History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

18th Jun '16 2:51:14 PM Naram-Sin
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** It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Another example is elevator, which is "elevador" in the former and "ascensor" in the latter.

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** It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Another example is elevator, which is "elevador" in the former Other examples are elevator (''elevador'' and "ascensor" ''ascensor'', respectively) and truck/lorry (''troca'' - this time only in the latter.Mexico - and ''camión'' - Spain and elsewhere in Latin America).
26th May '16 3:49:45 PM Jhonny
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* Names for food differ greatly between Germany and Austria, often depending on which language or dialect they were loaned from. Germans would call an eggplant ''Aubergine'' (French), but Austrians use ''Melanzani'' (Italian). Carrots are ''Karotten'' (Austrian) or Möhren (Northern German). Potatoes are Kartoffeln (standard German), ''Erdäpfel'' (Austrian) or ''Grundbirn'' (southern Austria).

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* Names for food differ greatly between Germany and Austria, often depending on which language or dialect they were loaned from. Germans would call an eggplant ''Aubergine'' (French), but Austrians use ''Melanzani'' (Italian). Carrots are ''Karotten'' (Austrian) or Möhren (Northern German).German), (rote) Rüben (Southern Germany). Potatoes are Kartoffeln (standard German), ''Erdäpfel'' (Austrian) or ''Grundbirn'' (southern Austria). And that's not even getting into the multiple terms used in local dialects - in some places the term for "potato" changes thrice in less than ten kilometers of distance.


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* "Das geht sich aus" is pretty standard in Austria for "that works" or "that is sufficient/ enough" in the rest of the German speaking world its a nonsensical phrase reminiscent of "that ends" or "that's turned of".
14th May '16 6:42:51 PM KaiYves
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** There's a memoir by an Australian sailor where one of the back cover quotes compares sailing around Cape Horn to "climbing Mount Everest in thongs".
13th May '16 6:20:38 AM Naram-Sin
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* [[WesternAnimation Cartoons]] are ''caricaturas'' in Latin America and ''dibujos animados'' in Spain. In Spain, ''caricaturas'' are... well, caricatures.
6th May '16 4:46:23 PM Naram-Sin
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* In Spain, a shooting is a ''tiroteo'', and to shoot is ''disparar'' or ''tirotear''. In Latin America, a shooting is a ''balacera'', and to shoot is ''balear''. In Spain, ''balear'' is only something or someone from the Balearic Islands.
25th Apr '16 9:22:07 AM 20person
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** In Canada, a stricter distinction is drawn between "colleges" (certificate- and diploma-granting institutions) and "universities" (degree-granting institutions). A university student would never refer to "going to college" the way an American might, for instance. Adding a complication is that certain universities, in a holdover from the UK system, contain "colleges" (notably the University of Toronto). For added fun, in some provinces (e.g. Manitoba) English-language high schools are called "collegiates", while French-language high schools are "collèges".

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** In Canada, a stricter distinction is drawn between "colleges" (certificate- and diploma-granting institutions) and "universities" (degree-granting institutions). A university student would never refer to "going to college" the way an American might, for instance.instance, but the American meaning is understood because of EaglelandOsmosis. Adding a complication is that certain universities, in a holdover from the UK system, contain "colleges" (notably the University of Toronto). For added fun, in some provinces (e.g. Manitoba) English-language high schools are called "collegiates", while French-language high schools are "collèges".
4th Apr '16 11:38:54 AM DaibhidC
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* Carbonated drinks have many names, depending on the region you're in—pop, soda, coke, fizzy drink, etc. In the U.S., the word "fizzy" has silly or childish connotations; the usual adjective is "carbonated" for sweetened drinks or "sparkling" (which isn't considered pretentious) for unsweetened ones.
** By analogy with the UK definition of lemonade, the "-ade" suffix is used for other carbonated drinks: "orangeade" = "orange soda", "cherryade" = "cherry soda", and so on.
** In Scotland, carbonated drinks are sometimes called "juice". In other parts of the UK, never mind other English-speaking countries, "juice" only means, well, juice.

