History UsefulNotes / MixedMartialArts

10th Apr '17 11:59:01 AM nombretomado
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** Mirko "Cro Cop" Filipovic and his deadly left high kick stepped into the Octagon to face giant grappler Gabriel Gonzaga in what many considered a squash match before an anticipated clash between the Croatian and then-champion Creator/RandyCouture. After manhandling the kickboxing legend for the majority of the first round, Gonzaga knocked Filipovic out, causing him to (in the words of {{Seanbaby}}) "ragdoll so hard that his foot was on backwards when he landed". What did he use to find his light switch? Why, a head kick, of course.

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** Mirko "Cro Cop" Filipovic and his deadly left high kick stepped into the Octagon to face giant grappler Gabriel Gonzaga in what many considered a squash match before an anticipated clash between the Croatian and then-champion Creator/RandyCouture. After manhandling the kickboxing legend for the majority of the first round, Gonzaga knocked Filipovic out, causing him to (in the words of {{Seanbaby}}) Creator/{{Seanbaby}}) "ragdoll so hard that his foot was on backwards when he landed". What did he use to find his light switch? Why, a head kick, of course.
10th Apr '17 11:17:53 AM nombretomado
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** Charles "Krazy Horse" Bennett: As SeanBaby wrote on [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-top-eight-oh-shit-moments-in-mma cracked.com]], "'Krazy Horse isn't a cute nickname. Charles Bennett is a legitimate lunatic." Bennett is known for his bizarre and entertaining in-ring antics, his claims that he trains only by playing basketball, and his arrests for drug possession and assault, and actually jumping another fighter backstage at a show.

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** Charles "Krazy Horse" Bennett: As SeanBaby Creator/{{Seanbaby}} wrote on [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/the-top-eight-oh-shit-moments-in-mma cracked.com]], "'Krazy Horse isn't a cute nickname. Charles Bennett is a legitimate lunatic." Bennett is known for his bizarre and entertaining in-ring antics, his claims that he trains only by playing basketball, and his arrests for drug possession and assault, and actually jumping another fighter backstage at a show.
7th Apr '17 6:02:13 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* StealthPun: An advertisement for ''Ultimate Ultimate 1995'', which took place near Christmas, featured a clip of Keith Hackney repeatedly punching Joe Son in the groin over music from Tchaikovsky's ''TheNutcracker''

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* StealthPun: StealthPun:
**
An advertisement for ''Ultimate Ultimate 1995'', which took place near Christmas, featured a clip of Keith Hackney repeatedly punching Joe Son in the groin over music from Tchaikovsky's ''TheNutcracker''''TheNutcracker''
** Toward the end of his career, "The Dean of Mean" Keith Jardine would wear shirts reading "Mean 1," which was a pun on his name and "Lean 1" brand protein.
3rd Apr '17 6:48:56 PM FordPrefect
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* WrestlerInAllOfUs: A wide range of wrestling moves to be used in actual athletic competition, creating some spectacular matches. Dropkicks, chops and triangle choke-countering powerbombs and piledrivers are the most common ones, but the sport has seen even German suplexes, abdominal stretches, airplane spins, superkicks, elbow drops and even diving attacks.

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* WrestlerInAllOfUs: A wide range of wrestling moves to be used in actual athletic competition, creating some spectacular matches. Dropkicks, chops and triangle choke-countering powerbombs and piledrivers are the most common ones, but the sport has also seen even German suplexes, abdominal stretches, airplane spins, superkicks, elbow drops and even diving attacks.
7th Mar '17 11:17:13 AM CaptainCrawdad
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Rules vary slightly between promotions. Japanese promotions have traditionally differed the most from the Unified Rules, such as by disallowing elbow strikes but allowing kicks and knees to the head of a downed opponent. Some Japanese promotions handle rounds and judging slightly differently as well. For example, Sengoku judges the whole fight instead of round-by-round, and DREAM splits the fight into two rounds of 10 minutes and 5 minutes. Women's bouts in all countries vary from three-minute to five-minute rounds depending on the promotion, though there is a growing movement in support of standardized five-minute rounds. The Strikeforce promotion was the first to hold women's bouts with five-minute rounds.

