History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

22nd May '18 12:40:57 PM sarysa
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* In most of the world, the word "barbecue" is a verb, meaning "to grill". It gets complicated in the United States, though:

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* In most of the world, the word "barbecue" is a verb, meaning "to grill". It gets complicated in the United States, as a noun or adjective, though:



* Amongst American youth, the slang term 'dawg' (pronounced 'dog') is often used affectionately. For Australian youth, it's only spelled 'dog', it's a ''very'' harsh putdown, used for the selfish and disloyal. Americans also have the negative interpretation of 'dog', but context matters.

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* Amongst American youth, the slang term 'dawg' (pronounced 'dog') is often used affectionately. For Australian youth, it's only spelled 'dog', and it's a ''very'' harsh putdown, used for the selfish and disloyal. Americans also have the negative interpretation of 'dog', but context matters.
22nd May '18 12:32:54 PM sarysa
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** The term "trainers" is slowly gaining traction in the US, and is most prominently used in marketing directed at running enthusiasts -- one of few places where the UK term isn't necessarily used alongside "sneakers".

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** The term "trainers" is slowly gaining traction in the US, and is most prominently used in marketing directed at running enthusiasts -- one of few places where the UK term isn't necessarily used alongside obligatorily accompanied by "sneakers".
22nd May '18 12:29:39 PM sarysa
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** Occasionally, Americans will use both -re and -er forms with the -re form meant to appear more distinguished, such as to separate one's traditional theatre from common movie theaters. In the UK, only the -re form holds meaning.



** The term "trainers" is slowly gaining traction in the US, and is most prominently used in marketing directed at running enthusiasts -- one of few places where the UK term isn't necessarily used alongside "sneakers".



** In US usage, "lavatory" exclusively refers to toilets on airplanes.

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** In US usage, "lavatory" exclusively refers to toilets is the more formal term often used by wait staff, flight attendants, and school faculty in private schools...as well as at various formal gatherings. "Bathroom" has mildly childish connotations in some circles, with "restroom" being the neutral term most commonly seen on airplanes.signs.



* Primary school in Britain is from four to eleven, and is broken down into infant (four to seven) and junior (seven to eleven). In America, there are no further subdivisions (when it's referred to at all; the generally preferred term in the States is "elementary school"), and it broadly designates Kindergarten through fifth grade, sometimes sixth depending on the school (that would be about five to ten or eleven).

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* Primary school in Britain is from four to eleven, and is broken down into infant (four to seven) and junior (seven to eleven). In America, there are no further subdivisions (when it's referred to at all; the generally preferred term in the States is "elementary school"), and it broadly designates Kindergarten through fifth grade, sometimes sixth depending for public schools while parochial schools may go as high as eighth, operating on the school (that would be about five to ten or eleven). a K-8 9-12 two tiered system.



* "Gypsy" as a term for the Roma people is generally considered a slur in the United Kingdom. In the United States, where there are very few Roma anyway, the word has no negative connotations. In Britain the terms 'Traveller' and 'Pikey' are used as slurs alongside 'Gypsy.

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* "Gypsy" as a term for the Roma people is generally considered a slur in the United Kingdom. In the United States, where there are very few Roma anyway, the word has no negative connotations.connotations and typically refers to a carnival fortuneteller wearing traditional Eastern European garb, completely divorced from the word's origins. In Britain the terms 'Traveller' and 'Pikey' are used as slurs alongside 'Gypsy.



* Amongst American youth, the slang term 'dog' is often used affectionately. For Australian youth, it's a ''very'' harsh putdown, used for the selfish and disloyal.

to:

