History UsefulNotes / SeparatedByACommonLanguage

20th May '17 9:20:21 PM luisedgarf
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** In Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Peru, Puerto Rico, Argentina and Uruguay the word "computer" is translated as "computadora" but in the rest of Latin America it's translated as "computador" and in Spain as "ordenador".
** Using "ordenador" could possibly be a way to avoid a version of the ScunthorpeProblem, as the Spanish word "puta" (whore) is in the words "computador" and "computadora." The same problem occurred in French. The word "computer" sounds like "con putain", meaning "cunt whore", so the word "ordinateur" was proposed instead.
** It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Other examples are elevator (''elevador'' and ''ascensor'', respectively) and truck/lorry (''troca'' - this time only in Mexico - and ''camión'' - Spain and elsewhere in Latin America).

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** In Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Peru, Puerto Rico, Argentina and Uruguay the word "computer" is translated as "computadora" but in the rest of Latin America it's translated as "computador" and in Spain as "ordenador".
** Using "ordenador"
"ordenador", in this case it could possibly be a way to avoid a version of the ScunthorpeProblem, as the Spanish word "puta" (whore) is in the words "computador" and "computadora." The same problem occurred in French. The word "computer" sounds like "con putain", meaning "cunt whore", so the word "ordinateur" was proposed instead.
** It's
instead.[[note]]It's common for 19th or early-mid 20th century inventions to have names derived from English in Latin America but from French in Spain. Other examples are elevator (''elevador'' and ''ascensor'', respectively) and truck/lorry (''troca'' - this time only in Mexico - and ''camión'' - Spain and elsewhere in Latin America).America)[[/note]]. This is quite problematic in some places like TheOtherWiki, when any of the three words can be used in any of the articles, depending of the dialect used by the editor.
16th May '17 5:07:47 AM Naram-Sin
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* The word "guagua" means "bus", "van", or "truck" in Canarian Spanish and several dialects influenced by it (Cuba, Puerto Rico, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isleño#Louisiana_Communities_of_the_Isle.C3.B1os Louisiana]]). So, "coger la guagua" means "take the bus" in Canarian and Puerto Rican Spanish. In Chile, however, "guagua" means "baby." Ahem. It is also very close to the babytalk word for dog, "guauguau" (guau is the Spanish rendering of woof).

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* The word "guagua" means "bus", "van", or "truck" in Canarian Spanish and several dialects influenced by it (Cuba, Puerto Rico, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isleño#Louisiana_Communities_of_the_Isle.C3.B1os Louisiana]]). So, "coger la guagua" means "take "to take the bus" in Canarian and Puerto Rican Spanish. In Chile, however, "guagua" means "baby." Ahem. It is also very close to the babytalk word for dog, "guauguau" (guau is the Spanish rendering of woof).
18th Apr '17 1:47:05 AM Chabal2
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* The term "dépanneur", mentioned above in the bit about English terms for places to buy alcoholic beverages (being what even an English-speaking Quebecker will call where he/she goes to buy beer), also causes problems in French: in Quebec French, it means "corner store/convenience store," but in France it means "repairman" or "troubleshooter."

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* The term "dépanneur", mentioned above in the bit about English terms for places to buy alcoholic beverages (being what even an English-speaking Quebecker will call where he/she goes to buy beer), also causes problems in French: in Quebec French, it means "corner store/convenience store," but in France it means "repairman" "repairman", "tow truck driver" or "troubleshooter."
17th Apr '17 1:08:50 PM StevieC
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* In Standard French, and most French dialects, numbering gets a bit strange between 70 and 100; instead of having unique base forms for "seventy," "eighty," and "ninety," French uses "soixante-dix" ("sixty-ten") for 70, "quatre-vingts" ("four twenties") for 80, and "quatre-vingt-dix" ("four-twenty-ten") for 90 (with the somewhat confusing French teens coming into play for the 70s and 90s: for instance, 75 is "soixante-quinze"--"sixty-fifteen"--92 is "quatre-vingt-douze"--"four-twenty-twelve"--and 99 is quatre-vingt-dix-neuf--practically "four-twenty-nineteen," but even more literally "four-twenty-ten-nine"). In some French dialects, particularly the ones spoken in Belgium and Switzerland, people have been known to use "septante," "huitante," and "nonante" respectively.

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* In Standard French, and most French dialects, numbering gets a bit strange between 70 and 100; instead of having unique base forms for "seventy," "eighty," and "ninety," French uses "soixante-dix" ("sixty-ten") for 70, "quatre-vingts" ("four twenties") for 80, and "quatre-vingt-dix" ("four-twenty-ten") for 90 (with the somewhat confusing French teens coming into play for the 70s and 90s: for instance, 75 is "soixante-quinze"--"sixty-fifteen"--92 is "quatre-vingt-douze"--"four-twenty-twelve"--and 99 is quatre-vingt-dix-neuf--practically "four-twenty-nineteen," but even more literally "four-twenty-ten-nine"). In some French dialects, particularly the ones spoken in Belgium and Switzerland, people have been known to use "septante," "huitante," "huitante" (in Belgium they instead say "octante"), and "nonante" respectively.
17th Apr '17 1:00:46 PM StevieC
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** That being said, while the word "Gringo" is known in Spain it is considered Latin American slang. The Spaniard (and Cuban) slang for US citizens is "Yanqui".