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Rules vary slightly between promotions. Japanese promotions promotions, but have traditionally differed the most from gradually migrated to coincide with the Unified Rules, such as by disallowing elbow Rules. Elbow strikes to the head are allowed, but allowing kicks and knees to the head of a downed opponent. Some Japanese promotions handle rounds and judging slightly differently as well. For example, Sengoku judges the whole fight instead of round-by-round, and DREAM splits the fight into two rounds of 10 minutes and 5 minutes. Women's opponent are not. Nonchampionship professional bouts in all countries vary from three-minute to go three five-minute rounds depending on the promotion, though there is a growing movement in support of standardized five-minute rounds, while championship fights go five rounds. The Strikeforce promotion was In the first event of a decision, three cageside judges use a modified version of boxing's 10-point must system to hold women's bouts with five-minute rounds.
score and award a winner.
7th Mar '17 11:11:38 AM CaptainCrawdad
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In Japan, the sport of MMA took a concurrent but separate evolution, with origins in a form of ProfessionalWrestling called "shoot wrestling." Founded by Belgian wrestler Wrestling/KarlGotch, the style incorporates both real submission wrestling techniques as well as striking in a hybrid style similar to MMA. Promotions like the Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation and its offspring celebrated occasionally real fights among their worked cards, and before the creation of the UFC, the UWF descendants of Pancrase and Shooto were already putting on hybrid fighting shows that had largely phased out pre-determined outcomes. Pancrase shoot wrestling champion Wrestling/KenShamrock participated in the first UFC event. As the popularity of MMA began to rise, the popularity of Japanese shoot wrestling promotions also enjoyed a bump. The PRIDE Fighting Championship (PRIDE FC) was created using an MMA-style rule set to take advantage of the new phenomenon. The promotion's roster included foreign mixed martial artists, Olympic judoka, traditional martial artists, and a number of popular Japanese professional wrestlers. A heated rivalry between UFC and Pride developed over several years before allegations of racketeering and {{Yakuza}} ties forced Pride out of business in 2006. The UFC bought all rights to Pride and dismantled it, taking some of its best fighters into their own roster.

With the popularity of MMA on the rise, a number of other rival promotions have risen up in the past few years. However, nearly all major promotions have either gone out of business or been bought by the UFC, giving it a stranglehold on the sport. The organization has enjoyed mainstream success by signing a contract with Fox to air live bouts on network television. They continue to air pay-per-view events about twice per month. The FX channel will air future seasons of ''Series/TheUltimateFighter''. Outside of the UFC, Bellator events have becomes Spike TV's new source for MMA. NBC Sports Network currently airs the World Series of Fighting. [=AXStv=] covers small promotions and provides regular analysis of the sport on ''Inside MMA''. ESPN covers the sport with ''MMA Live'', which often features current professional fighters giving commentary.

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In Japan, the sport of MMA took a concurrent but separate evolution, with origins in a form of ProfessionalWrestling called "shoot wrestling." Founded by Belgian wrestler Wrestling/KarlGotch, the style wrestling," which incorporates both real submission wrestling techniques as well as striking in a hybrid style similar to MMA. Promotions like the Wrestling/UniversalWrestlingFederation and its offspring celebrated occasionally held real ("shoot") fights among their worked cards, and before the creation of the UFC, the UWF descendants of Pancrase and Shooto were already putting on hybrid fighting shows that had largely phased out pre-determined outcomes. Pancrase shoot wrestling champion Wrestling/KenShamrock participated The concurrent rise of MMA in America culminated in the first UFC event. As the popularity creation of MMA began to rise, the popularity of Japanese shoot wrestling promotions also enjoyed a bump. The PRIDE Fighting Championship (PRIDE FC) was created using an MMA-style rule set to take advantage of the new phenomenon. The promotion's roster included foreign mixed martial artists, Olympic judoka, traditional martial artists, and FC), a number of popular Japanese professional wrestlers. A heated rivalry between MMA organization heavily influenced by its pro wrestling roots. PRIDE rivaled the UFC and Pride developed over for several years before allegations of racketeering and {{Yakuza}} ties forced Pride out of business in 2006. The UFC bought all rights to Pride and dismantled it, taking some of its best fighters into their own roster.

