History UsefulNotes / GermanTVStations

27th Jul '17 7:02:52 AM faunas
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** ''Das Erste'' (''The First'') - or just ''ARD''[[note]]'''A'''rbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen '''R'''undfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik '''D'''eutschland - Workingcommunity of the pubic legislated broadcasting-facilities of the federal republic of Germany (a LongTitle) - this is '"Erste'''s owner and frequently used metonym[[/note]], formal (seldom used) name ''Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen'' ("First German Television") - started broadcasting in 1952. Each part of the programme is made by one of the member stations (who form a so-called gremium (or "elder council") to democratically decide the programme between the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Bundesländer]]), and then broadcasted by all member stations. Not every state has its own ARD broadcaster, as some states operate them jointly.

to:

** ''Das Erste'' (''The First'') - or just ''ARD''[[note]]'''A'''rbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen '''R'''undfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik '''D'''eutschland - Workingcommunity of the pubic legislated broadcasting-facilities of the federal republic of Germany (a LongTitle) - this is '"Erste'''s ''Erste'''s owner and frequently used metonym[[/note]], formal (seldom used) name ''Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen'' ("First German Television") - started broadcasting in 1952. Each part of the programme is made by one of the member stations (who form a so-called gremium (or "elder council") to democratically decide the programme between the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Bundesländer]]), and then broadcasted by all member stations. Not every state has its own ARD broadcaster, as some states operate them jointly.
27th Jul '17 7:02:02 AM faunas
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** ''Das Erste'' (''The First'') - or just ''ARD''[[note]]'''A'''rbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen '''R'''undfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik '''D'''eutschland - Workingcommunity of the pubic legislated broadcasting-facilities of the federal republic of Germany (a LongTitle)[[/note]] - started broadcasting in 1952. Each part of the programme is made by one of the member stations (who form a so-called gremium (or "elder council") to democratically decide the programme between the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Bundesländer]]), and then broadcasted by all member stations. Not every state has its own ARD broadcaster, as some states operate them jointly.

to:

** ''Das Erste'' (''The First'') - or just ''ARD''[[note]]'''A'''rbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen '''R'''undfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik '''D'''eutschland - Workingcommunity of the pubic legislated broadcasting-facilities of the federal republic of Germany (a LongTitle)[[/note]] LongTitle) - this is '"Erste'''s owner and frequently used metonym[[/note]], formal (seldom used) name ''Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen'' ("First German Television") - started broadcasting in 1952. Each part of the programme is made by one of the member stations (who form a so-called gremium (or "elder council") to democratically decide the programme between the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Bundesländer]]), and then broadcasted by all member stations. Not every state has its own ARD broadcaster, as some states operate them jointly.
4th May '16 2:16:48 PM Jhonny
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During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- this being the standard in the Eastern Bloc, though may or may not have doubled as an aborted attempt to deter Easterners from watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system[[note]]specifically, DFF 1 had its frequencies taken over by ARD[=/=]''Das Erste'' and DFF 2 by the short-lived regional "DFF Länderkette" stations which were in turn replaced by new regional broadcasters and ARD member-stations[[/note]].

to:

During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- this being the standard in the Eastern Bloc, though this may or may not have doubled as an aborted attempt to deter Easterners from watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system[[note]]specifically, DFF 1 had its frequencies taken over by ARD[=/=]''Das Erste'' and DFF 2 by the short-lived regional "DFF Länderkette" stations which were in turn replaced by new regional broadcasters and ARD member-stations[[/note]].
21st Apr '16 7:52:07 AM valozzy
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25th Feb '16 3:56:23 PM Jhonny
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To European eyes, the German television system can seem rather weird. Rather than have a single national public broadcaster, there are multiple regional public broadcasters, which all produce their own content and then send it to other regions. While to some degree this is a recognition of the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland federal structure]] of Germany, it is also an attempt by the Allies to ensure that a national PropagandaMachine like that used by the Nazis could never again take hold in Germany: if one regional broadcaster started pumping out extremist propaganda, the other broadcasters could simply refuse to transmit it and program their own material instead. This system, rather interestingly to historians of broadcasting, inspired the system used by Creator/{{PBS}} in the United States, albeit with the bulk of funding coming from direct viewer contributions rather than a television license fee (which is how ARD is funded) and with a far finer division of the country (with multiple markets per state and multiple stations per market, as opposed to the occasional fusion of regional broadcasters in the ARD).

