History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

9th Aug '16 10:20:28 PM Hugpocalypse
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* The term "wog" in Britain is a ''very'' offensive slur towards Africans. In Australia, it's a neutral ([[AppropriatedAppellation though formerly offensive]]) term for people from south-east Europe (e.g. Italy, Greece, Croatia, etc.).
5th Aug '16 8:00:51 PM karstovich2
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* In European French, "gosse" is an informal term for "child". In Quebec, it means "testicles". It is a very common source of gags.
* In French, ''gosses'' and ''crosse'' mean "kids" and "stick" (as in "hockey stick") respectively. In Canadian French, they are also euphemisms for "testicles" and "masturbation". So when a Frenchman who's just moved to Quebec tells his new Canadian friends that he can't wait to handle the stick with his kids...

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* In European French, "gosse" is an informal term for "child". In Quebec, it means "testicles". It is a very common source of gags.
* In
French, ''gosses'' and ''crosse'' mean "kids" and "stick" (as in "hockey stick") respectively. In Canadian French, they are also euphemisms for "testicles" and "masturbation". So when a Frenchman who's just moved to Quebec and wants to demonstrate his interest in the culture of his new country tells his new Canadian friends that he can't wait to handle the stick with his kids...
5th Aug '16 7:58:25 PM karstovich2
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* Within the United States, there's a pretty significant one referring to time: when referring to the time fifteen minutes before the hour, people in the Northeast are likely to say that it's "a quarter of" the hour (e.g. 10:45 would be called "a quarter of eleven"). People from elsewhere in the country, particularly the Midwest, generally say "a quarter to" and tend to be a bit confused for a moment before they understand.
5th Aug '16 6:53:51 PM karstovich2
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16th Jul '16 10:37:50 AM luisedgarf
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* In Spain, "Euzkadi" would not be understood as anything but the Basque name of the Basque Country, but in Mexico people would think first of a famous brand of car tires, "Euzkadi Radial".

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* In Spain, "Euzkadi" would not be understood as anything but the Basque name of the Basque Country, but in Mexico people would think first of a famous brand of car tires, "Euzkadi Radial".Radial", who was founded by ''Germans'', ironically enough.


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** This is even worse in the bullfighting world between Spain and Latin America: In Spain, when a bullfighter is caved or gored by a bull, the word is used for those cases. In Mexico and probably other countries, the term "cornada" is used instead.
8th Jul '16 8:32:47 PM Adept
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* There's the word ''bender''. In America, it's an extended drinking spree; but in Britain, while it can mean this, it's more often a derogatory term for a gay man. This goes meta, but it makes ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' even funnier, and for this reason, ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' is called ''Avatar: the Legend of Aang'' over there. This had led to problems for [[TheLastAirbender the film]] (which incidentally didn't get such a rename in Britain), however, which features such lines as, "From the minute I lay eyes on you, I knew you were a bender." Haru's line "The only way I can feel close to my father is by bending." is particularly {{narm}}tastic to British viewers.

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* There's the word ''bender''. In America, it's an extended drinking spree; but in Britain, while it can mean this, it's more often a derogatory term for a gay man. This goes meta, but it makes ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' even funnier, and for this reason, ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' is called ''Avatar: the Legend of Aang'' over there. This had led to problems for [[TheLastAirbender [[Film/TheLastAirbender the film]] (which incidentally didn't get such a rename in Britain), however, which features such lines as, "From the minute I lay eyes on you, I knew you were a bender." Haru's line "The only way I can feel close to my father is by bending." is particularly {{narm}}tastic to British viewers.
7th Jul '16 5:29:21 PM Wyldchyld
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** It is a ''much'' worse insult in Canada than in the US, much worse in the US than in England, and much worse in England than in Australia.
*** That being said, it still typically tops lists of British swear-words year after year. By comparison, Fuck is usually third, with the specific MF variation usually coming in second.
** It's more likely in North America to be aimed at women, making it not just a profanity but a sexist slur. In other places it's more or less gender-neutral (probably more likely to be used toward men, if anything).
** It's very acceptable in some parts of Ireland, and in Connacht 'cuntish' is regularly used to drive something as bad or undesirable.

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** It is a ''much'' worse insult in Canada than in the US, much worse in the US than in England, and much worse in England than in Australia.
*** That being said,
Australia. In the UK it still typically tops lists of British swear-words year after year. By comparison, Fuck year, and is usually third, so offensive, many people won't even speak it even when having a casual conversation about swear words, preferring to say "the c-word" or "A four-letter word beginning with 'c'." instead. People who do use the specific MF variation usually coming in second.
** It's more likely in North America to be aimed at women, making it not just a profanity but a sexist slur.
word freely are regarded as being unacceptably/uncomfortably vulgar. In other places both the US and the UK, it's more or less gender-neutral (probably more likely to be used toward men, if anything).
**
often directed at women as an insult. It's very acceptable in some parts of Ireland, and in Connacht 'cuntish' is regularly used to drive something as bad or undesirable.
7th Jul '16 5:21:35 PM Wyldchyld
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* Date marking convention: In America, dates are usually written mm-dd-yy or mm-dd-yyyy, so Christmas 2013 would be noted as 12-25-13 or 12-25-2013. In Britain, most of the British Commonwealth, and in fact most of the world, dates are written dd-mm-yy, so Christmas would be 25-12-2013. It should be noted that the American system matches how dates are usually spoken on either side of the pond.

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* Date marking convention: In America, dates are usually written mm-dd-yy or mm-dd-yyyy, so Christmas 2013 would be noted as 12-25-13 or 12-25-2013. In Britain, most of the British Commonwealth, and in fact most of the world, dates are written dd-mm-yy, so Christmas would be 25-12-2013. It should be noted that the American system matches how dates are usually spoken on either side of written in the pond.manner in which it would be spoken. Americans lead with the month ("December 25th") while the British traditionally lead with the date ("25th December"). It is now becoming more common for the British to lead with the month first, like the Americans. It's also becoming more common in America to write the dates the way other countries do, particularly in corporations that do business internationally.
7th Jul '16 5:10:01 PM Wyldchyld
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** The use of the double-s can be potentially confusing as well, as it's standard for British English, but not seen in American English. For example, in British English "focusses" or "focussing" would be standard spelling, but it's spelled "focuses" or "focusing" in American English. To escalate the confusion, it's also acceptable British English to use the American spelling even though the double-s is preferred.
7th Jul '16 6:18:35 AM kaekaed
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** A 'bathroom' in Britain must A) be inside and B) contain a shower, bath, toilet, sink, mirror, (opaqued) window, a towel rack, and a shelf or cupboard for wash-stuff. Some include a bidet, too. A room with just a toilet and sink is a 'cloakroom'. In America, a room with only a toilet and sink is sometimes referred to as a "powder room".

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** A 'bathroom' in Britain must A) be inside and B) contain a shower, bath, toilet, sink, mirror, (opaqued) window, a towel rack, and a shelf or cupboard for wash-stuff. Some include a bidet, too. A room with just a toilet and sink is a 'cloakroom'. In America, a room with only a toilet and sink is sometimes referred to as a "powder room".room" or a "half-bath."
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