History UsefulNotes / GreenIsBlue

21st Nov '17 3:45:09 AM Paradoxic
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In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 青 (or its simplified glyph 靑).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (Japanese simplified: 緑, Chinese simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.

to:

In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 青 (or its simplified glyph 靑).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (Japanese simplified: 緑, Chinese simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous as the definitive character for blue.
21st Nov '17 3:44:37 AM Paradoxic
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In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 靑 (or its simplified glyph 青).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (Japanese simplified: 緑, Chinese simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.

However, even today, these two terms are not universally distinguished as would be understood in English. For example, forests are still 靑 (blue). Green eyes are also confusingly 靑 -- they were known to traditional Chinese civilization because there were ethnic groups on the periphery of their civilization (such as the Tocharian and Turkic peoples) who often had green eyes. And even green traffic lights are 靑. But not all "natural" green things are 靑 and not all "modern" green things are 綠 -- for instance, gemstones such as jade and emeralds are 綠 (green). Perhaps most confusingly, even though forests and grass are 靑 (blue), verdant flora is 綠 (green). In [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]], 靑 usually refers to yellow-green or lime green more often than blue.

to:

In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character (or its simplified glyph 青).靑).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (Japanese simplified: 緑, Chinese simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.

However, even today, these two terms are not universally distinguished as would be understood in English. For example, forests are still (blue). Green eyes are also confusingly -- they were known to traditional Chinese civilization because there were ethnic groups on the periphery of their civilization (such as the Tocharian and Turkic peoples) who often had green eyes. And even green traffic lights are 靑. 青. But not all "natural" green things are and not all "modern" green things are 綠 -- for instance, gemstones such as jade and emeralds are 綠 (green). Perhaps most confusingly, even though forests and grass are (blue), verdant flora is 綠 (green). In [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]], usually refers to yellow-green or lime green more often than blue.
8th Sep '17 6:40:36 PM ninjamitsuki2
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* In [[VideoGame/StyleSavvy ''Style Savvy Fashion Forward'']] the "green" color category consists mainly of teal colors. The colors most western players would call green is under "yellow greens".

to:

* In [[VideoGame/StyleSavvy ''Style ''[[VideoGame/StyleSavvy Style Savvy Fashion Forward'']] Forward]]'' the "green" color category consists mainly of teal colors. The colors most western players would call green is under "yellow greens".
8th Sep '17 6:40:01 PM ninjamitsuki2
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Added DiffLines:

* In [[VideoGame/StyleSavvy ''Style Savvy Fashion Forward'']] the "green" color category consists mainly of teal colors. The colors most western players would call green is under "yellow greens".
13th Jul '17 12:27:37 PM nighttrainfm
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* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', the Super Saiyans eye color is usually greenish in the anime, but from time to time they appear blue in some Toriyama illustrations, as well as in some promotional media and certain isolated anime episodes.

to:

* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', the ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', a Super Saiyans Saiyan's eye color is usually greenish in the anime, but from time to time they appear blue in some Toriyama illustrations, as well as in some promotional media and certain isolated anime episodes.
13th Jul '17 12:25:43 PM nighttrainfm
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** And before them was robot policeman Signalman from Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger - or Blue Senturion from ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. He has a prominent traffic light theme ("fighting for traffic safety" being the Carranger motto), and is covered in red, yellow and blue lights.

to:

** And before them was robot policeman Signalman from Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger ''Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger'' - or Blue Senturion from ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. He has a prominent traffic light theme ("fighting for traffic safety" being the Carranger motto), and is covered in red, yellow and blue lights.
13th Jul '17 12:23:00 PM nighttrainfm
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* Similar to ''Winspector'', ''Series/TokusouSentaiDekaranger''/''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' has the finishing move of the main robot use a gun with three colored barrels resembling traffic lights... with the colors being red, yellow and bluish green.
** "Green" lights ''[[JustifiedTrope are]]'' tinted blue, so that red-green colorblind people can distinguish between a green light and a red light.
* Oddly inverted in ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger''. The Shinkengers are meant to be the [[LegacyCharacter latest descendants of]] five ([[SixthRanger later six]]) mystical bloodlines dating back to ancient Japan. Despite this there's a separate blue and green ranger even though Japan didn't have a concept of blue being different from green when they supposedly originated.