With
helped increase the global popularity of MMA on the rise, a number of sport before ultimately being bought by the UFC in 2006.

While
other rival promotions have risen up in the past few years. However, nearly all major promotions have either gone out of business or been bought by rise and fall, the UFC, giving it a stranglehold on UFC remains the sport. The organization has enjoyed mainstream success by signing a contract with largest name in MMA. In 2011, the UFC and Fox to air live bouts signed a partnership that began putting MMA on network television. They continue television and vastly expanded the sport's reach. In 2016, Zuffa sold the UFC to air pay-per-view events about twice per month. The FX channel William Morris Endeavor Entertainment (WME-IMG) for $4.2 billion. What this new era of MMA will air future seasons of ''Series/TheUltimateFighter''. Outside of the UFC, Bellator events have becomes Spike TV's new source for MMA. NBC Sports Network currently airs the World Series of Fighting. [=AXStv=] covers small promotions and provides regular analysis of the sport on ''Inside MMA''. ESPN covers the sport with ''MMA Live'', which often features current professional fighters giving commentary.in store has yet to be seen.
7th Mar '17 10:58:23 AM CaptainCrawdad
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Fights can end by knockout, referee stoppage, or submission. Unlike boxing, the fight does not pause when a combatant falls to the floor. Thus, if a fighter gets knocked down, he must continue to defend himself as his opponent continues to attack him. The referee is vitally important in deciding when a fighter can no longer defend himself and calling a stop to the fight. For this reason, technical knockouts due to referee stoppage are much more common than a straight KO. If a fighter is not "intelligently defending" himself, even if he is not taking very much damage, the referee can stop the fight in the interest of fighter safety.(John [=McCarthy=], the longtime referee who helped write the Unified Rules of MMA, has gone on record clarifying this distinction: "A TKO is when I stop the fight because the fighter is NOT defending themselves. A KO is when the fighter CANNOT defend themselves.") If a fighter is placed in a submission hold or decides at any time that he wishes to surrender, he must "tap out" on the mat or his opponent's body to stop the fight. If the fighter's hands are tied up, he can also verbally submit.

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Fights can end by knockout, referee stoppage, or submission. Unlike boxing, the fight does not pause when a combatant falls to the floor. Thus, if a fighter gets knocked down, he must continue to defend himself as his opponent continues to attack him. The referee is vitally important in deciding when a fighter can no longer defend himself and calling a stop to the fight. For this reason, technical knockouts due to referee stoppage are much more common than a straight KO. If a fighter is not "intelligently defending" himself, even if he is not taking very much damage, the referee can stop the fight in the interest of fighter safety.(John [=McCarthy=], the longtime referee who helped write the Unified Rules of MMA, has gone on record clarifying this distinction: "A TKO is when I stop the fight because the fighter is NOT defending themselves. A KO is when the fighter CANNOT defend themselves.") If a fighter is placed in a submission hold or decides at any time that he wishes to surrender, he must "tap out" on the mat or his opponent's body to stop the fight. If the fighter's hands are tied up, he can also verbally submit.
7th Mar '17 10:49:48 AM DiScOrDtHeLuNaTiC
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Fights can end by knockout, referee stoppage, or submission. Unlike boxing, the fight does not pause when a combatant falls to the floor. Thus, if a fighter gets knocked down, he must continue to defend himself as his opponent continues to attack him. The referee is vitally important in deciding when a fighter can no longer defend himself and calling a stop to the fight. For this reason, technical knockouts due to referee stoppage are much more common than a straight KO. If a fighter is not "intelligently defending" himself, even if he is not taking very much damage, the referee can stop the fight in the interest of fighter safety. If a fighter is placed in a submission hold or decides at any time that he wishes to surrender, he must "tap out" on the mat or his opponent's body to stop the fight. If the fighter's hands are tied up, he can also verbally submit.

