History UsefulNotes / Scotland

6th Jan '18 11:17:54 AM costanton11
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Many began moving to Lowland cities, which thanks to the political and economic Union enacted in 1707 were beginning to experience the first stirrings of the IndustrialRevolution. The Lowland Scots, being Presbyterians, had found much in common with the English Dissenters -- Baptists, Congregationalists, Quakers, Unitarians, and of course [[CaptainObvious Presbyterians]] -- who, except for the Quakers, were (like the Scottish Presbyterians) essentially Calvinist, agreeing for the most part on theology and differing in practice; and as for the Quakers, despite their weird theory and practice, their businesslike, hardworking, and agreeable ethos combined with the common experience of High Church Anglican disdain led most of the other Dissenters (English or Scottish) to give them a pass. The English Dissenters had pioneered the new industrial techniques,[[note]]For instance, Abraham Darby, a Quaker, developed the first efficient way to make high-quality pig iron and steel; Thomas Newcomen, a Baptist, had made critical improvements to the steam engine; Josiah Wedgwood, a Unitarian, not only developed excellent ceramics but also invented techniques critical to the new factory system; and Sampson Lloyd and John Barclay, both Quakers, had the ingenious idea of expanding modern banking to the North of England and to Scotland.[[/note]] and eventually word of these new ideas came to the Lowland Scots, who began setting up their own factories and coming up with their own techniques.[[note]]Recall that James Watt, who invented the condenser critical to efficient steam engines, was the son of a Covenanter from Renfrewshire; the Newcomen steam engine he improved upon was probably brought up to Glasgow by a Quaker -- and was designed by a Baptist; and John Wilkinson, who developed solid, precision-engineered cylinders needed for efficient an inexpensive Watt engines and was one of Watt's major suppliers, was an English Presbyterian. Also, research into fuel efficiency was initiated by Scottish whisky distillers; industrial production of coal tar--critical to the eventual development of the chemical industry--was invented by the 9th Earl of Dundonald, the chief of Clan Cochrane, also from Renfrewshire; Glaswegian Charles Mackintosh founded the rubber industry with his, erm, macintosh (the raincoat); gas light was invented by Watt's engineer-assistant, the Ayrshireman William Murdoch (who also developed a lot else and eventually made partner in Watt's firm); a and the groundwork for the modern theoretical justification for capitalism was developed by the very Scottish Adam Smith.[[/note]] By the mid-19th century, the Lowlands were one of the most industrialised regions in the world--and were chock-full of labourers from the Highlands (and Ireland, but that's another matter), coming in via the new-built canals and railways. At this point, with so many people from all over Scotland not where they were before a mere thirty or forty years before, the Clan system had clearly become what it is today: more as a focus of identity then as the political system it once was.

to:

