History UsefulNotes / Scotland

8th Apr '17 11:05:52 AM nombretomado
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* ''TheRailwaySeries'': Donald and Douglas are from Scotland, which is reflected in their accent.

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* ''TheRailwaySeries'': ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'': Donald and Douglas are from Scotland, which is reflected in their accent.
4th Apr '17 7:31:19 PM otemple700
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->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!

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->'''Flynn:''' [[ShutUpHannibal AH'M SCOTTISH!SCOTTISH!]]
4th Apr '17 7:27:22 PM otemple700
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-->'''Tenaya 7:''' Red is [[StandardizedLeader the perfect one]], Black is [[TroubledButCute the brooding bad boy]], Green is [[PluckyComicRelief the clown]], and Yellow, well, she's [[TheSmurfettePrinciple the girl]]. So, who are you supposed to be?
-->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!

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-->'''Tenaya ->'''Tenaya 7:''' Red is [[StandardizedLeader the perfect one]], Black is [[TroubledButCute the brooding bad boy]], Green is [[PluckyComicRelief the clown]], and Yellow, well, she's [[TheSmurfettePrinciple the girl]]. So, who are you supposed to be?
-->'''Flynn:''' ->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!
4th Apr '17 7:27:06 PM otemple700
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--->'''Tenaya 7:''' Red is [[StandardizedLeader the perfect one]], Black is [[TroubledButCute the brooding bad boy]], Green is [[PluckyComicRelief the clown]], and Yellow, well, she's [[TheSmurfettePrinciple the girl]]. So, who are you supposed to be?
--->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!

to:

--->'''Tenaya -->'''Tenaya 7:''' Red is [[StandardizedLeader the perfect one]], Black is [[TroubledButCute the brooding bad boy]], Green is [[PluckyComicRelief the clown]], and Yellow, well, she's [[TheSmurfettePrinciple the girl]]. So, who are you supposed to be?
--->'''Flynn:''' -->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!
4th Apr '17 7:26:49 PM otemple700
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->''"[A] notion has been entertained that the moral spine in Scotland is more flexible than in England. The truth however is, that an elementary difference exists in the public feelings of the two nations quite as great as in the idioms of their respective dialects. The English are a justice-loving people, according to charter and statute; the Scotch are a wrong-resenting race, according to right and feeling: and the character of liberty among them takes its aspect from that peculiarity."''
-->--'''John Galt[[note]]No, not [[Literature/AtlasShrugged that one]][[/note]]''', ''Ringan Gilhaize'' (Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd, 1823) vol. 3, p. 313 [[note]][[ViolentGlaswegian Who're you callin' wrong-resenting, ye bloody sassenach!]][[/note]]

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->''"[A] notion has been entertained that --->'''Tenaya 7:''' Red is [[StandardizedLeader the moral spine in Scotland perfect one]], Black is more flexible than in England. The truth however is, that an elementary difference exists in [[TroubledButCute the public feelings of brooding bad boy]], Green is [[PluckyComicRelief the two nations quite as great as in clown]], and Yellow, well, she's [[TheSmurfettePrinciple the idioms of their respective dialects. The English girl]]. So, who are a justice-loving people, according to charter and statute; the Scotch are a wrong-resenting race, according to right and feeling: and the character of liberty among them takes its aspect from that peculiarity."''
-->--'''John Galt[[note]]No, not [[Literature/AtlasShrugged that one]][[/note]]''', ''Ringan Gilhaize'' (Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd, 1823) vol. 3, p. 313 [[note]][[ViolentGlaswegian Who're
you callin' wrong-resenting, ye bloody sassenach!]][[/note]]
supposed to be?
--->'''Flynn:''' AH'M SCOTTISH!
-->-- '''Series/PowerRangersRPM'''
27th Mar '17 7:38:33 AM Hedgebird
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* Several of Creator/RosemarySutcliff's historical novels take place in Scotland any time from the Stone Age to the nineteenth century, including ''Literature/TheEagleOfTheNinth'', ''Literature/FrontierWolf'', ''Literature/TheMarkOfTheHorseLord'', ''Literature/SwordAtSunset'', ''[[Literature/TheDolphinRing Sword Song]]'', ''Bonnie Dundee'', ''We Lived in Drumfyvie'', and ''The Shining Company'', while the hero of ''Blood and Sand'' is a real-life Scot who became Emir of Medina.

