History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

18th Feb '17 2:20:38 PM Macecurb
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* 'Pull' means 'attract a girl' in Britain, but means 'masturbate' in Canada.

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* 'Pull' means 'attract a girl' in Britain, but means 'masturbate' in some parts of Canada.
30th Jan '17 3:37:01 PM faunas
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* Even more similarly, "Polaco/a" in Portugal means a Polish man/woman; in Brazil it means "whore" (of either sex).[[note]]Until the late 19th/early 20th Century, it had the meaning of Polish woman in Brazil too, but then a [[KosherNostra Jewish mafia]] known as Tzvi Migdal or Zvi Migdal was involved in trafficking white women with blonde hair and blue eyes (a stereotypical Polish phenotype) from Europe to South America, so the name "Polaco/a" stuck for every prostitute, whether actually from Poland or not.[[/note]]
29th Jan '17 2:58:42 PM faunas
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* "Banheiros": in Brazil, bathrooms/restrooms; in Portugal, lifeguards.

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* "Banheiros": in Brazil, bathrooms/restrooms; in Portugal, lifeguards.[[note]]The latter is archaic; a more modern term is "nadador-salvador". Portuguese may also use the word in the Brazilian way, albeit much more rarely.[[/note]]
29th Jan '17 2:32:00 PM faunas
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* "Puto": in Portugal, kid; in Brazil, masculine of "whore". In Tagalog, rice cakes, though that depends largely on the intonation: ''pu''-to means male-whore, pu-''to'' means rice cake.

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* "Puto": in Portugal, kid; in Brazil, masculine of "whore". [[note]]In Portuguese dictionaries, the only definition that appears is the Brazilian one. Also, the word "puta", which is the feminine version, means "whore" in both sides of the Atlantic.[[/note]] In Tagalog, rice cakes, though that depends largely on the intonation: ''pu''-to means male-whore, pu-''to'' means rice cake.
11th Jan '17 11:26:31 AM LB7979
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[[folder:Dutch and Afrikaans]]

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[[folder:Dutch [[folder:Dutch, Flemish and Afrikaans]]



* Dutch and Afrikaans both have the word "Kont". In Dutch it's fanny as the Americans would say it. In Afrikaans... Fanny as the English would say it, with the cultural faux pas of the C-word.

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* Dutch and Afrikaans both have the word "Kont". In Dutch it's fanny as the Americans would say it.it[[note]]ass / butt[[/note]]. In Afrikaans... Fanny as the English would say it, it[[note]]vagina[[/note]], with the cultural faux pas of the C-word.
8th Jan '17 10:42:47 PM staticat09
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* English as spoken in Ireland (and sometimes in the UK as well) has picked up a few words from Irish. Many Irish people have gone to America and had [[HilarityEnsues amusing reactions]] to their use of the phrase "How's the craic?". It means "What's up?/What's happening?", but craic is pronounced 'crack'. And was originally an English word spelt 'crack' that was adopted into the Irish language http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craic

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* English as spoken in Ireland (and sometimes in the UK as well) has picked up a few words from Irish. Many Irish people have gone to America and had [[HilarityEnsues amusing reactions]] to their use of the phrase "How's the craic?". It means "What's up?/What's happening?", but craic is pronounced 'crack'. And was originally an English word spelt 'crack' that was adopted into the Irish language http://en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craicorg/wiki/Craic that was adopted into the Irish language]].
** 'Craic' can also mean "fun or amusement". Although an Irish doctor could tell an American patient to "have some craic" on their vacation, an American doctor wouldn't dare wish the same for their patients, Irish or not.
26th Dec '16 10:31:42 PM Midna
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* In British and Australian English, "overalls" refers to what an American or Canadian would call a "coverall" -- a suit that goes ''over all'' your body. The general term for the long trousers/jeans with straps holding them up is "dungarees".
11th Dec '16 8:33:18 PM Doug86
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** This has had a particular effect on the ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' franchise, as one of the original Dinobots was named Slag, an early nickname for Megatron [[AllInTheManual in the bios]] was "The Slag-Maker", and "slag" was a common slang term in the cartoons, especially in ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''. However, in recent years, sensitivity to the meaning of the term in the UK has caused Hasbro to steer away from that word, with the Dinobot eventually being renamed "Slug", and "scrap" becoming the preferred in-universe slang term.

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** This has had a particular effect on the ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' franchise, as one of the original Dinobots was named Slag, an early nickname for Megatron [[AllInTheManual [[AllThereInTheManual in the bios]] was "The Slag-Maker", and "slag" was a common slang term in the cartoons, especially in ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars''. However, in recent years, sensitivity to the meaning of the term in the UK has caused Hasbro to steer away from that word, with the Dinobot eventually being renamed "Slug", and "scrap" becoming the preferred in-universe slang term.
25th Nov '16 10:45:05 AM nombretomado
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** "Shag" means [[SexTropes one thing]] in Britain (and the ''AustinPowers'' movies made that definition popular in America) but something completely different along the coast on North and South Carolina, where Shag means a form of slow Lindy Hop dance popular since the 1940's.

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** "Shag" means [[SexTropes one thing]] in Britain (and the ''AustinPowers'' ''Film/AustinPowers'' movies made that definition popular in America) but something completely different along the coast on North and South Carolina, where Shag means a form of slow Lindy Hop dance popular since the 1940's.
30th Oct '16 4:59:02 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
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* In Britain the word "randy" simply means "horny", in a very straightforward manner. In North America on the other hand, the word "randy" carries the implication that the man in question (and it would ''always'' be a man) is also young, inexperienced, wildly exuberant, and [[Music/JustinBieber not terribly threatening]]. A colt is randy; a stallion is horny. That's probably why Randy is a nickname in North America, usually short for Randall or Randolph, there's an element of "cuteness" to the word in North American English that doesn't exist in British English. From a letter to the editor in an issue of Wizard Magazine: "Do British people make fun of Randy Queen's name?"

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* In Britain the word "randy" simply means "horny", in a very straightforward manner. In North America on the other hand, the word "randy" carries the implication that the man in question (and it would ''always'' be a man) is also young, inexperienced, wildly exuberant, and [[Music/JustinBieber not terribly threatening]].threatening. A colt is randy; a stallion is horny. That's probably why Randy is a nickname in North America, usually short for Randall or Randolph, there's an element of "cuteness" to the word in North American English that doesn't exist in British English. From a letter to the editor in an issue of Wizard Magazine: "Do British people make fun of Randy Queen's name?"
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