History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

20th Jul '17 4:59:12 AM C105
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* There are also some differences between French as spoken in the north and the south of France. For instance, a "sac" (bag) in northern France is a "poche" in southern France, which for a northerner means "pocket".
* One difference that has reached an almost memetic status among French speakers is the name given to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pain_au_chocolat this pastry]]: ''pain au chocolat'' (mostly in northern France) or ''chocolatine'' (southern France and non-Metropolitan French). Expect plenty of jokes on the topic that one of them is the "correct" name of the pastry, the other being a nonsensical word or designing something else entirely.
16th Jul '17 12:04:14 PM nombretomado
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* According to Wiki/TheOtherWiki, a misunderstanding once took place between American and British planners during WW2 surrounding the verb, "to table". (US usage: "postpone", UK usage: "propose") The British wanted to table a matter immediately, as it was important, while the Americans felt that the matter was important and should not be tabled ''at all''. The closest term the US has to the UK usage is "to bring [the matter] to the table".

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* According to Wiki/TheOtherWiki, a misunderstanding once took place between American and British planners during WW2 [=WW2=] surrounding the verb, "to table". (US usage: "postpone", UK usage: "propose") The British wanted to table a matter immediately, as it was important, while the Americans felt that the matter was important and should not be tabled ''at all''. The closest term the US has to the UK usage is "to bring [the matter] to the table".
8th Jul '17 9:59:30 AM nombretomado
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* According to TheOtherWiki, a misunderstanding once took place between American and British planners during WW2 surrounding the verb, "to table". (US usage: "postpone", UK usage: "propose") The British wanted to table a matter immediately, as it was important, while the Americans felt that the matter was important and should not be tabled ''at all''. The closest term the US has to the UK usage is "to bring [the matter] to the table".

to:

* According to TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, a misunderstanding once took place between American and British planners during WW2 surrounding the verb, "to table". (US usage: "postpone", UK usage: "propose") The British wanted to table a matter immediately, as it was important, while the Americans felt that the matter was important and should not be tabled ''at all''. The closest term the US has to the UK usage is "to bring [the matter] to the table".
8th Jul '17 9:58:27 AM nombretomado
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** In Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Peru, Puerto Rico, Argentina and Uruguay the word "computer" is translated as "computadora" but in the rest of Latin America it's translated as "computador" and in Spain as "ordenador", in this case it could possibly be a way to avoid a version of the ScunthorpeProblem, as the Spanish word "puta" (whore) is in the words "computador" and "computadora." The same problem occurred in French. The word "computer" sounds like "con putain", meaning "cunt whore", so the word "ordinateur" was proposed instead.[[note]]It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Other examples are elevator (''elevador'' and ''ascensor'', respectively) and truck/lorry (''troca'' - this time only in Mexico - and ''camión'' - Spain and elsewhere in Latin America)[[/note]]. This is quite problematic in some places like TheOtherWiki, when any of the three words can be used in any of the articles, depending of the dialect used by the editor.

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** In Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Peru, Puerto Rico, Argentina and Uruguay the word "computer" is translated as "computadora" but in the rest of Latin America it's translated as "computador" and in Spain as "ordenador", in this case it could possibly be a way to avoid a version of the ScunthorpeProblem, as the Spanish word "puta" (whore) is in the words "computador" and "computadora." The same problem occurred in French. The word "computer" sounds like "con putain", meaning "cunt whore", so the word "ordinateur" was proposed instead.[[note]]It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Other examples are elevator (''elevador'' and ''ascensor'', respectively) and truck/lorry (''troca'' - this time only in Mexico - and ''camión'' - Spain and elsewhere in Latin America)[[/note]]. This is quite problematic in some places like TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, when any of the three words can be used in any of the articles, depending of the dialect used by the editor.
4th Jul '17 11:52:17 PM AirofMystery
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** On that note, while Britons use the phrase "I fancy [person]" to mean "I am romantically and/or sexually attracted to [person] but [[CannotSpitItOut am unwilling to say I love them]]", Americans and other denizens of the Anglosphere say "I like [person]" to mean the same. Since this phrasing [[LoveYouAndEverybody can lead to confusion]], it's sometimes emphasised as "I ''like'' like [person]".
4th Jul '17 11:34:25 PM AirofMystery
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** It is a ''much'' worse insult in Canada than in the US, and much worse in England than in Australia. In the UK it typically tops lists of British swear-words year after year, and is so offensive, many people won't even speak it even when having a casual conversation about swear words, preferring to say "the c-word" or "A four-letter word beginning with 'c'." instead. People who do use the word freely are regarded as being unacceptably/uncomfortably vulgar. In both the US and the UK, it's often directed at women as an insult. It's very acceptable in some parts of Ireland, and in Connacht 'cuntish' is regularly used to drive something as bad or undesirable.

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** It is a ''much'' worse insult in Canada than in the US, and much worse in England than in Australia.Australia (where it is still unsuitable for polite conversation, but is not social death to use). In the UK it typically tops lists of British swear-words year after year, and is so offensive, many people won't even speak it even when having a casual conversation about swear words, preferring to say "the c-word" or "A four-letter word beginning with 'c'." instead. People who do use the word freely are regarded as being unacceptably/uncomfortably vulgar. In both the US and the UK, it's often directed at women as an insult.insult, in contrast to Australia where it's used regardless of gender. It's very acceptable in some parts of Ireland, and in Connacht 'cuntish' is regularly used to drive something as bad or undesirable.
4th Jul '17 11:32:12 PM AirofMystery
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* Date marking convention: In America, dates are usually written mm-dd-yy or mm-dd-yyyy, so Christmas 2013 would be noted as 12-25-13 or 12-25-2013. In Britain, most of the British Commonwealth, and in fact most of the world, dates are written dd-mm-yy, so Christmas would be 25-12-2013. It should be noted that the dates are written in the manner in which it would be spoken. Americans lead with the month ("December 25th") while the British traditionally lead with the date ("25th December"). It is now becoming more common for the British to lead with the month first, like the Americans. It's also becoming more common in America to write the dates the way other countries do, particularly in corporations that do business internationally.