Many began moving to Lowland cities, which thanks to the political and economic Union enacted in 1707 were beginning to experience the first stirrings of the IndustrialRevolution.Industrial Revolution. The Lowland Scots, being Presbyterians, had found much in common with the English Dissenters -- Baptists, Congregationalists, Quakers, Unitarians, and of course [[CaptainObvious Presbyterians]] -- who, except for the Quakers, were (like the Scottish Presbyterians) essentially Calvinist, agreeing for the most part on theology and differing in practice; and as for the Quakers, despite their weird theory and practice, their businesslike, hardworking, and agreeable ethos combined with the common experience of High Church Anglican disdain led most of the other Dissenters (English or Scottish) to give them a pass. The English Dissenters had pioneered the new industrial techniques,[[note]]For instance, Abraham Darby, a Quaker, developed the first efficient way to make high-quality pig iron and steel; Thomas Newcomen, a Baptist, had made critical improvements to the steam engine; Josiah Wedgwood, a Unitarian, not only developed excellent ceramics but also invented techniques critical to the new factory system; and Sampson Lloyd and John Barclay, both Quakers, had the ingenious idea of expanding modern banking to the North of England and to Scotland.[[/note]] and eventually word of these new ideas came to the Lowland Scots, who began setting up their own factories and coming up with their own techniques.[[note]]Recall that James Watt, who invented the condenser critical to efficient steam engines, was the son of a Covenanter from Renfrewshire; the Newcomen steam engine he improved upon was probably brought up to Glasgow by a Quaker -- and was designed by a Baptist; and John Wilkinson, who developed solid, precision-engineered cylinders needed for efficient an inexpensive Watt engines and was one of Watt's major suppliers, was an English Presbyterian. Also, research into fuel efficiency was initiated by Scottish whisky distillers; industrial production of coal tar--critical to the eventual development of the chemical industry--was invented by the 9th Earl of Dundonald, the chief of Clan Cochrane, also from Renfrewshire; Glaswegian Charles Mackintosh founded the rubber industry with his, erm, macintosh (the raincoat); gas light was invented by Watt's engineer-assistant, the Ayrshireman William Murdoch (who also developed a lot else and eventually made partner in Watt's firm); a and the groundwork for the modern theoretical justification for capitalism was developed by the very Scottish Adam Smith.[[/note]] By the mid-19th century, the Lowlands were one of the most industrialised regions in the world--and were chock-full of labourers from the Highlands (and Ireland, but that's another matter), coming in via the new-built canals and railways. At this point, with so many people from all over Scotland not where they were before a mere thirty or forty years before, the Clan system had clearly become what it is today: more as a focus of identity then as the political system it once was.
23rd Dec '17 5:33:59 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Clan system along the English border was slightly different from that in the Highlands, forged from constant warfare with England, and which lasted even after (roughly) amiable relations were established during the reign of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Elizabeth of England]] and [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart James VI of Scotland]] (of course, how nasty can you get with your most acceptable likely heir?).[[note]]Yes, Elizabeth killed James' mother, UsefulNotes/MaryOfScotland, but that was politically necessary simply because she's Roman Catholic, which no doubt raised not a few eyebrows among noblemen suspicious of Rome's encroachment. It was NothingPersonal, and everyone understood that nobody took any pleasure in the business. Frankly, many Scots were almost relieved to be rid of Mary; the very populous Lowlands were pretty much entirely Protestant, and as upset they might have been at the killing of their sovereign, they appreciated the opportunity to raise a good Protestant King.[[/note]] When James succeeded his second-degree aunt, placing the kingdoms under the same ruler for the first time, the Border clans were ethnically cleansed. After that they tended to be resettled in areas where highly ferocious people could be out of sight of Westminster, but not out from indigenous peoples whom the Crown also found inconvenient. In Ireland they formed much of the ancestry of the Ulstermen. In North America they became the "Scots-Irish", settling in the Appalachians and further West, thus presaging the famous anti-gub'mint orneriness of these regions. The Highland Clans took longer to subdue. They tended to take the side of the House of Stuart in the various civil wars and were almost eliminated culturally after the Battle of Culloden in 1745. They were saved by two quirks of history. One was that it was realised that Highlanders made for useful soldiers and were as apt to serve the Crown as to rebel against it. The other was the Romantic literary movement, notably as represented by Sir UsefulNotes/WalterScott. During this time ethnic exoticism became seen as colorful instead of dangerous, and the clans became fashionable in the ruling classes of Great Britain. Many of the customs we associate with the Clans in fact date from this period. For instance, the Tartans, or clan heraldry on the kilts, were in fact not standardized until this period. In another way, however, this was a bad time for the Highlands, as it was the time of the notorious Clearances in which landholders were evicting tenants for the sake of changing agricultural products; the largest landowners were of course their own chiefs who found that in a now pacified Scotland there was more status to be had from wealth than the number of followers (to be fair a few chiefs actually beggared themselves trying to protect their clans from economic conditions). Some of the evicted tenants survived by migration to North America (particularly Canada) and other places; others survived from the pay for [[BritsWithBattleships soldiering]] and related work across UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire.

to:

The Clan system along the English border was slightly different from that in the Highlands, forged from constant warfare with England, and which lasted even after (roughly) amiable relations were established during the reign of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Elizabeth of England]] and [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart James VI of Scotland]] (of course, how nasty can you get with your most acceptable likely heir?).[[note]]Yes, Elizabeth killed James' mother, UsefulNotes/MaryOfScotland, but that was politically necessary simply because she's Roman Catholic, which no doubt raised not a few eyebrows among noblemen suspicious of Rome's encroachment. It was NothingPersonal, and everyone understood that nobody took any pleasure in the business. Frankly, many Scots were almost relieved to be rid of Mary; the very populous Lowlands were pretty much entirely Protestant, and as upset they might have been at the killing of their sovereign, they appreciated the opportunity to raise a good Protestant King.[[/note]] When James succeeded his second-degree aunt, placing the kingdoms under the same ruler for the first time, the Border clans were ethnically cleansed. After that they tended to be resettled in areas where highly ferocious people could be out of sight of Westminster, but not out from indigenous peoples whom the Crown also found inconvenient. In Ireland they formed much of the ancestry of the Ulstermen. In North America they became the "Scots-Irish", settling in the Appalachians and further West, thus presaging the famous anti-gub'mint orneriness of these regions. The Highland Clans took longer to subdue. They tended to take the side of the House of Stuart in the various civil wars and were almost eliminated culturally after the Battle of Culloden in 1745. They were saved by two quirks of history. One was that it was realised that Highlanders made for useful soldiers and were as apt to serve the Crown as to rebel against it. The other was the Romantic literary movement, notably as represented by Sir UsefulNotes/WalterScott. During this time ethnic exoticism became seen as colorful instead of dangerous, and the clans became fashionable in the ruling classes of Great Britain. Many of the customs we associate with the Clans in fact date from this period. For instance, the Tartans, or clan heraldry on the kilts, were in fact not standardized until this period. In another way, however, this was a bad time for the Highlands, as it was the time of the notorious Clearances in which landholders were evicting tenants for the sake of changing agricultural products; the largest landowners were of course their own chiefs who found that in a now pacified Scotland there was more status to be had from wealth than the number of followers (to be fair a few chiefs actually beggared themselves trying to protect their clans from economic conditions). Some of the evicted tenants survived by migration to North America (particularly Canada) and other places; others survived from the pay for [[BritsWithBattleships [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships soldiering]] and related work across UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire.
16th Dec '17 1:13:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Scottish legal system has historically been different from [[TheCommonLaw that of England]], and the separate legal system was guaranteed by the 1707 treaty, and diverged a bit more with devolution (but not much, since the main change is that the same separate Scottish law is now mostly made at Holyrood, rather than Westminster: it's still the same law). This leads to various quirks in Scottish law, such as the fact that to this day there is no statute against fraud. Another interesting quirk is that in Scotland, there are three court verdicts: Proven, Not Proven (otherwise known as "not guilty and don't do it again" or the "bastard verdict"), and Not Guilty. Owing to the prevalence of Anglo-American media, very few people in Scotland know this. The Scottish Education system is also different, see UsefulNotes/BritishEducationSystem.