However, as the Bonn Republic matured, it became increasingly clear that these protections were not really necessary. This is how ''ZDF''--a single unified national broadcaster--was formed (albeit leaving ''Das Erste''--the original ARD structure--firmly intact).

to:

To European eyes, the German television system can seem rather weird. Rather than have a single national public broadcaster, there are multiple regional public broadcasters, which all produce their own content and then send it to other regions. While to some degree this is a recognition of the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland federal structure]] of Germany, it is also an attempt by the Allies to ensure that a national PropagandaMachine like that used by the Nazis could never again take hold in Germany: if one regional broadcaster started pumping out extremist propaganda, the other broadcasters could simply refuse to transmit it and program their own material instead. In fact BR (Bayrischer Rundfunk) ''did'' tune out of the running program on several high profile occasions. This system, rather interestingly to historians of broadcasting, inspired the system used by Creator/{{PBS}} in the United States, albeit with the bulk of funding coming from direct viewer contributions rather than a television license fee (which is how ARD is funded) and with a far finer division of the country (with multiple markets per state and multiple stations per market, as opposed to the occasional fusion of regional broadcasters in the ARD).

However, as the Bonn Republic matured, it became increasingly clear that these protections were not really necessary. This is how ''ZDF''--a single unified national broadcaster--was formed (albeit leaving ''Das Erste''--the original ARD structure--firmly intact).
intact). Interestingly ZDF was the result of attempts at establishing a "counterweight" to what the Adenauer administration deemed the "left wing slant" of ARD. Given that Kohl legalized private stations with similar intentions twenty years later the actual effectiveniss is debatable.
25th Aug '15 8:25:12 AM TheLyniezian
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During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- this being the standard in the Eastern Bloc, though may or may not have doubled as an aborted attempt to deter Easterners from watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.

to:

During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- this being the standard in the Eastern Bloc, though may or may not have doubled as an aborted attempt to deter Easterners from watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.
system[[note]]specifically, DFF 1 had its frequencies taken over by ARD[=/=]''Das Erste'' and DFF 2 by the short-lived regional "DFF Länderkette" stations which were in turn replaced by new regional broadcasters and ARD member-stations[[/note]].
25th Aug '15 8:18:34 AM TheLyniezian
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During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- in an ill-fated attempt to stop Easterners watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.

to:

During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- this being the standard in the Eastern Bloc, though may or may not have doubled as an ill-fated aborted attempt to stop deter Easterners from watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.
25th Aug '15 8:09:53 AM TheLyniezian
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During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the first colour broadcasts. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.

to:

During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the country's first colour broadcasts.broadcasts[[note]]using the French-orignated SECAM system instead of the PAL used in the West- in an ill-fated attempt to stop Easterners watching West German TV[[/note]]. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.
25th Aug '15 7:56:47 AM TheLyniezian
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Added DiffLines:

During the Cold War, Usefulnotes/EastGermany had its own television system provided by the state broadcaster, originally called DFF (Deutscher Fernsehfunk) and later DDR-FS (Fernsehen der DDR) which orignally operated a single channel, later adding a second, DFF2, in 1969 which contained the first colour broadcasts. (All this didn't stop East Germans from clandestinely picking up and watching West German stations, which could be picked up in all but a few regions such as Dresden[[note]]nicknamed ''Tal der Ahnungslosen'' or "Valley of the Clueless" for this reason[[/note]], prompting DFF to put out the propaganda programme ''Der schwarze Kanal'' to provide regime-sanctioned commentary on Western news reports.) Soon after reunification, the DFF/DDR-FS was abolished and the former East German states were subsumed into the West German broadcasting system.
15th Oct '14 10:38:58 AM Prfnoff
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*** ''DW'' (''Deutsche Welle'', ''German Wave''): The German broadcasting connection to the rest of the world.

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*** ''DW'' (''Deutsche Welle'', ''German Wave''): The German broadcasting connection to the rest of the world. Acquired the television channel of West Berlin broadcaster RIAS (Radio in the American Sector) when it was dissolved in 1992.
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