* Amongst American youth, the slang term 'dog' 'dawg' (pronounced 'dog') is often used affectionately. For Australian youth, it's only spelled 'dog', it's a ''very'' harsh putdown, used for the selfish and disloyal.disloyal. Americans also have the negative interpretation of 'dog', but context matters.
22nd May '18 10:51:39 AM sarysa
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* Carbonated drinks have many names, depending on the region you're in—pop, soda, [[BrandNameTakeover coke]] [[note]] yes, in the South, "coke" can refer to anything up to and including Mountain Dew, which is a) not brown and b) made by Coca-Cola's archrival [[/note]], fizzy drink, etc. In the U.S., the word "fizzy" has silly or childish connotations; the usual adjective is "carbonated" for sweetened drinks or "sparkling" (which isn't considered pretentious) for unsweetened ones. By analogy with the UK definition of lemonade, the "-ade" suffix is used for other carbonated drinks: "orangeade" = "orange soda", "cherryade" = "cherry soda", and so on. In Scotland, carbonated drinks are sometimes called "juice". In other parts of the UK, never mind other English-speaking countries, "juice" only means, well, juice.

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* Carbonated drinks have many names, depending on the region you're in—pop, soda, [[BrandNameTakeover coke]] [[note]] yes, in the South, "coke" can refer to anything up to and including Mountain Dew, which is a) not brown and b) made by Coca-Cola's archrival [[/note]], fizzy drink, etc. In the U.S., the word "fizzy" has silly or childish connotations; the usual adjective is "carbonated" for sweetened drinks or "sparkling" (which isn't considered pretentious) for unsweetened ones. ones.
**
By analogy with the UK definition of lemonade, the "-ade" suffix is used for other carbonated drinks: "orangeade" = "orange soda", "cherryade" = "cherry soda", and so on. In the US, it's the exact opposite, with "-ade" drinks being exclusively flat, including lemonade, Gatorade, Powerade, and others.
** In
Scotland, carbonated drinks are sometimes called "juice". In other parts of the UK, never mind other English-speaking countries, "juice" only means, well, juice.
22nd May '18 10:31:41 AM sarysa
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* In most of the world, the word "barbecue" is a verb, meaning "to grill". However, in the [[DeepSouth American South]] (and part of the Midwest) it refers to a specific style of outdoor cookery, distinct from grilling. Grilling is done fairly quickly, over an open flame and/or coals. Barbecue is a far slower process (several hours at minimum) involving lower heat, which may or may not involve the subspeciality known as "smoking", which is even slower. The word barbecue can also be applied as a noun to the products of the whole process. In Britain, it generally applies to any form done outside without a specific process, as well as as a noun to the object this is done on. This technique--and insistence that it is the only thing entitled to be called "barbecue"--is tremendously SeriousBusiness to its practitioners and aficionados (for details, see UsefulNotes/CuisinesInAmerica). In Britain, a grill is an indoor appliance, often part of the oven, consisting of a ''downwards'' heating element with a rack underneath it for the food--Americans call it a "broiler." It's good for making food, especially anything with melted cheese, go brown and crispy on the top. A barbecue (or BBQ to most Brits) is something outdoors, and to barbecue is to use one of these outdoor appliances with coals in the bottom and a rack on top to slowly char your food - not grilling it at all.

to:

* In most of the world, the word "barbecue" is a verb, meaning "to grill". It gets complicated in the United States, though:
** In most parts of the US, it can refer to the various outdoor grills used for cooking, the meat that has been barbecued (which is sparsely spelled "barbeque" to differentiate it), and the backyard gatherings where food is barbecued (almost always prefixed as "the barbecue" or "[name]'s barbecue").
**
However, in the [[DeepSouth American South]] (and part of the Midwest) it refers to a specific style of outdoor cookery, distinct from grilling. Grilling is done fairly quickly, over an open flame and/or coals. Barbecue is a far slower process (several hours at minimum) involving lower heat, which may or may not involve the subspeciality known as "smoking", which is even slower. The word barbecue can also be applied as a noun to the products of the whole process. In Britain, it generally applies to any form done outside without a specific process, as well as as a noun to the object this is done on. This technique--and insistence that it is the only thing entitled to be called "barbecue"--is tremendously SeriousBusiness to its practitioners and aficionados (for details, see UsefulNotes/CuisinesInAmerica). UsefulNotes/CuisinesInAmerica).
**
In Britain, it generally applies to any form done outside without a specific process, as well as as a noun to the object this is done on. A grill is an indoor appliance, often part of the oven, consisting of a ''downwards'' heating element with a rack underneath it for the food--Americans call it a "broiler." It's good for making food, especially anything with melted cheese, go brown and crispy on the top. A barbecue (or BBQ to most Brits) is something outdoors, and to barbecue is to use one of these outdoor appliances with coals in the bottom and a rack on top to slowly char your food - not grilling it at all.
22nd May '18 10:12:04 AM sarysa
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* In the UK, a flashlight is called a torch. In the US, a torch is a stick with a flame on the end.

