History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursNonDinosaurs

10th Aug '17 9:49:58 AM TheMorlock
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#'''Entry Time:''' N/A for the woolly mammoth which has been a cultural icon since prehistory. 1863 for the mastodon.
#'''TropeMaker:''' Literature/JourneyToTheCenterOfTheEarth (Mastodon)


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#'''Entry Time:''' 1903
#'''TropeMaker:''' The paintings of Charles R. Knight


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#'''Entry Time:''' 1918 (''Coelodonta''), 2006 (''Elasmotherium'')
#'''TropeMaker:''' Literature/TheLandThatTimeForgot (''Coelodonta''), Series/PrehistoricPark (''Elasmotherium'')


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#'''Entry time:''' 1864
#'''TropeMaker:''' Literature/JourneyToTheCenterOfTheEarth


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#'''Entry Time:''' 1897
#'''TropeMaker:''' A Story of the Stone Age
14th Jul '17 8:36:01 PM schoi30
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In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a memorably chilling sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking quadrupedally as opposed to upright like a human.

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In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a memorably chilling sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking quadrupedally on its knuckles as opposed to upright like a human.
14th Jul '17 8:16:31 PM schoi30
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In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a memorably chilling sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking on their knuckles as opposed to upright like a human.

to:

In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a memorably chilling sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking on their knuckles quadrupedally as opposed to upright like a human.
15th May '17 12:30:21 PM chasemaddigan
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# '''Trope Maker:''' Walking With Monsters

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# '''Trope Maker:''' Walking With Monsters
''Series/WalkingWithMonsters''
12th May '17 6:51:13 PM chasemaddigan
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Several interesting new pterosaurs were discovered in the second half of the 20th century, but only one managed to achieve some consideration in media: ''Quetzalcoatlus'', because it was the only one clearly bigger than ''Pteranodon'', and the new "biggest flying animal ever." In the 2000s, ''Ornithocheirus'' gained some popularity as well thanks to a memorable appearance in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', but only because was (wrongly) described as [[UpToEleven the biggest flying animal ever existed]]. The others (''Dsungaripterus'', ''Pterodaustro'', ''Tapejara'', ''Eudimorphodon'', ''Sordes'', and so on) were largely ignored outside dino-books and documentaries. If you’re looking for these and other non-stock pterosaurs, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]].

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Several interesting new pterosaurs were discovered in the second half of the 20th century, but only one managed to achieve some consideration in media: ''Quetzalcoatlus'', because it was the only one clearly bigger than ''Pteranodon'', and the new "biggest flying animal ever." In the 2000s, ''Ornithocheirus'' gained some popularity as well thanks to a memorable appearance in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'', but only because was (wrongly) described as [[UpToEleven the biggest flying animal ever existed]]. The others (''Dsungaripterus'', ''Pterodaustro'', ''Tapejara'', ''Eudimorphodon'', ''Sordes'', and so on) were largely ignored outside dino-books and documentaries. If you’re looking for these and other non-stock pterosaurs, see [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles here]].



# '''TropeMaker:''' ''WalkingWithDinosaurs''

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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''WalkingWithDinosaurs''
''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs''



The only other marine reptile which has appeared in fiction more than once, ''Archelon'' lived in the same Late Cretaceous inland shallow sea which once covered the Great Plains. Discovered at the start of the 20th century, it shared its habitat with ''Elasmosaurus'', ''Tylosaurus'', and the flying ''Pteranodon'': its size and armor made adult ''Archelon'' virtually immune to predators. (Even though in [[WalkingWithDinosaurs WWD]] a dead ''Archelon'' is shown killed by a giant mosasaur, but the latter was oversized.)

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The only other marine reptile which has appeared in fiction more than once, ''Archelon'' lived in the same Late Cretaceous inland shallow sea which once covered the Great Plains. Discovered at the start of the 20th century, it shared its habitat with ''Elasmosaurus'', ''Tylosaurus'', and the flying ''Pteranodon'': its size and armor made adult ''Archelon'' virtually immune to predators. (Even though in [[WalkingWithDinosaurs [[Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs WWD]] a dead ''Archelon'' is shown killed by a giant mosasaur, but the latter was oversized.)



A common misconception about the woolly mammoth is that it was ''larger'' than modern elephants: actually the "woolly" was the same size as its tropical, 21st-century cousins — perhaps this is due to the confusion with other mammoth species that ''were'' a bit larger, like the [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Emperor mammoth]] and [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Columbian mammoth]]). Also note that only males had the typical huge, curly tusks: the females' tusks were not that different from those of modern elephants. As preserved fossil hair is often reddish-brown, some depictions show woollies with this color: actually, this is due to a chemical change since 10,000 years ago. When alive they were blackish, as seen in the ''[[WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With]]'' series.