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* Several of Creator/RosemarySutcliff's historical novels take place in Scotland any time from the Stone Age to the nineteenth century, including ''Literature/TheEagleOfTheNinth'', ''Literature/FrontierWolf'', ''Literature/TheMarkOfTheHorseLord'', ''Literature/SwordAtSunset'', ''[[Literature/TheDolphinRing Sword Song]]'', ''Bonnie Dundee'', ''We Lived in Drumfyvie'', and ''The Shining Company'', ''Literature/TheShiningCompany'', while the hero of ''Blood and Sand'' is a real-life Scot who became Emir of Medina.
5th Mar '17 4:52:01 PM nombretomado
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* Sultry succubus Morrigan Aensland, of {{Darkstalkers}} fame is Scottish, and is named after a Celtic war goddess. She even has an approximate Scots accent in ''Marvel Vs Capcom 3''.

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* Sultry succubus Morrigan Aensland, of {{Darkstalkers}} ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}'' fame is Scottish, and is named after a Celtic war goddess. She even has an approximate Scots accent in ''Marvel Vs Capcom 3''.
14th Feb '17 10:12:00 AM JohnPrestwick
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Scotland is the country on the north of the British Isles. Historically an independent state, it was formally merged with England into Great Britain by a treaty in 1707. Its capital is Edinburgh (appointed as such in 1999, though it had been one for centuries prior to the 1707 treaty), while its largest city is the industrial center of UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}.

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Scotland is the country on the north of the British Isles. Historically an independent state, it was formally merged with England into Great Britain by a treaty in 1707. Its capital is Edinburgh (appointed as such in 1999, though it had been one for centuries prior to the 1707 treaty), while its largest city is the industrial center of UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}.
UsefulNotes/{{Glasgow}}. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Scot "English"]] (ditto for the Welsh). It is correct to say that the Scottish are British, though, as we'll see below, there's a political debate ongoing over this.



The Scottish legal system has historically been different from [[TheCommonLaw that of England]], and the separate legal system was guaranteed by the 1707 treaty, and diverged a bit more with devolution (but not much, since the main change is that the same separate Scottish law is now mostly made at Holyrood, rather than Westminster: it's still the same law). This leads to various quirks in Scottish law, such as the fact that to this day there is no statute against fraud. Another interesting quirk is that in Scotland, there are three court verdicts: Proven, Not Proven (otherwise known as "not guilty and don't do it again" or the "bastard verdict"), and Not Guilty. Owing to the prevalence of Anglo-American media, very few people in Scotland know this. Also, Scots receive more tax per capita than the English, which has caused a degree of outcry in the past. The justification given is that Scotland has a greater amount of sparsely populated rural areas than England and as a result, fewer schools, hospitals, etc. are needed. Some also argue that, were it a separate nation, Scotland would rightfully claim enough of Britain's North Sea gas deposits -- which are held by the Union as a whole -- to offset this apparent imbalance. It has also been observed that certain areas of England receive a similarly above-average revenue, particularly the former industrial heartland OopNorth, which has suffered from a similar post-industrial depression in recent decades.

to:

The Scottish legal system has historically been different from [[TheCommonLaw that of England]], and the separate legal system was guaranteed by the 1707 treaty, and diverged a bit more with devolution (but not much, since the main change is that the same separate Scottish law is now mostly made at Holyrood, rather than Westminster: it's still the same law). This leads to various quirks in Scottish law, such as the fact that to this day there is no statute against fraud. Another interesting quirk is that in Scotland, there are three court verdicts: Proven, Not Proven (otherwise known as "not guilty and don't do it again" or the "bastard verdict"), and Not Guilty. Owing to the prevalence of Anglo-American media, very few people in Scotland know this. Also, Scots receive more tax per capita than the English, which has caused a degree of outcry in the past. The justification given Scottish Education system is that Scotland has a greater amount of sparsely populated rural areas than England and as a result, fewer schools, hospitals, etc. are needed. Some also argue that, were it a separate nation, Scotland would rightfully claim enough of Britain's North Sea gas deposits -- which are held by the Union as a whole -- to offset this apparent imbalance. It has also been observed that certain areas of England receive a similarly above-average revenue, particularly the former industrial heartland OopNorth, which has suffered from a similar post-industrial depression in recent decades.
different, see UsefulNotes/BritishEducationSystem.