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** That being said, while the word "Gringo" is known in Spain it is considered Latin American slang. The Spaniard (and Cuban) slang for US citizens is "Yanqui"."Yanqui" (as in "Yankee", as used in Britain for referring derisively to Americans).
13th Apr '17 7:55:58 AM xoriak
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* There are 53 officially recognized german variations. While some are related and thus understandable among each other, others are so vastly different that german shows ''subtitle'' them for the rest of the country. Bavarian dialects are often major offenders for this, to the point where even bavarian channels sometimes use them as well.

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* There are 53 officially recognized german German variations. While some are related and thus understandable among each other, others are so vastly different that german German shows ''subtitle'' them for the rest of the country. Bavarian dialects are often major offenders for this, to the point where even bavarian Bavarian channels sometimes use them as well.
7th Apr '17 12:23:43 PM MoonByte
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Added DiffLines:

* There are 53 officially recognized german variations. While some are related and thus understandable among each other, others are so vastly different that german shows ''subtitle'' them for the rest of the country. Bavarian dialects are often major offenders for this, to the point where even bavarian channels sometimes use them as well.
3rd Apr '17 5:25:45 PM DoctorDetective
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In some quarters of Britain and most of the rest of the Anglosphere, in fact[[labelnote:*]] the exception being Canada, which is (much as they hate to admit it) part of a dialect continuum with the United States[[/labelnote]] the American dialects are looked upon unfavorably as a decayed version of the language, with American usages derisively called "Americanisms". The first documented observation of the distinction between the two dialects was a sneering comment from 1735 by an English visitor to Savannah, Georgia who pronounced the American word "bluff" (meaning a raised riverbank) as [[http://books.google.com/books?id=znFmBZ2D8rEC&pg=PA186&dq=differences+american+and+british+english+bluff&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6p16UdbFIMfuiQKWn4GQBw&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=differences%20american%20and%20british%20english%20bluff&f=false "barbarous"]]. There are, of course, no intrinsic qualities that make any one dialect of a language superior to any other, and in any case, American English is [[http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/change/ruining/ in many ways]] a more conservative, traditionalist dialect than British English. American English has, among other things, retained the flat "a" in words like "bath", retained the past participle "gotten" (dates back to Middle English at least), retained the figurative use of "I guess" for "think, suppose" (used by Creator/GeoffreyChaucer), and retained the word "Fall" to describe the season that comes after summer (that being a usage that dates back to the Anglo-Saxons but was replaced in [=BrE=] by the Latinate "autumn").

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In some quarters of Britain and most of the rest of the Anglosphere, in fact[[labelnote:*]] the exception being Canada, which is (much as they hate to admit it) part of a dialect continuum with the United States[[/labelnote]] the American dialects are looked upon unfavorably as a decayed version of the language, with American usages derisively called "Americanisms". The first documented observation of the distinction between the two dialects was a sneering comment from 1735 by an English visitor to Savannah, Georgia who pronounced referred to the American word "bluff" (meaning a raised riverbank) as [[http://books.google.com/books?id=znFmBZ2D8rEC&pg=PA186&dq=differences+american+and+british+english+bluff&hl=en&sa=X&ei=6p16UdbFIMfuiQKWn4GQBw&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=differences%20american%20and%20british%20english%20bluff&f=false "barbarous"]]. There are, of course, no intrinsic qualities that make any one dialect of a language superior to any other, and in any case, American English is [[http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/change/ruining/ in many ways]] a more conservative, traditionalist dialect than British English. American English has, among other things, retained the flat "a" in words like "bath", retained the past participle "gotten" (dates back to Middle English at least), retained the figurative use of "I guess" for "think, suppose" (used by Creator/GeoffreyChaucer), and retained the word "Fall" to describe the season that comes after summer (that being a usage that dates back to the Anglo-Saxons but was replaced in [=BrE=] by the Latinate "autumn").
30th Mar '17 7:39:48 PM danlansdowne
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* One of the most famous is ''queue'' vs. ''line'', with the former being used in Britain and the latter in the United States. (In Canada, it's a "line-up".) "Queue" has caught on somewhat in America in describing computer applications such as the printer queue. The list of movies you want to get from Netflix is your Netflix queue.

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* One of the most famous is ''queue'' vs. ''line'', with the former being used in Britain and the latter in the United States. (In Canada, it's a "line-up"."line-up", though line is still used frequently.) "Queue" has caught on somewhat in America in describing computer applications such as the printer queue. The list of movies you want to get from Netflix is your Netflix queue.
19th Mar '17 11:58:57 AM MadCormorant
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** There's a memoir by an Australian sailor where one of the back cover quotes compares sailing around Cape Horn to "climbing Mount Everest in thongs".

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** There's a memoir by an Australian sailor where one of the back cover quotes compares sailing around Cape Horn to "climbing Mount Everest in thongs". Which, wonderfully, works with both meanings--you'd be insane to try climbing Mount Everest in just scanty underwear, and neither would it be sensible to climb it wearing sandals rather than boots.
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