to:

The Scottish legal system has historically been different from [[TheCommonLaw [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw that of England]], and the separate legal system was guaranteed by the 1707 treaty, and diverged a bit more with devolution (but not much, since the main change is that the same separate Scottish law is now mostly made at Holyrood, rather than Westminster: it's still the same law). This leads to various quirks in Scottish law, such as the fact that to this day there is no statute against fraud. Another interesting quirk is that in Scotland, there are three court verdicts: Proven, Not Proven (otherwise known as "not guilty and don't do it again" or the "bastard verdict"), and Not Guilty. Owing to the prevalence of Anglo-American media, very few people in Scotland know this. The Scottish Education system is also different, see UsefulNotes/BritishEducationSystem.
10th Dec '17 8:47:41 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Wolfsbane from ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}''. Also Moira [=McTaggert and her son=], [[RealityWarping reality warper]] Proteus, a classic villain. Muir Island, where [=McTaggert=] lives, is a notable location and the setting for many important stories.

to:

* Wolfsbane from ''ComicBook/{{X-Men}}''.''ComicBook/XMen''. Also Moira [=McTaggert and her son=], [[RealityWarping reality warper]] Proteus, a classic villain. Muir Island, where [=McTaggert=] lives, is a notable location and the setting for many important stories.
26th Nov '17 2:33:53 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A Clan was a tribal network named after its first patron. It included the chief, the clan elders and the clansfolk which were often the tenants of the chief as well. Each Clan operated like an independent principality -- for instance, the [=MacDonalds=], who held the title "Lords of the Isles" (i.e., Hebrides) were a great sea power in their own right, and had history been just a little bit different, they could have been an independent power or subjected to the Norwegian Crown. Several larger Clans could field several thousand warriors. The system ingrained itself into Scottish life and was a referent for delicate matters of internal politics. For instance one King of Scots, when deciding how the [[UsefulNotes/{{Romani}} Roma]] should be integrated into the system, simply declared one of them "Chief of the Egyptians" (Gypsies), effectively declaring them a new Clan. Another example is the title of the Scottish monarch, which is tribal rather then feudal in concept. The proper title is King (or Queen) of Scots. That is, the Queen of Scots (known more commonly by her English title [[HMTheQueen Elizabeth II]]) is not the Lady of a manor named [=ScotLAND=] of which "Scotsfolk" are tenants; she is the chieftainess of a "clan of clans" named ''Scots'' which happens to possess [=SCOTland=] as its patrimony.

to:

A Clan was a tribal network named after its first patron. It included the chief, the clan elders and the clansfolk which were often the tenants of the chief as well. Each Clan operated like an independent principality -- for instance, the [=MacDonalds=], who held the title "Lords of the Isles" (i.e., Hebrides) were a great sea power in their own right, and had history been just a little bit different, they could have been an independent power or subjected to the Norwegian Crown. Several larger Clans could field several thousand warriors. The system ingrained itself into Scottish life and was a referent for delicate matters of internal politics. For instance one King of Scots, when deciding how the [[UsefulNotes/{{Romani}} Roma]] should be integrated into the system, simply declared one of them "Chief of the Egyptians" (Gypsies), effectively declaring them a new Clan. Another example is the title of the Scottish monarch, which is tribal rather then feudal in concept. The proper title is King (or Queen) of Scots. That is, the Queen of Scots (known more commonly by her English title [[HMTheQueen [[UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen Elizabeth II]]) is not the Lady of a manor named [=ScotLAND=] of which "Scotsfolk" are tenants; she is the chieftainess of a "clan of clans" named ''Scots'' which happens to possess [=SCOTland=] as its patrimony.
24th Nov '17 1:45:55 PM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The '''Macaroni Pie''' variant comes as a particular shock to tourists, who often find it difficult to wrap their heads around the idea.[[note]]Yes, it's macaroni cheese, inside a pie. By comparison, Haggis (which contains protein, minerals and whole grains) is ''health food''.[[/note]]