There is a segment of Scottish society that wishes for independence. The Scottish National Party (SNP), the current ruling party of the devolved Scottish Parliament, bases its political platform around such a move, with an independence referendum held on 18th September 2014. Both nationalist Yes Scotland (led by Alex Salmond, at the time First Minister and leader of the SNP) and unionist Better Together (led by Alistair Darling of the Scottish Labour Party, and formerly Chancellor of the Exchequer under UsefulNotes/GordonBrown) accused each other of fact-twisting and propaganda. Most British news outlets (such as the BBC) are commonly believed to be biased against independence, although most of them -- especially the BBC -- firmly deny it. The "Yes" side is still seen as ''Film/{{Braveheart}}''-watching England-haters, and the "No" side as Tories and other right-wingers who hate poor people and Scotland generally--there's a lot of history there. Finally, it's worth noting that the voting age for the referendum was pushed back to 16, compared to 18 for other elections in Scotland and the Union as a whole. The vote for under-16s was a reasonably hot topic, as one side claimed young people would be easily swayed by propaganda instead of facts, while the other argued that it's a big decision for adults to be making over young people's lives. In the event, the extension of the franchise proved such a success that a measure to extend the vote to 16-year-olds in local and Scottish Parliament elections was subsequently passed unopposed.

On the 19th of September it was announced that the Scots voted in favour of staying in the Union, 55.3% against 44.7%, with an unusually (for Britain) high turnout of 84.6% -- a fairly comfortable margin for the "No" side by any standard, but still narrow enough to shake things up a bit. A lot of people attributed this to the fact many businesses (including the Royal Bank of Scotland) threatened to leave Scotland if it became independent, not to mention promises by UsefulNotes/DavidCameron (and, oddly, emphasised by Brown, who, despite being hated by everyone after leaving Downing Street and having gone into semi-retirement as backbencher for his native Fife, proved to be their best advocate) to grant Scotland more devolutionary powers in exchange for choosing to stay. Salmond announced his resignation as First Minister the day after the results came in, stating he would not stand for reelection as SNP leader at the party conference in November. Meanwhile, the referendum has touched off a big debate about devolution not only for Scotland, but England as well, with many a Tory questioning certain asymmetries in the system that put England at a theoretical disadvantage, at the very least, in certain arenas (e.g., the West Lothian Question). With everyone more or less settled about further devolution for Scotland, the debate has now switched to the fate of England, between the Tories (who want devolution for the entire country) and Labour (who prefer regional devolution). Naturally, they think, respectively, that the Tories would be more or less in permanent control of an English Parliament, while Labour would at least have a chance of controlling some of the regional assemblies, e.g. Greater London and the North-West.

The Scottish Education system is also different, see UsefulNotes/BritishEducationSystem.

Glasgow has its own subway system, albeit much smaller than UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground. It's nicknamed the Clockwork Orange for its colour, and the "Shoogly" for the ride quality. It's one big circle, with two lines running in opposite directions.

to:

There Scotland has had its own Parliament since 1999. It has accumulated many powers ever since. Pressure had been growing for ''devolution'' (transfer of powers to a more local level) in the previous decades. In the 1950s Scotland's politics were very much in harmony in England's. A variety of factors caused the two to fall out of step: the end of the British Empire, the discovery of North Sea oil and industrial decline over the next few decades. That had the twin effect of giving Scotland a political scene that was more left-wing than England's and that featured a prominent nationalist movement. The Scottish National Party (SNP) is the main political party to advocate independence. The other that has a foothold in the Scottish Parliament is the Greens. Three UK-wide parties have been the main organisers of opposition to independence, even if they don't agree on much else: Labour, the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats.

For the nationalists, devolution was never going to be enough and there
is a segment of Scottish society that wishes for independence. The Scottish National Party (SNP), In 2011, the current ruling party of SNP won a surprise majority in the devolved Scottish Parliament, bases its political platform around such a move, with an independence referendum held on 18th September 2014. Both nationalist Yes Scotland (led by Alex Salmond, at the time First Minister and leader of the SNP) and unionist Better Together (led by Alistair Darling of the Scottish Labour Party, and formerly Chancellor of the Exchequer under UsefulNotes/GordonBrown) accused each other of fact-twisting and propaganda. Most British news outlets (such as the BBC) are commonly believed to be biased against independence, although most of them -- especially the BBC -- firmly deny it. The "Yes" side is still seen as ''Film/{{Braveheart}}''-watching England-haters, and the "No" side as Tories and other right-wingers who hate poor people and Scotland generally--there's a lot of history there. Finally, it's worth noting that the voting age for the referendum was pushed back to 16, compared to 18 for other elections in Scotland and the Union as a whole. The vote for under-16s was a reasonably hot topic, as one side claimed young people would be easily swayed by propaganda instead of facts, while the other argued that it's a big decision for adults to be making over young people's lives. In the event, the extension of the franchise proved such a success that a measure to extend the vote to 16-year-olds in local and Scottish Parliament elections was subsequently passed unopposed.