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A common misconception about the woolly mammoth is that it was ''larger'' than modern elephants: actually the "woolly" was the same size as its tropical, 21st-century cousins — perhaps this is due to the confusion with other mammoth species that ''were'' a bit larger, like the [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Emperor mammoth]] and [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Columbian mammoth]]). Also note that only males had the typical huge, curly tusks: the females' tusks were not that different from those of modern elephants. As preserved fossil hair is often reddish-brown, some depictions show woollies with this color: actually, this is due to a chemical change since 10,000 years ago. When alive they were blackish, as seen in the ''[[WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With]]'' series.''Series/WalkingWithBeasts''.



An extremely controversial idea is that ground sloths might have supplemented their diet with meat that they scavenged from predators such as saber-tooths by chasing them away from their kill. There isn't much to support this theory other than RuleOfCool, though.[[note]]It is entirely possible they may have eaten ''some'' meat, since modern herbivores like deer have been known to do so for protein and because it's easier to digest. However, this would not be a natural part of their diet, and they would more likely prefer plants.[[/note]] This did not stop ''Walking With Beasts'' from depicting ''Megatherium'' chasing some ''Smilodon'' away from their kill and eating it, and since then, it has been forever cemented as an omnivore in video games such as ''VideoGame/ZooTycoon'' and ''VideoGame/ArkSurvivalEvolved''. Some portrayals take this depiction UpToEleven by having it be an ''active hunter'', knocking over animals like glyptodonts to tear open their soft belly.

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An extremely controversial idea is that ground sloths might have supplemented their diet with meat that they scavenged from predators such as saber-tooths by chasing them away from their kill. There isn't much to support this theory other than RuleOfCool, though.[[note]]It is entirely possible they may have eaten ''some'' meat, since modern herbivores like deer have been known to do so for protein and because it's easier to digest. However, this would not be a natural part of their diet, and they would more likely prefer plants.[[/note]] This did not stop ''Walking With Beasts'' ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'' from depicting ''Megatherium'' chasing some ''Smilodon'' away from their kill and eating it, and since then, it has been forever cemented as an omnivore in video games such as ''VideoGame/ZooTycoon'' and ''VideoGame/ArkSurvivalEvolved''. Some portrayals take this depiction UpToEleven by having it be an ''active hunter'', knocking over animals like glyptodonts to tear open their soft belly.



Pop culture appearances include ''Walking With Beasts'', the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, and even an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}''. If it ever appears in non-documentary fiction, don't expect it to be referred to by name.

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Pop culture appearances include ''Walking With Beasts'', ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'', the ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' franchise, and even an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}''. If it ever appears in non-documentary fiction, don't expect it to be referred to by name.



''Megacerops'' (formerly called ''Brontotherium''... these ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Bronto]]''s just can't keep their names) the prototype and the most well-known member of its group of mammals, the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin brontotheres]]. [[note]]However, one brontothere, the primitive ''Brontops'', preserved its bronto- prefix... until it was reclassified as a synonym for ''Megacerops''[[/note]] While ''Uintatherium'' was not related with any modern hoofed mammals, brontotheres were distant relatives of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perissodactyla horses, tapirs and rhinos]]. The biggest brontotheres were almost Triceratops-sized or elephant-sized, and their cool name indeed means "thunder beasts." They had a more rhino-like look than uintatheres, having one single "horn" on their nose: ''Megacerops'' 's prominence was forked and slingshot-like, while that of ''Embolotherium'' (the brontothere portrayed in [[WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With Beasts]]) was shovel-like and not forked. Like uintatheres, brontotheres too roamed plains of the northern continents in huge numbers in the Early Cenozoic; they eventually went extinct, perhaps because they weren't able to adapt to the diffusion of the very first grasslands which replaced their former foods (scrub and non-grass herbs).

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''Megacerops'' (formerly called ''Brontotherium''... these ''[[UsefulNotes/StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Bronto]]''s just can't keep their names) the prototype and the most well-known member of its group of mammals, the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin brontotheres]]. [[note]]However, one brontothere, the primitive ''Brontops'', preserved its bronto- prefix... until it was reclassified as a synonym for ''Megacerops''[[/note]] While ''Uintatherium'' was not related with any modern hoofed mammals, brontotheres were distant relatives of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perissodactyla horses, tapirs and rhinos]]. The biggest brontotheres were almost Triceratops-sized or elephant-sized, and their cool name indeed means "thunder beasts." They had a more rhino-like look than uintatheres, having one single "horn" on their nose: ''Megacerops'' 's prominence was forked and slingshot-like, while that of ''Embolotherium'' (the brontothere portrayed in [[WalkingWithDinosaurs Walking With Beasts]]) ''Series/WalkingWithBeasts'') was shovel-like and not forked. Like uintatheres, brontotheres too roamed plains of the northern continents in huge numbers in the Early Cenozoic; they eventually went extinct, perhaps because they weren't able to adapt to the diffusion of the very first grasslands which replaced their former foods (scrub and non-grass herbs).
10th May '17 4:48:50 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a quite [[NightmareFuel/TheJungleBook2016 intense]] and memorable sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking on their knuckles as opposed to upright like a human.

