History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

8th Nov '17 10:51:19 AM TheWarioBros
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Even the terms for punctuation vary between British and American English. In the former, the dot at the end of a sentence is called a full stop, whereas in the latter it's called a period. This also affects sentences exclaiming how important something is to, since British people will say 'do not do this, full stop' whereas Americans will say 'do not do this, period'.
8th Nov '17 10:50:29 AM TheWarioBros
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Even the terms for punctuation vary between British and American English. In the former, the dot at the end of a sentence is called a full stop, whereas in the latter it's called a period. This also affects sentences exclaiming how important something is to, since British people will say 'do not do this, full stop' whereas Americans will say 'do not do this, period'.
23rd Oct '17 1:33:46 PM luisedgarf
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Military terminology is also different between countries, for obvious reasons:
** The military rank "second lieutenant" is translated as "Sub-teniente" in Mexico, and "Alferez" in Spain, Chile and other Latin American countries.
** A "squadron" is cognated as "escuadrón" in Mexico, but in Spain, it's translated as "escuadrilla" instead.
22nd Oct '17 10:15:18 AM RCLeahcar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The British "bird" and the American "chick" are both avian-based slang terms for young, attractive women.

to:

* The British "bird" and the American "chick" are both avian-based slang terms for young, attractive women. However, the term "bird" is considered somewhat disrespectful in the UK, while "chick" has more playful connotations amongst Americans.
21st Oct '17 3:03:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* And to acknowledge the elephant in the room, there are indeed some differences in the types of spoken German between WestGermany and EastGermany, though they tend to be few and far between. The most example is the word for roasted chicken. While Wessis call it ''Hähnchen'', Ossis call them ''Broiler''; supposedly after American broiler chicken breed WarsawPact countries bought en masse after they failed to create a chicken breed that produce much meat.

to:

* And to acknowledge the elephant in the room, there are indeed some differences in the types of spoken German between WestGermany UsefulNotes/WestGermany and EastGermany, UsefulNotes/EastGermany, though they tend to be few and far between. The most example is the word for roasted chicken. While Wessis call it ''Hähnchen'', Ossis call them ''Broiler''; supposedly after American broiler chicken breed WarsawPact countries bought en masse after they failed to create a chicken breed that produce much meat.
21st Oct '17 1:53:53 AM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Italian]]
* A BilingualBonus in TV sitcom ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'' is that it illustrates Italian as spoken in North America is classed, by linguists, as a distinctly separate dialect of the language, with its own peculiarities: different pronunciation, new vocabulary items, andespecially different words for foodstuffs and dishes. People more familiar with European -Italian culinary terms are often baffled by seeing Marie prepare familar dishes with completely unfamiliar names. ''Braciole'', for instance, is better known as ''Involtini'' in Europe. While the series avoids use of GratuitousItalian, in episodes where it would be odd for a lively Italian-American family ''not'' to use the language, differences are marked. Native Italians speak the name "Barone" with three syllables and emphasis on the final "e"; the Barone family of New York pronounce their name wih only two. This is a quirk of Italian as spoken in North America.
[[/folder]]
15th Oct '17 6:34:35 PM AntonF
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Malay]]
* There are so, so many in Indonesian and Malaysian/Bruneian/Singaporean Malay. Both derive from the same language, but due to circumstances are usually regarded by locals as separate languages. In general, casual Malaysian and co. speech sounds like a Malay equivalent of FloweryElizabethanEnglish (or at the very least, AntiquatedLinguistics) to Indonesians. Many of Malaysian vocabulary "quirks" do in fact exist in literary Indonesian, but they had gone obsolete or rendered archaic with the introduction of other words (Indonesians usually learn them from decades-old novels, like ''Sitti Nurbaya''). Malaysia has a stricter rule regarding language usage, while until recent times Indonesians were free to absorb and use any words they wish, not helped by the fact that there are a more distinct languages in Indonesia or the sheer fact that ''most Indonesians don't speak Malay as a first language'' (the Constitution calls it a unifying language for a reason). Overtime, some archaic words are reinterpreted to refer to contemporary things, not all of them flattering.
* A frequently cited example is "awak", which Malaysians readily understand as "you" matter-of-fact. In Indonesia, people won't catch it as quickly, unless you're specifying it, and even then they would give you funny looks for using it in the first place. Instead, it would bring to mind "body", the meaning of the word in Javanese and Sundanese (over 50% of Indonesians speak either as first language). The usual term in Indonesian is "kamu", which Malaysians also understand matter-of-fact and without any problem.
* Malaysians also pepper a lot more Arabic loanwords in their speech, due to the country's more conservative slant. Some examples are (Malaysian vs Indonesian, respectively): "askar" vs "tentara" (soldier), "kaedah" vs "metode" (method), and "sifar" vs "nol" (zero), but the most recognizable one is "Ahad", which is still the casual Malaysian word for "Sunday". In Indonesia, the term is associated with Quranic schools and Muslim conservatives (others use the Portuguese-derived "Minggu").
* Malaysian cooking show hosts may ask their viewers to "menggauli", or mix a certain concoction. An Indonesian listening in may wonder why and how they'd rape a concoction.
* In Indonesian, "buntut" is perfectly normal word meaning "tail", but in Malay it means "butt". Malay uses "ekor" instead. (which is a synonym of "tail" in Indonesian)
* In Malaysia, the national census is known as "Banci Penduduk". An Indonesian would have presumed that transvestites are banned there...
* Eraser in Malaysia is called both "getah pemadam" and "penghapus". Only "penghapus" is acceptable in Indonesian; "getah pemadam" sounds rather gibberish (they would translate it literally as "extinguishing (pemadam) sap (getah)").
* The word "budak" (Indonesian for "slave") can mean "child" according to some regional Indonesian languages, and definitely means "child" in Malay. Those only familiar with the Indonesian language may be surprised at how common and often the word is used in everyday conversations. ("Hey, your slave is misbehaving again. Try to discipline him, will you?" or "My slave is so lazy, he refuses to do his chores!" or even "This is Rudi, my slave. He's grown a lot since you last met him!")
[[/folder]]



