History UsefulNotes / StayingOutOfLegalTrouble

17th Sep '16 11:04:20 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** If leaving a bad review, don't make anything up or use hyperbole that could be taken at face value. Stick to the facts of the situation - if your review includes false claims or accusations or engages in hyperbole that a reasonable person may actually believe is factual, you ''can'' be sued for it. If the service or goods provided really were that terrible and you weren't being an unreasonable asshole, the truth should speak for itself. If you were given bad service because you were a dick and you leave an angry review that claims that you were served dirty or rotten food or addressed with derogatory slurs when you really weren't, the business has every right to sue you for trying to tarnish their good name out of spite.
14th Sep '16 9:00:06 AM HasturHasturHastur
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#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but it has to actually have satiric value; "it's social commentary" is not a get-out-of-jail-free card for genuinely defamatory statements, and neither is, [[JustJokingJustification "Aw, I was just kidding!"]]. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but most states have anti-SLAPP tools that make dismissing them a relatively painless process.

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#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim you can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections be sued for parody and satire, but it has to actually have satiric value; "it's social commentary" is not a get-out-of-jail-free card for genuinely defamatory statements, and neither is, [[JustJokingJustification "Aw, I was just kidding!"]]. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but most states have anti-SLAPP tools that make dismissing them a relatively painless process.it.



** Don't get into physical fights.

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** Don't get into physical fights. If defending yourself is unavoidable, do not go overboard



** If you're in a sticky situation with taxes, ''do not'' use tax protestor arguments when stating your case. No matter what you may think, your interpretation of the law is not new, and they have almost certainly heard your argument before and are more than prepared to shoot it down. Also, it should be mentioned that even ''trying'' to use tax protestor arguments has a high likelihood of netting contempt charges and hefty fines; time and time again, it has been proven that if the IRS was previously cordial and understanding with you, busting out tax protestor arguments will make them jump for the boxing gloves and come after you with a vengeance. This goes at least quadruple for sovereign citizen tactics; employ these, and the most likely outcome is a prison sentence[[note]]As a matter of fact, even using the terms "sovereign citizen" or "free man" when filing improper returns will get you slapped with an automatic $5,000 fine by the IRS, and depending on what other language you use or if the incorrect amount being claimed is particularly ridiculous, you may be looking at far more massive fines or criminal prosecution. The IRS does ''not'' fuck around when you piss them off, and they ''really'' hate sovereigns[[/note]].

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** If you're in a sticky situation with taxes, ''do not'' use tax protestor arguments when stating your case. No matter what you may think, your interpretation of the law is not new, and they have almost certainly heard your argument before and are more than prepared to shoot it down. Also, it should be mentioned that even ''trying'' to use tax protestor arguments has a high likelihood of netting contempt charges and hefty fines; time and time again, it has been proven that if the IRS was previously cordial and understanding with you, busting out tax protestor arguments will make them jump for the boxing gloves and come after you with a vengeance. This goes at least quadruple for sovereign citizen tactics; employ these, and the most likely outcome is a prison sentence[[note]]As a matter of fact, even using the terms like "sovereign citizen" or "free man" when filing improper returns will get you slapped with an automatic $5,000 fine by the IRS, and depending on what other language you use or if the incorrect amount being claimed is you're making particularly ridiculous, massive deductions or already have a bad history with them, you may be looking at far more massive fines or criminal prosecution. The IRS does ''not'' fuck around when you piss them off, and they ''really'' hate sovereigns[[/note]].



** Don't make public, accusatory statements about people unless you can back it up or it is obvious opinion (something that cannot be proven true or false). For example, "Bob is in TheMafia" or "Sarah is a child molester" are potential slander or libel as they are objective statements of fact that can be proven false (e.g. if Bob is ''not'' in TheMafia or Sarah does ''not'' molest children, they can sue you). "Bob is fat and ugly" or "Sarah is a bitch" are indeed abusive, but they are not illegal statements because they can't be proven true or false (e.g. there is no objective fact of what "fat and ugly" is or what defines someone as a "bitch").

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** Don't make public, accusatory statements about people unless you can back it up or it is obvious opinion (something that cannot be proven true or false). For example, "Bob is in TheMafia" or "Sarah is a child molester" are potential slander or libel as they are objective statements of fact that can be proven false (e.g. if Bob is ''not'' in TheMafia or Sarah does ''not'' molest children, they can sue you). "Bob is fat and ugly" or "Sarah is a bitch" are indeed abusive, but they are not illegal statements because they can't be proven true or false (e.g. there is no objective fact of what "fat and ugly" is or what defines someone as a "bitch"). Public figures have a heightened burden of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but "it's social commentary" and/or "I was joking" are not get-out-of-jail-free cards for genuinely defamatory statements. While it's largely up to a court to decide, it can generally be assumed that if a reasonable person would take it at face value and/or would not have reason to assume that it was in jest, they're going to call bullshit on your claims that it wasn't meant to be taken seriously.
26th Aug '16 12:16:58 PM DavidDelony
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* ''Do not hit a child. Ever. '''FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER.''''' Even if it's "CorporalPunishment"--the law today views that as child abuse. Seriously. Americans can be remarkably protective of children in the first place, so harming children is a way to call official attention to yourself even if you haven't done anything illegal per se. If you're ''caring'' for the children, you better watch yourself--at a minimum you'll lose your job caring for the kid, and if the parents ''knew'' about the hitting--again, even if you ''and'' the parents thought the kid deserved a spanking, it may be sufficient grounds for at least temporary removal of the children from the custody of the parents until such time as the parents have satisfied the state that they are never going to lay hands on their children again.

