having a mostly herbivorous diet judging from the wear on its teeth (though it may have eaten meat on occasion, like other bears).

to:

The most famous extinct bear is the cave bear (''Ursus spelaeus''), whose remains are extremely abundant in European caves. Quite similar to a modern Kodiak in shape and size, but with a bigger hump on its shoulder and a more prominent skull, the cave bear is often portrayed as [[BearsAreBadNews the archenemy of Neanderthals]], because both lived in the same places (Pleistocene Europe) and were forced to share the same caves to repair themselves from the frigid Ice Age winters. But it's more probable that Neanderthals (and humans) were actually the worst enemies of cave bears, and some think they could even have contributed to cave bears' extinction.

extinction. Studies show the cave bear to have been to an almost pure herbivore, like the living giant panda, living on a strict diet of berries and shrubs.shrubs (though, like pandas, it may have supplemented its diet with meat every now and then). In fact, the inflexibility of its diet may be what contributed to its extinction.

The North American short-faced bear (''Arctodus''), in contrast to its stockier cousin, had long limbs and limbs, a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin bulldog-like snout]] snout]], and was probably an almost purely carnivorous diet. At first glance, it seems like it would be an agile runner and specialized hunter.

fast runner, and a very powerful hunter. However, [[ScienceMarchesOn more recent studies]] show that its limbs were too gracile to wrestle large prey to the ground, and too fragile for sharp turns, the latter of which is required for a fast-running hunter. More likely, it was a scavenging kleptoparasite that stole prey from other predators by scaring them away with its large size. However, very few animals can live entirely on scavenging (vultures are an exception, as they can fly for miles without eating), hinting that it may have been an omnivore like other bear species.

Expect the two to be confused in pop culture, despite being quite different in appearance, and the short-faced bear being more related to the South American spectacled bear than the modern grizzly. Also expect the cave bear to be depicted as a hunter of large prey despite having a mostly herbivorous diet judging from the wear on its teeth (though it may have eaten meat on occasion, like other bears).
teeth. Another thing to note is that despite most books describing the short-faced bear as the largest bear, its South American relative ''Arctotherium'' is actually larger.
12th Jan '17 1:19:09 PM CJCroen1393
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Among the rare ''Archelon'' appearences in fiction, the most remembered is in Harryhausen's ''One Million Years B.C.''. The turtle is the first animal cavemen encounter in the island, [[UpToEleven upsized to be as big as a house]]. Surprisingly, many viewers think it was [[{{Slurpasaur}} live-acted by a Real Life turtle]], but it too is stop-motion like most other animals here.

to:

Among the rare ''Archelon'' appearences in fiction, the most remembered is in Harryhausen's ''One Million Years B.C.''. The turtle is the first animal cavemen encounter in the island, [[UpToEleven upsized to be as big as a house]]. Surprisingly, many viewers think it was [[{{Slurpasaur}} live-acted by a Real Life turtle]], but it too is stop-motion like most other animals here.
here. A Franchise/{{Pokemon}} based on ''Archelon'' made its debut in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''; a two-tier fossil Pokemon, Tirtouga and Carracosta are interesting, as even fully grown they're actually ''smaller'' than their real world inspiration.
7th Jan '17 3:05:29 PM whunt
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The most famous ground sloth in fiction is Sid from the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, who is only about the size of a human, and resembles ''no'' ground sloth in fiction, much less ''Megatherium''. He resembles more of a modern tree sloth, which the animators did indeed model him off of. The most bizarre portrayal would have to be in the 1948 B-movie ''Film/UnknownIsland'', where a ground sloth was depicted as a strange, roaring predator that resembles a cross between a gorilla and a bear.

to:

The most famous ground sloth in fiction is Sid from the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, who is only about the size of a human, and resembles ''no'' ground sloth in fiction, much less ''Megatherium''. He resembles more of a modern tree sloth, which the animators did indeed model him off of. In prehistoric terms, though, he seems to be closest to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothrotheriops Nothrotheriops]] at least in terms of appearance. The most bizarre portrayal would have to be in the 1948 B-movie ''Film/UnknownIsland'', where a ground sloth was depicted as a strange, roaring predator that resembles a cross between a gorilla and a bear.
13th Dec '16 9:06:08 AM StFan
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Among the rare ''Archelon'' appearences in fiction, the most remembered is in Harryhausen’s ''One Million Years BC''. The turtle is the first animal cavemen encounter in the island, [[UpToEleven upsized to be as big as a house]]. Surprisingly, many viewers think it was [[{{Slurpasaur}} live-acted by a Real Life turtle]], but it too is stop-motion like most other animals here.

to:

Among the rare ''Archelon'' appearences in fiction, the most remembered is in Harryhausen’s Harryhausen's ''One Million Years BC''.B.C.''. The turtle is the first animal cavemen encounter in the island, [[UpToEleven upsized to be as big as a house]]. Surprisingly, many viewers think it was [[{{Slurpasaur}} live-acted by a Real Life turtle]], but it too is stop-motion like most other animals here.



# '''TropeMaker:''' ''[[HarryhausenMovie One Million Years B.C.]]''

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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''[[HarryhausenMovie One Million Years B.C.]]''
''Film/OneMillionYearsBC''



''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, aka the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives.

For [[RuleOfCool VERY obvious reasons]], ''Deinosuchus'' is a popular crocodilian choice in the world of DinosaurMedia, though curiously enough it's not quite as common in mainstream works as it is in educational ones. Naturally, its size and abilities will usually be exaggerated, though fortunately it tends to avoid foraging into PrehistoricMonster territory due to the fact that it was essentially a scaled-up alligator, and we have plenty of those in the modern day to use as points of reference[[note]]Interestingly, sufficiently giant alligators exist even today — the largest on record was a whopping 15 feet in length and reportedly another one was caught that was around 19 feet in length — though none of them make it to the same level of massiveness that ''Deinosuchus'' did[[/note]]. One noteworthy appearance was the fourth ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' film, a cantankerous ''Deinosuchus'' appears as one of the two main villains (partnered with an equally disagreeable ''Ichthyornis''), while another was in an episode of ''Series/PrehistoricPark'', wherein Nigel brings one back to the present for his dinosaur zoo.

to:

''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, aka a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives.

For [[RuleOfCool VERY obvious reasons]], ''Deinosuchus'' is a popular crocodilian choice in the world of DinosaurMedia, though curiously enough it's not quite as common in mainstream works as it is in educational ones. Naturally, its size and abilities will usually be exaggerated, though fortunately it tends to avoid foraging into PrehistoricMonster territory due to the fact that it was essentially a scaled-up alligator, and we have plenty of those in the modern day to use as points of reference[[note]]Interestingly, sufficiently giant alligators exist even today -- the largest on record was a whopping 15 feet in length and reportedly another one was caught that was around 19 feet in length -- though none of them make it to the same level of massiveness that ''Deinosuchus'' did[[/note]]. One noteworthy appearance was the fourth ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' film, a cantankerous ''Deinosuchus'' appears as one of the two main villains (partnered with an equally disagreeable ''Ichthyornis''), while another was in an episode of ''Series/PrehistoricPark'', wherein Nigel brings one back to the present for his dinosaur zoo.
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