History UsefulNotes / Existentialism

22nd Aug '17 8:48:14 AM CosmicFerret
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* Jon on both ''{{Garfield}}'' and ''Webcomic/GarfieldMinusGarfield'' explains [[http://www.gocomics.com/garfieldminusgarfield/2013/08/21#.Ukmd6z-IqV0 existential angst]].

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* Jon on both ''{{Garfield}}'' ''ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}'' and ''Webcomic/GarfieldMinusGarfield'' explains [[http://www.gocomics.com/garfieldminusgarfield/2013/08/21#.Ukmd6z-IqV0 existential angst]].
6th Aug '17 2:16:41 PM Knightofbalance
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%%* ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann''


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* ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'', much like the above example, also has the main character Simon dealing with a nilistic sense of self-loathing (bonus points for being an {{Expy}} of Shinji) and learning to find worth in himself through self-esteem. His mentor/surrogate brother is a heroic example of an {{Ubermensch}} who makes up his own values and morality and encourages Simon to take up his way of thinking. The good guys are always actively engaging in change whereas the antagonists are inactive and trying to keep things as they are out of a sense of hopelessness. The show constantly enforces the idea that people should think for themselves and live their lives how they want to, no matter what anyone else say, the morality of the show is actually a case of GreyAndGrayMorality. And when faced the fact that [[spoiler: their way of life was actually gonna bring the entire universe]], Simon and his team adapt an [[TheAntiNihilist existentialist]] approach.
25th Jul '17 6:10:27 PM nombretomado
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%%** Which is to be expected, being an XMeetsY of the previous two plays.

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%%** Which is to be expected, being an XMeetsY JustForFun/XMeetsY of the previous two plays.
10th Jul '17 10:37:21 AM trumpetmarietta
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It is important to stress that, befitting a philosophy of individuality and self-created meaning, thinkers both pre-existential, existential, and post-existential differ wildly in their conclusions and their sentiments. You'll find that many of the people held up as examples of existentialism indignantly claimed that they weren't -- probably a side-effect of the fact that nonconformity is one of the school's main tenets ("Once you label me, you negate me" is a famous line of Kierkegaard's). For instance, Soren Kierkegaard was a Protestant Priest and a devout Christian, and some of his works were about [[DeconReconSwitch finding and discovering a new modern approach to religious belief]]. A strain and approach that anticipated and inspired other thinkers interested in reconciling religion with the modern world. Creator/FriedrichNietzsche however was an atheist, as was most of the post-war French thinkers (Sartre, Camus, Beauvoir). Yet even Nietzsche differed from the latter by means of his distinct pessimism, his strong sense of {{Irony}} which allowed him to advocate ideas and views that are inherently contradictory and paradoxical. Active existentialists like Sartre, and his circle of friends, as well as the school of literature and philosophy that he inspired, advocated ideas that were intended to be clear, humanistic, bridge together ideas and views even from sources that were on the opposite spectrum. For Sartre, who was sympathetic to Marxism, existentialism was primarily a means of advocating and advancing social criticism into contemporary society, and criticizing colonialism, racism and advocating social justice. The likes of Creator/AlbertCamus differed with Sartre in his political sympathies and he also rejected the label of existentialism and advocated instead the idea of "the absurd" which was a middle ground between Nietzschean pessimism and Sartrean humanism. As such existentialism was originally, and ''intentionally'' a very diverse school of thought rather than a single authoritative ideology or beliefs. Some historians see it as simply a cultural and intellectual movement rather than a real philosophy. That's about as far as we can cover the philosophical side of existentialism.