to:

* ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' / ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
**
Similar to ''Winspector'', ''Series/TokusouSentaiDekaranger''/''Series/PowerRangersSPD'' has the finishing move of the main robot use a gun with three colored barrels resembling traffic lights... with the colors being red, yellow and bluish green.
** "Green"
green. Then again, "green" lights ''[[JustifiedTrope are]]'' tinted blue, so that red-green colorblind people can distinguish between a green light and a red light.
* ** And before them was robot policeman Signalman from Series/GekisouSentaiCarranger - or Blue Senturion from ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. He has a prominent traffic light theme ("fighting for traffic safety" being the Carranger motto), and is covered in red, yellow and blue lights.
**
Oddly inverted in ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger''. The Shinkengers are meant to be the [[LegacyCharacter latest descendants of]] five ([[SixthRanger later six]]) mystical bloodlines dating back to ancient Japan. Despite this there's a separate blue and green ranger even though Japan didn't have a concept of blue being different from green when they supposedly originated.
3rd May '17 2:20:14 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Western Example: Despite the team's name, it was pretty easy to tell that the Green Monkeys from ''Series/LegendsOfTheHiddenTemple'' were wearing light blue T-shirts, just barely edging on teal.

to:

* Western Example: Despite the team's name, it was pretty easy to tell that the Green Monkeys from ''Series/LegendsOfTheHiddenTemple'' were wearing light blue T-shirts, just barely edging on teal. The [[https://www.templeshirts.com/ reproduction T-Shirts you can buy]], however, are a vivid Kelly green.
27th Apr '17 12:01:25 AM Wuz
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In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 靑 (or its simplified glyph 青).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (alternate: 緑, simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.

to:

In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 靑 (or its simplified glyph 青).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (alternate: (Japanese simplified: 緑, Chinese simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.
27th Apr '17 12:00:30 AM Wuz
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In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 靑 (or its simplified glyph 青).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (simplified: 緑) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.

to:

In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinosphere Sinosphere]] -- the regions that either speak one of the Chinese languages (such as China, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.), or have languages that incorporate massive amounts of Chinese-derived extended vocabulary and have historically made widespread use of Chinese written characters (such as Japan, Korea and Vietnam), these regions traditionally have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguishing_blue_from_green_in_language the same word for both blue and green]], indicated with the Chinese character 靑 (or its simplified glyph 青).[[note]]This character is read as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''tsheng'', Mandarin ''qīng'', Vietnamese ''thanh'' (poetic) or ''xanh'' (daily usage), Korean 청 ''cheong'', indigenous Japanese あお ''ao'', さお ''sao'' and しい ''shii'', and Sino-Japanese せい ''sei'' and しょう ''shō''.[[/note]] Most natural and traditional uses of both blue and green are represented by this word, including the color of the sea, the color of forests, etc. In more recent centuries, there has arisen a greater need to distinguish the concepts that English-speakers would understand as blue and green. The newer compound Chinese character 綠 (simplified: 緑) (alternate: 緑, simplified: 绿) came to use in Chinese, Japanese and Korean to specifically mean green as opposed to blue.[[note]]This character is as reconstructed Middle Chinese ''ljowk'', Mandarin ''jī'', ''jí'', ''lǜ'' and ''qī'', Vietnamese ''lục'', Korean 록 ''rok'' and 녹 ''nok'', indigenous Japanese みどり ''midori'', and Sino-Japanese りょく ''ryoku'' and ろく ''roku''.[[/note]] Meanwhile, in China, the character 藍 (simplified: 蓝), [[note]]Mandarin: ''lán''[[/note]] has been implemented to phase out the ambiguous 靑 as the definitive character for blue.
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