History Trivia / MontyPythonsFlyingCircus

18th Oct '17 9:49:46 AM ClintEastwood
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* BadExportForYou: Inverted with the original episode package that aired on {{Creator/PBS}} in TheSeventies. The episodes were taken from the master tapes and not the BBC broadcast tapes, which meant that several of the cut scenes mentioned in the Executive Meddling entry below were untouched in the PBS version.
* BigNameFan: Music/PinkFloyd. Not only did they frequently halt recording sessions to watch the show, but they later donated proceeds from ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'' to the production of ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail.''

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* BadExportForYou: Inverted with the original episode package that aired on {{Creator/PBS}} in TheSeventies. The episodes were taken from the master tapes and not the BBC broadcast tapes, which meant that several of the cut scenes mentioned in the Executive Meddling ExecutiveMeddling entry below were untouched in the PBS version.
* BigNameFan: BigNameFan:
**
Music/PinkFloyd. Not only did they frequently halt recording sessions to watch the show, but they later donated proceeds from ''Music/TheDarkSideOfTheMoon'' to the production of ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail.''



* EditedForSyndication: In the "Mouse Problem" sketch from Episode 2, the address and phone number of an interview subject who has admitted to wanting to be a mouse are displayed and read out by John Cleese. In the original broadcast from 1969, the phone number was David Frost's home phone number, and after fielding a large number of prank calls, an annoyed Frost complained to the BBC, who edited the number out of the first re-runs in August 1970.

to:

* EditedForSyndication: In the "Mouse Problem" sketch from Episode 2, the address and phone number of an interview subject who has admitted to wanting to be a mouse are displayed and read out by John Cleese. Creator/JohnCleese. In the original broadcast from 1969, the phone number was David Frost's home phone number, and after fielding a large number of prank calls, an annoyed Frost complained to the BBC, Creator/TheBBC, who edited the number out of the first re-runs in August 1970.



** Additionally, most episodes of the two Python precursor series, ''Series/DoNotAdjustYourSet'' and ''Series/AtLastThe1948Show'', have been wiped. This could have happened to ''Flying Circus'' itself were it not for the actions of Terry Gilliam, who bought the masters as soon as he could.

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** Additionally, most episodes of the two Python precursor series, ''Series/DoNotAdjustYourSet'' and ''Series/AtLastThe1948Show'', have been wiped. This could have happened to ''Flying Circus'' itself were it not for the actions of Terry Gilliam, Creator/TerryGilliam, who bought the masters as soon as he could.



* FakeAmerican: Many cases, to varying success. Even Terry Gilliam, who ''is'' American, had trouble sounding like it because he had been living in England for so long (even now, as a British citizen since 1968, his real speaking voice ''sounds'' similar to a fake American accent!). For specific examples...
** In the Marriage Counselor sketch, John Cleese plays a random cowboy with a laughably thick accent to help give a pep talk.

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* FakeAmerican: Many cases, to varying success. Even Terry Gilliam, Creator/TerryGilliam, who ''is'' American, had trouble sounding like it because he had been living in England for so long (even now, as a British citizen since 1968, his real speaking voice ''sounds'' similar to a fake American accent!). For specific examples...
** In the Marriage Counselor sketch, John Cleese Creator/JohnCleese plays a random cowboy with a laughably thick accent to help give a pep talk.



** John Cleese's narration in the Science Fiction Sketch goes an over-the-top Hollywood-style narration.

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** John Cleese's Creator/JohnCleese's narration in the Science Fiction Sketch goes an over-the-top Hollywood-style narration.



* MagnumOpusDissonance: John Cleese has often expressed frustration over the fact that, of all the high-minded, satirical sketches they'd done, it's the "Ministry Of Silly Walks," the one skit that deliberately made absolutely no sense, is considered their best (this also probably has to do with people stopping him the street and asking him to do a silly walk).

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* MagnumOpusDissonance: John Cleese Creator/JohnCleese has often expressed frustration over the fact that, of all the high-minded, satirical sketches they'd done, it's the "Ministry Of Silly Walks," the one skit that deliberately made absolutely no sense, is considered their best (this also probably has to do with people stopping him the street and asking him to do a silly walk).walk).
* NoStuntDouble: The Pythons did almost all of their own stunts, including Creator/GrahamChapman (a qualified mountaineer) reading a sketch while hanging upside-down on a rope, and Creator/MichaelPalin plummeting 15 feet into a canal in "The Fish-Slapping Dance" after Creator/JohnCleese smacks him in the head with a trout.