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It is important to stress that, befitting a philosophy of individuality and self-created meaning, thinkers both pre-existential, existential, and post-existential differ wildly in their conclusions and their sentiments. You'll find that many of the people held up as examples of existentialism indignantly claimed that they weren't -- probably a side-effect of the fact that nonconformity is one of the school's main tenets ("Once you label me, you negate me" is a famous line of Kierkegaard's). For instance, Soren Søren Kierkegaard was a Protestant Priest and a devout Christian, and some of his works were about [[DeconReconSwitch finding and discovering a new modern approach to religious belief]]. A strain and approach that anticipated and inspired other thinkers interested in reconciling religion with the modern world. Creator/FriedrichNietzsche however was an atheist, as was most of the post-war French thinkers (Sartre, Camus, Beauvoir). Yet even Nietzsche differed from the latter by means of his distinct pessimism, his strong sense of {{Irony}} which allowed him to advocate ideas and views that are inherently contradictory and paradoxical. Active existentialists like Sartre, and his circle of friends, as well as the school of literature and philosophy that he inspired, advocated ideas that were intended to be clear, humanistic, bridge together ideas and views even from sources that were on the opposite spectrum. For Sartre, who was sympathetic to Marxism, existentialism was primarily a means of advocating and advancing social criticism into contemporary society, and criticizing colonialism, racism and advocating social justice. The likes of Creator/AlbertCamus differed with Sartre in his political sympathies and he also rejected the label of existentialism and advocated instead the idea of "the absurd" which was a middle ground between Nietzschean pessimism and Sartrean humanism. As such existentialism was originally, and ''intentionally'' a very diverse school of thought rather than a single authoritative ideology or beliefs. Some historians see it as simply a cultural and intellectual movement rather than a real philosophy. That's about as far as we can cover the philosophical side of existentialism.
5th Jul '17 1:06:26 AM DrakeCuffs
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You see, existentialism is one of those rare serious intellectual strains whose ideas entered the cultural lexicon and became important and relevant to mainstream popular culture. One reason for this is that the original existentialists actually wrote for a non-academic audience, and by means of word-of-mouth, the ForeignCultureFetish for Americans for forties and fifties' UsefulNotes/{{France}}, and the counter-culture of TheSixties and TheSeventies, the ideas spread and inspired much popular philosophy, campus radicals,literary and genre fiction, popular musicians and film-makers. Such works differ in many ways from philosophical existentialism for the understandable reason that as works of entertainment, they are more interested in using it as sources of conflict and dramatic tension, than as serious philosophical inquiry and research. Existentialist ideas inform works of art by [[TrueArtIsAngsty providing greater inner conflict and tension]] as well as [[TropesAreTools a source and method]] for deeper characterization. It led to the introduction of general ambiguity; a questioning of motives, and separating motivation from actions in manners that are supposed to make the audience question their identification with the protagonist. Audiences became reluctant to accept a character doing something right on face value; it became important to know what that particular "right thing" was, how did this character decide if it was "right" or not, or if [[JustFollowingOrders said character did it because someone else told him it was right]]. Stories inspired by existentialism often paved the way for conclusions that were [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow tentative]], [[TheEndOrIsIt skeptical]], and [[GainaxEnding unresolved]], even when the plots were otherwise simple and straightforward. It also leads to stories with MoralityKitchenSink and GrayAndGreyMorality. Existentialist works can be tragic, pessimistic and end on a DownerEnding but it can also be affirmative, optimistic, have BittersweetEnding and EarnYourHappyEnding.

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You see, existentialism is one of those rare serious intellectual strains whose ideas entered the cultural lexicon and became important and relevant to mainstream popular culture. One reason for this is that the original existentialists actually wrote for a non-academic audience, and by means of word-of-mouth, the ForeignCultureFetish for Americans for forties and fifties' UsefulNotes/{{France}}, and the counter-culture of TheSixties and TheSeventies, the ideas spread and inspired much popular philosophy, campus radicals,literary radicals, literary and genre fiction, popular musicians and film-makers. Such works differ in many ways from philosophical existentialism for the understandable reason that as works of entertainment, they are more interested in using it as sources of conflict and dramatic tension, than as serious philosophical inquiry and research. Existentialist ideas inform works of art by [[TrueArtIsAngsty providing greater inner conflict and tension]] as well as [[TropesAreTools a source and method]] for deeper characterization. It led to the introduction of general ambiguity; a questioning of motives, and separating motivation from actions in manners that are supposed to make the audience question their identification with the protagonist. Audiences became reluctant to accept a character doing something right on face value; it became important to know what that particular "right thing" was, how did this character decide if it was "right" or not, or if [[JustFollowingOrders said character did it because someone else told him it was right]]. Stories inspired by existentialism often paved the way for conclusions that were [[SoWhatDoWeDoNow tentative]], [[TheEndOrIsIt skeptical]], and [[GainaxEnding unresolved]], even when the plots were otherwise simple and straightforward. It also leads to stories with MoralityKitchenSink and GrayAndGreyMorality. Existentialist works can be tragic, pessimistic and end on a DownerEnding but it can also be affirmative, optimistic, have BittersweetEnding and EarnYourHappyEnding.
1st Jul '17 9:12:02 AM nombretomado
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TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Existentialism has an article and analysis on this subject.]] See also {{Absurdism}}, {{Postmodernism}}, {{Romanticism}}, {{Deconstruction}} and Individualism.