to:

** The '''Macaroni Pie''' variant comes as a particular shock to tourists, who often find it difficult to wrap their heads around the idea.[[note]]Yes, it's macaroni cheese, inside a pie. By comparison, Haggis (which contains protein, minerals and whole grains) is ''health food''. Also, looking at the rest of the list, you will notice that this carbohydrate bomb is the only vegetarian option.[[/note]]
23rd Sep '17 8:29:58 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Finally, Scotland also has differing traditions for the holiday season. Christmas is traditionally less important (people working on Christmas Day is still quite common, and almost everyone is back at work by the 27th), with an increased emphasis on New Year's Eve (known as Hogmanay). Hogmanay is, more or less, a gigantic booze-up. Ceilidh music and the singing of Auld Lang Syne are also very common. Street parties are held - most famously in Edinburgh - and [[Creator/TheBBC BBC Scotland]] has an evening of programmes dedicated to it. Both New Year's Day and January 2nd are BankHolidays in Scotland, basically to deal with the almighty hangovers from Hogmanay. Hogmany programming traditionally revolved around the late, great Rikki Fulton's ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSDaNIdmV-Y Last Call]]'' monologue prior to the bells. Over time this has been replaced with ''Chewin' the Fat'' and ''Series/StillGame'' specials and football-themed sketch show ''Only an Excuse''. Creator/TheBBC coverage is often mocked as consistently being downright awful for [[TheEighties some unfathomable reason]].

to:

Finally, Scotland also has differing traditions for the holiday season. Christmas is traditionally less important (people working on Christmas Day is still quite common, and almost everyone is back at work by the 27th), with an increased emphasis on New Year's Eve (known as Hogmanay). Hogmanay is, more or less, a gigantic booze-up. Ceilidh music and the singing of Auld Lang Syne are also very common. Street parties are held - most famously in Edinburgh - and [[Creator/TheBBC BBC Scotland]] has an evening of programmes dedicated to it. Both New Year's Day and January 2nd are BankHolidays UsefulNotes/BankHolidays in Scotland, basically to deal with the almighty hangovers from Hogmanay. Hogmany programming traditionally revolved around the late, great Rikki Fulton's ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSDaNIdmV-Y Last Call]]'' monologue prior to the bells. Over time this has been replaced with ''Chewin' the Fat'' and ''Series/StillGame'' specials and football-themed sketch show ''Only an Excuse''. Creator/TheBBC coverage is often mocked as consistently being downright awful for [[TheEighties some unfathomable reason]].
31st Jul '17 3:05:39 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''RabCNesbitt'' (They did allow Tennant a part. As a pre-op transgender barmaid. With great legs!)

to:

* ''RabCNesbitt'' ''Series/RabCNesbitt'' (They did allow Tennant a part. As a pre-op transgender barmaid. With great legs!)
22nd Jul '17 11:57:33 PM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Twelfth Doctor has a strong Glaswegian accent and the show is mining this for jokes, including an entire speech in "Deep Breath" about his eyebrows wanting to become independent and that now he's Scottish, he can really start complaining. StevenMoffat is himself Scottish.

to:

** The Twelfth Doctor has a strong Glaswegian accent and the show is mining this for jokes, including an entire speech in "Deep Breath" about his eyebrows wanting to become independent and that now he's Scottish, he can really start complaining. StevenMoffat Creator/StevenMoffat is himself Scottish.
15th Jul '17 10:23:17 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, who wrote, among other things, his splendid history of the Border Clans, ''Literature/TheSteelBonnets'' and his memoir of his experiences in a Border regiment during WorldWarII, ''Quartered Safe Out Here''. Also his experiences in the Gordon Highlanders, told in the ''Literature/McAuslan'' stories.

to:

* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, who wrote, among other things, his splendid history of the Border Clans, ''Literature/TheSteelBonnets'' and his memoir of his experiences in a Border regiment during WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, ''Quartered Safe Out Here''. Also his experiences in the Gordon Highlanders, told in the ''Literature/McAuslan'' stories.
This list shows the last 10 events of 218. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Scotland