History UsefulNotes / StayingOutOfLegalTrouble

17th Apr '15 11:41:56 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** Make it clear what forms of payment you will and will not accept before engaging in a sale of property. Cash, in this case, is the safest option - you will know that you're getting the agreed-upon amount on the spot. Do not accept checks without first verifying that they are legitimate; if someone insists on paying with one, always go to their bank or credit union with them to ensure that they are not hot or counterfeit. If they balk, do not accept the check. Lastly, if engaging in online transactions involving credit cards, always use delivery confirmation and demand signatures if the item is particularly expensive, keep records of every order, and ask for confirmation numbers of returns.
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** Make it clear what forms of payment you will and will not accept before engaging in a sale of property. Cash, in this case, is the safest option - you will know that you're getting the agreed-upon amount on the spot. Do not accept checks without first verifying that they are legitimate; if someone insists on paying with one, always go to their bank or credit union with them to ensure that they are not hot or counterfeit. If they balk, do not accept the check. Lastly, if engaging in online transactions involving credit cards, always use delivery confirmation and demand signatures if the item is particularly expensive, keep records of every order, and ask for confirmation numbers of returns. If you ''really'' don't want to take any chances, insist on collect-on-delivery/COD; this ensures that you will either get paid or get the item returned to you if they fail to pay. While this is primarily reserved for situations involving other businesses (usually when a client is at risk of defaulting on their account or regularly contests charges on invoices), it can come in handy whenever you want a guarantee that you will either be paid or get a hassle-free return.
4th Apr '15 4:59:36 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** Make it clear what forms of payment you will and will not accept before engaging in a sale of property. Cash, in this case, is the safest option - you will know that you're getting the agreed-upon amount on the spot. Do not accept checks without first verifying that they are legitimate; if someone insists on paying with one, always go to their bank or credit union with them to ensure that they are not hot or counterfeit. If they balk, do not accept the check. Lastly, if engaging in online transactions involving credit cards, always use delivery confirmation and demand signatures if the item is particularly expensive, keep records of every order, and ask for confirmation numbers of returns.

** Don't make public, accusatory statements about people unless you can back it up or it is obvious opinion (something that cannot be proven true or false). For example, "Bob is in TheMafia" is potential slander or libel as it is an objective statement of fact that can be proven false (e.g. if Bob is ''not'' in TheMafia he can sue you). "Bob is fat and ugly" is, while abusive, not an illegal statement because it can't be proven true or false (e.g. there is no objective fact of what "fat and ugly" is).
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** Don't make public, accusatory statements about people unless you can back it up or it is obvious opinion (something that cannot be proven true or false). For example, "Bob is in TheMafia" or "Sarah is a child molester" are potential slander or libel as it is an they are objective statement statements of fact that can be proven false (e.g. if Bob is ''not'' in TheMafia he or Sarah does ''not'' molest children, they can sue you). "Bob is fat and ugly" is, while or "Sarah is a bitch" are indeed abusive, but they are not an illegal statement statements because it they can't be proven true or false (e.g. there is no objective fact of what "fat and ugly" is).is or what defines someone as a "bitch").
4th Apr '15 4:40:53 PM HasturHasturHastur
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#Slander, libel, and defamation suits are also quite common. If you know that a harmful or inflammatory allegation is objectively false or do not know whether it is true or false but also do not care and go forward with it anyways, the victim can sue you if your actions caused them actual harm. Public figures have a higher standard of proof due to protections for parody and satire, but you may still wind up in hot water if your words had no satiric value and were just venomous. Not making harmful statements of objective fact that are untrue will protect you from the vast majority of these suits outside of the occasional SLAPP (strategic lawsuit against public participation), but those can easily be thrown out with a simple motion under most circumstances.
19th Mar '15 6:08:28 PM xenol
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** Of note, winning the lottery will attract a lot of unwanted attention (by law, lottery winners are recorded in a public registry), particularly those who want to file lawsuits for the smallest thing against you. If you are the lucky winner of a lottery and you are hit with a lawsuit, '''fight them off and do not settle'''. The moment they know you will fight back, and certainly now have the money to do so, they'll soon back off.