* There are so, so many in Indonesian and Malay. Not exactly a common language, but they're generally mutually intelligible languages so these are actually pretty common. (Most of the time, [[IThoughtItMeant awkward silence]] happens first, 'then' HilarityEnsues.)
** Malaysian cooking show hosts may ask their viewers to "menggauli", or mix a certain concoction. An Indonesian listening in may wonder why and how they'd rape a concoction.
** In Indonesian, "buntut" is perfectly normal word meaning "tail", but in Malay it means "butt". Malay uses "ekor" instead. (which is a synonym of "tail" in Indonesian)
** In Malaysia, the national census is known as "Banci Penduduk". An Indonesian would have presumed that transvestites are banned there...
** The word "budak" (Indonesian for "slave") can mean "child" according to some regional Indonesian languages, and definitely means "child" in Malay. Those only familiar with the Indonesian language may be surprised at how common and often the word is used in everyday conversations. ("Hey, your slave is misbehaving again. Try to discipline him, will you?" or "My slave is so lazy, he refuses to do his chores!" or even "This is Rudi, my slave. He's grown a lot since you last met him!")
** The word ''Busuk'' in Malay is used to describe pungent smell. However, Indonesians have no such word, the common word used is ''tajam'', which in Malay means ''sharp''. Thankfully it still does convey the message across, but the urgency of the message is lost.
10th Oct '17 3:39:36 PM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Then there's the ''poes'' thing. Afrikaaner comic Caspar de Vries points out in a routine that in Holland, it's the word you'd use when calling your cat in at night - "hier, poes, poes, poes!" In Afrikaans it also means "pussy". But in the Donald Trump sense of the word. Try shouting "Poes!" in the street in South Africa, and watch the reaction.
1st Oct '17 12:23:02 PM frozen
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** As for Canadian English regarding ''any'' of the above? Look it up if you’re in doubt because it can go either way, and sometimes a third way: ‘honourary’ is acceptable in Canada if nowhere else.
25th Sep '17 9:09:05 AM Naram-Sin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Cajeta'' used to mean "box" but this meaning has almost been completely lost today. The diminutive ''Cajetilla'' survives in Spain as the word for "matchbox", but in Argentina ''Cajetilla'' it is slang for an UpperClassTwit, and in Cuba ''enseñar la cajetilla'' is slang for smiling.

to:

** ''Cajeta'' used to mean "box" but this meaning has almost been completely lost today. The diminutive ''Cajetilla'' survives in Spain as the word for "matchbox", but in Argentina ''Cajetilla'' it is slang for an UpperClassTwit, and in Cuba ''enseñar la cajetilla'' is slang for smiling.
This list shows the last 10 events of 404. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.SeparatedByACommonLanguage