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* Carbonated drinks have many names, depending on the region you're in—pop, soda, coke, fizzy drink, etc. In the U.S., the word "fizzy" has silly or childish connotations; the usual adjective is "carbonated" for sweetened drinks or "sparkling" (which isn't considered pretentious) for unsweetened ones.
**
ones. By analogy with the UK definition of lemonade, the "-ade" suffix is used for other carbonated drinks: "orangeade" = "orange soda", "cherryade" = "cherry soda", and so on.
**
on. In Scotland, carbonated drinks are sometimes called "juice". In other parts of the UK, never mind other English-speaking countries, "juice" only means, well, juice.
3rd Apr '16 5:02:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* 'Shit', in colloquial US and Australian parlance, seems like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f46HRlTIYDM it can be used to denote anything]]; a substitute for 'stuff' (whilst retaining its specific, scatological meaning), or as a concise form of "bullshit", a general synonym for "nonsense". In the UK it remains much more of a negative word. A US observer commenting on, say, your fully-stocked fridge by saying 'Wow, you've got loads of shit in here' would probably be received a little coldly. You can describe random stuff as 'shit', but only to give the impression you don't think much of it. ([[ArmstrongAndMiller Unless you are a World War II RAF pilot who speaks like a 2010s teenager]].) Admittedly, whether "shit" as "stuff" has a positive or negative connotation is entirely dependent on context and tone.

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* 'Shit', in colloquial US and Australian parlance, seems like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f46HRlTIYDM it can be used to denote anything]]; a substitute for 'stuff' (whilst retaining its specific, scatological meaning), or as a concise form of "bullshit", a general synonym for "nonsense". In the UK it remains much more of a negative word. A US observer commenting on, say, your fully-stocked fridge by saying 'Wow, you've got loads of shit in here' would probably be received a little coldly. You can describe random stuff as 'shit', but only to give the impression you don't think much of it. ([[ArmstrongAndMiller ([[Series/TheArmstrongAndMillerShow Unless you are a World War II RAF pilot who speaks like a 2010s teenager]].) Admittedly, whether "shit" as "stuff" has a positive or negative connotation is entirely dependent on context and tone.
1st Apr '16 2:44:17 AM Naram-Sin
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* There are two state lotteries in Chile - the oldest and largest is the Polla Chilena de Beneficencia note . Originally, the word "polla" meant "betting pool", a meaning that's still in use in most of Spanish-speaking Latin America... but in Spain, it's slang for "penis". Invariably, Spaniards visiting Chile are amused by this particular lottery and some of its advertising: "Juegue con la polla y sea feliz." ("Play with the lottery and be happy."), "Hágase millonario con la Polla." ("Become a millionaire with the lottery), etcetera. This isn't a terribly uncommon occurrence: a lot of words with innocent meanings in Latin America carry vulgar meanings in Spain.

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* There are two state lotteries in Chile - the oldest and largest is the Polla Chilena de Beneficencia note . Originally, the word "polla" meant "betting pool", a meaning that's still in use in most of Spanish-speaking Latin America... but in Spain, it's slang for "penis". Invariably, Spaniards visiting Chile are amused by this particular lottery and some of its advertising: "Juegue con la polla y sea feliz." ("Play with the lottery ''the lottery'' and be happy."), "Hágase millonario con la Polla." ("Become a millionaire with the lottery), etcetera. This isn't a terribly uncommon occurrence: a lot of words with innocent meanings in Latin America carry vulgar meanings in Spain.''the lottery''), etcetera.
1st Apr '16 2:35:31 AM Naram-Sin
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* There are two state lotteries in Chile - the oldest and largest is the Polla Chilena de Beneficencia note . Originally, the word "polla" meant "betting pool", a meaning that's still in use in most of Spanish-speaking Latin America... but in Spain, it's slang for "penis". Invariably, Spaniards visiting Chile are amused by this particular lottery and some of its advertising: "Juegue con la polla y sea feliz." ("Play with the lottery and be happy."), "Hágase millonario con la Polla." ("Become a millionaire with the lottery), etcetera. This isn't a terribly uncommon occurrence: a lot of words with innocent meanings in Latin America carry vulgar meanings in Spain.
* ''Cerdo'' is Spanish for "pig", in all meanings it has in English (except as slang for Police). However, in Spain it is more commonly used for the animal, while in Latin America it is more used as an insult (depending of the country, the animal will go by "chancho", "coche", etc).
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