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* ''Do not hit a child. Ever. '''FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER.''''' Even if it's "CorporalPunishment"--the law today views that as child abuse. Seriously. Americans can be [[MamaBear remarkably protective protective]] [[PapaWolf of children children]] in the first place, so harming children is a way to call official attention to yourself even if you haven't done anything illegal per se. If you're ''caring'' for the children, you better watch yourself--at a minimum you'll lose your job caring for the kid, and if the parents ''knew'' about the hitting--again, even if you ''and'' the parents thought the kid deserved a spanking, it may be sufficient grounds for at least temporary removal of the children from the custody of the parents until such time as the parents have satisfied the state that they are never going to lay hands on their children again.
9th Aug '16 9:05:48 PM MsChibi
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#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but it has to actually have satiric value; "it's social commentary" is not a get-out-of-jail-free card for genuinely defamatory statements. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but most states have anti-SLAPP tools that make dismissing them a relatively painless process.

to:

#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but it has to actually have satiric value; "it's social commentary" is not a get-out-of-jail-free card for genuinely defamatory statements.statements, and neither is, [[JustJokingJustification "Aw, I was just kidding!"]]. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but most states have anti-SLAPP tools that make dismissing them a relatively painless process.
6th Aug '16 12:25:16 PM HasturHasturHastur
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#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but you may still wind up in hot water if your words had no satiric value and were just venomous. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but those can easily be thrown out with a simple motion under most circumstances.

to:

#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but you may still wind up in hot water if your words had no it has to actually have satiric value and were just venomous. value; "it's social commentary" is not a get-out-of-jail-free card for genuinely defamatory statements. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but those can easily be thrown out with a simple motion under most circumstances.states have anti-SLAPP tools that make dismissing them a relatively painless process.
17th Jul '16 11:05:09 PM MsChibi
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** If the person in question has actually done something ''illegal'', report them to the appropriate law enforcement official. That's way more effective than "signal boosting" on the Internet. If the person hasn't done anything ''illegal'' (just upsetting), then simply unfollow or unfriend them, and if necessary, report the offending post to the site's administrative team. If they harass you, report that to site admins as well.

to:

** If the person in question has actually done something ''illegal'', report them to the appropriate law enforcement official.official, as well as to site admins. That's way more effective than "signal boosting" on the Internet. If the person hasn't done anything ''illegal'' (just upsetting), then simply unfollow or unfriend them, and if necessary, report the offending post to the site's administrative team. If they harass you, report that to site admins as well.
17th Jul '16 11:04:24 PM MsChibi
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Added DiffLines:

** If the person in question has actually done something ''illegal'', report them to the appropriate law enforcement official. That's way more effective than "signal boosting" on the Internet. If the person hasn't done anything ''illegal'' (just upsetting), then simply unfollow or unfriend them, and if necessary, report the offending post to the site's administrative team. If they harass you, report that to site admins as well.
14th Jul '16 6:35:28 PM MsChibi
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** On a related note, don't make threats [[{{GIFT}} online]], either. No matter what. Remember, the Internet is not as anonymous as you think it is, and making threats against a person/their family/their property/all of the above can get you in trouble, just like in meatspace. Similarly, don't [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doxing "doxx"]] other people; even if ''you'' wouldn't threaten or harm them, even if the worst thing ''you'' would do is set them up with a few unsolicited pizzas or make a few {{Prank Call}}s, you can't be certain that someone else won't stalk, harass, threaten, or harm this person...and if someone does, ''you'' could be held responsible. (Whether you think they deserve it or not, whether you think it's a good way to "teach them a lesson" or not, is irrelevant. Remember, the law does not look kindly on any form of [[VigilanteMan vigilante "justice."]]) Another good reason not to doxx: it puts other people in the crossfire. Namely, anyone the doxxee lives with, or anyone on their contact lists. People who might not be involved in your drama, or might not even be aware of it.

to:

** On a related note, don't make threats [[{{GIFT}} online]], either. No matter what. Remember, the Internet is not as anonymous as you think it is, and making threats against a person/their family/their property/all of the above can get you in trouble, just like in meatspace. Similarly, don't [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doxing "doxx"]] other people; even if ''you'' wouldn't threaten or harm them, even if the worst thing ''you'' would do is set them up with a few unsolicited pizzas or make a few {{Prank Call}}s, you can't be certain that someone else won't stalk, harass, threaten, or harm this person...and if someone does, ''you'' could be held responsible. (Whether you think they deserve it or not, whether you think it's a good way to "teach them a lesson" or not, is irrelevant. Remember, the law does not look kindly on any form of [[VigilanteMan vigilante "justice."]]) The law also does not care whether you're copy-pasting information that they had posted previously, or whether it's something you dug up from the Deep Web; the end result is the same. Also, there is no guarantee that the information you're putting out there is accurate, complete, or up-to-date. (For example, what if the address or phone number you listed no longer belongs to the person you're targeting, but to someone else?) Another good reason not to doxx: it puts other people in the crossfire. Namely, anyone the doxxee lives with, or anyone on their contact lists. People who might not be involved in your drama, or might not even be aware of it.
5th Jul '16 10:10:31 AM MsChibi
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** On a related note, don't make threats [[{{GIFT}} online]], either. No matter what. Remember, the Internet is not as anonymous as you think it is, and making threats against a person/their family/their property/all of the above can get you in trouble, just like in meatspace. Similarly, don't [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doxing "doxx"]] other people; even if ''you'' wouldn't threaten or harm them, even if the worst thing ''you'' would do is set them up with a few unsolicited pizzas or make a few {{Prank Call}}s, you can't be certain that someone else won't stalk, harass, threaten, or harm this person...and if someone does, ''you'' could be held responsible. Another good reason not to doxx: it puts other people in the crossfire. Namely, anyone the doxxee lives with, or anyone on their contact lists. People who might not be involved in your drama, or might not even be aware of it.

to:

** On a related note, don't make threats [[{{GIFT}} online]], either. No matter what. Remember, the Internet is not as anonymous as you think it is, and making threats against a person/their family/their property/all of the above can get you in trouble, just like in meatspace. Similarly, don't [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doxing "doxx"]] other people; even if ''you'' wouldn't threaten or harm them, even if the worst thing ''you'' would do is set them up with a few unsolicited pizzas or make a few {{Prank Call}}s, you can't be certain that someone else won't stalk, harass, threaten, or harm this person...and if someone does, ''you'' could be held responsible. (Whether you think they deserve it or not, whether you think it's a good way to "teach them a lesson" or not, is irrelevant. Remember, the law does not look kindly on any form of [[VigilanteMan vigilante "justice."]]) Another good reason not to doxx: it puts other people in the crossfire. Namely, anyone the doxxee lives with, or anyone on their contact lists. People who might not be involved in your drama, or might not even be aware of it.
3rd Jul '16 9:43:38 PM MsChibi
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** With regards to prostitution or escort services, please note that sexual services of that nature are illegal almost ''everywhere'' in the United States, with only a few exceptions. The safest way to stay out of trouble with prostitutes is to just not hire them. If you do plan on hiring them, remember that ''everyone'' who knows that you've hired prostitutes is breaking the law, so if you're calling some in for your friend's stag party, everyone at that party is considered to be soliciting prostitutes and can be charged. Now, nine times out of ten, the police won't arrest you and will let you off with a warning--however, it does give them a good reason to search your premises and check your credit history. See above about why that's a terrible idea: namely, you can't be 100% certain about what they'll find. Generally speaking with prostitutes the less you know about each other, the better. Don't give your name to a prostitute, or use a fake name. Pay by cash, not credit card. Don't ask for their number or anything stupid like that (it's unlikely they'll give it to you anyway). Remember that most prostitutes are well aware of the risks of their jobs, and a lot of them carry hidden weapons on their persons, so as with strip clubs, don't be an idiot. If a prostitute refuses to have sex with you, ''do not force him or her under any circumstances,'' even if you've already paid. It's still rape, just like hitting them or otherwise hurting them without their consent is still assault. Always use protection--that's just basic common sense. (It's also usually cheaper.)

to:

** With regards to prostitution or escort services, please note that sexual services of that nature are illegal almost ''everywhere'' in the United States, with only a few exceptions. The safest way to stay out of trouble with prostitutes is to just not hire them. If you do plan on hiring them, remember that ''everyone'' who knows that you've hired prostitutes is breaking the law, so if you're calling some in for your friend's stag party, everyone at that party is considered to be soliciting prostitutes and can be charged. Now, nine times out of ten, the police won't arrest you and will let you off with a warning--however, it does give them a good reason to search your premises and check your credit history. See above about why that's a terrible idea: namely, you can't be 100% certain about what they'll find. Generally speaking with prostitutes the less you know about each other, the better. Don't give your name to a prostitute, or use a fake name. Pay by cash, not by credit card.card or personal check. Don't ask for their number or anything stupid like that (it's unlikely they'll give it to you anyway). Remember that most prostitutes are well aware of the risks of their jobs, and a lot of them carry hidden weapons on their persons, so as with strip clubs, don't be an idiot. If a prostitute refuses to have sex with you, ''do not force him or her under any circumstances,'' even if you've already paid. It's still rape, just like hitting them or otherwise hurting them without their consent is still assault. Always use protection--that's just basic common sense. (It's also usually cheaper.)
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