to:

In TheNewTens, ''Gigantopithecus'' made two notable film appearances. First, there was the villainous pirate Captain Gutt in ''WesternAnimation/IceAgeContinentalDrift''. Then in ''[[Film/TheJungleBook2016 The Jungle Book]]'', a 2016 remake of [[Disney/TheJungleBook the 1967 Disney classic]], King Louie was [[AdaptationSpeciesChange changed]] from an orangutan to a ''Gigantopithecus'' to avert MisplacedWildlife. The latter appearance could very well place this creature in the public's mind for quite a long time, since not only was he quite humorous, being voiced by Creator/ChristopherWalken and all, but he was much more menacing than his animated counterpart, chasing Mowgli through the ancient temple ruins in a quite [[NightmareFuel/TheJungleBook2016 intense]] and memorable memorably chilling sequence. Both film appearances [[ShownTheirWork correctly]] depict ''Gigantopithecus'' as orangutan-like apes, walking on their knuckles as opposed to upright like a human.
14th Apr '17 10:58:15 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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Although "saber-tooths" belongs to the cat family Felidae, they are in a separate branch of that clade from modern felines; thus, the popular denomination "saber-toothed tiger" is not correct at all. The "tiger" thing means that ''Smilodon'' is often heard roaring just like an actual tiger or a lion, though only the big cats of the genus ''[[PantheraAwesome Panthera]]'' (that is, lions, tigers, jaguars and leopards) can roar thanks to the structure of their larynxes unique to this group. Even though scientists say the structure of the small bones in the saber-tooth's mouth are set up for making a sort of roar, this roar arguably was''not'' identical to that of modern big cats.

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Although "saber-tooths" belongs to the cat family Felidae, they are in a separate branch of that clade from modern felines; thus, the popular denomination "saber-toothed tiger" is not correct at all. The "tiger" thing means that ''Smilodon'' is often heard roaring just like an actual tiger or a lion, though only the big cats of the genus ''[[PantheraAwesome Panthera]]'' (that is, lions, tigers, jaguars and leopards) can roar thanks to the structure of their larynxes unique to this group. Even though scientists say the structure of the small bones in the saber-tooth's mouth are set up for making a sort of roar, this roar arguably was''not'' was ''not'' identical to that of modern big cats.
30th Mar '17 2:25:07 PM 0000
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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 9m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.

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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 9m 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.
15th Mar '17 11:39:41 AM 0000
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''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.

to:

''Deinosuchus'' ("terrible crocodile", also called ''Phobosuchus'' "fearsome crocodile") belonged to the eusuchians, a.k.a. the "true crocodilians." This gigantic gator appeared only in the Cretaceous but had the same anatomy we still see today. More precisely, it was closer to alligators and caimans than to true crocodiles, hence the nickname "giant alligator". Like gators, the ''Deinosuchus''' skull had wide strong jaws and relatively blunt teeth. Its head was as long as a fully grown man, but the length of its body is unknown because the skull is the only surviving part. Comparing with modern alligators, ''Deinosuchus'' could have reached 15m 9m in length and weighed more than a ''Tyrannosaurus''. Its home was freshwater basins in Late Cretaceous North America, but it could also have frequented the inland sea that divided the continent at the time. Since its fossil is from 75 mya, ''Deinosuchus'' could not have lived long enough to meet ''T. rex'' in RealLife, but only the latter's smaller relatives, like ''Albertosaurus''.
15th Feb '17 9:33:02 PM schoi30
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Expect to see ''Smilodon'' heavily interacting with humans, as our ancestors' main predator: in RealLife other carnivores such as [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife prehistoric lions]] were probably more important predators. And expect to see it ''living alongside woolly mammoths''. Even though they were contemporary, their habitat in RealLife was largely different, with ''Smilodon''s preferring warmer climates. And, naturally, don't exclude seeing saber-toothed cats somehow living alongside dinosaurs, and in the worst scenario, [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot fighting against a ''T. rex'']].

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Expect to see ''Smilodon'' heavily interacting with humans, as our ancestors' main predator: in RealLife other carnivores such as [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife prehistoric lions]] were probably more important predators. And expect to see it ''living alongside woolly mammoths''. Even though they were contemporary, their habitat in RealLife was largely different, with ''Smilodon''s preferring warmer climates.climates[[note]]Though ''S. fatalis'' would have experienced snowy winters considering its region's climate at the time[[/note]]. And, naturally, don't exclude seeing saber-toothed cats somehow living alongside dinosaurs, and in the worst scenario, [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot fighting against a ''T. rex'']].
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