** In the "Father-In-Law" sketch, the father is played by Graham Chapman; when the sketch comes back as a link, he is replaced by Terry Gilliam.
** On live stage productions, Eric Idle would sing the Lumberjack Song instead of Michael Palin.

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** In the "Father-In-Law" sketch, the father is played by Graham Chapman; Creator/GrahamChapman; when the sketch comes back as a link, he is replaced by Terry Gilliam.
Creator/TerryGilliam.
** On live stage productions, Eric Idle Creator/EricIdle would sing the Lumberjack Song instead of Michael Palin.Creator/MichaelPalin.



* ThrowItIn: During a sketch with John Cleese where they played a pair of Pepperpots, Graham Chapman suddenly went off script and screamed "BURMA!" for no reason. Cleese then asked Chapman, in character, why he did that, to which Chapman replied, in character, "I panicked!". It was later decided it was too funny ''not'' to include.

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* ThrowItIn: During a sketch with John Cleese where they played a pair of Pepperpots, Graham Chapman Creator/GrahamChapman suddenly went off script and screamed "BURMA!" for no reason. Cleese then asked Chapman, in character, why he did that, to which Chapman replied, in character, "I panicked!". It was later decided it was too funny ''not'' to include.



* UnfinishedEpisode: A sketch John Cleese found in poor taste was written but not filmed. (There is actually some controversy amongst the Pythons themselves as to whether it was filmed or not, but certainly never broadcast.) It involved a wine connoisseur showing off his wine cellar to a visitor, and after each tasting he reveals that it's "wee wee."

to:

* UnfinishedEpisode: A sketch John Cleese Creator/JohnCleese found in poor taste was written but not filmed. (There is actually some controversy amongst the Pythons themselves as to whether it was filmed or not, but certainly never broadcast.) It involved a wine connoisseur showing off his wine cellar to a visitor, and after each tasting he reveals that it's "wee wee." "
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: While the majority of the Pythons' humour is pretty damn ageless, some of the jokes will fly over your head if you aren't familiar with British television presenters, celebrities and politicians who were around at the time. You might get a joke about a "Mrs. Thatcher", "Mr. (Harold) Wilson", and "Mr. (Edward) Heath", but unless you're well-versed in British culture, you probably won't know who Robin Day was (except that he owned a hedgehog called Frank). Some sketches parody aspects of British bureaucracy that are no longer around - for example the 'Fish License' sketch is based around dog licenses which were abolished in 1987. "Appearing on the M2" are many Vauxhall Vivas - a brand of car long disappeared from the United Kingdom. On top of that, the costuming and hairstyles on the series are pretty definitively '60s-'70s, albeit in a fairly low-key way... except when actual women are involved.
** Probably the most notable thing pegging Python to its time is its use of traditional currency - shillings, sixpence, etc. - in the first two series; Britain did not decimalise its currency until 1971, so pre-decimal money shows up from time to time, like in the "Embezzler Accountant" sketch as well as the "New Television Licenses" end credit background. One third-series sketch included an onscreen note, "Old Sketch written before decimalisation" and helpfully provided conversions, which probably counts as LampshadeHanging.
** Their ''The Bishop'' sketch is a parody of ''Series/TheSaint'', but most younger generations don't remember this show anymore.
** In the first season there was a sketch where some hippies have taken custody of a man's stomach, which is discovered during his operation.
** Frequent references to ''communist uprisings'' and Maoism, actors appearing in BrownFace or YellowFace for gags, direct references to the BBC globe spinning around during programs (something the BBC abandoned in 1997)...


Added DiffLines:

* WorkingTitle: ''Gwen Dibley's Flying Circus'', ''Owl-Stretching Time'' (which was used as the name for one episode), ''Bun, Whackett, Buzzard, Stubble and Boot'', ''A Toad Elevating Moment'', ''Sex and Violence'', ''A Horse, a Bucket and a Spoon''. One early working title for the series was simply, ''It's...''
15th Oct '17 4:15:40 PM thelivingtoad
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* FakeAmerican: Many cases, to varying success. Even Terry Gilliam, who ''is'' American, had trouble sounding like it. For specific examples...

to:

* FakeAmerican: Many cases, to varying success. Even Terry Gilliam, who ''is'' American, had trouble sounding like it.it because he had been living in England for so long (even now, as a British citizen since 1968, his real speaking voice ''sounds'' similar to a fake American accent!). For specific examples...
15th Oct '17 4:12:37 PM thelivingtoad
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Added DiffLines:

** Carol Cleveland, who is British but was raised in the United States, actually manages a better American accent than all of the guys (even, at times, Gilliam) when she's called upon to give one in sketches like "Scott of the Antarctic".
15th Oct '17 4:08:07 PM thelivingtoad
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* EditedForSyndication:
* EditedForSyndication:
** In the "Mouse Problem" sketch from Episode 2, the address and phone number of an interview subject who has admitted to wanting to be a mouse are displayed and read out by John Cleese. In the original broadcast from 1969, the phone number was David Frost's home phone number, and after fielding a large number of prank calls, an annoyed Frost complained to the BBC, who edited the number out of the first re-runs in August 1970.

to:

* EditedForSyndication:
* EditedForSyndication:
**
EditedForSyndication: In the "Mouse Problem" sketch from Episode 2, the address and phone number of an interview subject who has admitted to wanting to be a mouse are displayed and read out by John Cleese. In the original broadcast from 1969, the phone number was David Frost's home phone number, and after fielding a large number of prank calls, an annoyed Frost complained to the BBC, who edited the number out of the first re-runs in August 1970.
15th Oct '17 4:07:58 PM thelivingtoad
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Added DiffLines:

* EditedForSyndication:
* EditedForSyndication:
15th Oct '17 4:07:28 PM thelivingtoad
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* {{Defictionalization}}: Several things, but perhaps most prominently the "Silly Party" of the Election Night Sketch inspired the RealLife Monster Raving Loony Party. The OverlyLongName of a candidate was also borrowed by a real British election candidate.
* EditedForSyndication:

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* {{Defictionalization}}: Several things, but perhaps most prominently A British man named John Desmond Lewis legally changed his name to "Tarquin Fin-tim-lin-bin-whin-bim-lim-bus-stop-F'tang-F'tang-Olé-Biscuitbarrel", from the "Silly Party" of "Election Night" sketch and ran for a parliamentary seat in 1981 as the Election Night Sketch inspired candidate for the RealLife Official Monster Raving Loony Party. The OverlyLongName of a candidate was also borrowed by Party, a real British election candidate.
* EditedForSyndication:
political party that was loosely inspired "Very Silly" party from the sketch. He came in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosby_by-election,_1981 fifth of nine candidates]].



* LifeImitatesArt: A British man named John Desmond Lewis legally changed his name to "Tarquin Fin-tim-lin-bin-whin-bim-lim-bus-stop-F'tang-F'tang-Olé-Biscuitbarrel", from the "Election Night" sketch and ran for a parliamentary seat in 1981 as the candidate for the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, the real life counterpart of the "Very Silly" party from the sketch. He came in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosby_by-election,_1981 fifth of nine candidates]].
15th Oct '17 4:06:26 PM thelivingtoad
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Added DiffLines:

* LifeImitatesArt: A British man named John Desmond Lewis legally changed his name to "Tarquin Fin-tim-lin-bin-whin-bim-lim-bus-stop-F'tang-F'tang-Olé-Biscuitbarrel", from the "Election Night" sketch and ran for a parliamentary seat in 1981 as the candidate for the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, the real life counterpart of the "Very Silly" party from the sketch. He came in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crosby_by-election,_1981 fifth of nine candidates]].
3rd Aug '17 12:28:16 PM wikkit
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** All Music/TheBeatles were also big fans of the show; Ringo was a good enough sport to appear as a guest star in one episode.

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** All Music/TheBeatles were also big fans of the show; Ringo was a good enough sport to appear as a guest star in one episode.episode, and George would later go on to fund ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian'' out of his own pocket.
31st Jul '17 12:37:36 PM WildeOscar
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* All Music/TheBeatles were also big fans of the show; Ringo was a good enough sport to appear as a guest star in one episode.

to:

* ** All Music/TheBeatles were also big fans of the show; Ringo was a good enough sport to appear as a guest star in one episode.
31st Jul '17 12:37:22 PM WildeOscar
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Added DiffLines:

* All Music/TheBeatles were also big fans of the show; Ringo was a good enough sport to appear as a guest star in one episode.
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