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* Date marking convention: In America, dates are usually written mm-dd-yy or mm-dd-yyyy, so Christmas 2013 would be noted as 12-25-13 or 12-25-2013. In Britain, most of the British Commonwealth, and in fact most of the world, dates are written dd-mm-yy, so Christmas would be 25-12-2013. It should be noted that the dates are written in the manner in which it would be spoken. Americans lead with the month ("December 25th") while the British traditionally lead with the date ("25th December"). It is now becoming more common for the British to lead with the month first, like the Americans. It's also becoming more common in America to write the dates the way other countries do, particularly in corporations that do business internationally. Majorly important dates (to Americans) seem to be the international exception: the celebratory holiday for American independence is "the Fourth of July" rather than "July Fourth", and nobody anywhere says "the Eleventh of September", it's always "September Eleven" or "9/11".
27th Jun '17 6:42:14 PM GrammarNavi
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* No matter where you live, a "kiwi" is a brown, furry New Zealand icon. However, if you are in New Zealand, you most definitely will ''not'' eat one. New Zealanders call the green-fleshed fruit "kiwifruit", and use "kiwi" to refer to their national bird -- the fruit got its name from looking similar to the bird. Kiwi birds are an endangered species and protected by the law. "Kiwi(s)" may also refer to a New Zealand person, the New Zealand dollar,[[note]]In terms of currency trading, e.g. "The Kiwi is up half a cent against the Euro" - in everyday speak, New Zealanders like Americans use the term "buck"[[/note]] the New Zealand national RugbyLeague team, or it may just be an adjective meaning "of New Zealand" (because it's a pain to write "New Zealander" every time we want to describe something). Kiwifruits are actually not native to New Zealand[[note]]It used to be called "Chinese gooseberry"[[/note]] or considered the plant that represents New Zealand - that honour would go to the silver fern.

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* No matter where you live, a "kiwi" is a brown, furry New Zealand icon. However, if you are in New Zealand, you most definitely will ''not'' eat one. New Zealanders call the green-fleshed fruit "kiwifruit", and use "kiwi" to refer to their national bird -- the fruit got its name from looking similar to the bird. Kiwi birds are an endangered species and protected by the law. "Kiwi(s)" may also refer to a New Zealand person, the New Zealand dollar,[[note]]In terms of currency trading, e.g. "The Kiwi is up half a cent against the Euro" - in everyday speak, New Zealanders like Americans use the term "buck"[[/note]] the New Zealand national RugbyLeague UsefulNotes/RugbyLeague team, or it may just be an adjective meaning "of New Zealand" (because it's a pain to write "New Zealander" every time we want to describe something). Kiwifruits are actually not native to New Zealand[[note]]It used to be called "Chinese gooseberry"[[/note]] or considered the plant that represents New Zealand - that honour would go to the silver fern.
27th Jun '17 4:01:00 AM Diapphire
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* In Standard French, and most French dialects, numbering gets a bit strange between 70 and 100; instead of having unique base forms for "seventy," "eighty," and "ninety," French uses "soixante-dix" ("sixty-ten") for 70, "quatre-vingts" ("four twenties") for 80, and "quatre-vingt-dix" ("four-twenty-ten") for 90 (with the somewhat confusing French teens coming into play for the 70s and 90s: for instance, 75 is "soixante-quinze"--"sixty-fifteen"--92 is "quatre-vingt-douze"--"four-twenty-twelve"--and 99 is quatre-vingt-dix-neuf--practically "four-twenty-nineteen," but even more literally "four-twenty-ten-nine"). In some French dialects, particularly the ones spoken in Belgium and Switzerland, people have been known to use "septante," "huitante" (in Belgium they instead say "octante"), and "nonante" respectively.
* In Metropolitan French, breakfast translated as petit déjeuner, while lunch and dinner are known as "déjeuner" and "dîner" respectively. In Switzerland and Québec, breakfast becomes simply as "déjeuner", while the words for lunch becomes "dîner" and dinner as "souper" (supper).

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* In Standard French, and most French dialects, numbering gets a bit strange between 70 and 100; instead of having unique base forms for "seventy," "eighty," and "ninety," French uses "soixante-dix" ("sixty-ten") for 70, "quatre-vingts" ("four twenties") for 80, and "quatre-vingt-dix" ("four-twenty-ten") for 90 (with the somewhat confusing French teens coming into play for the 70s and 90s: for instance, 75 is "soixante-quinze"--"sixty-fifteen"--92 is "quatre-vingt-douze"--"four-twenty-twelve"--and 99 is quatre-vingt-dix-neuf--practically "four-twenty-nineteen," but even more literally "four-twenty-ten-nine"). In some French dialects, particularly the ones spoken in Belgium and Switzerland, people have been known to use "septante," "huitante" (in (Switzerland only, in Belgium they instead say "octante"), use "quatre-vingts" as in France), and "nonante" respectively.
* In Metropolitan French, breakfast translated as petit déjeuner, while lunch and dinner are known as "déjeuner" and "dîner" respectively. In Switzerland Switzerland, Belgium and Québec, breakfast becomes simply as "déjeuner", while the words for lunch becomes "dîner" and dinner as "souper" (supper).
18th Jun '17 8:42:19 AM 8BrickMario
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* The common British term for the thin adhesive pulled off a roll is "sticky tape", but Americans just call it "tape", or sometimes, due to brand takeover, Scotch tape.
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