On the 19th of
and were able to secure a referendum on independence. That vote, held on 18 September it was announced that the Scots voted in favour of staying in the Union, 55.3% 2014, saw Scotland vote against 44.7%, independence by a 55.3%-44.7% margin, with an unusually (for Britain) high turnout of 84.6% -- a fairly comfortable margin for the "No" side by any standard, but still narrow enough to shake things up a bit. A lot of people attributed this to Economic arguments and the fact many businesses (including the Royal Bank promise of Scotland) threatened to leave Scotland if it became independent, not to mention promises by UsefulNotes/DavidCameron (and, oddly, emphasised by Brown, who, despite being hated by everyone after leaving Downing Street and having gone into semi-retirement as backbencher for his native Fife, proved to be their best advocate) to grant Scotland more devolutionary powers in exchange for choosing to stay. Salmond announced his resignation as First Minister the day after the results came in, stating he would not stand for reelection as SNP leader at the party conference in November. Meanwhile, the referendum has touched off a big debate about devolution not only for Scotland, but England as well, with many a Tory questioning certain asymmetries in helped the system that put England at a theoretical disadvantage, at the very least, in certain arenas (e.g., the West Lothian Question). With everyone more or less settled about further devolution for Scotland, the debate has now switched to the fate of England, between the Tories (who want devolution for the entire country) and Labour (who prefer regional devolution). Naturally, they think, respectively, that the Tories would be more or less in permanent control of an English Parliament, "No" side win, while Labour would at least have a chance of controlling some of the regional assemblies, e.g. Greater London disenchantment with Westminster politics and the North-West.

economy were the main drivers of the "Yes" campaign. The Scottish Education system "Yes" side is also different, see UsefulNotes/BritishEducationSystem.

Glasgow has its own subway system, albeit much smaller than UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground. It's nicknamed the Clockwork Orange for its colour,
still seen as ''Film/{{Braveheart}}''-watching England-haters, and the "Shoogly" for the ride quality. It's one big circle, with two lines running in opposite directions.
"No" side as Tories and other right-wingers who hate poor people and Scotland generally--there's a lot of history there.
14th Nov '16 7:28:16 PM nombretomado
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* Lilly Satou, one of the five heroines of the VisualNovel ''KatawaShoujo'' and her sister Akira are Half Japanese, Half Scottish.

to:

* Lilly Satou, one of the five heroines of the VisualNovel ''KatawaShoujo'' ''VisualNovel/KatawaShoujo'' and her sister Akira are Half Japanese, Half Scottish.
23rd Oct '16 9:57:27 AM nombretomado
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* ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]'' had Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery "Scotty" Scott, Chief Engineer of [[CoolShip the starship]] ''[[CoolShip Enterprise]]'', and arguably the most famous fictional Scotsman, [[FakeNationality as played by a Canadian]]. And not even a Scottish-Canadian (who, as noted above, are plentiful), but an ''[[{{Scotireland}} Irish]]''-Canadian. Nonetheless, despite the [[BritishAccents very fake accent]], both character and [[Creator/JamesDoohan actor]] are [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales fondly regarded by actual Scots]], largely because the character is a personification of all the positive stereotypical traits associated with Scotland (ingenuity, work ethic, boisterousness, loyalty, pride in both his work and his homeland, and ability to hold his liquor) and is portrayed with just the right combination of lightheartedness and gravitas.

to:

* ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]'' had Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery "Scotty" Scott, Chief Engineer of [[CoolShip the starship]] ''[[CoolShip Enterprise]]'', and arguably the most famous fictional Scotsman, [[FakeNationality as played by a Canadian]]. And not even a Scottish-Canadian (who, as noted above, are plentiful), but an ''[[{{Scotireland}} Irish]]''-Canadian. Nonetheless, despite the [[BritishAccents [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents very fake accent]], both character and [[Creator/JamesDoohan actor]] are [[MexicansLoveSpeedyGonzales fondly regarded by actual Scots]], largely because the character is a personification of all the positive stereotypical traits associated with Scotland (ingenuity, work ethic, boisterousness, loyalty, pride in both his work and his homeland, and ability to hold his liquor) and is portrayed with just the right combination of lightheartedness and gravitas.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Scotland