19th Mar '15 2:08:22 AM Tdarcos
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** Plus the threat could come back to haunt you. A humorous example occurred in the movie ''Starting Over'' where Jill Clayburgh is visiting her parents and is unaware that Burt Reynolds has been invited as a blind date. So, she's walking at night, and some guy she doesn't know is following her, even tailing her in the direction of her parents home. She's frightened, walks up to the guy she thinks is stalking her, and runs off to her parents. Later, he gets to the door and is introduced, and he tells them that he knows her. Her mother asks where they met, and he says, "Outside, as I was walking up here, she said 'Get the fuck away from me, I've got a knife in my purse and I'll cut your fucking balls off.'"
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** Plus the threat could come back to haunt you. A humorous example occurred in the movie ''Starting Over'' where Jill Clayburgh is visiting her parents and is unaware that Burt Reynolds has been invited as a blind date. So, she's walking at night, and some guy she doesn't know is following her, even tailing her in the direction of her parents home. She's frightened, walks up to the guy she thinks is stalking her, tells him off in no uncertain terms, and runs off to her parents. Later, he gets to the door and is introduced, and he tells them that he knows her. Her mother asks where they met, and he says, tells them exactly what she said: "Outside, as I was walking up here, she said 'Get the fuck away from me, I've got a knife in my purse and I'll cut your fucking balls off.'"
19th Mar '15 2:06:05 AM Tdarcos
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** Plus the threat could come back to haunt you. A humorous example occurred in the movie ''Starting Over'' where Jill Clayburgh is visiting her parents and is unaware that Burt Reynolds has been invited as a blind date. So, she's walking at night, and some guy she doesn't know is following her, even tailing her in the direction of her parents home. She's frightened, walks up to the guy she thinks is stalking her, and runs off to her parents. Later, he gets to the door and is introduced, and he tells them that he knows her. Her mother asks where they met, and he says, "Outside, as I was walking up here, she said 'Get the fuck away from me, I've got a knife in my purse and I'll cut your fucking balls off.'"
19th Mar '15 1:42:49 AM Tdarcos
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# Do not give consent for police searches in pretty much any situation.
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# Do not give consent for police searches in pretty much any situation. This also means that if the police tell you to empty your pockets, you do not, and instead you say, "officer, while I will not resist, I do not consent to police searches." If a cop tells you to empty your pockets and you do, that's considered a consent to the search.
14th Mar '15 10:10:19 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** Also, know that even the act of inviting people to fight can get you in legal trouble. If you go up to someone at a bar and challenge them to one, you'll probably just get ejected by the staff. If you're in a parking lot or other open public area, loudly challenging someone is absolutely grounds for a disturbing the peace arrest and can quite possibly lead to worse charges depending on the circumstances.
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** Also, Similarly, you should know that this also applies to preventing thefts or robberies. If you have good reason to believe that you or someone else is at risk of facing imminent physical harm, proportionate force is allowed. On the other hand, jumping straight to lethal force just because you caught someone attempting to break into your car or steal something off your lawn is not allowed and will absolutely result in murder charges. Threatening them to get them to stop is fine - actually following through on the threats without a credible threat to your own being is not. ** Lastly, know that even the act of inviting people to fight can get you in legal trouble. If you go up to someone at a bar and challenge them to one, you'll probably just get ejected by the staff. If you're in a parking lot or other open public area, loudly challenging someone is absolutely grounds for a disturbing the peace arrest and can quite possibly lead to worse charges depending on the circumstances.
31st Jan '15 1:55:33 PM HasturHasturHastur
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** If you are currently in the middle of a legal battle, don't file anything purely for the sake of annoying or frustrating the opposition or otherwise making their life hard. Bad faith filings can kill a case that you may have otherwise have, invite sanctions that can and often will cost you, and get you sued or potentially even result in contempt charges, and people who habitually file abusive, malicious motions and petitions can and often will wind up getting their access to the courts severely limited.
26th Jan '15 12:51:09 AM RevolutionStone
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** Never pay a deposit in anything that doesn't have a paper trail. Cash does not work for deposits.
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** Never pay a deposit in anything that doesn't have a paper trail. Cash does not work for deposits. This ''especially'' goes for rental deposits for both sides of the equation: a tenant whose deposit vanishes can have to pay more or face eviction proceedings, while if a tenant claims that as a landlord or subletter, you stole their deposit, and you can't prove you didn't, you can at least be sued - and possibly even criminally charged.
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