History UsefulNotes / GreenIsBlue

19th Apr '17 4:47:55 AM xoriak
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* Several Franchise/{{Pokemon}} are listed as "green" in the Pokédex, when most Westerners would consider them teal: specifically, Bronzor, Bronzong, Golett and Golurk are all listed as "green"; this is especially unusual for the last two as they were designed by a Brit, James Turner (though the illustrator, Ken Sugimori, is Japanese).
** There are several orange Pokémon as well. But the Pokédex ends up listing them as either red or brown.
** It gets funny when intentionally we had Red and ''Blue'', whereas Japan got Red and ''Green''.
*** ...which caused a problem when dealing with your rival. His Japanese name of "Green" fits his families plant themed names, the fact that green and red are complementary colors, and his bedroom is green toned. Still he is called "Blue" in the games even after ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=Leafgreen=]''.

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* Several The first Franchise/{{Pokemon}} games released were ''Red (赤)'' and ''Green (緑)'', followed by a third version, ''Blue (青)'', containing slight improvements and glitch fixes. For the international release, ''Red'' and ''Green'' were combined with ''Blue'''s graphics and game engine and released as ''Red'' and ''Blue''.[[note]]A subtle irony in that green and blue are clearly distinguished in Japan but "combined" for Western audiences.[[/note]] The remakes are known as ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'' worldwide, however.
** This extends to the name of the player’s rival, known as "Green" in Japan (which ties in with his family’s plant themed names, the fact that green and red are complementary colors, and the green rug in his bedroom) and "Blue" internationally.
** Taken up a level in the ''Manga/PokemonAdventures manga'', where the characters Green (based on the aforementioned rival) and Blue (based on an unused female character who would later inspire the remakes' female player character) have their names swapped in English translations. A source of much headache in the fandom, as one might imagine.
** Several Pokémon
are listed as "green" in the Pokédex, when most Westerners would consider them teal: specifically, Bronzor, Bronzong, Golett and Golurk are all listed as "green"; this is especially unusual for the last two as they were designed by a Brit, James Turner (though the illustrator, Ken Sugimori, is Japanese).
** There are several Several orange Pokémon are affected by this as well. But well, being listed in the Pokédex ends up listing them as either red or brown.
** It gets funny when intentionally we had Red and ''Blue'', whereas Japan got Red and ''Green''.
*** ...which caused a problem when dealing with your rival. His Japanese name of "Green" fits his families plant themed names, the fact that green and red are complementary colors, and his bedroom is green toned. Still he is called "Blue" in the games even after ''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=Leafgreen=]''.
brown.
25th Feb '17 12:29:22 AM Trueman001
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In English, there are eleven [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_term#Basic_color_terms basic color terms]] -- [[TropesInBlack black]], {{blue|Tropes}}, [[ThisIndexIsBrown brown]], {{gray|Tropes}}, {{green|Tropes}}, [[AnIndexOrange orange]], {{pink|Tropes}}, {{purple|IsTheNewTrope}}, [[PaintTheIndexRed red]], [[TropesInWhite white]] and [[TheYellowIndex yellow]]. These colors are fairly consistent, each with culturally canonical hues, by which similar hues are usually associated -- for instance, scarlet is considered a type of red, gold is considered a type of yellow, etc.

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In English, there are eleven [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_term#Basic_color_terms basic color terms]] -- [[TropesInBlack black]], {{blue|Tropes}}, [[ThisIndexIsBrown brown]], {{gray|Tropes}}, {{green|Tropes}}, [[AnIndexOrange orange]], {{pink|Tropes}}, {{purple|IsTheNewTrope}}, [[PaintTheIndexRed red]], [[TropesInWhite white]] and [[TheYellowIndex yellow]]. [[note]]Of course, these are not all entirely distinct; black, grey and white are different shades of the neutral hue, brown is deep orange, pink is light red.[[/note]] These colors are fairly consistent, each with culturally canonical hues, by which similar hues are usually associated -- for instance, scarlet is considered a type of red, gold is considered a type of yellow, etc.
22nd Feb '17 6:42:32 AM Trueman001
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* To add to the confusion, the "green" light in traffic signals is deliberately mixed with a strong component of blue, to assist people with red-green colour blindness to distinguish between "stop" and "go" at a distance.

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* To add to the confusion, the "green" light in traffic signals is deliberately mixed with a strong component of blue, to assist people with red-green colour blindness to distinguish between "stop" and "go" at a distance.[[note]]In Britain at least, it varies a lot; old incandescent go signals are usually green (often light green, probably because of fading), newer LED go signals are sometimes green but more often the "traffic-light green" which is somewhere between green and cyan, and some are ''cyan''.[[/note]]
24th Dec '16 7:11:39 PM Trueman001
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** Traffic signals on London's Croydon Tramlink bypass this problem by using a white | for "go" and a white -- for "stop". The rarely-seen "caution" signal (usually only seen where the trams run along the public roadway and thus have their signal mounted below a standard traffic light) is a white + with arms that are much shorter than those of the other two signals.
24th Dec '16 7:05:21 PM Trueman001
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* To add to the confusion, the "green" light in U.S. traffic signals is deliberately mixed with a strong component of blue, to assist people with red-green colour blindness to distinguish between "stop" and "go" at a distance.

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* To add to the confusion, the "green" light in U.S. traffic signals is deliberately mixed with a strong component of blue, to assist people with red-green colour blindness to distinguish between "stop" and "go" at a distance.distance.
** When experimental traffic signals which used an X as the "go" signal were tried out in London in 1967, the X was made white rather than green. Presumably both these measures were to assist colour-blind motorists; but they caused more confusion than they prevented.
* Heraldic tincture names (such as Azure for blue) are always spelled with a capital intital letter, so as to distinguish "Or" (the metal) from "or" (the conjunction).
24th Dec '16 6:57:23 PM Trueman001
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24th Dec '16 6:57:21 PM Trueman001
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* While the the color cyan obviously has its own name in English, its more commonly referred to as light blue in English and most languages. This is odd as, from a physical standpoint, cyan, a secondary color, is as distinct from true blue as magenta (pink) is from blue.

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* While the the color cyan obviously has its own name in English, its more commonly referred to as light blue in English and most languages. This is odd as, from a physical standpoint, cyan, a secondary color, cyan (midway between green and blue) is as distinct from true blue as magenta (pink) (midway between blue and red) is from blue.
24th Dec '16 7:33:37 AM Owlorange1995
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[[folder: Western Animation]]
* The "Red Eye" meteor from WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse is mostly colored orange, with only the pupil of the eye actually being red.
[[/folder]]
21st Dec '16 2:57:33 AM Trueman001
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* The coin-op ''Super Locomotive'' has blue go signals.
18th Dec '16 11:47:26 AM JakesBrain
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** Some of the oldest words for non-primary colors surviving from Old English -- dun, grey, fallow, etc. -- seem to be meant to distinguish the different colors of animal pelts or hides.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.GreenIsBlue