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* In On both sides of the UK, a flashlight is called a torch. In the US, Atlantic, a torch is a stick with a flame on the end. In the UK, a flashlight is also called a torch, though they sometimes use "burning torch" to denote fire on a stick when the context isn't immediately apparent.
4th May '18 9:46:38 AM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

* The name of the language itself is subject of this as well: In Latin America, the Spanish language itself is named as "Español", but in Spain, it's named "Castellano" instead. This is because the Spanish language was born in the Kingdom of Castile (in Spanish, Reino de ''Castilla'') and is named as such as result. Some Spaniards, especially those from non-Spanish speaking provinces like Catalonia or the Basque Country, takes personal offense when the Spanish language is named as "Español", due of their already complex relationship with the rest of Spain. For a better comparison for English-speaking readers, that would be the equivalent for an American to say he speaks "American" language, when talking about his accent.
** The same goes with Basque as well: In Latin America, the Basque language is named as "Vasco". In Spain, the same language is named as "Euzkera" instead in either Spanish or any other Spaniard languages, and some Spaniards takes personal offense if the word "Vasco" is used instead.
18th Mar '18 10:16:29 AM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

** "Meerkat" is normally translated as "Suricata" (female, regardless the gender of the animal) in Mexico and male (Suricat''o'') anywhere else.
** An outdated example happens with the words "fox" and "vixen": Until the middle 90s in Mexico, the word fox was translated as "zorra" (female), regardless the gender of the critter. Since the word "zorra" can be also used, just like English, as a euphemism for "whore", the word now has separated genders when dealing with the animal itself ("zorro" for males and "zorra" for vixens).
15th Mar '18 5:47:26 PM Akaihiryuu
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* At one point, it was thought that American and British English would eventually keep diverging until they were completely differently languages and no longer mutually intelligable. However, the existence of the internet, and the instantaneous worldwide communication it enables, has started to slowly reverse this trope. Nowadays, everyone talks to each other and watches each other's entertainment, and the language differences between the various English dialects are very slowly starting to diminish. It's very common to hear Americans use British and Australian slang now.

to:

* At one point, it was thought that American and British English would eventually keep diverging until they were completely differently languages and no longer mutually intelligable. However, the existence of the internet, and the instantaneous worldwide communication it enables, has started to slowly reverse this trope. Nowadays, everyone talks to each other and watches each other's entertainment, and the language differences between the various English dialects are very slowly starting to diminish. It's very common to hear Americans use British and Australian slang now. A great example is "selfie"...slang that originated in Australia, but is now used worldwide. It's also becoming more common for Americans to use the British "university" rather than the American "college".
15th Mar '18 5:46:23 PM Akaihiryuu
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* At one point, it was thought that American and British English would eventually keep diverging until they were completely differently languages and no longer mutually intelligable. However, the existence of the internet, and the instantaneous worldwide communication it enables, has started to slowly reverse this trope. Nowadays, everyone talks to each other and watches each other's entertainment, and the language differences between the various English speaking countries are very slowly starting to diminish. It's very common to hear Americans use British and Australian slang now.

to:

* At one point, it was thought that American and British English would eventually keep diverging until they were completely differently languages and no longer mutually intelligable. However, the existence of the internet, and the instantaneous worldwide communication it enables, has started to slowly reverse this trope. Nowadays, everyone talks to each other and watches each other's entertainment, and the language differences between the various English speaking countries dialects are very slowly starting to diminish. It's very common to hear Americans use British and Australian slang now.
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