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TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Existentialism has an article and analysis on this subject.]] See also {{Absurdism}}, {{Postmodernism}}, {{Romanticism}}, {{Deconstruction}} and Individualism.
18th Jun '17 8:32:04 PM nombretomado
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The term existentialism came into prominence in TheForties in France where it was used in club debates, [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness and after early resistance]], adopted by Sartre as a label and category defining his philosophy. The term "existentialism" seems to have been coined by the French philosopher Gabriel Marcel. As Sartre, and others, noted in his works, the philosophy [[TropeCodifier codifies]] and identifies a particular strain of thought and idea, rather than invent something new out of whole cloth. As such one can find ideas similar to, or anticipating existentialism, in the works of Kierkegaard and Creator/FriedrichNietzsche, as well as a host of other novelists (Creator/FyodorDostoevsky, Creator/LeoTolstoy for instance) and dramatists and other artists. Sartre himself went further, citing Jesus's words on the cross in the Gospel of Matthew [[note]]"My God! My God! Why have you forsaken me?"[[/note]]. It gained popularity in the early 1940s around the time of the Modernist movement (amidst incomprehensible scientific discoveries that inspired LovecraftianFiction, and of course the horrors of WorldWarTwo, which contributed to further [[TrueArtIsAngsty popularity of Angst in the arts]]), when Jean-Paul Sartre [[TropeCodifier codified]] existential philosophy with three words: "Existence precedes essence." It was the reverse of most previous philosophical thought, which held that the essence (soul, purpose, meaning) of a thing came first. Existentialism coevolved with, and takes tropes and inspirations from, the artistic movement of PostModernism, which [[NoFourthWall dissolves the boundary between life and art and reality and fiction]]. Both are connected by the philosophy that life is art, and you can live your life as your own creative art.

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The term existentialism came into prominence in TheForties in France where it was used in club debates, [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness and after early resistance]], adopted by Sartre as a label and category defining his philosophy. The term "existentialism" seems to have been coined by the French philosopher Gabriel Marcel. As Sartre, and others, noted in his works, the philosophy [[TropeCodifier codifies]] and identifies a particular strain of thought and idea, rather than invent something new out of whole cloth. As such one can find ideas similar to, or anticipating existentialism, in the works of Kierkegaard and Creator/FriedrichNietzsche, as well as a host of other novelists (Creator/FyodorDostoevsky, Creator/LeoTolstoy for instance) and dramatists and other artists. Sartre himself went further, citing Jesus's words on the cross in the Gospel of Matthew [[note]]"My God! My God! Why have you forsaken me?"[[/note]]. It gained popularity in the early 1940s around the time of the Modernist movement (amidst incomprehensible scientific discoveries that inspired LovecraftianFiction, and of course the horrors of WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, which contributed to further [[TrueArtIsAngsty popularity of Angst in the arts]]), when Jean-Paul Sartre [[TropeCodifier codified]] existential philosophy with three words: "Existence precedes essence." It was the reverse of most previous philosophical thought, which held that the essence (soul, purpose, meaning) of a thing came first. Existentialism coevolved with, and takes tropes and inspirations from, the artistic movement of PostModernism, which [[NoFourthWall dissolves the boundary between life and art and reality and fiction]]. Both are connected by the philosophy that life is art, and you can live your life as your own creative art.
14th Jun '17 7:11:36 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored2}}'' both a CentralTheme dealing with power, choice and WhatYouAreInTheDark. The game provides the players and their villains with abilities and resources and makes their choice on how they use that power the central dramatic conflict. You are judged by your smallest and your biggest actions, all of which have consequences and for which you alone are responsible.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' The CentralTheme of the Franchise/DishonoredSeries (''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored2}}'' both a CentralTheme dealing especially) deal with power, choice and WhatYouAreInTheDark. The game provides the players and their villains with abilities and resources and makes their choice on how they use that power the central dramatic conflict. You are judged by your smallest and your biggest actions, all of which have consequences and for which you alone are responsible.
12th May '17 4:15:26 AM jormis29
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* ''The Unbearable Lightness Of Being'': The book actually opens with a contemplation on Nietzsche's concept of "eternal return" (which is then refuted).

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* ''The Unbearable Lightness Of Being'': ''Literature/TheUnbearableLightnessOfBeing'': The book actually opens with a contemplation on Nietzsche's concept of "eternal return" (which is then refuted).
10th Apr '17 10:07:02 AM JulianLapostat
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* ''VideoGame/{{BioShock}}'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'' is generally a {{Deconstruction}} of the notion of player choice, stated beliefs, motivations and actions. The first game articulates is by means of Nietzsche via Creator/AynRand:
--> '''Andrew Ryan''': ''In the end what separates a man from a slave? Money? Power? No, a man chooses, and a slave obeys! You think you have memories. A farm. A family. An airplane. A crash. And then this place. Was there really a family? Did that airplane crash, or, was it hijacked? Forced down, forced down by something less than a man, something bred to sleepwalk through life unless activated by a simple phrase, spoken by their kindly master.''


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* ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored2}}'' both a CentralTheme dealing with power, choice and WhatYouAreInTheDark. The game provides the players and their villains with abilities and resources and makes their choice on how they use that power the central dramatic conflict. You are judged by your smallest and your biggest actions, all of which have consequences and for which you alone are responsible.


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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' puts the whole First Person Shooter genre and its attendant military simulation base under an existentialist microscope, showing how the hero's actions get absurd in light of MotiveDecay, with Captain Walker (and by extension the player) revealed to be in bad faith:
--> '''Colonel Konrad''': ''The truth, Walker, is that you're here because you wanted to feel like something you're not: a hero.''
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