to:

Fights can end by knockout, referee stoppage, or submission. Unlike boxing, the fight does not pause when a combatant falls to the floor. Thus, if a fighter gets knocked down, he must continue to defend himself as his opponent continues to attack him. The referee is vitally important in deciding when a fighter can no longer defend himself and calling a stop to the fight. For this reason, technical knockouts due to referee stoppage are much more common than a straight KO. If a fighter is not "intelligently defending" himself, even if he is not taking very much damage, the referee can stop the fight in the interest of fighter safety. (John [=McCarthy=], the longtime referee who helped write the Unified Rules of MMA, has gone on record clarifying this distinction: "A TKO is when I stop the fight because the fighter is NOT defending themselves. A KO is when the fighter CANNOT defend themselves.") If a fighter is placed in a submission hold or decides at any time that he wishes to surrender, he must "tap out" on the mat or his opponent's body to stop the fight. If the fighter's hands are tied up, he can also verbally submit.
28th Jan '17 5:43:49 AM Cieloazul
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-->"Akiyama, you betrayed so many people and little kids in the ring. I cannot forgive you. But, after tonight’s match with you, your heart reached me. After tonight, you should fight with a deep apology in mind for people. Would you support? Judo is the best! Everybody, Japanese is strong!"

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-->"Akiyama, you betrayed the trust of so many people and little kids children in the ring. ring, and that's something I cannot forgive you. you for. But, after tonight’s match with you, while I was fighting you tonight, your heart reached me. After tonight, you should fight with sincerity and a deep apology in mind for all that people. Would Will you support? accept? Judo is the best! Everybody, Japanese is people are strong!"
13th Jan '17 2:57:04 AM Xarvas
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* TheBerserker: Wanderlei Silva. Following closely the feral Brazilian school of UsefulNotes/MuayThai, his offensive was based around swarming his opponents with frightening hooks, knees, kicks and being willing to take hits in order to land his. This, though quite effective against Japanese nonstrikers and highly entertaining for the audience, proved to be a liability on his fights against the precise, technically impeccable Mirko Cro Cop, who was able to outstrike him by reading through his frenzy.

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* TheBerserker: Wanderlei Silva. Following closely the feral Brazilian school of UsefulNotes/MuayThai, his offensive was based around swarming his opponents with frightening hooks, knees, kicks and being willing to take hits in order to land his. This, though quite effective against Japanese nonstrikers and highly entertaining for the audience, proved to be a liability on his fights against the precise, technically impeccable Mirko Cro Cop, who was able to outstrike him by reading through his frenzy. It got even worse in the UFC, when his chin started fading after years of constant punishment.



** One could also argue that UFC Women's Champion Creator/RondaRousey has become one of these.

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** One could also argue that UFC Women's Champion Creator/RondaRousey has become one of these. Accusation intensified after she was fast-tracked into a fight against the champion, Amanda Nunes, despite coming off a loss against Holly Holm and taking a year off.



** Women's UFC Strawweight Champion Joanna Jedrzejczyk. Her management even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr3yOkbFAps released an 11-second video]] explaining how to pronounce her name. It's close to Yoanna Yen-Dray-Trick. She often goes by "Joanna Champion" to make it easier for fans.

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** Women's UFC Strawweight Champion Joanna Jedrzejczyk. Her management even [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr3yOkbFAps released an 11-second video]] explaining how to pronounce her name. It's close to Yoanna Yen-Dray-Trick.Yen-Jay-Chick. She often goes by "Joanna Champion" to make it easier for fans.
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